Is Bob Dylan overrated?

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What do you think?

Atomic Clock, Tuesday, 17 February 2004 17:36 (thirteen years ago) Permalink

No, but some of his songs may be.

Tico Tico (Tico Tico), Tuesday, 17 February 2004 17:39 (thirteen years ago) Permalink

I think it's another case of this:
Most Underrated Overrated Band?

jody (Jody Beth Rosen), Tuesday, 17 February 2004 17:41 (thirteen years ago) Permalink

dylan: no
dylan's lyrics: OH GOD YES!! A THOUSAND TIMES YES!!!!

Mr. Snrub (Mr. Snrub), Tuesday, 17 February 2004 17:41 (thirteen years ago) Permalink

I tried to give ol' Bobby D. another chance yesterday and listened to Dilate, which was highly recommended. Booooooring.

nickalicious (nickalicious), Tuesday, 17 February 2004 17:43 (thirteen years ago) Permalink

there'll be puke by sundown

nate detritus (natedetritus), Tuesday, 17 February 2004 17:43 (thirteen years ago) Permalink

No he aint. However some people analyze some portions of his ouevre too much. I don't think there's any point close reading the lyric of 'I'll Be Your Baby Tonight'. Possibly Bob sometimes wishes his songs were enjoyed in the same way people enjoyed the big country hits that used to fill up the Billboard charts in the 50s and 60s.

pete s, Tuesday, 17 February 2004 17:46 (thirteen years ago) Permalink

If anything, most of his '70s stuff is underappreciated.

morris pavilion (samjeff), Tuesday, 17 February 2004 17:55 (thirteen years ago) Permalink

Yes.

mei (mei), Tuesday, 17 February 2004 18:04 (thirteen years ago) Permalink

I think of it more like framing a guy who's actually guilty. He really (really really) is great, but 95 percent of everything you read praising him gets the essence of why he's great wrong. Classic blind men/elephant scenario: You can describe the words, the music, the jokes, the viciousness, the blues and country and gospel and rock, you can even try to describe the voice although almost nobody ever gets that right...but trying to add it all up is a fool's game. It's like complexity theory, where once reach a certain density of interconnectivity, with information flowing in multiple, almost untrackable directions simultaneously, you get emergence: new things arise from the system that couldn't be predicted from any single element of the system. Dylan's like a whole complex system all unto himself.

spittle (spittle), Tuesday, 17 February 2004 18:09 (thirteen years ago) Permalink

spittle just proved it

My Huckleberry Friend (Horace Mann), Tuesday, 17 February 2004 18:11 (thirteen years ago) Permalink

I've been listening to the Dylan/Band basement tapes recently, and it's just quality "rock," loose and fun... I don't really listen to lyrics anyway.

andy, Tuesday, 17 February 2004 18:17 (thirteen years ago) Permalink

When's that Todd Haynes movie come out?

morris pavilion (samjeff), Tuesday, 17 February 2004 18:17 (thirteen years ago) Permalink

I like the song he did for Wonder Boys, what's it called, "Things Have Changed." I like that one pretty good.

My Huckleberry Friend (Horace Mann), Tuesday, 17 February 2004 18:21 (thirteen years ago) Permalink

I liked when he did it at the Oscars except he wasn't really there, he was in Australia or something and he played live on the huge Oscar screen, and when they did closeups it was like the giant Bob head coming to visit the little people of Hollywood. With a riverboat gambler mustache.

spittle (spittle), Tuesday, 17 February 2004 18:24 (thirteen years ago) Permalink

Actually, after thinking for a minute, I think the problem is that all the embarrassing, chin-stroking praise and analysis heaped upon '60s Dylan (and especially his "poetic" lyrics, blah blah) by olde-tyme critics (Dave Marsh et. al.) makes for an overrated air, and makes it understandable that people have a hard time just digging Dylan's rockin' music, as Andy suggests.

I bet if people (rock 'n' roll fans) heard "Planet Waves" with no preconceptions about **DYLAN,** most of them would have to love it!!

morris pavilion (samjeff), Tuesday, 17 February 2004 18:24 (thirteen years ago) Permalink

I can certainly understand people being turned off to the whole Dylan thing, due to the overbaked Boomer mythos. (But they shouldn't be!)

morris pavilion (samjeff), Tuesday, 17 February 2004 18:25 (thirteen years ago) Permalink

Actually if you listen to "The Times They Are A-Changin'" back to back with "Things Have Changed," you learn a lot about the difference between being 22 years old and 60 years old.

mr. man, Tuesday, 17 February 2004 18:26 (thirteen years ago) Permalink

well you can't overrate his influence, which is staggeringly huge.
maybe he's the joyce of rock?

pete s, Tuesday, 17 February 2004 18:26 (thirteen years ago) Permalink

62-69 -- no
70 on -- a rollercoast that sometimes dips so deep into the sewers you think it will never come back up again.

jack cole (jackcole), Tuesday, 17 February 2004 18:27 (thirteen years ago) Permalink

for some reason, when I was in my early 20s (as I was in 2000 when I listened to "Things Have Changed") I was really into songs about being over the hill or whatever. Personal apocalypses. Now I'm into songs about revenge.

My Huckleberry Friend (Horace Mann), Tuesday, 17 February 2004 18:28 (thirteen years ago) Permalink

dylan's worst albums still aren't as bad as U2's worst albums, and dylan's discography is at least three times as large.

jody (Jody Beth Rosen), Tuesday, 17 February 2004 18:29 (thirteen years ago) Permalink

I guess I'd say if he's "overrated" it's in the way that great artists tend to be -- past a point, their "greatness" gets taken as a given and cited as such by people who would be hard-pressed to actually tell you what's great about it. (See: Picasso, Louis Armstrong, Orson Welles, etc. etc.)

spittle (spittle), Tuesday, 17 February 2004 18:31 (thirteen years ago) Permalink

not that Dylan doesn't have his share of shitty songs though

My Huckleberry Friend (Horace Mann), Tuesday, 17 February 2004 18:31 (thirteen years ago) Permalink

"Street Legal" is a great, underrated album. Total spiritual crisis album.

Mr. Man, Tuesday, 17 February 2004 18:32 (thirteen years ago) Permalink

not that Dylan doesn't have his share of shitty songs though

anyone with a career like that surely has to phone it in sometimes.

jody (Jody Beth Rosen), Tuesday, 17 February 2004 18:32 (thirteen years ago) Permalink

I feel for the Edge there because having that fucking glare in your eye can't have made him happy.

Ned Raggett (Ned), Tuesday, 17 February 2004 18:36 (thirteen years ago) Permalink

nevermind that that twit Bono is always around him

My Huckleberry Friend (Horace Mann), Tuesday, 17 February 2004 18:37 (thirteen years ago) Permalink

oh, but the edge had his revenge against the boner ... like, the boner directs him, "edge, play the blues!" and edge cuts in with a guitar solo that is so NOT the blues.

Eisbär (llamasfur), Tuesday, 17 February 2004 18:41 (thirteen years ago) Permalink

It's always bugged me that there's an overwhelming consensus, not just commonly held opinion but something teetering perilously close to universal FACT, that certain Dylan albums are AWFUL AWFUL SHIT SHIT SHIT -- and it's a consensus that's built mostly on reputation, guesswork, fear of '80s production values, fear of the earnestness of someone wrestling with his spirituality. I wonder how many people who "hate" Knocked Out Loaded have heard it at all, or more than that one time 17 years ago or whatever.

jody (Jody Beth Rosen), Tuesday, 17 February 2004 18:43 (thirteen years ago) Permalink

my answer to this thread: no, he's not overrated. i don't especially LIKE much of his music or his musical legacy, but bob dylan isn't overrated.

Eisbär (llamasfur), Tuesday, 17 February 2004 18:44 (thirteen years ago) Permalink

my Dad is a big Dylan fan and has most of the "good" stuff on vinyl, but had the "not-so-good" stuff on tape, so that's the Dylan I mostly listened to as a kid with my dorky walkman, and I sorta like it.

My Huckleberry Friend (Horace Mann), Tuesday, 17 February 2004 18:49 (thirteen years ago) Permalink

Actually I think his legacy is underrated -- to this day I constantly hear little Dylanisms pop up all over the place (not just lyric steals but little melodic tendencies, phrasings, etc), and critics very seldom point these out, because they're too busy hearing the goddamn BEATLES in everything.

jody (Jody Beth Rosen), Tuesday, 17 February 2004 18:50 (thirteen years ago) Permalink

yes, isn't it interesting how critics and fans cream all over Bob Marley's spiritual quest (rightly so) yet shit all over Dylan's Christian conversion? Both were honest, both had a lot of intolerance built in (check out Rasta anti-semitism and major sexism), but they both informed some very passionate music.

Tab25, Tuesday, 17 February 2004 18:54 (thirteen years ago) Permalink

I don't think Dylan is overrated in general. Though undoubtedly there are fans out there who overrate him. And I think he still tends to get off easy on certain things, since he's Dylan. For instance, his voice is really shot to hell these days, but that seldom gets more than a passing mention in his reviews. I'm one of the people who thinks that he used to have a great voice, but really, these days, it's so bad that it gets in the way. Especially when he still feels the need to write songs with like 20 verses.

o. nate (onate), Tuesday, 17 February 2004 19:05 (thirteen years ago) Permalink

I never hear anyone even mention Dylan's '80s albums, except for people who are Dylan fans... it seems like most people's casual knowledge of Dylan stops around Desire. (Maybe picking up briefly again for Empire Burlesque/Infidels... then jump-starting again with Time Out of Mind.)

morris pavilion (samjeff), Tuesday, 17 February 2004 19:07 (thirteen years ago) Permalink

I think his voice is better than ever. And I don't think his wicked guitar playing gets enough credit.
And he has nice eyes.

My Huckleberry Friend (Horace Mann), Tuesday, 17 February 2004 19:07 (thirteen years ago) Permalink

x-post

Self-Portrait might be the most underrated album of all time.

And I agree with Tab. Dylan as fundamentalist spitfire preacher is definitely underrated. That phase of his might be the most dramatic remove from an established image anyone's ever accomplished. It's interesting how Neil Young did his schizo albums right after, which maybe's another example of Dylan's huge sway over everybody else.

otto, Tuesday, 17 February 2004 19:07 (thirteen years ago) Permalink

I like his voice these days -- it has a lot of character. One of my pet peeves is people who hate Dylan's singing (full-stop), because there's so much going on in his voice, always.

jody (Jody Beth Rosen), Tuesday, 17 February 2004 19:10 (thirteen years ago) Permalink

I own some Bob Dylan stuff, I hardly ever listen to it, and if I never hear him again I'm not gonna get all weepy. However I don't think he's overrated.

Gear! (Gear!), Tuesday, 17 February 2004 19:13 (thirteen years ago) Permalink

Character?! It sounds like his vocal cords have been through a cheese grater.

o. nate (onate), Tuesday, 17 February 2004 19:13 (thirteen years ago) Permalink

a cheese grater from heaven!

My Huckleberry Friend (Horace Mann), Tuesday, 17 February 2004 19:15 (thirteen years ago) Permalink

It sounds like his vocal cords have been through a cheese grater.

This is bad why?

jody (Jody Beth Rosen), Tuesday, 17 February 2004 19:16 (thirteen years ago) Permalink

I'm sorta annoyed with the valuing of his voice as mystic signifier...but at base, I just don't like it.

Ned Raggett (Ned), Tuesday, 17 February 2004 19:19 (thirteen years ago) Permalink

I listen to Dylan more than i listen to the Beatles and i think i always will.

NOT overrated -- and go ahead and strike up another vote for Self Portrait.

christoff (christoff), Tuesday, 17 February 2004 19:33 (thirteen years ago) Permalink

I think his voice is better than ever.

Yeah buddy. I've seen him several times over the past 17 years (first in '87, most recently in '02), and the most recent show was the best hands down. His singing was so sharp and (OK, in its own way) *rich*. But the "mystic signifier" thing is true, I guess, because I think loving Dylan's singing vs. appreciating him as a songwriter or "important influence" or whatever is kind of the dividing line on really digging him or not.

spittle (spittle), Tuesday, 17 February 2004 19:38 (thirteen years ago) Permalink

mystic signifier

I wouldn't call it that. I just think his delivery is really funny! He has a great sense of comedic timing (even when he's being serious) and almost everything he sings is pregnant with some kind of... I don't wanna say "meaning," it's more like "presence of mind." Like you know he wrote the line to be sung a certain way and the fun of getting to sing it justifies the labor of writing it.

jody (Jody Beth Rosen), Tuesday, 17 February 2004 19:41 (thirteen years ago) Permalink

I think it was John Lennon who said you don't need to hear Dylan's words, just the way he sings them.

I mean, I'd put him with Sinatra and Ella and Billie and ... not many others, maybe Elvis? Bing? Howlin' Wolf? Hank Williams? ... as great American singers of the recorded era.

But then, that's the kind of statement that makes people say he's overrated. Can't win.

spittle (spittle), Tuesday, 17 February 2004 19:42 (thirteen years ago) Permalink

Like you know he wrote the line to be sung a certain way and the fun of getting to sing it justifies the labor of writing it.

And this is important because so many "clever" singer-songwriters have no idea how to emote comedically and their jokes just don't translate well to being sung.

jody (Jody Beth Rosen), Tuesday, 17 February 2004 19:47 (thirteen years ago) Permalink

and i don't know the stuff about the other guys named Zimmerman -- a confusing thing, but I think Dylan's always been sort of obsessed with doubling / twins etc.

http://thumbs.ebaystatic.com/images/g/h0IAAOSw-itXvIC7/s-l225.jpg

Patti Labelle is in here with her high but mediocre singing voice. (Tom D.), Friday, 21 October 2016 18:57 (one year ago) Permalink

Listening to Tempest for the first time ever, and as my comments on several other threads probably shows, Bob Dylan isn't my cup of tea, but most most of it is pleasant and ok. But the title track is just BAD, huh? This is really one where the text works better on it's own, without the horrible melody and plodding rhythm, not that that's saying much. Oy. But some of the other tracks were ok, I'll give him that. But oy.

Frederik B, Friday, 21 October 2016 18:59 (one year ago) Permalink

this is the part that feels the weirdest:

I'm trying to determine whom you've been transfigured from, or as.

I just showed you. Go read the book.

That's who you have in mind? What could the connection to that Bobby Zimmerman be other than name?

I don't have it in mind. I didn't write that book. I didn't make it up. I didn't dream that. I'm not telling you I had a dream last night. Remember the song "Last Night I Had the Strangest Dream"? I didn't write that, either. I'm showing you a book that's been written and published. I mean, look at all the connecting things: motorcycles, Bobby Zimmerman, Keith and Kent Zimmerman, 1964, 1966. And there's more to it than even that. If you went to find this guy's family, you'd find a whole bunch more that connected. I'm just explaining it to you. Go to the grave site.

tylerw, Friday, 21 October 2016 19:00 (one year ago) Permalink

it's like the mystical messenger character in a thriller w/ paranormal elements

niels, Friday, 21 October 2016 19:03 (one year ago) Permalink

Too bad he didn't write a song about it--or maybe he did, and we just didn't get it...

dow, Friday, 21 October 2016 19:14 (one year ago) Permalink

It was "Wigwam."

Montgomery Burns' Jazz (Tarfumes The Escape Goat), Friday, 21 October 2016 19:29 (one year ago) Permalink

haha! i mean, the most obvious candidate is "Tweedle Dee & Tweedle Dum" ... there was some essay about i that i can't seem to track down right now.

tylerw, Friday, 21 October 2016 19:30 (one year ago) Permalink

Those Dylan quotes just make me wish some writer sometime had put him and Ornette Coleman together in a room and transcribed the results.

Don Van Gorp, midwest regional VP, marketing (誤訳侮辱), Friday, 21 October 2016 19:55 (one year ago) Permalink

yeah haha, they definitely both have/had weird brains

tylerw, Friday, 21 October 2016 19:58 (one year ago) Permalink

Well, the thing is, a big part of that is/was an act - I've had extended conversations this summer/fall with one of Ornette's bassists, and his son Denardo, and both of them said to me that Ornette liked to basically gaslight journalists. That within the band, he would have extremely detailed, down-to-earth conversations about the actual music and how it worked and what he wanted and why, but when a journalist (like me!) asked him about musical stuff, he'd give them a philosophical disquisition instead.

Don Van Gorp, midwest regional VP, marketing (誤訳侮辱), Saturday, 22 October 2016 00:24 (one year ago) Permalink

Oh I believe it -- the ornette in the Spellman book strikes me as very different than the mystic sage of his latter days. And Dylan is probably the same -- making a game out of explaining himself, playing with a journalist's expectations etc. but I do think they get wrapped up in that stuff themselves, to the extent that they might not know where it begins or ends.

tylerw, Saturday, 22 October 2016 02:37 (one year ago) Permalink

I think he's trying to tell us that he staged a motorcycle crash in which he killed off his original identity and was reborn as "Robert Zimmerman", after getting the idea from a book he'd been reading that day

Tell me who sends these infamous .gifs (bernard snowy), Saturday, 22 October 2016 15:17 (one year ago) Permalink

(xp re: the dylan interview bit in question)
would be pretty funny if you did go to the gravesite, something was off, & shit very rapidly went all North-by-Northwest tho -- mr. dylan if you're reading please finance this adventure film & I promise to find a way to put you in, even if you're dead by the time we start shooting, we will find a way to cast your remains in a minor speaking role

Tell me who sends these infamous .gifs (bernard snowy), Saturday, 22 October 2016 15:20 (one year ago) Permalink

He'll try to make it

rhymes with "blondie blast" (cryptosicko), Saturday, 29 October 2016 13:48 (one year ago) Permalink

this is a strange thing to say, especially the way the journalist connected these two ideas

“There’s a certain intensity in writing a song,” he replies, “and you have to keep in mind why you are writing it and for who and what for,” he says. “Paintings, and to a greater extent movies, can be created for propaganda purposes, whereas songs can’t be.”

F♯ A♯ (∞), Saturday, 29 October 2016 15:22 (one year ago) Permalink

with films, you can really lead the viewer by the nose and force them to experience the work the way you want them too. maybe paintings are similar -- images are more potent in advertising than jingles.

Treeship, Saturday, 29 October 2016 19:07 (one year ago) Permalink

i feel like his paintings are the opposite of propaganda though -- these quiet scenes, rendered with these bold, oversaturated colors that collapse space and texture. the most propagandistic things he's done are songs like "blowin in the wind."

his statements in interviews often seem tossed off

Treeship, Saturday, 29 October 2016 19:13 (one year ago) Permalink

Can someone show Dylan this, cheers - https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Category:Propaganda_songs

Camaraderie at Arms Length, Saturday, 29 October 2016 19:32 (one year ago) Permalink

I don't think of "Blowin' In The Wind" as "proprandistic", although yeah he's shaking his head re them cannonballs etc., but "the answer is"--not "we're gonna win, in a righteous peaceful way, that is" or "It's too soon to know", with cautious hope, folkie folk wisdom, like "the answer's out there, just hang in there"---nope, it's not doin' nothin" but blowin' in the wind, like a flag flappin' or any random piece of paper, paper bag, pine pollen, whutever. He marches us along and tips us over the edge like a trash can at the end of the line, over and over. And makes us, well some of us most of the time, makes us like it. Kind of an anti-anthem, or at the very least his own doubts.
Much later, one woman's experience of writing, in a way, with Mr. D.:
http://www.vulture.com/2016/10/bob-dylan-carole-bayer-sager-book-excerpt.html

dow, Saturday, 29 October 2016 21:20 (one year ago) Permalink

Beautifully otm re blowing and that excerpt is outstanding

niels, Saturday, 29 October 2016 21:31 (one year ago) Permalink

Outstanding indeed. Leafed through that book in the store the other day and read a funny anecdote about her and a shrink when she was breaking up with Burt.

Funkateers for Fears (James Redd and the Blecchs), Saturday, 29 October 2016 22:04 (one year ago) Permalink

Rex Murphy typically comes off as Canada's cranky, conservative old uncle, but I mostly* agree with him here:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZUmDDkIeIq4

*Dylan > Cohen

rhymes with "blondie blast" (cryptosicko), Sunday, 30 October 2016 14:56 (one year ago) Permalink

http://pitchfork.com/reviews/albums/22485-blood-on-the-tracks/

Pitchfork reviewing BOTT for some reason

Duke, Sunday, 30 October 2016 18:36 (one year ago) Permalink

They're planting stories in the press.

Funkateers for Fears (James Redd and the Blecchs), Sunday, 30 October 2016 18:59 (one year ago) Permalink

i feel like his paintings are the opposite of propaganda though -- these quiet scenes, rendered with these bold, oversaturated colors that collapse space and texture. the most propagandistic things he's done are songs like "blowin in the wind."

Don't tell me we're supposed to take his painting seriously too as well now, how much more overrated can Bob Dylan get?

Millions of species Faye Dunaway (Tom D.), Sunday, 30 October 2016 20:55 (one year ago) Permalink

Analysing the shit daubings of famous people is pure 1st world degeneracy and should never have happened. A recent example was that laughable Marr program about Winston Churchill's art club style Sunday paintings.

calzino, Sunday, 30 October 2016 21:40 (one year ago) Permalink

Dylan apparently really valued his painting lessons from his neighbor down the road, all the more so since the guy didn't care at all about rock and roll celebrity, although he did feel pretty guilty when he abandoned the guy one day to entertain George Harrison at his house.

From a Vanity 6 (James Redd and the Blecchs), Sunday, 30 October 2016 21:51 (one year ago) Permalink

Bob was painting in Dorfman’s studio on Thanksgiving 1968 when Pattie and George Harrison’s car came up the road toward his property. Bob put down his brushes and asked Dorfman excitedly, ‘Aren’t ya comin‘?’ ‘Well, Bob, I’ve got work to do. You go ahead.’ It seemed to Dorfman, as Bob left, that his friend was irritated by his lack of interest in such a distinguished visitor.

Sounes, Howard (2011-05-24). Down the Highway: The Life of Bob Dylan, Grove/Atlantic

From a Vanity 6 (James Redd and the Blecchs), Sunday, 30 October 2016 22:35 (one year ago) Permalink

Dylan apparently really valued his painting lessons from his neighbor down the road, all the more so since the guy didn't care at all about rock and roll celebrity, although he did feel pretty guilty when he abandoned the guy one day to entertain George Harrison at his house.

― From a Vanity 6 (James Redd and the Blecchs),

not guilty

The burrito of ennui (Alfred, Lord Sotosyn), Thursday, 3 November 2016 23:40 (one year ago) Permalink

For leading you astray
On the road to Mandalay..

Mark G, Friday, 4 November 2016 00:24 (one year ago) Permalink

great read, thanks Karl

niels, Friday, 4 November 2016 19:44 (one year ago) Permalink

that garland jeffries album is great if you were there were another early graham parker & the rumor or elvis costello record

blonde redheads have more fun (upper mississippi sh@kedown), Friday, 4 November 2016 19:55 (one year ago) Permalink

three months pass...

Can someone remember which Heylin book is good?

niels, Saturday, 25 February 2017 14:48 (eight months ago) Permalink

hmm my library only has the 1991 version of 'Behind the Shades' - must've been the one I read last time

iirc it's p definitive - any other recommendations?

wanna do a Dylan podcast, so I'm gonna read up a bit (the Heylin bio, Chronicles, Gray's Encyclopedia for reference, the Scorsese doc)

niels, Saturday, 25 February 2017 15:30 (eight months ago) Permalink

Took that one out of my own library a while back, perhaps in Revisited. The quotes are excellent, but I skimmed over his own opinions, since I was forewarned.

Nesta Leaps In (James Redd and the Blecchs), Saturday, 25 February 2017 15:44 (eight months ago) Permalink

two months pass...

happy birthday, you overrated genius!

made a playlist for the occasion https://open.spotify.com/user/betamaxdk/playlist/5ObYSdPI0mpDzl7ObTe2cR

niels, Wednesday, 24 May 2017 08:30 (five months ago) Permalink

two months pass...

a tony award is next bob dylan has written lyrics and music for a musical opening next year

― conrad, Friday, 21 October 2016

i must say - i wasn't expecting three songs off of infidels

conrad, Saturday, 29 July 2017 19:55 (three months ago) Permalink

one month passes...

I saw it. It's very bad indeed. Don't waste your money.

glumdalclitch, Thursday, 14 September 2017 02:37 (two months ago) Permalink

Dylan's not overrated. Conor McPherson, however...

Eazy, Thursday, 14 September 2017 02:39 (two months ago) Permalink

Bob Dylan is overrated, depending on who you're talking to.

rap is dad (it's a boy!), Friday, 15 September 2017 00:58 (two months ago) Permalink

trying to decide if i want to shell out to see bob next month — mavis staples opening definitely makes it more enticing.

tylerw, Friday, 15 September 2017 14:10 (two months ago) Permalink

didn't know they were still touring together, that's sweet

Οὖτις, Friday, 15 September 2017 15:41 (two months ago) Permalink

one month passes...

$2500 for a signed copy of his Nobel prize lecture (the one he couldn't be bothered to deliver in person):

http://bobdylannobel.com/

heaven parker (anagram), Thursday, 2 November 2017 15:11 (two weeks ago) Permalink

lol wasn't it plagiarized from sparknotes or whatever too

j., Thursday, 2 November 2017 15:37 (two weeks ago) Permalink


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