Rolling Classical 2019

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I've been fascinated with Fausto Romitelli's music since I first heard Professor Bad Trip, an unusually successful attempt at spectralist psychedelia. Romitelli studied under Gérard Grisey and Hugues Dufourt, but he was no less a pupil of Pink Floyd and Jimi Hendrix. As a result, he is – to my knowledge – one of the few noted European composers of his generation (1963-2004) to have cast the electric guitar in a leading role. I've often listened to the solo Trash TV Trance, which has spawned a remarkable amount of performances on YouTube (of which I think I like this one the best) but wasn't familiar with his output for acoustic guitar, which was recently recorded for the Italian Stradivarius label alongside Trash TV Trance and two other works (one for flute and guitar, the second for solo flute). There's even a Highway to Hell from 1984 which, while more subdued than his later material for the electric guitar, gives a good sense of his overall intentions.

pomenitul, Friday, 4 January 2019 03:14 (six months ago) link

I have 12 nominations left for the ILM poll if anyone has used up their noms and wants more classical (or jazz or avant stuff) on the ballot.

Locked in silent monologue, in silent scream (Sund4r), Friday, 4 January 2019 19:35 (six months ago) link

If you've ever wondered what a YT-ready video of contemporary notated music might look like, this is pretty cool:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NFEGSLRvV9U

pomenitul, Friday, 11 January 2019 14:45 (six months ago) link

Enjoyed the piece a lot.

Locked in silent monologue, in silent scream (Sund4r), Friday, 11 January 2019 16:14 (six months ago) link

Listening to ILX Listen: 2019

Fuck the NRA (ulysses), Wednesday, 16 January 2019 16:45 (six months ago) link

i'm iffy on spectralism as a whole (well, grisey mostly), but i did like professor bad trip!

The Elvis of Nationalism and Amoral Patriotism (rushomancy), Thursday, 17 January 2019 02:16 (six months ago) link

Happy to hear it! If you're in the mood for more, his disc of orchestral works, Audiodrome (with Peter Rundel conducting), is also very much worth delving into.

pomenitul, Thursday, 17 January 2019 12:03 (six months ago) link

Rebecca Saunders wins this year's Ernst von Siemens prize. Undoubtedly well-deserved!

https://www.rhinegold.co.uk/classical_music/ernst-von-siemens-prize-awarded-rebecca-saunders/

pomenitul, Thursday, 17 January 2019 13:33 (six months ago) link

Ah yes, was gonna ask, afaik I have never heard a note of hers, is anyone up to suggesting a primer C60 or Rough Guide or something of Spotify-available Saunders?

anatol_merklich, Friday, 18 January 2019 01:07 (six months ago) link

Re: electric guitar in new music, Pierluigi Billone is another composer. Two recordings of electric guitar works on Kairos.

Hans Holbein (Chinchilla Volapük), Friday, 18 January 2019 06:45 (six months ago) link

I'm not much of a playlist guy, unfortunately, but I do think Saunders's first monograph for Kairos – QUARTET, Into the Blue, Molly's Song 3 – shades of crimson, dichroic seventeen, all played by musikFabrik – makes for a fine introduction. It should be available on Spotify.

pomenitul, Friday, 18 January 2019 10:38 (six months ago) link

Readymade playlist is more than fine; thanks, pomenitul! :-)

anatol_merklich, Friday, 18 January 2019 14:24 (six months ago) link

Nice to see the latest cd from Danish String Quartet got nominated in the album poll. Prism I, the first of five albums which will each include a late Beethoven quartet, and something else related to it. On the first it's Shostakovich Quartet no 15, and it's pretty amazing. Great album, snuck into the lower part of my ballot.

Frederik B, Friday, 18 January 2019 14:47 (six months ago) link

I liked Wood Works a lot less than I thought I would but I love the Danish String Quartet. They used to call themselves the Young Danish String Quartet, right? Their Nielsen recordings are almost definitive as far as I'm concerned.

pomenitul, Friday, 18 January 2019 14:52 (six months ago) link

Speaking of Nielsen, it's such a shame that Thomas Dausgaard never officially recorded Nielsen's six symphonies with the Danish National Symphony Orchestra during his tenure. He started a cycle with the Seattle Symphony a couple of years ago but either he's run out of ideas or the orchestra has little feel for the music (admittedly a bit of an acquired taste) because I found his 3rd and 4th surprisingly listless.

pomenitul, Friday, 18 January 2019 15:00 (six months ago) link

I liked Wood Works a lot less than I thought I would but I love the Danish String Quartet. They used to call themselves the Young Danish String Quartet, right? Their Nielsen recordings are almost definitive as far as I'm concerned.

― pomenitul, 18. januar 2019 15:52 (thirty-eight minutes ago) Bookmark Flag Post Permalink

Yeah, they were called the Young Danish String Quartet when they were younger. When the old Danish String Quartet retired they took over the name.

Frederik B, Friday, 18 January 2019 15:31 (six months ago) link

Full concert - Terry Riley live at Koerner Hall in Toronto's Royal Conservatory, with Tracy Silverman and his son Gyan. Really good show, based on this: https://livestream.com/accounts/3811338/events/8517853/videos/186015720

(Posted to post-minimalist thread as well)

Locked in silent monologue, in silent scream (Sund4r), Monday, 21 January 2019 04:02 (five months ago) link

Barbara Hannigan awarded the Sonning Award for 2020! I'd really thought she'd miss it, as they gave it to Hans Abrahamsen in 2019 and made Hannigan and 'Let Me Tell You' the centerpiece of the galla concert, but nope. So incredibly deserving!

Frederik B, Friday, 1 February 2019 11:42 (five months ago) link

Excellent news! Every bit of praise lavished upon her is utterly deserved.

pomenitul, Friday, 1 February 2019 11:45 (five months ago) link

Guys are there two of these threads or is my hangover psychosis worse than I thought?

Also yes great win

Brex Avery (Noodle Vague), Friday, 1 February 2019 11:46 (five months ago) link

I've been clamouring for the gods mods to delete the duplicate but they've yet to respond to my bootless pleas.

pomenitul, Friday, 1 February 2019 11:48 (five months ago) link

what's the other one? might as well use it while i got it.

Fuck the NRA (ulysses), Friday, 1 February 2019 12:34 (five months ago) link

found it, got it.

Fuck the NRA (ulysses), Friday, 1 February 2019 12:35 (five months ago) link

Barbara Hannigan awarded the Sonning Award for 2020!

― Frederik B

this is cool but unfortunately thanks to ilx i will always believe in the back of my mind that the Sonning Award is given for outstanding performance in a twitter beef

The Elvis of Nationalism and Amoral Patriotism (rushomancy), Friday, 1 February 2019 14:44 (five months ago) link

lol

pomenitul, Friday, 1 February 2019 14:45 (five months ago) link

On Saturday I heard Jonathan Biss and the Seattle Symphony play Caroline Shaw's new piano concerto Watermarks, which was sort of playfully and delightfully in stylistic tension between the romantic and the contemporary. Highlights include a theme for the soloist in the second movement that almost but not quite resolves into the sound of a pop melody and a recurring gag in the third movement. Part of Biss' project to commission new concerti in response to those of Beethoven.

Norm’s Superego (silby), Monday, 4 February 2019 17:50 (five months ago) link

Sounds interesting. I've been disappointed by a lot of Shaw other than Partita but I'd definitely be interested to hear it.

silent as a seashell Julia (Sund4r), Tuesday, 5 February 2019 13:40 (five months ago) link

man, i wish i were free for this tonight and recommend it strongly to New Yorkers who are:
http://roulette.org/event/the-voices-of-erin-gee/

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xbVIUt-YtaM

Fuck the NRA (ulysses), Friday, 8 February 2019 18:13 (five months ago) link

Holy shit:

https://youtu.be/gzodB0Sp6ZI

pomenitul, Tuesday, 12 February 2019 13:03 (five months ago) link

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gzodB0Sp6ZI

pomenitul, Tuesday, 12 February 2019 13:03 (five months ago) link

Aargh! I've seen that shared easily over 10 times in the past week. It annoys me tbh. The idea is cute and a lot of work probably went into it but the ol' atonal music was NOT about favouring intellect over emotion. (Maybe some postwar serialist music was but Schoenberg and Berg certainly weren't.) Cage's 4'33" isn't really what I think of as an atonal composition, either, although you could possibly make a case.

silent as a seashell Julia (Sund4r), Tuesday, 12 February 2019 14:22 (five months ago) link

I completely agree with you (there's nothing even remotely unemotional about Schoenberg's 2nd quartet or Berg's Lyric Suite, to say the least), but my expectations when it comes to pop culture discourse about this stuff are so low as to be nonexistent.

pomenitul, Tuesday, 12 February 2019 14:29 (five months ago) link

That said, if his dad really was a composer of 12 tone music and it's not just a fictive spin on country tropes, he should definitely know better.

pomenitul, Tuesday, 12 February 2019 14:31 (five months ago) link

Yeah I enjoyed the song and video but my mind was screaming foul at all the inaccuracies and generalizations

flamboyant goon tie included, Tuesday, 12 February 2019 14:35 (five months ago) link

Cage's 4'33" isn't really what I think of as an atonal composition, either, although you could possibly make a case.

I somehow doubt he is trying to be historically accurate.

I really liked that atonal solo in the middle of it. Its just nerdy internet stuff but I'd like to think passers by might be horrified/mystified and curious enough to check it out.

xyzzzz__, Tuesday, 12 February 2019 14:38 (five months ago) link

The solo really clinches it. Wouldn't be a worthwhile meme otherwise.

pomenitul, Tuesday, 12 February 2019 14:41 (five months ago) link

No point to this kind of thing if it's not well-informed imo. Otherwise, it comes closer to being a put-down (of something that probably doesn't need to be taken down).

silent as a seashell Julia (Sund4r), Tuesday, 12 February 2019 14:59 (five months ago) link

(Solo is the best part.)

silent as a seashell Julia (Sund4r), Tuesday, 12 February 2019 15:01 (five months ago) link

To be fair, this is how most people perceive it. I've taken friends/relatives to several such concerts, made them listen to recordings and 'cold, forbidding complexity' remains their takeaway to this day. I frankly gave up a long time ago.

pomenitul, Tuesday, 12 February 2019 15:03 (five months ago) link

Even early 20th century abstract painting elicits less incomprehension, no doubt because it's less time-consuming.

pomenitul, Tuesday, 12 February 2019 15:05 (five months ago) link

Yeah, that's sort of why I dislike this.

silent as a seashell Julia (Sund4r), Tuesday, 12 February 2019 15:06 (five months ago) link

I don't imagine that modern literature fans would eagerly share a comedy song about pining for the emotionless, incomprehensible writing of modern authors like Joyce, Woolf, Beckett, and cummings (but maybe they would).

silent as a seashell Julia (Sund4r), Tuesday, 12 February 2019 15:25 (five months ago) link

I probably would tbh. But I've abandoned all hope of ever turning more than a pinch of people on to 'modernist' art. And when it does happen, it's usually an accident.

pomenitul, Tuesday, 12 February 2019 15:28 (five months ago) link

It would have to be a comedy short story

imago, Tuesday, 12 February 2019 15:30 (five months ago) link

Even early 20th century abstract painting elicits less incomprehension, no doubt because it's less time-consuming.

There's a whole book about this phenomenon - the subtitle is something like Why Do People Like Rothko But Not Schoenberg? I've always meant to read it.

grawlix (unperson), Tuesday, 12 February 2019 15:40 (five months ago) link

Here it is; it's called Fear of Music: Why People Get Rothko But Don't Get Stockhausen

grawlix (unperson), Tuesday, 12 February 2019 15:42 (five months ago) link

That sounds interesting. I'd need to be convinced of the premise first, though.

jmm, Tuesday, 12 February 2019 15:45 (five months ago) link

I'll have to check it out, thanks. Too bad there's no matching phenomenon for poetry (haikus notwithstanding).

xp

pomenitul, Tuesday, 12 February 2019 15:45 (five months ago) link

The book is an OK read. Idk if it really arrives at a satisfying answer to that question and it turns into a kind of historical overview. Hard to deny that more people know Picasso and Dali than Schoenberg and Cage, at the least. I used to have my late 20th c avant-garde classes debate the question. Alex Ross and Philip Ball have also written about it (taking v different positions).xp

silent as a seashell Julia (Sund4r), Tuesday, 12 February 2019 15:52 (five months ago) link

Just looking at the blurb, I'm not sure that this indicates much about popular enthusiasm for modern paintings; it's more about the extravagant amounts of money being moved around: "Works by 20th century abstract artists like Mark Rothko are selling for record breaking sums at auction, while the millions commanded by works by Andy Warhol and Francis Bacon make headline news."

jmm, Tuesday, 12 February 2019 15:55 (five months ago) link

Oh, I see it now. It's under "Maja S. K. Ratkje" and didn't turn up when I looked on the Spotify artist page for "Maja Ratkje" but it came up when I searched for "Sult".

That first clip from Reid's Prism is amazing! It actually made me think a bit of the Knife's Tomorrow in a Year for some reason. Listening to the Soundcloud excerpts now and this is nice so far. xp

All along there is the sound of feedback (Sund4r), Friday, 19 April 2019 14:52 (three months ago) link

<3

All along there is the sound of feedback (Sund4r), Friday, 19 April 2019 14:56 (three months ago) link

The Ratkje album is really nice. I still don't pay for Spotify so the commercials spoiled the mood a little but the pieces were often more beautiful than I expect from her, and, you're right, it works as a consistent album.

All along there is the sound of feedback (Sund4r), Saturday, 20 April 2019 02:09 (two months ago) link

Yeah, this one's got actual songs. She's a remarkably versatile artist, as a composer and performer both.

On the more traditional end of things, I'm finding Bomsori Kim and Rafał Blechacz's DG recital for violin and piano to be most enjoyable. It includes Fauré's first sonata, Debussy's lone effort in the genre and an early attempt (from 1904) by Szymanowski. The Fauré and Debussy are stunningly well played, as is the Szymanowski, but the work itself doesn't do it for me at all. I suspect my tolerance for late Romantic histrionics is higher than most people's, but the piece falls apart almost as soon as it begins, devolving into a catalogue of emotive fin de siècle clichés. Szymanowski appears to have only really hit his stride around 1914.

pomenitul, Saturday, 20 April 2019 10:04 (two months ago) link

Put on the video of Still while making and eating breakfast. It started out sounding beautiful and sparse, then started driving me bonkers in the lack of development, and now (28m in), I'm just getting engrossed in the spaces and slight variations.

All along there is the sound of feedback (Sund4r), Saturday, 20 April 2019 12:05 (two months ago) link

I quite like Still so far. It's eternally unfolding somewhere between Feldman's Triadic Memories and Pärt's Für Alina.

pomenitul, Saturday, 20 April 2019 13:26 (two months ago) link

I haven't managed to find a recording of Andrew Norman's Sustain, alas. I might give Ellen Reid's opera a shot, but it's a genre I tend to dislike almost systematically, so I'll probably just skip it.

pomenitul, Saturday, 20 April 2019 13:34 (two months ago) link

I don't think Sustain has been recorded at all, but if you want to hear Norman I'd say give Play a play or two. It's pretty great.

Frederik B, Saturday, 20 April 2019 13:37 (two months ago) link

this maja s.k. ratkje record is lovely, thanks

she carries a torch. two torches, actually (Joan Crawford Loves Chachi), Saturday, 20 April 2019 13:42 (two months ago) link

Ratkje gave an incredible performance at the Rune Grammofon anniversary concerts in Oslo in December, and I love organ music, so I'm definitely gonna check this album out.

shared unit of analysis (unperson), Saturday, 20 April 2019 16:58 (two months ago) link

another thanks for the Ratkje; sizzles on first contact.

Fuck the NRA (ulysses), Wednesday, 24 April 2019 16:49 (two months ago) link

Glad you guys like it!

pomenitul, Wednesday, 24 April 2019 17:20 (two months ago) link

Went to the Hans Abrahamsen Leonie Sonning Award concert yesterday. Sat at fourth row and heard Barbara Hannigan sing Let Me Tell You. One of the biggest concert experiences I've had in a while. The program also consisted of Abrahamsens orchestrations of six Debussy pieces and his concert for left-handed piano called Left, Alone. Second half was good as well, but it was the first half that was awe-inspiring.

Frederik B, Saturday, 27 April 2019 14:39 (two months ago) link

Abrahamsen has finished his first opera, based on the fairy tale The Snow Queen (or as it's known nowadays, Frozen) and in his version the snow queen character will be portrayed by a bass singer.

Frederik B, Saturday, 27 April 2019 14:40 (two months ago) link

Jelly.

xp

pomenitul, Saturday, 27 April 2019 14:41 (two months ago) link

Which Debussy pieces did he orchestrate and have they been recorded?

I won’t have money to go to this year’s Hannigan-led Ojai festival. I really wanted to.

valet doberman (Jon not Jon), Saturday, 27 April 2019 17:15 (two months ago) link

Children's Corner. You might be able to stream the whole thing here? https://www.dr.dk/radio/p2/p2-koncerten/p2-koncerten-hans-abrahamsen-leonie-sonnings-musikpris-2019 If not, then I think the concert is broadcast in every EBU member, so it might show up someday :)

Frederik B, Saturday, 27 April 2019 20:41 (two months ago) link

early warning for NYCers to add this to their calendar (looking at you jon)
July 25 – ICE plays Ashley Fure and Anna Thorvaldsdottir
http://www.lincolncenter.org/mostly-mozart-festival/show/fure-and-thorvaldsdottir

Fuck the NRA (ulysses), Wednesday, 1 May 2019 20:27 (two months ago) link

That's my birthday :D

Definitely want to go

valet doberman (Jon not Jon), Wednesday, 1 May 2019 20:36 (two months ago) link

Nice! And free! Gonna have to try and get to that.

shared unit of analysis (unperson), Wednesday, 1 May 2019 22:45 (two months ago) link

I have little sympathy for what Michel Houellebecq has become (or revealed himself to be) in recent years, but I often think back on his simple description of Liszt's late music in The Map and the Territory (Houellebecq's best novel imho):

There is perhaps no music that expresses better than Franz Liszt’s last pieces of chamber music that funereal and gentle feeling of the old man whose friends are all dead, who in some way already belongs to the past and who in turn feels death approaching, who sees it as a sister, a friend, the promise of a return to the childhood home.

With this in mind, I've been listening to Cédric Tiberghien's recent recital for Hyperion, showcasing the third and last year of Liszt's Années de pèlerinage, as well as a smattering of pieces from the 1870s-1880s including the notorious Bagatelle sans tonalité, said to foreshadow Schoenberg. It's all wonderfully bleak for the most part, and played just right – a shame Tiberghien didn't record Nuages gris, however, although I suppose the disc's running time wouldn't have permitted it.

pomenitul, Tuesday, 7 May 2019 17:06 (two months ago) link

Oh, that sounds worth checkimg out.

All along there is the sound of feedback (Sund4r), Tuesday, 7 May 2019 18:10 (two months ago) link

*checking

All along there is the sound of feedback (Sund4r), Tuesday, 7 May 2019 18:10 (two months ago) link

i am obsessed with late liszt, not just the pieces houllebecq is referring to there but also the strange and whimsical dances (valses oubliees, mephisto waltzes, the bagatelle) which are just as resignedly forward-pushing as the laments

valet doberman (Jon not Jon), Tuesday, 7 May 2019 18:55 (two months ago) link

The late pieces sound especially great on a fortepiano - search out Andrea Bonatta's disc on Arcana. For the late dances, I am head over heels for Olivia Sham's Liszt recital 'The Art Of Remembering'. Brendel is incredible in the selection of late pieces he recorded. For 'Nuages Gris', Krystian Zimerman is almost hallucinatory.

There's a great disc of late liszt arranged for wind ensemble by the Netherlands Wind Ensemble and a disc on BMC of late liszt orchestral adaptations by a hungarian composer. Finally, Heinz Holliger made two incredible orchestrations which were recorded on an old Arte Nova disc.

Liszt himself did very little for orchestra at this point in his life BUT his final symphonic poem From the Cradle to the Grave is a stunning exception.

valet doberman (Jon not Jon), Tuesday, 7 May 2019 19:01 (two months ago) link

I'm with you, Jon: those bizarre dance-like pieces are just as fascinating as the dirges (incidentally, Tiberghien's recital includes the fourth Mephisto Waltz).

I must admit I'm not too keen on Bonatta's disc, however, due to a blind spot more than anything – I've never really warmed up to the sound of premodern pianos. But Zimerman's Liszt recital is an absolute favourite of mine and I love all things Holliger.

I'll check out the arrangements for wind instruments – I had no idea, so thanks for the tip. And yes, From the Cradle to the Grave, despite its short length, dwarfs the Dante and Faust symphonies both.

There's also an old Hungaroton disc featuring Liszt's works for harmonium (including an arrangement of the lovely Angelus, which also kicks off year three of the Années de pèlerinage), as well as cello & piano versions of Romance oubliée, La lugubre gondola and the two late Elegies. With Miklós Perényi, no less.

Speaking of which, I always come back to Alexis Descharmes and Sébastian Vichard's recordings of the works for cello & piano (all of them, including Tristia for piano trio, an 1880 transcription of an early work, which makes for a fascinating juxtaposition). It's a clichéd thing to say, but Liszt was such an incredible arranger, an undersung craft if ever there was one.

pomenitul, Wednesday, 8 May 2019 09:24 (two months ago) link

Saw this with Jon at The Stone and STRONGLY recommend it... Jon, you wanna go again on the 21?
https://roulette.org/event/travis-laplante-yarn-wire-inner-garden/

Fuck the NRA (ulysses), Tuesday, 14 May 2019 16:07 (two months ago) link

I was gonna ask you about that today! Yes I want to see it again man.

valet doberman (Jon not Jon), Tuesday, 14 May 2019 20:50 (two months ago) link

Great, hit me by email and let's get you a ticket.

Fuck the NRA (ulysses), Wednesday, 15 May 2019 15:26 (two months ago) link

http://5against4.com/2019/03/05/quatuor-bozzini-phill-niblock-baobab/

Quatuor Bozzini – Phill Niblock: Baobab

2 pieces of "uppercase ambient" from the impressive experimental string quartet that the reviewer says is a recording that recreates the brilliance of the live experience they encountered of them at the Hudds music festival.

calzino, Friday, 17 May 2019 07:58 (two months ago) link

https://quatuorbozzini-actuellecd.bandcamp.com/

and another:
Simon Martin : Musique d’art

calzino, Friday, 17 May 2019 07:59 (two months ago) link

Yes, but is it true ambient?

Kidding aside, I'll be sure to check them both of them out, thanks.

pomenitul, Friday, 17 May 2019 08:33 (two months ago) link

“There are no waves, there is only the ocean.” or something like that!

calzino, Friday, 17 May 2019 08:39 (two months ago) link

Confession: while listening to András Schiff's second volume of Schubert pieces and sonatas played on a 1820 fortepiano, I once again came to the conclusion that pre-20th century pianos are an exercise in frustration. I can't recall a single recording where I preferred the prototype to its modern equivalent.

pomenitul, Wednesday, 22 May 2019 09:56 (one month ago) link

I like Bach on historical keyboards, modern pianos, and Wendy Carlos's Moog. I like how harpsichords and clavichords can rip in a way that pianos don't. Not sure about early fortepianos, though: haven't listened to a lot of that tbh.

All along there is the sound of feedback (Sund4r), Wednesday, 22 May 2019 15:15 (one month ago) link

Period performance Bach is right up my alley and I love the harpsichord's tone. It's really just the fortepiano I struggle with, perhaps because I like my Romanticism to be forward-looking.

pomenitul, Wednesday, 22 May 2019 15:18 (one month ago) link

Just listened to this and enjoyed it on first listen. It will be played here on Sunday, although I will have to miss it, unfortunately:
https://vimeo.com/332029867/35f6f43258

All along there is the sound of feedback (Sund4r), Saturday, 25 May 2019 02:24 (one month ago) link

For English ilxors, my choir, Lille Muko, is going on a small tour this summer. We're singing July 11th in Ely, 13th in Norwich, and 14th in Cambridge. We're singing only 20th century Danish choral music on this tour.
http://cambridgesummermusic.co.uk/the-university-choir-lille-muko/?fbclid=IwAR2x5xxwiV1GewmvutAIw6Ua5xhrWzKAKZrjzZ-e5TG2ueuytyfWahpDNtg
I'm the third guy from the right, btw. I was very, very hungover the day the photo was taken.

Frederik B, Tuesday, 28 May 2019 20:34 (one month ago) link

your hairstyle is quite indecorous

don't mock my smock or i'll clean your clock (silby), Tuesday, 28 May 2019 20:38 (one month ago) link

one month passes...

i think we tutted about that in the Graun thread. i assume they let a work experience kid write it.

jou're much too jung, girl (Noodle Vague), Wednesday, 10 July 2019 14:32 (one week ago) link

Ah, I only just got wind of it through a series of rebuttals.

pomenitul, Wednesday, 10 July 2019 14:33 (one week ago) link

In any case, lol @ the undying and undead notion that live classical music is somehow egregiously more expensive to consume than other genres.

pomenitul, Wednesday, 10 July 2019 14:34 (one week ago) link

it's impressive in the number of wrong sentences it packs in.

jou're much too jung, girl (Noodle Vague), Wednesday, 10 July 2019 14:36 (one week ago) link

A few responses:

Here is a screen grab of @RichmoMusic’s Times rebutal of the Guardian’s ‘state of classical music’ editorial. pic.twitter.com/YZBajW3yM1

— Petroc Trelawny (@PetrocTrelawny) July 9, 2019

https://www.theguardian.com/music/2019/jul/07/classical-music-and-the-dreaded-elite-tag

pomenitul, Wednesday, 10 July 2019 14:40 (one week ago) link

yep, attacking the proms as conspicuous commercialism or whatever stupid term they used in that garbage piece was spectacularly missing the point - seeing as it is probably the only major event in London doing six quid tickets!

calzino, Wednesday, 10 July 2019 14:52 (one week ago) link

https://johnlutheradams.bandcamp.com/album/become-desert

this is beautiful.

calzino, Friday, 12 July 2019 08:17 (one week ago) link

Indeed it is. More oceanic (again) than desert-like but I'm not keeping a tally.

pomenitul, Friday, 12 July 2019 10:27 (one week ago) link

yep, attacking the proms as conspicuous commercialism or whatever stupid term they used in that garbage piece was spectacularly missing the point - seeing as it is probably the only major event in London doing six quid tickets!

Also many of the seats cost less than a tenner. Ive booked 5 concerts and 2 of those are under ten, in the circle

glumdalclitch, Friday, 12 July 2019 10:34 (one week ago) link


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