Wherein We Elect Our Favourite Novels of 1911

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here ya go

Poll Results

OptionVotes
Ethan Frome by Edith Wharton 3
The Secret Garden by Frances Hodgson Burnett 3
Under Western Eyes by Joseph Conrad 2
Peter Pan by J.M. Barrie 2
The Lair Of The White Worm by Bram Stoker 1
The White Peacock by D.H. Lawrence 1
The Story Girl by L.M. Montgomerey 0
What A Life! by Edward Verral Lucas and George Morrow 0
Suffragette Sally by Gertrude Colmore 0
A Safety Match by Ian Hay 0
The New Machiavelli by H.G. Wells 0
Miranda Of The Balcony by A.E.W. Mason 0
The Mahatma And The Hare by H. Rider Haggard 0
Alraune by Hanns Heinz Ewers 0
Waves by Eduard von Keyserling 0
The Children Of The Poor by Patricio Mariano 0
Wandering Stars by Sholem Aleichem 0
The Sad End of Policarpo Quaresma by Lima Barreto 0
The Tree Of Knowledge by Pío Baroja 0
In The Name Of God by Faustino Aguillar 0
The Farmlanders by Rosauro C. Almario 0
Juha by Juhani Aho 0
Jenny by Sigrid Undset 0
The Garnet Bracelet by Alexander Kuprin 0
The Family by Tōson Shimazaki 0
Ethiopia Unbound by J.E. Casely Hayford 0
The Wild Geese by Mori Ogai 0
The Hampdenshire Wonder by J.D. Beresford 0
Jennie Gerhardt by Theodore Dreiser 0
The Iron Woman by Margaret Deland 0
The Daring Twins by L. Frank Baum 0
The Book Of Khalid by Ameen Rihani 0
Adventure by Jack London 0
Fermina Márquez by Valery Larbaud 0
Fantômas by Marcel Allain and Pierre Souvestre 0
Exploits and Opinions of Dr. Faustroll, Pataphysician by Alfred Jarry 0
Zuleika Dobson by Max Beerbohm 0
Just Patty by Jean Webster 0
Ladies Whose Bright Eyes by Ford Maddox Ford 0
Mother Carey's Chickens by Kate Douglas Wiggin 0
Fox Farm by Warwick Deeping 0
The Four Men by Hillaire Belloc 0
Hilda Lessways by Arnold Bennett 0
The Case Of Richard Meynell by Mary Augusta Ward 0
Gambler's Gold by Arthur Wright 0
Ralph 124C 41+ by Hugo Gernsback 0
The Prodigal Judge by Vaughan Kester 0
The Outcry by Henry James 0
Moving The Mountain by Charlotte Perkins Gilman 0
Jonah by Louis Stone 0


Daniel_Rf, Monday, 5 October 2020 13:08 (three weeks ago) link

Haven't read anything. Midly curious about the Fantômas stories, though Jess Nevins compares them unfavourably to the Arsene Lupin series - more bloodthirsty, less charming, less well written. Do love those silent serials tho!

Daniel_Rf, Monday, 5 October 2020 13:10 (three weeks ago) link

The Secret Garden obviously classic but I’d have to go for Peter Pan for being both classic children’s literature that is also very disturbing.

seumas milm (gyac), Monday, 5 October 2020 13:12 (three weeks ago) link

lol i missed both of those in my initial scan. guess this thread will be a fair fight between 'em

Chip-vill-A (imago), Monday, 5 October 2020 13:15 (three weeks ago) link

peter pan is *such* a goddamn asshole

Chip-vill-A (imago), Monday, 5 October 2020 13:15 (three weeks ago) link

I've seen but not read several of these.

Fwiw the Jarry was indeed published in 1911 but he wrote it in 1898. Hardly surprising seeing as he died in 1907…

pomenitul, Monday, 5 October 2020 13:19 (three weeks ago) link

I read The White Peacock but can’t remember anything about it.

seumas milm (gyac), Monday, 5 October 2020 13:22 (three weeks ago) link

probably loads of macho posturing

Chip-vill-A (imago), Monday, 5 October 2020 13:23 (three weeks ago) link

Lawrence gets a terrible rep these days but his poetry, which is a strange alloy of the incantatory and the tone-deaf, helped me through my late teens.

pomenitul, Monday, 5 October 2020 13:27 (three weeks ago) link

And Chatterley is among the great unintentional knee-slappers imo. But we’re not quite there yet.

pomenitul, Monday, 5 October 2020 13:29 (three weeks ago) link

Going for Undset's dramatic 'Jenny' over Larbaud's 'Fermina Márquez'. Undset would go on to receive the 1928 Nobel mostly for her work 'Kristin Lavransdatter' but 'Jenny' is not to be overlooked imo.

Lots of books with excellent titles here that I never heard of.

Ilxor in the streets, Scampo in the sheets (Le Bateau Ivre), Monday, 5 October 2020 13:46 (three weeks ago) link

probably loads of macho posturing

― Chip-vill-A (imago), Monday, 5 October 2020 bookmarkflaglink

Thank you for being such an ally.

xyzzzz__, Monday, 5 October 2020 13:55 (three weeks ago) link

the_rainbow_sympathiser has logged on

Chip-vill-A (imago), Monday, 5 October 2020 13:57 (three weeks ago) link

Reading DH Lawrence in the #metoo era

xyzzzz__, Monday, 5 October 2020 14:01 (three weeks ago) link

Anyway, I’m too much of a low information voter to participate in this one. I trust LBI’s pick as he seems to have a lot more experience with the early 20th century novel.

pomenitul, Monday, 5 October 2020 14:01 (three weeks ago) link

Ethan Frome is awesome, y'all are fucking crazy to pick anything else imo.

healthy cocaine off perfect butts (the table is the table), Monday, 5 October 2020 14:04 (three weeks ago) link

There's loads I don't know here, Pom. I benefit from being in a book club abt 19th/early 20th century French novels when in uni. Paired with an above average interest in Scandinavian lit is how I navigate through these polls. Lots of American literature I'm not drawn to but willing to learn.

Ilxor in the streets, Scampo in the sheets (Le Bateau Ivre), Monday, 5 October 2020 14:23 (three weeks ago) link

The Sad End of Policarpo Quaresma by Lima Barreto

This looks really interesting btw..

xyzzzz__, Monday, 5 October 2020 14:26 (three weeks ago) link

It's the Brazilian/Portuguese literature Daniel picks that has me most curious.

Ilxor in the streets, Scampo in the sheets (Le Bateau Ivre), Monday, 5 October 2020 14:27 (three weeks ago) link

This one is a wash for me again.

Lots of American literature I'm not drawn to but willing to learn.

This makes me curious what American lit non-Americans generally read in pre-university/canon-focused education.

rob, Monday, 5 October 2020 14:42 (three weeks ago) link

That's a good question, albeit a difficult one to answer. I think our secondary schools are mostly focused on national lit first, then UK/EU books. Thinking back I don't think there were any American books on the list we had to read when I was 14/15, except for Huckleberry Finn! After that it's mostly a question of where you end up education-wise. I dare say o'er here American literature is a small to non-existent portion of the curriculum, before young people go to uni that is.

Ilxor in the streets, Scampo in the sheets (Le Bateau Ivre), Monday, 5 October 2020 14:51 (three weeks ago) link

I haven't read the Wharton, so I'll vote for Under Western Eyes, Conrad's take on Dusty Dusty and revolutionary politics

the Fantômas series is pure pulp but entertaining and interesting as a source of popular culture tropes ... he's an anti-hero super-villain with mysterious powers, and the crazy plots are heavy on weird menace, sometimes drifting into horror

Brad C., Monday, 5 October 2020 15:01 (three weeks ago) link

This is purely anecdotal and hardly relevant since my own education was a weird transatlantic and translinguistic mishmash but I was somewhat surprised by the relative popularity of Faulkner in France.

pomenitul, Monday, 5 October 2020 15:03 (three weeks ago) link

It's so cool to watch children's literature developing as a genre as we go through these lists.

I haven't read anything here beyond The Secret Garden, Peter Pan and Zuleika Dobson. Zuleika Dobson was a lot of fun, but I think I'll have to vote Secret Garden.

Lily Dale, Monday, 5 October 2020 15:36 (three weeks ago) link

Lawrence gets a terrible rep these days but his poetry, which is a strange alloy of the incantatory and the tone-deaf, helped me through my late teens.

― pomenitul

Kind of on your side here. I mean, maybe it's b/c he's a Notts lad so I've got more patience to extend, but I will defend a Lawrence to a certain extent. Novels really are too much macho posturing for me despite his skills with language, but the poetry is definitely worth checking out.

emil.y, Monday, 5 October 2020 15:37 (three weeks ago) link

Its quasi animist (iirc) understanding of nature also jives with current developments in ecocriticism.

pomenitul, Monday, 5 October 2020 15:42 (three weeks ago) link

It's the Brazilian/Portuguese literature Daniel picks that has me most curious.

ftr I only include the works that English language wikipedia itself includes - so it's more about which countries have ppl who care enough to write English language entries for their canon. So far I've noticed Brazil and the Philipines being really good at this - conversely, I'm sure that if I went into French or German language wikipedia there'd be a lot of stuff that hasn't gotten mentioned in these polls

A sad truth is that we did literally zero Brazillian literature in high school :(

Daniel_Rf, Tuesday, 6 October 2020 09:56 (three weeks ago) link

Par for the course, alas. Québécois literature is all but nonexistent in France.

pomenitul, Tuesday, 6 October 2020 12:52 (three weeks ago) link

Automatic thread bump. This poll is closing tomorrow.

System, Wednesday, 7 October 2020 00:01 (three weeks ago) link

Its quasi animist (iirc) understanding of nature also jives with current developments in ecocriticism.

― pomenitul

OK now I'm intrigued, thanks

sleeve, Wednesday, 7 October 2020 00:06 (three weeks ago) link

That was a bit of hyperbole on my part, but his animal poems, starting with ‘Snake’ are worth exploring. There’s an acknowledgment of the proximity between us and other species but also an emphasis on remoteness, which bespeaks respect. It’s still mediated through myth, in accordance with poetic tradition, but there’s more to it than that: it’s an encounter with an irreducible other whose existence is beyond what we humans attempt to make of it.

I also quite like ‘New Heaven and Earth’, which is a somewhat artless yet highly effective take on the fin de siècle spiritual temper tantrum. It blew my mind when I was 18.

pomenitul, Wednesday, 7 October 2020 00:32 (three weeks ago) link

Jenni or Ethan, both are great.

Tsar Bombadil (James Morrison), Wednesday, 7 October 2020 11:49 (three weeks ago) link

Automatic thread bump. This poll's results are now in.

System, Thursday, 8 October 2020 00:01 (three weeks ago) link

The Lair Of The White Worm by Bram Stoker

what's this like? i haven't read any stoker besides the obvious, but the premise of this one is intriguing enough.

(The Other) J.D. (J.D.), Thursday, 8 October 2020 04:27 (three weeks ago) link

It's terrible, really. All of his novels other than Dracula are terrible, but in this one the syphilitic brain damage was really kicking in.

Tsar Bombadil (James Morrison), Thursday, 8 October 2020 06:04 (three weeks ago) link

Wherein We Elect Our Favourite Novels of 1912

Daniel_Rf, Thursday, 8 October 2020 10:58 (three weeks ago) link

I am sorry I missed this one, I'd have voted for Fermina Márquez, which I loved.

Tim, Sunday, 11 October 2020 12:35 (two weeks ago) link


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