ThReads Must Roll: the new, improved rolling fantasy, science fiction, speculative fiction &c. thread

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Because the old one got too long and Shakey couldn't load it. A sequel to rolling fantasy, science fiction, speculative fiction &c. thread

fgtbaoutit (James Redd and the Blecchs), Thursday, 13 November 2014 00:51 (five years ago) link

Hoping to report on Report On Probability A in the near future.

fgtbaoutit (James Redd and the Blecchs), Thursday, 13 November 2014 00:54 (five years ago) link

Gregory Benford: Artifact --- archaeologists uncover lethal alien thingy in Mycenean burial ground. Not brilliantly written, but interesting enough to continue with. Entertainingly, for a book written in 1985, it contains early 21st-century Greece falling apart because of a worldwide economic depression/recession

ornamental cabbage (James Morrison), Thursday, 13 November 2014 01:11 (five years ago) link

lol @ thread title

Report on Probability A - was idly thinking of re-reading that recently, I remember being p underwhelmed by its central formal conceit. I expected it to be much loopier and disorienting. In general, Aldiss is v hit or miss for me (something I've read Moorcock attribute to his needing a good editor/manager, someone to set goals/targets for him). Cryptozoic is undreadable, for example, but I consider Barefoot in the Head from just a year or two later a masterpiece.

Οὖτις, Thursday, 13 November 2014 17:20 (five years ago) link

undreadable
Brian W. "Crazy Baldhead" Aldiss

Junior Dadaismus (James Redd and the Blecchs), Thursday, 13 November 2014 17:27 (five years ago) link

Read rep on prob a at least twice a long time ago, didn't know anything about last year at marienbad but enjoyed the formal conceit and the last few pages made me want to high five him.

thread title capitalisation and constant reminder of that dunderheaded heinlein story is gonna make me rmde to eternity.

ledge, Friday, 14 November 2014 10:03 (five years ago) link

agonising as it may be for ledge, this restart is v handy for me, as I meant to start following the previous thread after the initial poll that prompted it, and then i didn't and then it got so long that my approach of 'I must read all of it before participating' turned into hiding from the thread and not ever talking about some of my favourite strands of writing :/

Fizzles, Friday, 14 November 2014 10:41 (five years ago) link

Sorry for thread title, ledge, I did it to annoy Shakey, not you.

Junior Dadaismus (James Redd and the Blecchs), Friday, 14 November 2014 11:17 (five years ago) link

You are not the only one who couldn't read prior thread, Fizzles. Was constantly using the search feature or wondering where something was only to learn it was further upthread.

Junior Dadaismus (James Redd and the Blecchs), Friday, 14 November 2014 11:26 (five years ago) link

Still slogging through the last of Atwood's Maddadam trilogy. The third book is piss-weak, slow going and uninteresting, and her stylistic flaws seem to show through more and more. Because it's sci-fi there's an attempt to be, I dunno, edgy or hardboiled or something and it's about as convincing as one of your parents trying on an ill-fitting leather jacket. Bit of a shame really, becaus eI enjoyed the first two books (Oryx & Crake / Year of the Flood) immensely.

joni mitchell jarre (dog latin), Friday, 14 November 2014 11:34 (five years ago) link

I think I forgotten to say on the previous thread that another one of the best features on fantasticfiction site is it shows you the blurbs writers have done for other people's books.

Robert Adam Gilmour, Friday, 14 November 2014 14:35 (five years ago) link

Cool I'll just keep pasting in stuff from prev thread everytime somebody mentions something already discussed thoroughly, as I kept etc on prev thread its own self. Speaking of blurbs, here's a good 'un from a recent library shop score, Wandering Stars, An Anthology of Jewish Fantasy and Science Fiction, edited by Jack Dann, Introduction by Isaac Asimov:
I loved Wandering Stars, and why not? Two of the thirteen stories are from Orbit, and I would have bought seven of the rest if I had got my hands on them first. If the book had nothing else going for it, it would still be a triumph to get William Tenn to write the great story he was talking about in the fifties.--Damon Knight
(Also a blurb from Leo Rosten, who wrote The Education of Hyman Kaplan, about an immigrant who tends to take over English classes with his own versions and visions of language and lit.)

dow, Friday, 14 November 2014 15:47 (five years ago) link

Contents (some of these titles are corny, but the few stories I kinda remember from mags etc were good):

Introduction:
"Why Me?" by Isaac Asimov

William Tenn: "On Venus, Have We Got A Rabbi"

Avram Davidson: "The Golem"

Isaac Asimov: "Unto the Fourth Generation"

Carol Carr: "Look, You Think You've Got Troubles"

Avram Davidson: "Goslin Day"

Robert Silverberg: "The Dybbuk of Mazel Tov IV"

Horace L. Gold: "Trouble With Water"

Pamela Sargent: "Gather Blue Roses"

Bernard Malamud: "The Jewbird"

Geo. Alec Effinger: "Paradise Lost"

Robert Sheckley: "Street of Dreams, Feet of Clay"

Isaac Bashevis Singer: Jachid and Jechidah"

Harlan Ellison: "I'm Looking For Kadah"

dow, Friday, 14 November 2014 16:00 (five years ago) link

I just looked at a full schedule of all the books on SF Gateway (presumably this is the ebook titles). It's 2599 books!
Cant remember where I found the document.

Robert Adam Gilmour, Friday, 14 November 2014 21:16 (five years ago) link

UK or US or other?

Junior Dadaismus (James Redd and the Blecchs), Friday, 14 November 2014 21:39 (five years ago) link

Probably UK

Robert Adam Gilmour, Friday, 14 November 2014 22:02 (five years ago) link

Considerably fewer in US

Junior Dadaismus (James Redd and the Blecchs), Friday, 14 November 2014 22:12 (five years ago) link

Mark Sinker makes some connections (for inst., between Gothic and Futurist lit) new to me, after viewing the National Gallery's William Morris exhibition: http://dubdobdee.co.uk/2014/11/02/the-wood-beyond-the-world-or-this-bus-has-a-new-destination/

dow, Sunday, 16 November 2014 14:51 (five years ago) link

Thanks. Surely the friend mentioned there is an ILB poster.

Junior Dadaismus (James Redd and the Blecchs), Sunday, 16 November 2014 14:59 (five years ago) link

RMDE at that this thread title too, as well as the terrible screenname I had at the time. Don't know why I did it. I guess the door dilated and I just had to go through it.

Junior Dadaismus (James Redd and the Blecchs), Sunday, 16 November 2014 14:59 (five years ago) link

before I forget: this Brazilian writer recently died and Clute tweeted link to very appealing SFE overview of his work:
http://www.sf-encyclopedia.com/entry/carneiro_andre

dow, Sunday, 16 November 2014 15:51 (five years ago) link

Ooh! I mean RIP but yknow

Οὖτις, Sunday, 16 November 2014 16:02 (five years ago) link

Thanks. Often hard to find something like that in translation or even not in translation. Wonder if he had anything in that Cosmos Latinos anthology? Don't seem to recognize the name.

Junior Dadaismus (James Redd and the Blecchs), Sunday, 16 November 2014 16:03 (five years ago) link

(xp, obv)

Junior Dadaismus (James Redd and the Blecchs), Sunday, 16 November 2014 16:03 (five years ago) link

okay, "Brain Transplant."

Junior Dadaismus (James Redd and the Blecchs), Sunday, 16 November 2014 16:05 (five years ago) link

I've only read Brain Transplant but would def read more provided stuff gets translated

Οὖτις, Sunday, 16 November 2014 16:06 (five years ago) link

Hey James, tried to reply to yr kind email, but it won't let us reply directly, and the webmail form has the worst captcha evah, I refreshed it a half-dozen times, got rejected over and over and over and over and over and over. So I'll reply here: thanks, you keep up the good posts too!

dow, Monday, 17 November 2014 02:06 (five years ago) link

has this been posted already?
http://www.luminist.org/archives/SF/

Οὖτις, Monday, 17 November 2014 16:18 (five years ago) link

Laird Barron wrote a parody of the horror/weird scene, it included jabs at Mark Samuels in particular (however serious they were intended, nobody knows), there was some discussion of this at the Ligotti forum and eventually that resulted in Justin Isis writing hilarious rap battle lyrics.
Several spread across this page
http://www.ligotti.net/showthread.php?t=6815&page=9

Robert Adam Gilmour, Monday, 17 November 2014 23:35 (five years ago) link

The xpost link to Mark Sinker's William Morris exhibit etc is back online this afternoon. Read that before reading further, for max headroom:
When his fellow visitor/ILXor xyzzz (sic?) said it was down this morning, I told Mark, and we had this email exchange:

Mark:oh cheers, yes, the guy who hosts it (on a laptop in his spare room) sometimes has to reboot :)

me: OK, will keep in mind. I fairly recently got into Morris and those Kipling stories (if you meant "As Easy As A-B-C" and "With The Night Mail," for inst), but hadn't made the connection. Now I'm also thinking of Blade Runner's Earth, a mostly abandoned First World-as-Third World backstreet, where it rains all night in perpetual eco-ruins; also PKD's original setting, more like a slightly-future-to-us Beijing, with workers scuttling between buildings, hoping not to be singed/cancer-seeded by the invisible sun. Some later Tiptree stories too, and Mary Shelley's The Last Man, for me amazing as Frankenstein.
Probably some of Kim Stanley Robinson's later novels too, though they've gotten so long I may never know (early The Wild Shore was fine, best I recall). But I recently saw a mention of "cli-fi" as emerging trend, so we may get sick of the whole thing even before it all comes true.

Mark: Yes, Kipling’s mum was related to a famous Pre-Raphaelite in the Morris circle — his dad of course ran the Lucknow museum — and when he was boarded in England as kid (not the notorious time that became Baa Baa Black Sheep) he stayed with the De Morgans, who were also minor slebs in Arts&Crafts terms: William DM a high-end potter and tile designer (he did the fireplaces for the Titanic iirc!)

Yrs partly (Kipling's)sic-fi stories, but also the stories about ships and trains and cars — esp.the ones from the perspective of the train or ship. The ones abt cars are really intriguing: he was totally an early adopter.

me: Didn't know any of that, thanks! Will def have to read more Kipling----recently found one of his I mentioned in an anth w HG's "The Land Ironclads"---getting back into Wells, and suspect the Eloi and Morlocks might have gotten Morris (and Tolkien) going. Finally read The Lord Of The Rings, and feel like I totally/mostly get it! Specific associations re the "not allegorical, dammit!" Ring/magic can shift, but lately I think of fossil fuels as thee ancient source of modern marvels, source which must now be sacrificed to/for any chance of future lives, bearable legacy But once that ship sails off into the autumn sea, it sails, buddy. So the book is a tragedy, but fairly often experienced as a comedy, in a commedia sense: fascination of the vivid details, robustly acted out, with some mortal meat joy, and other meat conditions.

dow, Tuesday, 18 November 2014 19:08 (five years ago) link

William DM a high-end potter and tile designer (he did the fireplaces for the Titanic iirc!

De Morgan Centre looking for a foothold. (Those are Tolkien's ships, right there)

alimosina, Thursday, 20 November 2014 01:24 (five years ago) link

Just heard "Dream Weaver" on the radio. Wasn't there an sf writer named Gary Wright who had a much anthologized story about some futuristic luge called something like "Ice Slide"? "Ice Capades"? "Ice Rink" ? "Ice Mutants"? and then was never heard from again? I'll guess I'll see what Clute & Co have to say.

Junior Dadaismus (James Redd and the Blecchs), Sunday, 23 November 2014 20:44 (five years ago) link

http://www.sf-encyclopedia.com/entry/games_and_sports
"Mirror of Ice"

Junior Dadaismus (James Redd and the Blecchs), Sunday, 23 November 2014 20:48 (five years ago) link

Looks like some Canadian teacher assigned it to his students to adapt as a short film. Don't think it was clemenza, though.

Junior Dadaismus (James Redd and the Blecchs), Sunday, 23 November 2014 20:55 (five years ago) link

Can anyone tell me what on earth Science Fiction Poetry is? Poems of fantasy and horror just uses tropes of those genres but how do you achieve the conceptual framework of SF in poetry? Because without that, the tropes by themselves would just be fantasy poems or poems about radical change.

Robert Adam Gilmour, Sunday, 23 November 2014 20:56 (five years ago) link

If you have to ask you'll never know.

Tom Disch might have had something to tell you about it, but he is sadly no longer with us.

Junior Dadaismus (James Redd and the Blecchs), Sunday, 23 November 2014 21:00 (five years ago) link

Oh gosh, now that you mention it, I've seen poetry in science fiction mags as far back as I can remember, though I don't remember any specific poem, at least in part because I haven't read any sf mags in a long time. I do remember there being quite a range, from short light verse (limericks, even)to much more ambitious testimonials and mini-sagas(never got much space in the page sense).
I'll have to dig up some of those zines; meanwhile this looks like a good place to start:
http://www.sf-encyclopedia.com/entry/poetry

dow, Sunday, 23 November 2014 22:22 (five years ago) link

Also notable were the infusion of a quantity of poetry into the text of Brian W Aldiss's novel Barefoot in the Head (1969)

Thinking about what Aldiss to read next, since I finished Report on Probability A , which I will give a report grade of 'A' to, and this is on my short list.

There are some poems in the anthology Sense of Wonder.

Junior Dadaismus (James Redd and the Blecchs), Sunday, 23 November 2014 22:51 (five years ago) link

Just came across a 1962 American printing of The Long Afternoon of Earth, AKA Hothouse; unabridged edition didn't come out in the US 'til 76.

http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/915UUZNX5hL._SL1500_.jpg

dow, Sunday, 23 November 2014 23:37 (five years ago) link

Did you buy it? It is currently out of print. I loved the story/extract in the Silverberg SF 101 book, as mentioned on prior thread.

Junior Dadaismus (James Redd and the Blecchs), Sunday, 23 November 2014 23:41 (five years ago) link

This is the abridged version I got (for 25 cents)

http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/518xgA8aO7L._SY344_BO1,204,203,200_.jpg

dow, Monday, 24 November 2014 00:00 (five years ago) link

in terms of thematic vibe, this cover may be more appropriate, but the UK is awesome o coures

dow, Monday, 24 November 2014 00:01 (five years ago) link

In your favorite online sf reference work I believe that book has the tag ***SEMISPOILER ALERT** "Space Elevator" **END OF SEMISPOILER ALERT

Junior Dadaismus (James Redd and the Blecchs), Monday, 24 November 2014 00:28 (five years ago) link

Vandermeer has come back to one he still thinks is underappreciated. The title and author seem vaguely familiar; anybody read it? http://www.jeffvandermeer.com/2007/08/19/smile-on-the-void-by-stuart-gordon/

dow, Monday, 24 November 2014 05:22 (five years ago) link

New Yorker won't let me link, but check out Laura Miller's "Fresh Hell" for clear lens view of profuse YA dystopias, and how the lit varies from Classic adult-aimed (later school-assigned). TNY's Amy Davidson later agrees with much but not all of Miller's take.

dow, Tuesday, 25 November 2014 17:40 (five years ago) link

been reading LeGuin's "A Fisherman of the Inland Sea" (they had it at the library). I took Disch to task in "The Dreams Our Stuff is Made of" for his attacks on her, and while I won't recant on that count (he was unnecessarily harsh and dismissive), she really can let her didacticism get in the way. I can think of few fiction writers that have a more keenly developed political agenda that is so readily apparent in their work. Ayn Rand obviously (lol) and Heinlein and Scott Card I suppose. But LeGuin's well to the left of those boorish blowhards, and arguably more audacious conceptually. I wonder if I should go back and re-read the Kestrel books for any political subtext I may have missed in jr high, I always liked those...

Οὖτις, Tuesday, 25 November 2014 22:17 (five years ago) link

I don't think I'll read her for a very long time unless I come across her work in anthologies. Because once Moorcock said her work was self-consciously literary and left him cold. But he was very fond of her as a person.

That really put me off and what you say here adds to that. But Wizard Of Earthsea is an attractive name so I'm not totally discouraged.

Robert Adam Gilmour, Wednesday, 26 November 2014 01:28 (five years ago) link

Moorcock doesn't always make the right choices...

Even people I know who don't usually like her (or science fiction in general) tend to like this

http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/81dSlqYK3SL.jpg

dow, Wednesday, 26 November 2014 01:40 (five years ago) link

In UK bookshops - which basically means the Waterstones chain - the SF offering is generally a bit broader than the one Shakey describes. I think that's partly because most Waterstones stock at least some of Gollancz's SF Masterworks series, which of course includes classics from the fifties, sixties, seventies and earlier. PKD is always well represented, I think in part because his reputation in Europe was always higher than in the US, and because nowadays he scores as both a cult author and as the source for lots of movies and TV series. But yes, very little of the back catalogue of people like Silverberg, Salzburg, Sheckley etc etc is still in print here - maybe because a lot of it is so easy to source online?

Haven't read much Heinlein in the last thirty or so years, but would tentatively vouch for Puppet Masters, Door into Summer, some of the juveniles and short stories. Definitely a better stylist than Asimov - who isn't - although Asimov never had the same disastrous drop-off as the last thirty or so years of Heinlein's writing career.

Ward Fowler, Friday, 15 November 2019 09:38 (three weeks ago) link

like J.D. I too find the persistence of Heinlein in this market something of a mystery. I mean I find him interesting in a historical way, given his huge impact on the genre, but in the new woke age idg how this guy gets a pass (or is it that the "sad puppy" types see him as a forefather and they're propping up his rep? idk) Asimov was terrible as a stylist and notoriously handsy with the ladies but he wasn't nearly the sexist cryptofascist that Heinlein was.

It's also interesting to see what women/POCs *haven't* made the cut for canonization in the new era - Emshwiller, Wilhelm, CL Moore. Apart from the occasional copy of Her Smoke Rose Up Forever collection you never see anything else from Tiptree/Sheldon.

And for all its impact in the 80s, the OG cyberpunk guys have also been largely erased. Stephenson seems like something of an exception, but Sterling and Rucker have disappeared, and Jeter (if he's available at all) is a footnote to steampunk. The occasional Gibson book still sneaks through, but I don't see lavish reprints of his original trilogy or anything.

Οὖτις, Friday, 15 November 2019 16:06 (three weeks ago) link

erased from where? Online discussions, critical surveys, bookstores?

Reminds me, this fairly recent Library of America anth is in local library and bookstore:

The Future Is Female! 25 Classic Science Fiction Stories by Women, from Pulp Pioneers to Ursula K. Le Guin
Edited by Lisa Yaszek
"

Space-opera heroines, gender-bending aliens, post-apocalyptic pregnancies, changeling children, interplanetary battles of the sexes, and much more: a groundbreaking new collection of classic American science fiction by women from the 1920s to the 1960s
"

Overview
News & Views
Table of Contents
Contributors

Introduction by Lisa Yaszek

CLARE WINGER HARRIS: The Miracle of the Lily | 1928
LESLIE F. STONE: The Conquest of Gola | 1931
C. L. MOORE: The Black God’s Kiss | 1934
LESLIE PERRI: Space Episode | 1941
JUDITH MERRIL: That Only a Mother | 1948
WILMAR H. SHIRAS: In Hiding | 1948
KATHERINE MACLEAN: Contagion | 1950
MARGARET ST. CLAIR: The Inhabited Men | 1951
ZENNA HENDERSON: Ararat | 1952
ANDREW NORTH: All Cats Are Gray | 1953
ALICE ELEANOR JONES: Created He Them | 1955
MILDRED CLINGERMAN: Mr. Sakrison’s Halt | 1956
LEIGH BRACKETT: All the Colors of the Rainbow | 1957
CAROL EMSHWILLER: Pelt | 1958
ROSEL GEORGE BROWN: Car Pool | 1959
ELIZABETH MANN BORGESE: For Sale, Reasonable | 1959
DORIS PITKIN BUCK: Birth of a Gardener | 1961
ALICE GLASER: The Tunnel Ahead | 1961
KIT REED: The New You | 1962
JOHN JAY WELLS & MARION ZIMMER BRADLEY: Another Rib | 1963
SONYA DORMAN: When I Was Miss Dow | 1966
KATE WILHELM: Baby, You Were Great | 1967
JOANNA RUSS: The Barbarian | 1968
JAMES TIPTREE, JR.: The Last Flight of Dr. Ain | 1969
URSULA K. LE GUIN: Nine Lives | 1969

Biographical Notes
https://www.loa.org/books/583-the-future-is-female-25-classic-science-fiction-stories-by-women-from-pulp-pioneers-to-ursula-k-le-guin

dow, Friday, 15 November 2019 17:19 (three weeks ago) link

Agree with Ward that the early Heinleins seemed pretty decent, when I was a juvenile (this was before the term Young Adult was applied). Stranger In A Strange Land was where I got off the bus.

dow, Friday, 15 November 2019 17:23 (three weeks ago) link

bookstores

I was referring strictly to bookstores in my city

Οὖτις, Friday, 15 November 2019 17:30 (three weeks ago) link

It's also interesting to see what women/POCs *haven't* made the cut for canonization in the new era - Emshwiller, Wilhelm, CL Moore.

― Οὖτις, Friday, November 15, 2019 4:06 PM

I don't think there's much interest there, sadly. If it gone before Norton (and isn't Mary Shelley), it probably wont have much chance but reviving interest in any author that old is tough for most demographics. Oddly enough, puppygaters rep hard for CL Moore and Brackett, but puppygaters are too small in number to have any impact on bookshelves.

As Ward says, Gollancz covers a lot of stuff like Wolfe and Silverberg but Moorcock seems to be slipping away (I still see the newest series though).

How well is DAW books stocked in America? Because they're the American publisher I most wish had more presence in the UK.

Robert Adam Gilmour, Friday, 15 November 2019 18:47 (three weeks ago) link

Probably said this a year ago but Heinlein is interesting to me because he really polarizes people in unpredictable directions. The most lefty person I know in the spec fiction circles loves Heinlein.

Robert Adam Gilmour, Friday, 15 November 2019 18:49 (three weeks ago) link

I've got tons of old DAW paperbacks. As far as what they publish nowadays though I have no idea.

Οὖτις, Friday, 15 November 2019 18:53 (three weeks ago) link

Delany still reps big time for RAH, iirc.

Saw a pile of a few Gollancz CL Moore omnibuses a while back on sale outside the cart near the coffee stand associated with the Hunter College Shakespeare & Co. but yeah.

Irae Louvin (James Redd and the Blecchs), Friday, 15 November 2019 18:54 (three weeks ago) link

DAW is keeping Cherryh and Tanith in print but I really don't know in how many stores. Current bestsellers would be Rothuss, Lackey, Ben Aaronovitch, and Seanan McGuire. Aaronovitch, Rothuss and Lackey do decent in UK (under different publishers) but I cant actually remember if I've seen McGuire over here.

Robert Adam Gilmour, Friday, 15 November 2019 19:06 (three weeks ago) link

lol oh and how could I have forgot - for all the crowing these days about how YA fantasy fiction for girls should be respected, it's funny that Anne McCaffrey doesn't seem to be in for the canonical treatment, cuz she basically invented that shit.

Οὖτις, Friday, 15 November 2019 22:44 (three weeks ago) link

Wait until you see my poll, Shakey.

Irae Louvin (James Redd and the Blecchs), Friday, 15 November 2019 22:48 (three weeks ago) link

Norton came a bit before her but I cant say who had more influence on YA as a category. But it seems pretty sure that McCaffrey isn't faring nearly as well as a writer in retrospect.

Some of you may have heard about the probable downfall of the publisher Chizine and the accompanying stories of unpaid work, racism and harassment associated with them.

Robert Adam Gilmour, Saturday, 16 November 2019 00:06 (three weeks ago) link

I too find the persistence of Heinlein in this market something of a mystery. I mean I find him interesting in a historical way, given his huge impact on the genre, but in the new woke age idg how this guy gets a pass (or is it that the "sad puppy" types see him as a forefather and they're propping up his rep? idk)

Bingo. Middle-aged and older SF readers ALL seem to have started out with his juveniles, and nostalgia beats common sense any time.

Apart from the occasional copy of Her Smoke Rose Up Forever collection you never see anything else from Tiptree/Sheldon.

There isn't that much more tbh, a couple of novels and a few other stories and that's yer lot.

Some of you may have heard about the probable downfall of the publisher Chizine and the accompanying stories of unpaid work, racism and harassment associated with them.

Author Twitter is talking of nothing else, until the next shitty thing comes along. Turns out internet pile-ons are useful for something though if it gets rid of bullying dodgepots like this bunch seemingly are/were.

Cornelius Fondue (Matt #2), Saturday, 16 November 2019 22:03 (three weeks ago) link

Turns out internet pile-ons are useful for something though if it gets rid of bullying dodgepots like this bunch seemingly are/were.

― Cornelius Fondue (Matt #2), Saturday, November 16, 2019 10:03 PM

As might be expected, there's still a lot of controversies I hear about that have been bubbling for years and never get made entirely public. Leaves you wondering what people are accusing each other of.

Robert Adam Gilmour, Sunday, 17 November 2019 00:09 (three weeks ago) link

Bingo. Middle-aged and older SF readers ALL seem to have started out with his juveniles, and nostalgia beats common sense any time. Less nostalgia in my case than dim, persistent memory of enjoyment; common sense would have to be applied in (unlikely) re-reading, if at all.

There isn't that much more tbh, a couple of novels and a few other stories and that's yer lot. Only if you don't check her bibliographies (spoiler: quite a few stories)(and the good 'uns aren't all in Her Smoke....)

dow, Sunday, 17 November 2019 01:53 (three weeks ago) link

Got xpost The Future is Female from the library today, started this evening: stately prose of first two selections in good contrast to reveals, esp. Leslie F. Stone's testimony/bed time story re matriarchal utopia vs. waves of capitalist barbarian male things from third planet: seems pretty wild for 1931 market (target audience?) Prev. read this in The Big Book of Science Fiction, still startling, with wicked zoom lens at times. Next up: C. L. MOORE: The Black God’s Kiss | 1934

dow, Sunday, 17 November 2019 02:07 (three weeks ago) link

Amazed how often Japanese cover artists are famous manga or videogame artists.

Robert Adam Gilmour, Sunday, 17 November 2019 18:30 (three weeks ago) link

C.L. Moore is maybe at her most pulpadelic, flexing the form and my head, spiraling sword and sorcery through Dark Ages scientific romance ov netherworld geometry and geography and trans-cosmological human and alien perceptual and emotional separation and convergence--also nonstop action. Joiry has fallen, and Jirel descends, willing to sell her soul rather than be sold into sexual slavery as prize ex-commander (spiritual adviser says she could be forgiven for the latter, never for the former, but she must have thee weapon).

dow, Sunday, 17 November 2019 19:35 (three weeks ago) link

Great description, Don. Read that one in a Best Of.

Irae Louvin (James Redd and the Blecchs), Sunday, 17 November 2019 20:35 (three weeks ago) link

SF TV note:

Last night BBC1 started a new adaptation of THE WAR OF THE WORLDS. Oddly it mixed the invasion story with a domestic drama - I'm not sure where the latter comes from.

Then BBC4 re-screened a documentary about Ursula K. Le Guin. It affirmed her greatness and made me want to read her again. I especially enjoyed

a) the mid-1970s SF convention circuit, the sense of UKL amid all the others in the field
b) how glamorous she was as a young woman - many terrific photographs were glimpsed
c) David Mitchell a huge, eloquent fan
d) UKL apparently making waves with her 2014 lifetime achievement speech attacking Amazon and others, rather than going quietly.

the pinefox, Monday, 18 November 2019 10:44 (three weeks ago) link

> Oddly it mixed the invasion story with a domestic drama - I'm not sure where the latter comes from

HG Wells' personal life iirc from Front Row last week.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/H._G._Wells#Personal_life

koogs, Monday, 18 November 2019 11:24 (three weeks ago) link

Thanks Koogs - I wondered if it was something like that.

Perhaps better to draw from HGW's lie than to make it up randomly, but I still don't quite see the logic, and not sure it adds to this particular drama which is world-shattering enough already.

There is a general desire / need to put 'feisty women' into every historical narrative even where, in reality, the women might not have had such opportunities or even inclinations to be feisty ... but that's another discussion.

the pinefox, Monday, 18 November 2019 11:45 (three weeks ago) link

The WOTW series gets worse as it goes along.

Tsar Bombadil (James Morrison), Monday, 18 November 2019 11:46 (three weeks ago) link

Saw the Lost Transmissions book in Waterstones recently. I think I was aware of most of the topics but it does make for an interesting mix. Last night I listened to a panel interview about the book on Geek's Guide To The Galaxy podcast.

The editor/main author was fretting about people complaining that too many of the topics were too famous, but including them on the basis that many of the younger generations will not know them and some of the older fans will not know things less ingrained in older ideas of the genre.
Then ensued discussion of a sometimes puzzling reluctance of speculative fiction fans to claim things that originated outside the heartland.

The host made an interesting observation that many kids like him in the 70s-80s-90s had no real idea how popular their favorite things were. I would have thought magazines would give you some idea but I don't know how widely circulated they were or what their coverage was like.

There are hopes for a second book but if the small number of user reviews is anything to go by, it doesn't seem likely. It's pretty nice looking, I might get it this week.

Robert Adam Gilmour, Monday, 18 November 2019 23:34 (three weeks ago) link

http://www.isfdb.org/cgi-bin/pl.cgi?89573
This lineup is crazy

Robert Adam Gilmour, Tuesday, 19 November 2019 00:12 (three weeks ago) link

http://scripsit.com/website/about-mapping-winter/

Marta Randall on her necessary remake of an older novel.

I think Phyllis Ann Karr and some other writers of this generation had done recent novel remakes too.

Robert Adam Gilmour, Wednesday, 20 November 2019 18:17 (three weeks ago) link

has anyone read ada palmer's too like the lightning, and does it become less insufferable than the first 20 pages is?

― The Pingularity (ledge), Wednesday, June 19, 2019 2:41 PM (five months ago)

objections: a grating 18th century prose style with frequent asides to the reader; copious chandleresque unexplained in-universe words and concepts; ridiculous names (martin guildbreaker, saneer-weeksbooth); frequent references to theology and theological concepts.

― The Pingularity (ledge), Wednesday, June 19, 2019 2:51 PM (five months ago)

She had donned her boots too, tall, taut Humanist boots patterned with a flowing brush-pen landscape, the kind with winding banks and misty mountains that the eye gets lost in. Any Humanist transforms, grows stronger, prouder, when they don the Hive boots which stamp each Member’s signature into the dust of history, but if others change from house cat to regal tiger, Thisbe becomes something more extreme...

kill me now

― The Pingularity (ledge), Wednesday, June 19, 2019 2:58 PM (five months ago)

It's funny, I was totally uninterested in this when it came out years ago, everyone was talking about it; but after seeing an enthusiastic review by Paul Di Filippo and seeing her buzz about her many interests (refreshing, since too many authors talk about the same shit everyone else does), I'd really like to read it sometime.

Robert Adam Gilmour, Friday, 22 November 2019 19:48 (two weeks ago) link

Tor announced recently that they are reprinting John M Ford's novels. This is after years and years of people complaining about a lack of reprints. It was widely believed that Ford's remaining family was hostile to his work and was preventing it from going back into print, but Will Shetterly was very eager to say this was a baseless myth.

Robert Adam Gilmour, Friday, 22 November 2019 19:54 (two weeks ago) link

Quite amused that the term "Killer Bs" (always referring to Benford, Bova, Brin, Baxter and Greg Bear) actually got used on a book cover at least once.

Another was "McMacs" for Ken Macleod, Ian McDonald, Ian Macleod, Paul McAuley and probably more.

Robert Adam Gilmour, Friday, 22 November 2019 20:36 (two weeks ago) link

McMacs >>> Killer Bs in overall quality terms, though Bova will drop any group's average quality

Tsar Bombadil (James Morrison), Saturday, 23 November 2019 06:14 (two weeks ago) link

Lol. Feel like Bova did something good once, can’t remember. Maybe editing one of those SF Hall of Fame volumes.

Irae Louvin (James Redd and the Blecchs), Saturday, 23 November 2019 11:36 (two weeks ago) link

AAAggghhh, Ligotti forum has been under maintenance for over a week.

Robert Adam Gilmour, Saturday, 23 November 2019 16:09 (two weeks ago) link

Cool

Irae Louvin (James Redd and the Blecchs), Sunday, 24 November 2019 05:52 (two weeks ago) link

This Stan Lee-with-an-eyepatch Fantasy Masterworks edition of Dragon Waiting isn't too hard to source in the UK:

https://images.gr-assets.com/books/1173289687l/268437.jpg

Ward Fowler, Sunday, 24 November 2019 07:58 (two weeks ago) link

It's a great book, too.

Tsar Bombadil (James Morrison), Monday, 25 November 2019 08:07 (two weeks ago) link

Thought this interview with Ada Palmer was a lot of fun
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bMg92oT8lk4
Don't know why Crilly thought censorship was so new though.

Robert Adam Gilmour, Friday, 29 November 2019 18:41 (one week ago) link

It's news to me that the Laemmles showed interested in making a Clark Ashton Smith adaptation before they were booted from Universal. One of the stories Smith submitted to them for consideration has a giant made of melted corpses.

Robert Adam Gilmour, Friday, 29 November 2019 19:15 (one week ago) link

I wonder if there's any books which resemble the aesthetic of Voivod's Dimension Hatross or Skinny Puppy at their most scifi.

Robert Adam Gilmour, Saturday, 7 December 2019 14:05 (five days ago) link

K.W. Jeter

Οὖτις, Saturday, 7 December 2019 14:30 (five days ago) link

Specifically Dr. Adder, Noir, Glass Hammer, Death Arms

Οὖτις, Saturday, 7 December 2019 14:31 (five days ago) link

this http://www.voivodfan.com/morgoth_bio_neutronboy2000.htm mentions a few books in passing (but is probably not what you want):

lord of the rings
dracula
neuromancer
dune
various French philosophers
don juan(?)

koogs, Saturday, 7 December 2019 14:49 (five days ago) link

I have Doctor Adder somewhere in my room (for years I've been getting them mixed up with William Kotzwinkle's Doctor Rat). I might bump it up the pile a little but I feel I should read a bit more PK Dick before I do.

Robert Adam Gilmour, Saturday, 7 December 2019 15:10 (five days ago) link

Quite interested to see how this plays out. Some people are worried.
https://www.blackgate.com/2019/11/30/the-chinese-worldcon-bid-for-2023-and-the-chengdu-conference-of-2019/

Robert Adam Gilmour, Sunday, 8 December 2019 01:08 (four days ago) link

good piece about my local scene
https://thebolditalic.com/san-franciscos-sci-fi-renaissance-95713a91171c

Hard for my brain to see M. Luke McDonnell and not immediately think K.M. O'Donnell

Οὖτις, Wednesday, 11 December 2019 20:17 (yesterday) link

only natural

Tales of Jazz Ulysses (James Redd and the Blecchs), Wednesday, 11 December 2019 23:48 (yesterday) link

I briefly wondered if it was a deliberate tribute/nom de plume but doesn't seem likely

Οὖτις, Wednesday, 11 December 2019 23:50 (yesterday) link


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