The Michelangelo Antonioni Poll

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choose your favorite film

Poll Results

OptionVotes
Professione: reporter (The Passenger, 1975) 9
L'eclisse (The Eclipse, 1962) 7
L'avventura (The Adventure, 1960) 6
Blowup (1966) 5
Zabriskie Point (1970) 2
Il grido (The Outcry, 1957) 1
La notte (The Night, 1961) 1
Le amiche (The Girl Friends, 1955) 1
Il deserto rosso (The Red Desert, 1964) 1
Il mistero di Oberwald (The Mystery of Oberwald, 1981) 0
Identificazione di una donna (Identification of a Woman, 1982) 0
Chung Kuo, Cina (documentary, 1972) 0
Cronaca di un amore (Chronicle of a Love, 1950) 0
La signora senza camelie (Camille Without Camellias, 1953) 0
I vinti (The Vanquished, 1952) 0
Beyond the Clouds (co-credited with Wim Wenders, 1995) 0


groovemaaan, Wednesday, 14 October 2009 16:15 (thirteen years ago) link

Blow up will win, for it has been seen by more people.

Mark G, Wednesday, 14 October 2009 16:17 (thirteen years ago) link

L'Avventura's dimmed somewhat from too many watchings, but L'Eclisse and The Passenger haven't. Either one.

Roman Polanski now sleeps in prison. (Alfred, Lord Sotosyn), Wednesday, 14 October 2009 16:18 (thirteen years ago) link

The Passenger. My favorite movie of all time.

The Perfect Weapon 2, Wednesday, 14 October 2009 16:37 (thirteen years ago) link

The Passenger. I find all of Antonioni's films pretty moving, but that one especially.

ryan, Wednesday, 14 October 2009 16:39 (thirteen years ago) link

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YNk6MO7vy7w

Sublime.

The Perfect Weapon 2, Wednesday, 14 October 2009 16:41 (thirteen years ago) link

When I first saw it, L'avventura definitely had the most impact - though I also think it was probably the first Antonioni I saw, which could have been part of it. But the style and unconventional weirdness of the structure as well as the themes really threw me for a loop. The Red Desert also stands out in my mind (weird that it still hasn't come out on DVD in R1, when even Zabriskie Point has).

Jeff LeVine, Wednesday, 14 October 2009 16:56 (thirteen years ago) link

The Passenger out of the measly three i've seen (Blowup, Zabriskie Pt)

feed them to the (Linden Ave) lions (will), Wednesday, 14 October 2009 17:12 (thirteen years ago) link

seen 5 of these

l'eclisse>l'avventura>the passenger>blow up>zabriskie point

the last ten minutes of l'eclisse are among my favorite minutes of cinema i think

rent, Wednesday, 14 October 2009 17:30 (thirteen years ago) link

I've seen ten; btwn l'Eclisse, Blowup and Passenger

Your Favorite Saturday Night Thing (Dr Morbius), Wednesday, 14 October 2009 17:33 (thirteen years ago) link

L'Eclisse is superb. I am drawn to David Thomson's incisive observation of L'Eclisse in which he implies, "we feel that there is some gentle force in the city and the world ready to wash over the characters, freeing us from the arid preoccupations of small, private stories. It isn't faith - Antonioni is an anxious unbeliever. Call it light or continuity."

The way Antonioni used Monica Vitti as a vehicle in that light or continuity is masterful and gorgeous. All the sixties films with Vitti are fabulous.

The Perfect Weapon 2, Wednesday, 14 October 2009 18:00 (thirteen years ago) link

Seen 'em all, went w/Le amiche cause someone has to. Really though, this run:

La signora senza camelie (Camille Without Camellias, 1953)
Le amiche (The Girl Friends, 1955)
Il grido (The Outcry, 1957)
L'avventura (The Adventure, 1960)
La notte (The Night, 1961)
L'eclisse (The Eclipse, 1962)
Il deserto rosso (The Red Desert, 1964)
Blowup (1966)

is damn near unfuckwithable, with Camellas & Notte probably being the weakest, and those are mildly flawed at worst.

Roomful of Moogs (C. Grisso/McCain), Wednesday, 14 October 2009 19:40 (thirteen years ago) link

Red Desert is some kinda bullshit though.

Roman Polanski now sleeps in prison. (Alfred, Lord Sotosyn), Wednesday, 14 October 2009 19:49 (thirteen years ago) link

It stuck with me though. Vitti's pretty inconsistent in it (tries too hard to sell being "crazy"). It holds up better than Zabriskie.

Roomful of Moogs (C. Grisso/McCain), Wednesday, 14 October 2009 19:54 (thirteen years ago) link

I like Zabriskie Point.

Your Favorite Saturday Night Thing (Dr Morbius), Wednesday, 14 October 2009 19:56 (thirteen years ago) link

i really need to see the passenger and zabriskie point

velko, Wednesday, 14 October 2009 20:23 (thirteen years ago) link

I despised it both times I saw it. But I should check it out again since I imagine I'd be more open to its countercultural pretensions (or critique thereof? was never quite sure).

I saw Le amiche during the 1950s poll (probably on your recommendation, Grisso) and was unmoved. Certainly minor compared to anything in the 1960s (yeah but it's GREAT bullshit).

Never seen The Mystery of Oberwald but it looks exactly like the kind of film maudit I'd vote for.

I'm going with The Passenger. A tad too Oedipal for my tastes. But I think Antonioni did a superb job knocking some of the stuffing out of it, deliberately deflating his following-patterns (to borrow from Rick Altman). Kinda reminded me of Beau Travail. And maybe some Fassbinder. Of particular genius is how Antonioni reveals the mise-en-scene surrounding the documentary footage.

Kevin John Bozelka, Wednesday, 14 October 2009 20:29 (thirteen years ago) link

I despised Zabriskie Point both times I saw it, that is.

Kevin John Bozelka, Wednesday, 14 October 2009 20:30 (thirteen years ago) link

re: that clip above. so many shots of people drifting in space or suspended in air in that movie. my fav is nicholson leaning out of the gondola and "flying" over the water...

ryan, Wednesday, 14 October 2009 20:31 (thirteen years ago) link

Never seen The Mystery of Oberwald but it looks exactly like the kind of film maudit I'd vote for.

Well, video maudit at any rate. It's fascinating and pretty great, but it's no L'aaventura or Blowup, et al.

cough syrup in coke cans (Eric H.), Wednesday, 14 October 2009 21:37 (thirteen years ago) link

Really need to see his early ones.

No nrq no credibility!

xyzzzz__, Thursday, 15 October 2009 09:09 (thirteen years ago) link

You're joking, right?

Kevin John Bozelka, Thursday, 15 October 2009 15:36 (thirteen years ago) link

Automatic thread bump. This poll is closing tomorrow.

System, Sunday, 18 October 2009 23:01 (thirteen years ago) link

Someone I've had a lot of trouble with over the years. I've seen L'Avventura at least three times, and I basically draw a blank whenever I try to recall specifics. But I saw La Notte and L'Eclisse for the first time a couple of years ago, and finally made some headway. Blow-Up would be the easy vote, but I'd probably just be voting for the Yardbirds, so I'll go with L'Eclisse--great final image, and Monica Vitti's awesomely gorgeous. (Yes, I'm a real intellectual.) I saw Zabriskie Point in the same series, and actually enjoyed the nutty ending a lot; great songs from Jerry Garcia and a bizarrely anomalous Pink Floyd, too.

clemenza, Monday, 19 October 2009 00:44 (thirteen years ago) link

Seen so few but LOVED The Passenger. One of the greatest final scenes ever.

Dorian (Dorianlynskey), Monday, 19 October 2009 09:39 (thirteen years ago) link

Automatic thread bump. This poll's results are now in.

System, Monday, 19 October 2009 23:01 (thirteen years ago) link

Semi-surprising yet not all-together unexpected result. I have to admit that I'm happy to see this win. Good work ilxor. Honestly, Antonioni is so great, any result would gratify this fan.

The Perfect Weapon 2, Tuesday, 20 October 2009 05:08 (thirteen years ago) link

Maria Schneider over Monica Vitti shockah!

The Perfect Weapon 2, Tuesday, 20 October 2009 05:12 (thirteen years ago) link

two years pass...

l'avventura changed the way i watch movies, tho i'd have trouble pinning down exactly why.

(The Other) J.D. (J.D.), Saturday, 11 February 2012 02:06 (ten years ago) link

Same here, and I doubt I could watch it again now.

Exile in lolville (Alfred, Lord Sotosyn), Saturday, 11 February 2012 02:14 (ten years ago) link

Same here with l'avventura, and I still love to watch it. Can't believe The Passenger won this poll, weird. I can't remember much from watching that movie many years ago, but Antonioni's best? 50 - 62 Antonioni is really amazing, and everything afterwards fell short for me. So much promise in is his early work.

JacobSanders, Saturday, 11 February 2012 02:22 (ten years ago) link

I have more affection for it and L'Eclisse in recent years, although I wouldn't watch them now.

Exile in lolville (Alfred, Lord Sotosyn), Saturday, 11 February 2012 02:26 (ten years ago) link

six months pass...

I watched L'Avventura for the first time tonight and was bored as hell by it. I honestly can't say that I liked anything about it beyond looking at Monica Vitti. I'm a philistine... but, still, I have L'Eclisse lined up. I fancy that one. I liked The Passenger and Blow Up too, btw.

jed_, Sunday, 2 September 2012 00:40 (ten years ago) link

Feel like I could watch L'avventura forever. Feels fresher and less claustrophobic than L'ecclise. More of an "open" text to that movie's austerity and modernism, I guess you could say. Every shot is a beauty and so well composed.

The Passenger is my favorite though.

ryan, Sunday, 2 September 2012 03:04 (ten years ago) link

I'm close to jed here. I think I've tried six or seven times, spread out over 30 years--most recently a few months ago on DVD. I keep trying because, temperamentally, I feel like it's something I should be receptive to (unlike 8-1/2, which I don't think I'll ever go back to again--it's just not the kind of thing I like). L'avventura, I keep trying, and will probably try again in a few years. I love the music over the opening credits--it always makes me think "This is the time"--and, yes, looking at Monica Vitti. But I just don't care about any of it, even while appreciating its place in film history, and loving lots of films that are just as austere and clearly influenced by L'avventura.

(Have a feeling I've said all this in another thread...not in this one, anyway.)

clemenza, Sunday, 2 September 2012 03:25 (ten years ago) link

The open secret of early days Euro art film boils down to: a pretty women to look at + weird shots of stuff.

I'd exclude Left Bank material out of that.

xyzzzz__, Sunday, 2 September 2012 08:28 (ten years ago) link

In his book on Stalker, Geoff Dyer claims that L'Aventurra is the most painfully boring film he's ever sat through, so you are far from alone jed (tho' I get the impression that Dyer hasn't actually seen that many movies...)

Part of the problem re: watching L'Aventurra today is that the narrative 'lack' (of resolution/refusal of meaning) that so shocked and inspired audiences at the time is nowadays fairly commonplace, so that you're constantly asking yourself, 'what's all the fuss about?', especially because lots of elements in the film - the social relations between characters, the manner of performance - are still pretty traditional, even 'melodramatic'. But aside from the beauty of Monica Vitti, there's always, w/ Antonioni, the beauty of landscape, of bodies moving through architectural spaces, that wonderful way he has of passing from the individual to the cosmic (eg that breathtaking shot when vitti opens out the window of the island shack, or the endings of the Passenger and L'Eclisse).

FWIW L'Eclisse is my favourite, because you have the two most beautiful ppl in the world acting together, because the theme of financial collapse and hysteria feels very timely and engaged, and because the final ten minutes are the most beautiful expression of entropic surrender even seen on film.

Ward Fowler, Sunday, 2 September 2012 10:46 (ten years ago) link

excellent post

Unlike humans, dogs don't talk shit (Nilmar Honorato da Silva), Sunday, 2 September 2012 11:29 (ten years ago) link

Ward otm. The other problem: Gabriele Ferzetti is a limited actor and Vitti was already showing signs of same. Acting opposite Alain Delon sent an electric charge through her.

a regina spektor is haunting europe (Alfred, Lord Sotosyn), Sunday, 2 September 2012 11:48 (ten years ago) link

three weeks pass...

Centennial anniversary this Saturday.

Just 'need' to see 5 of those zero-vote films.

kizz my hairy irish azz (Dr Morbius), Tuesday, 25 September 2012 16:30 (ten years ago) link

two years pass...

Third or fourth time for Red Desert last night--pretty well attended; they had to move it into a larger theatre than the one originally designated--came up a little short again. I wish I liked it as much as I love looking at this one still.

http://1.bp.blogspot.com/-BOpxUI38PBI/TnjbAOv2lkI/AAAAAAAAAPY/LxyRLan2Tw0/s1600/cap260.bmp

Obviously (from what I remember from one screening when it came out) the blueprint for Safe; also thought of 2001 at moments last night. Some of Vitti's performance did seem a little overwrought.

clemenza, Wednesday, 22 July 2015 15:45 (seven years ago) link

seven months pass...

Driving home, I was writing a post in my mind about how I've tried harder to like L'Avventura than any film I can think of...and I see I wrote it above already. I want to step out the theatre and feel like Phillip Lopate did when he saw it as a teenager in 1961. Still not there. Maybe the themes have been so thoroughly absorbed into so much else that I take them for granted; Don Draper crossed my mind tonight.

One thing I try not to do is hold older art too stringently to the attitudes of today. I don't mean egregious stuff like Birth of a Nation and such, but less obvious moments of awkwardness. The last shot--I see it as a moment of acceptance and empathy (profound empathy, even if I don't feel it deeply myself), and I'm sure that was Antonioni's intention, but do modern-day critics ever complain that it's self-serving exoneration from a male director?

clemenza, Monday, 7 March 2016 00:43 (six years ago) link

nine months pass...

Very detailed piece about the london locations in Blowup

http://www.bfi.org.uk/news-opinion/news-bfi/features/blowup-michelangelo-antonioni-london-locations

Darcy Sarto (Ward Fowler), Saturday, 17 December 2016 21:28 (six years ago) link

Wow, no punches pulled against Charlton! Maryon Park is hardly the raggedy trash heap it's portrayed as here. And the desolateness of Woolwich Road is actually quite charming in its way... Great article though, thanks. Love this film.

dance band (tangenttangent), Sunday, 18 December 2016 00:22 (six years ago) link

one month passes...

“I don’t think there is any love in this world…Also, there is no feeling for family. No religion…LSD and mescaline are better for [the young] than love.”

http://www.filmcomment.com/blog/cinema-67-revisited-blow/

Supercreditor (Dr Morbius), Thursday, 19 January 2017 19:19 (six years ago) link

two weeks pass...

1963 Antonioni challops

Michelangelo Antonioni, the shallow bore

Alba, Tuesday, 7 February 2017 08:38 (five years ago) link

Focusing on the shallow selfishness of our existential angst is exactly what makes Antonioni essential, and seems more relevant now that it must have at the time.

29 facepalms, Tuesday, 7 February 2017 12:14 (five years ago) link

Not that I claim to understand the nuances of internet-speak, but doesn't challops mean to dispute overwhelming consensus in a really contrived way, just to get a reaction? At least in the context of 1963, Antonioni was still pretty divisive; I don't think the writer's point of view would have been all that unusual, and may have even represented majority opinion.

clemenza, Tuesday, 7 February 2017 12:39 (five years ago) link

She was middling on Blow-Up, with one line that would neatly separate those who love her from those who despise her: "Yet despite Antonioni's negativism, the world he presents looks harmless, and sex without 'connecting' doesn't really seem so bad."

(Was going to post just before Ward did--another example.)

clemenza, Tuesday, 7 February 2017 19:06 (five years ago) link

As I alluded to upthread, Philip Lopate is great on L'Avventura. Found one excerpt online:

"It was the movie I had been preparing for, for it came at the right time in my development. As a child, I had wanted only action movies. Dialogues and story set-ups bored me; I waited for that moment when the knife was hurled through the air. My awakening in adolescence to the art of film consisted precisely in overcoming this impatience. Over-compensating, perhaps, I now loved a cinema that dawdled; that lingered. Antonioni had a way of following characters with a pan shot, letting them exit and keeping the camera on the depopulated landscape. With his detachment from the human drama and his tactful spying on objects and backgrounds, he forced me to disengage as well, and to concentrate on the purity of his technique. Of course the story held me, too, with its bitter world-weary disillusioned tone. The adolescent wants to touch the bottom, to know the worst. His soul craves sardonic disenchantment."

clemenza, Tuesday, 7 February 2017 19:08 (five years ago) link

The essay that's taken from is better--about discovering art houses in general at exactly the right moment in the early '60s.

clemenza, Tuesday, 7 February 2017 19:10 (five years ago) link

I own that Lopate collection; he introduced me to Ozu and Naruse.

The burrito of ennui (Alfred, Lord Sotosyn), Tuesday, 7 February 2017 19:11 (five years ago) link

sex without 'connecting' doesn't really seem so bad."

no wonder she hooked up w/ gay men

Supercreditor (Dr Morbius), Tuesday, 7 February 2017 19:14 (five years ago) link

nine months pass...

complete retro in NYC

https://www.moma.org/calendar/film/3894?locale=en

ice cream social justice (Dr Morbius), Monday, 4 December 2017 20:38 (five years ago) link

eight months pass...

Wow

Michelangelo Antonioni's original ending was a shot of an airplane sky-writing the phrase "Fuck You, America," which was cut by MGM president Louis F. Polk along with numerous other scenes. Louis F. Polk was eventually replaced by James T. Aubrey, who had most of the cut footage restored, but without this final shot.

flappy bird, Friday, 10 August 2018 17:15 (four years ago) link

^ Zabriskie Point

flappy bird, Friday, 10 August 2018 17:15 (four years ago) link

lmao

circa1916, Friday, 10 August 2018 18:05 (four years ago) link

maybe we could rescue that shot for a(ny) current film

a Mets fan who gave up on everything in the mid '80s (Dr Morbius), Friday, 10 August 2018 18:08 (four years ago) link

Louis F. Polk OTM, the destruction of the house says exactly the same thing

Ward Fowler, Friday, 10 August 2018 18:10 (four years ago) link

the ending is already amazing and "Fuck You, America" is maybe too on the nose but damn I wish that footage was extant

flappy bird, Friday, 10 August 2018 18:12 (four years ago) link

polk not otm, he shd have cut everything else as well

mark s, Friday, 10 August 2018 18:14 (four years ago) link

the myth of Zabriskie Point being a piece of shit.... ugh. I avoided the movie for many years, in fact I remember the day Antonioni (and Bergman) died, my best friend's dad went on a long rant about how much ZP sucked. he compared it to Heaven's Gate (also unfairly savaged but still by no means a great film). But Zabriskie Point is an astonishing movie, easily one of his best and rivaled only by L'avventura & Red Desert imo. Blow-Up is the overrated one.

flappy bird, Friday, 10 August 2018 18:18 (four years ago) link

blow-up is also bad

mark s, Friday, 10 August 2018 18:19 (four years ago) link

blow-up sucks

flappy bird, Friday, 10 August 2018 18:23 (four years ago) link

But it was the first Antonioni I saw, will definitely see it again next time it plays in a theater in town.

flappy bird, Friday, 10 August 2018 18:24 (four years ago) link

it will still suck

mark s, Friday, 10 August 2018 18:24 (four years ago) link

man, mark s taking the Orson Welles view of Mike

a Mets fan who gave up on everything in the mid '80s (Dr Morbius), Friday, 10 August 2018 18:25 (four years ago) link

ZP >> Blow-Up.

morning wood truancy (Alfred, Lord Sotosyn), Friday, 10 August 2018 18:26 (four years ago) link

i think I like The Passenger and L'Eclisse better than either

a Mets fan who gave up on everything in the mid '80s (Dr Morbius), Friday, 10 August 2018 18:33 (four years ago) link

well, yeah

morning wood truancy (Alfred, Lord Sotosyn), Friday, 10 August 2018 18:42 (four years ago) link

but i like em all. really haven't seen any loathsome Antonioni.

a Mets fan who gave up on everything in the mid '80s (Dr Morbius), Friday, 10 August 2018 18:44 (four years ago) link

Ditto. Really like some of the pre-L'Aventurra films too, Le Amiche in particular.

Ward Fowler, Friday, 10 August 2018 18:54 (four years ago) link

They're all pretty much great. L'eclisse narrowly first among a bunch of equals.

I Never Promised You A Hose Harden (Eric H.), Friday, 10 August 2018 18:58 (four years ago) link

I love how they were able to work the title into the lyrics.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NZwdTkBJxcU

I got to see ZP in 35mm during a full retro in '07. That print had the correct Pink Floyd music at the end instead of this studio-imposed Roy number, which unfortunately isn't the case with the DVD.

Ubering With The King (C. Grisso/McCain), Friday, 10 August 2018 19:47 (four years ago) link

I find Red Desert pretty silly (ZP too) but I'm in the minority.

morning wood truancy (Alfred, Lord Sotosyn), Friday, 10 August 2018 19:49 (four years ago) link

"Listen man, a molotov cocktail is a mixture of gasoline and kerosene. White radicalism is a mixture of bullshit and jive."

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rK0g_J1hhDc&t=243s

flappy bird, Tuesday, 14 August 2018 06:02 (four years ago) link

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rK0g_J1hhDc

flappy bird, Tuesday, 14 August 2018 06:03 (four years ago) link

ZP was my first Antonioni - made very little impression. I think it was the only one screened on TV regularly before The Passenger started doing the rounds.

That quote displays his reactionary politics (I guess this is where the doc on China might be useful to delve into this a bit more). I really don't care for almost any of the dialogue in his films, or what he thinks that could be written down. All the depth, focus and thinking went on in the image. Amazing any of it holds up over the length of a film, never mind four of them.

xyzzzz__, Tuesday, 14 August 2018 08:55 (four years ago) link

four years pass...

Watching Zabriskie Point.

The Triumphant Return of Bernard & Stubbs (Raymond Cummings), Wednesday, 25 January 2023 01:38 (one week ago) link

Zabriskie Point is interesting as a marker for the beginning of the 70s

His most memorable films to me are from the 60s -
L’avventura, La notte, L’eclisse, and Il deserto rosso

Blowup was good too, but seemed more shallow when I watched it recently


I still haven’t seen The Passenger

Dan S, Wednesday, 25 January 2023 02:02 (one week ago) link

Diana Halprin was married to Dennis Hopper for four years.

clemenza, Wednesday, 25 January 2023 02:18 (one week ago) link

The energy or the vibe reminds me of The Model Shop in some ways - a shaggy story, a lot of drinking in of scenery (though this film has a lot of manufactured backdrops that help set a certain scene).

The Triumphant Return of Bernard & Stubbs (Raymond Cummings), Wednesday, 25 January 2023 02:22 (one week ago) link

And man, what a soundtrack.

The Triumphant Return of Bernard & Stubbs (Raymond Cummings), Wednesday, 25 January 2023 02:24 (one week ago) link

It got torn to shreds at the time, but I saw a good print in a theater once and enjoyed the apocalyptic trippiness and the soundtrack.

clemenza, Wednesday, 25 January 2023 02:25 (one week ago) link

Has the Dick Cavett Show appearance been discussed yet?

Cry for a Shadowgraph (James Redd and the Blecchs), Wednesday, 25 January 2023 02:26 (one week ago) link

PINK FLOYD RULES

Pink Floyd sucks but directors like Antonioni and Barbet Schroeder are good at framing them to make them look good

Josefa, Wednesday, 25 January 2023 04:10 (one week ago) link

Blowup was good too, but seemed more shallow when I watched it recently

Interested in hearing why you think that about this one in specific. Most Antonioni I've seen boils down to beautiful people looking sad while walking down the streets of European cities - Zabriskie Point actually the closest I've seen him to being cerebral. But I think that kind of pure vibe filmmaking has its place and the pure beauty makes up for some of the emptiness.

Has the Dick Cavett Show appearance been discussed yet?

Amazing stuff. "Tonight on the show, Mel Brooks and TWO FUCKING CULT MEMBERS."

Daniel_Rf, Wednesday, 25 January 2023 11:03 (one week ago) link

I remember reading in Astral Weeks about Jonathan Richman referring to “that Mel guy.”

Cry for a Shadowgraph (James Redd and the Blecchs), Wednesday, 25 January 2023 11:32 (one week ago) link

The leader of the cult I mean, not Brooks.

Cry for a Shadowgraph (James Redd and the Blecchs), Wednesday, 25 January 2023 11:33 (one week ago) link

I think he may have even built him a pizza oven.

Cry for a Shadowgraph (James Redd and the Blecchs), Wednesday, 25 January 2023 11:33 (one week ago) link

Not guy, fellow. That Mel fellow.
Eden Ahbez, Jack Parsons, and other LA kooks...

Cry for a Shadowgraph (James Redd and the Blecchs), Wednesday, 25 January 2023 12:05 (one week ago) link

Did we mention Antonioni visiting The Band whilst they were recording The Band in Sammy Davis Jr’s poolhouse?

Cry for a Shadowgraph (James Redd and the Blecchs), Wednesday, 25 January 2023 12:07 (one week ago) link

gnna start saying that zabriskie point is actually abt jack parsons, hence the explosion at the end (spoiler)

(sadly it isn't tho, yet another reason why it's rubbish)

mark s, Wednesday, 25 January 2023 12:10 (one week ago) link

Relevant discussion starts around here: The Band.

Cry for a Shadowgraph (James Redd and the Blecchs), Wednesday, 25 January 2023 12:14 (one week ago) link

Now starting to imagine Zabriskie Point with a Harry Nilsson soundtrack.

Cry for a Shadowgraph (James Redd and the Blecchs), Wednesday, 25 January 2023 12:20 (one week ago) link

https://pbs.twimg.com/media/FmRosJmWIAMnNsP?format=png

mark s, Wednesday, 25 January 2023 12:31 (one week ago) link

Mark Frechette gave a good performance (dubbed into Italian) in Francesco Rosi's very dark and grim Many Wars Ago.

Halfway there but for you, Wednesday, 25 January 2023 16:41 (one week ago) link


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