Words, usages, and phrases that annoy the shit out of you...

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Lately, "veggies" has been bugging the shit out of me... too flip, too Australian sounding. Also, "At the end of the day..." is being heavily abused by politicos... a new catch-phrase with no meaning.

Now, a small cadre of philistines in my office has been using the word "outreach" as a NOUN... "Were you able to establish some outreach with the printers?" etc.

What language abuses have been rubbing you raw lately?

andy, Tuesday, 23 December 2003 22:18 (fifteen years ago) Permalink

"TURN BACK YOU POXY FULE"

TEH ONE AN ONLEY DEANN GULBAREY (deangulberry), Tuesday, 23 December 2003 22:35 (fifteen years ago) Permalink

what?

Eisbär (llamasfur), Tuesday, 23 December 2003 22:36 (fifteen years ago) Permalink

That seems like it'd be right up your alley, TEH ONE AN ONLEY DEANN GULBAREY

oops (Oops), Tuesday, 23 December 2003 22:36 (fifteen years ago) Permalink

My friends got into saying "P-word" as a jokingly PC way of saying "pussy" .. i.e. - "so-and-so is a p-word." I tried to explain that it's a real pussy move to be afraid of saying pussy and hypocritical of anyone then to call anyone else a p-word. I think it fell on deaf ears.

TEH ONE AN ONLEY DEANN GULBAREY (deangulberry), Tuesday, 23 December 2003 22:37 (fifteen years ago) Permalink

my p hurts!

Eisbär (llamasfur), Tuesday, 23 December 2003 22:37 (fifteen years ago) Permalink

If my dad wants to agree with something you've said, he says "This is true." It really, really gets me annoyed, for no other reason than overuse as far as I can think.

caitlin (caitlin), Tuesday, 23 December 2003 23:21 (fifteen years ago) Permalink

"Have a Cool Yule!" - I haven't actually heard this lately but because of the season I remembered this the other day and darkly mulled over its wankiness.

Chriddof (Chriddof), Tuesday, 23 December 2003 23:26 (fifteen years ago) Permalink

using "Cool Yule" seems like it should automatically warrant a knife in the face.

El Santo Claus (Kingfish), Tuesday, 23 December 2003 23:36 (fifteen years ago) Permalink

My father met Cheech Marin while drunk and got his autograph. My father is not the autograph type, but kept it because it is a small bar napkin that says "BE COOL FOOL, CHEECH." A man of few words, that Cheech.

TEH ONE AN ONLEY DEANN GULBAREY (deangulberry), Tuesday, 23 December 2003 23:38 (fifteen years ago) Permalink

I cant stand it when I hear someone say 'impactful' is that even a word? Impact is not a property, its created.

bill stevens (bscrubbins), Tuesday, 23 December 2003 23:45 (fifteen years ago) Permalink

I'm getting really pissed of with american interpretations of 'Liberal', 'Libertarian' and 'Conservative'

Ed (dali), Tuesday, 23 December 2003 23:52 (fifteen years ago) Permalink

I also get upset about "N-Word" as well. If you're using it in a critical context, people will understand that. If you're not, then you should have the conviction to let people hear it if you want to say it.

TEH ONE AN ONLEY DEANN GULBAREY (deangulberry), Tuesday, 23 December 2003 23:54 (fifteen years ago) Permalink

I hate "touch base" and "metrosexual"

phil-two (phil-two), Tuesday, 23 December 2003 23:55 (fifteen years ago) Permalink

OH come on, let's touch bases.

TEH ONE AN ONLEY DEANN GULBAREY (deangulberry), Tuesday, 23 December 2003 23:57 (fifteen years ago) Permalink

Yeah, "metrosexual" is possible the lamest noun of the new millenia.

andy, Wednesday, 24 December 2003 00:00 (fifteen years ago) Permalink

Or is it an adjective? I don't know.

andy, Wednesday, 24 December 2003 00:00 (fifteen years ago) Permalink

If my dad wants to agree with something you've said, he says "This is true." It really, really gets me annoyed, for no other reason than overuse as far as I can think.

-- caitlin (wpsal...) (webmail), December 23rd, 2003. (caitlin)


Oh yes, yes yes. I second that one. And the people who say it, say it over and over.

the music mole (colin s barrow), Wednesday, 24 December 2003 00:02 (fifteen years ago) Permalink

But Ed, those words have different interpretations in almost every country in which they are used.

oops (Oops), Wednesday, 24 December 2003 00:03 (fifteen years ago) Permalink

I blame the consolidation of global political power and the diminution of class mobility on people who write in the passive voice.

I also have a horror of people who write prolifically in all caps.

felicity (felicity), Wednesday, 24 December 2003 00:07 (fifteen years ago) Permalink


"It must say something about ILX that this is the most repeated topic of all time..."

This is true.

But, this is a topic that should be dealt with routinely and harshly... the only way we can correct the language and suppress it's organic growth is by exposing and banning every new usage as it occurs... Isn't that what the French do?

andy, Wednesday, 24 December 2003 00:14 (fifteen years ago) Permalink

Least favorite (mis)usage ever - "ON accident..." it's BY accident you fucking moron!!

Also: 'fridge,' girls who refer to each other as 'girl,' proactive...i'll be back when i think of more....

roger adultery, Wednesday, 24 December 2003 00:47 (fifteen years ago) Permalink

I know, oops, but still it pisses me off.

Ed (dali), Wednesday, 24 December 2003 00:54 (fifteen years ago) Permalink

The recurrence of this topic is always accompanied by the recurrence of complaint about its recurrence.

the music mole (colin s barrow), Wednesday, 24 December 2003 01:00 (fifteen years ago) Permalink

Space. All this crap about needing space. Fuck off, then.

Roderick the Visigoth. (Jake Proudlock), Wednesday, 24 December 2003 03:19 (fifteen years ago) Permalink

All girls must now refer to one another as "guy"

Curt1s St3ph3ns, Wednesday, 24 December 2003 03:30 (fifteen years ago) Permalink

ok?

Curt1s St3ph3ns, Wednesday, 24 December 2003 03:30 (fifteen years ago) Permalink

Using "Sexy" in a business environment that has nothing to do with sex. As in "this is a very sexy proposal for our company". Well, I guess, if ripping people off is what turns you on.

BrianB (BrianB), Wednesday, 24 December 2003 05:26 (fifteen years ago) Permalink

'exact same'.

luna (luna.c), Wednesday, 24 December 2003 20:47 (fifteen years ago) Permalink

"bird" instead of "girl" or "woman". AAAAAARGH.

Melly E (Melly E), Wednesday, 24 December 2003 21:10 (fifteen years ago) Permalink

When people call each other 'babe' and the completely inappropriate use of the word 'literally'. Also can I add at this point, even if it may not be entirely relevant, the unjustifiable grammatical error in Rachael Stevens' song 'Sweet Dreams My LA Ex' : "accuse me of things I never done." And I've listened hard for "I've never done" to try and give her the benefit of the doubt but she doesn't say it.

barbara wintergreen, Monday, 29 December 2003 18:24 (fifteen years ago) Permalink

"Begging the question" and "chomping at the bit." The first is almost always used incorrectly, and the second should be "champing," Goddamn it.

Salmon Pink (Salmon Pink), Monday, 29 December 2003 20:18 (fifteen years ago) Permalink

or "bits"

Curt1s St3ph3ns, Monday, 29 December 2003 20:34 (fifteen years ago) Permalink

'any way shape or form'. Most heard in full-media-glare denials of misdeeds. Used by dodgy sportsmen who have been 'coached' by their minders for the occasion. It immediately strips the first dozen layers of credibility from whatever statement is being made.

'poetic justice'. Used by the lazy to describe all 'justice' the speaker approves of, instead of a particular type. The adjective is rendered meaningless.

Agree re 'bird' for woman/girl, and lament its threatened return. Stinks of 'I'm being un-PC, where's my medal?'. Also the C-person uses it, which kinda ends the argument.

Fred Nerk (Fred Nerk), Monday, 29 December 2003 23:59 (fifteen years ago) Permalink

optics

Mr Noodles (Mr Noodles), Tuesday, 30 December 2003 00:00 (fifteen years ago) Permalink

also photonic inplace of optic

Mr Noodles (Mr Noodles), Tuesday, 30 December 2003 00:10 (fifteen years ago) Permalink

"the....(insert superlative)...in pop."

barbara wintergreen, Tuesday, 30 December 2003 00:19 (fifteen years ago) Permalink

To return to the top of the thread, I still after 20 odd years gag on 'outreach' as a VERB....

Fred Nerk (Fred Nerk), Tuesday, 30 December 2003 00:46 (fifteen years ago) Permalink

the mightily empty "i could care less" variant on being unable to do the same

ermes marana, Tuesday, 30 December 2003 01:47 (fifteen years ago) Permalink

one year passes...
People who pronounce the word "presentation" as "PRE-sentation".

J-rock (Julien Sandiford), Thursday, 18 August 2005 07:29 (thirteen years ago) Permalink

since i was reading some VICIOUS anti- rachael ray sentiment last night and i'm still feelin' the love: "E.V.O.O. EXTRA VIRGIN OLIVE OIL"

s/c (Jody Beth Rosen), Thursday, 18 August 2005 07:32 (thirteen years ago) Permalink

"YUM-O"

s/c (Jody Beth Rosen), Thursday, 18 August 2005 07:33 (thirteen years ago) Permalink

cf.

gear (gear), Thursday, 18 August 2005 07:34 (thirteen years ago) Permalink

Also: 'fridge,'

Wait, huh? Fridge is the thing you put food in, whats wrong with it?

Trayce (trayce), Thursday, 18 August 2005 08:01 (thirteen years ago) Permalink

Saying "it impacted on me" instead of "it had an impact on me"... well that's annoying enough but, just recently, I've heard people say "it impacted me" - which surely would only make sense if the speaker was a molar?

Diddyismus (Dada), Thursday, 18 August 2005 09:10 (thirteen years ago) Permalink

'fridge,'

I'm picturing him saying things such as "Would you like me to remove another beverage from the refrigerator for you, whilst we watch some association football?"

Chewshabadoo (Chewshabadoo), Thursday, 18 August 2005 10:29 (thirteen years ago) Permalink

bougie, instead of bourgeois. heard it four times last week.

naus (Robert T), Thursday, 18 August 2005 10:38 (thirteen years ago) Permalink

"Chav"

Diddyismus (Dada), Thursday, 18 August 2005 10:39 (thirteen years ago) Permalink

bourgie?

Andrew Farrell (afarrell), Thursday, 18 August 2005 10:42 (thirteen years ago) Permalink

ill be picked up on cable like *that*

ɪmˈpəʊzɪŋ (darraghmac), Thursday, 7 February 2019 00:44 (one week ago) Permalink

I recently dreamt I entered a physical manifestation of this thread (i.e. a circle of people talking) and noted how I hate when people will say “a little bit of” to mean they have a pretty good amount of it: e.g. “I’ve made a little bit of money this year.” “Yeah, I have a little bit of experience with that.”

This never really bothered me until I dreamt about it, now I can’t get past it.

ed.b, Thursday, 7 February 2019 01:19 (one week ago) Permalink

another understatement that bugs me is "it's been a minute!" etc. don't know why but i HATE it

illegal economic migration (Tracer Hand), Thursday, 7 February 2019 08:34 (one week ago) Permalink

It’s kind of fake-Southern?

suzy, Thursday, 7 February 2019 09:34 (one week ago) Permalink


I didn't post it to this thread, but I have given in and started using 'puppers' to refer to my dogs. Someone I know and respect used it about a month ago and inside I was so mad at her. Then, this morning it just slipped out while I was putting the dog food down and I guess now I'm over my hatred.

Upthread Phil D mentions 'doggo' which I will remain steadfastly against.

― how's life, Saturday, September 9, 2017 11:03 AM (one year ago) Bookmark Flag Post Permalink

Sigh, I lost this battle too.

peace, man, Thursday, 7 February 2019 14:07 (one week ago) Permalink

Nothing that the phrase "let that sink in" is used in conjunction with ever actually requires much time to "sink in."

longtime caller, first time listener (man alive), Thursday, 7 February 2019 17:08 (one week ago) Permalink

armchair twitter generals speculating about politics and/or tech and talking about what "the play" should be

illegal economic migration (Tracer Hand), Thursday, 7 February 2019 21:39 (one week ago) Permalink

I recently dreamt I entered a physical manifestation of this thread (i.e. a circle of people talking) and noted how I hate when people will say “a little bit of” to mean they have a pretty good amount of it: e.g. “I’ve made a little bit of money this year.” “Yeah, I have a little bit of experience with that.”

This never really bothered me until I dreamt about it, now I can’t get past it.

― ed.b, Wednesday, February 6, 2019 5:19 PM (yesterday) Bookmark Flag Post Permalink

never go to scotland

( ͡☉ ͜ʖ ͡☉) (jim in vancouver), Thursday, 7 February 2019 21:42 (one week ago) Permalink

I’ve heard this word twice in three days that I swear I’ve never encountered before, once from a policy guy for AOC on Tucker Carlson’s show and second on an NBA podcast.

Optionality

Seriously, W. T. F.

Evans on Hammond (evol j), Sunday, 10 February 2019 20:11 (one week ago) Permalink

"Time is a flat circle" might've been funny the first time I heard it but ever since then it has been a scourge. and aren't all circles flat?

flappy bird, Tuesday, 12 February 2019 06:12 (six days ago) Permalink

Anyone using autistic to just say they're slightly anal about things. Ffs stop it.

nathom, Tuesday, 12 February 2019 07:21 (six days ago) Permalink

Related to that: 'we're all a bit on the spectrum, aren't we lol?'

Good cop, Babcock (Chinaski), Tuesday, 12 February 2019 10:39 (six days ago) Permalink

OCD and "Aspy" being casually thrown out, also rageworthy

People seem to have eased up on using schizophrenic or bipolar to mean labile, two-sided, or conflicted, though

Gunther Gleiben (Ye Mad Puffin), Tuesday, 12 February 2019 11:08 (six days ago) Permalink

Oh god yes. My kid was pissed when some classmate said:"I'm depressed bec we're having a test on Latin tomorrow." Otm

nathom, Wednesday, 13 February 2019 07:44 (five days ago) Permalink

A trend, not a word/phrase/usage: once a day, the all-news radio station here reports a story (sometime sports or entertainment, but regular news, too) in terms of what people are saying on Twitter. Is this a temporary thing, or is this kind of idiocy here to stay?

clemenza, Wednesday, 13 February 2019 17:22 (five days ago) Permalink

That’s been a thing here for ages, we have a thread about guardian stories that say “twitter user @angry_whovian called it a ‘bloody disgrace’” or whatever and it’s probably about 5 years old

xp I’m in total agreement re “I’m so ocd/add/autistic about x” but I totally think you should be able to say you are depressed or anxious without actually having clinical depression or an anxiety disorder

gray say nah to me (wins), Wednesday, 13 February 2019 17:43 (five days ago) Permalink

related: people who don't understand that obsessions and compulsions are separate things

kinder, Wednesday, 13 February 2019 17:48 (five days ago) Permalink

Is this a temporary thing, or is this kind of idiocy here to stay?

This is rooted in the desperation of the print and broadcast news media to be seen as relevant in the internet age. I'd say that, although idiocy is a permanent part of human society, this particular manifestation will be temporary, just because almost everything is temporary.

A is for (Aimless), Wednesday, 13 February 2019 18:26 (five days ago) Permalink

"Have a good one" = I do not care enough about you to actively recollect what time of day it is, bye

― mick signals, Thursday, June 14, 2018 8:07 PM (seven months ago)

Have realized that this is useful ending phone conversations when you have no idea what time zone the other party is in. Possibly also no interest.

mick signals, Wednesday, 13 February 2019 19:40 (five days ago) Permalink

this phenomenon is how the phrase "took to twitter" doubles the length of pointless news articles

seedy ron (Autumn Almanac), Wednesday, 13 February 2019 19:58 (five days ago) Permalink

(xp to clemenza's twitter post)

seedy ron (Autumn Almanac), Wednesday, 13 February 2019 19:59 (five days ago) Permalink

Takin' it to the Tweets

Gunther Gleiben (Ye Mad Puffin), Wednesday, 13 February 2019 20:00 (five days ago) Permalink

can we add casual "i've got ptsd lol" comments to the list

weird woman in a bar (La Lechera), Wednesday, 13 February 2019 20:02 (five days ago) Permalink

i kind of like "have a good one" for some reason. it sounds vaguely friendly in an inoffensive and like brotherly way to me? i don't have any brothers so idk where i am getting that.

weird woman in a bar (La Lechera), Wednesday, 13 February 2019 20:05 (five days ago) Permalink

related: people who don't understand that obsessions and compulsions are separate things

― kinder, Wednesday, February 13, 2019 11:48 AM (two hours ago) Bookmark Flag Post Permalink

having some deep thoughts right now related to this one. good point!

mh, Wednesday, 13 February 2019 20:11 (five days ago) Permalink

i say have a good one. it's nondenominational.

difficult listening hour, Wednesday, 13 February 2019 20:18 (five days ago) Permalink

who am i to know what time of day it is where you are, yk?

difficult listening hour, Wednesday, 13 February 2019 20:22 (five days ago) Permalink

news radio stations quoting twitter is just a way for them to voice reactionary sentiments that are otherwise difficult to pound into a news-like shape.

Dan I., Wednesday, 13 February 2019 20:38 (five days ago) Permalink

can we add casual "i've got ptsd lol" comments to the list


Omg never heard this. I'd turn into linda blair if someone uttered this

nathom, Wednesday, 13 February 2019 20:41 (five days ago) Permalink

xp I’m in total agreement re “I’m so ocd/add/autistic about x” but I totally think you should be able to say you are depressed or anxious without actually having clinical depression or an anxiety disorder


Well, it does sound different in our language (dutch/flemish). Or maybe because my kid had a depression, she's more sensitive to its usage. Personally I don't get angered by it so much.

My colleague used autistic today. Lol.

nathom, Wednesday, 13 February 2019 20:45 (five days ago) Permalink

when "have a good'un" was surpassed by "have a blessed day", that was the day Donald Trump became president

illegal economic migration (Tracer Hand), Wednesday, 13 February 2019 21:11 (five days ago) Permalink

Kid I said "see ya" to last night said "yeah have a good day..er night!". And therefore, per societal rules, he is a moron to me. Could've avoided his fate if he was a "have a good one" person.

A True White Kid that can Jump (Granny Dainger), Wednesday, 13 February 2019 21:28 (five days ago) Permalink

now I'm thinking of some frat dude with a pukka shell necklace and a tie-die shirt using "one" as a generic greeting

I have no idea if this still happens but it was definitely a thing

mh, Wednesday, 13 February 2019 21:29 (five days ago) Permalink

i kind of like "have a good one" for some reason. it sounds vaguely friendly in an inoffensive and like brotherly way to me? i don't have any brothers so idk where i am getting that.

― weird woman in a bar (La Lechera), Wednesday, February 13, 2019 3:05 PM (one hour ago) Bookmark Flag Post Permalink

I feel the same way -- it has a universal quality to it and I use it a lot. So does "have a nice day" I guess, but that sounds less friendly somehow and is more tainted by its association with the smiley face. Maybe the fact that "have a good one" is not a phrase you'd get from a customer service rep makes it feel more personal, but not overly familiar.

longtime caller, first time listener (man alive), Wednesday, 13 February 2019 21:36 (five days ago) Permalink

yes
it's close but not too close
"have a nice day" is meaningless -- "have a good one" = maybe this person has a shred of care about my wellbeing

weird woman in a bar (La Lechera), Wednesday, 13 February 2019 21:39 (five days ago) Permalink

(even though they probably don't actually care -- it gives the impression of caring just a little, which is the right amount usually)

weird woman in a bar (La Lechera), Wednesday, 13 February 2019 21:41 (five days ago) Permalink

I am getting a lot of milage out of "take care" lately

Norm’s Superego (silby), Wednesday, 13 February 2019 21:42 (five days ago) Permalink

that's usually my signoff of choice because i do want people to take care. i sometimes say "take care of yourself" because that is important

weird woman in a bar (La Lechera), Wednesday, 13 February 2019 21:51 (five days ago) Permalink

likewise, I genuinely would like to smell some people at a later date

A True White Kid that can Jump (Granny Dainger), Wednesday, 13 February 2019 21:51 (five days ago) Permalink

"take care" is nice, I've been using it lately too

jmm, Wednesday, 13 February 2019 21:53 (five days ago) Permalink

I never really say "take care" but a guy was outside in the cold with his kid the other night and was asking people walking by if they had a few bucks so he could get his kid a sandwich and I gave him some money and said that. A moment later, I realized I really meant it. That's a bad situation to be in.

mh, Wednesday, 13 February 2019 21:56 (five days ago) Permalink

I still remember 1st time I ever used "take care": at the end of last game of Little League season, to a teammate. I'd heard my parents say it to their friends/family. It sounded odd coming out of my mouth. Felt like I had my 1st adult sign-off.

A True White Kid that can Jump (Granny Dainger), Wednesday, 13 February 2019 21:58 (five days ago) Permalink

When I moved from the Midwest (where nobody said ‘take care’) to NYC (where everyone says it) I kinda felt menace in it, as in ‘that’s a nice life ya got there, too bad if anything should happen to it’.

suzy, Wednesday, 13 February 2019 22:15 (five days ago) Permalink

it's catching on in the midwest now

but it's been a few years

mh, Wednesday, 13 February 2019 22:24 (five days ago) Permalink

semi relatedly, has anyone ever used, or heard used (in the wild), any variation on "a cold one" in reference to beer? I feel like I have only ever heard this in commercials or movies ("I could go for a nice cold one right now.")

longtime caller, first time listener (man alive), Wednesday, 13 February 2019 22:29 (five days ago) Permalink

i hear it but it's always with some irony, cf "barley pop" or "brewski" etc

calumy (rip van wanko), Wednesday, 13 February 2019 22:36 (five days ago) Permalink

Hand me the hot one

calumy (rip van wanko), Wednesday, 13 February 2019 22:37 (five days ago) Permalink

I will invite friends to meet me for a cold one when it seems like an added touch of salesmanship is called for.

Maybe the fact that "have a good one" is not a phrase you'd get from a customer service rep

My original annoyance with this was because I ONLY hear it from customer service reps, and only robotically. If someone I even slightly know said it to my face, I can see how it would sound pleasantly colloquial rather than like a line from an employee training binder.

It also always sounds to me like a laxative ad slogan.

mick signals, Wednesday, 13 February 2019 23:18 (five days ago) Permalink

I have never heard that from a customer service/help desk person! Usually they have a relatively strict script and it ends up being something like “mr. mh thank you and have a good rest of your day”

mh, Wednesday, 13 February 2019 23:35 (five days ago) Permalink

When I worked in tech support (phone-based) we were banned from saying "no problem" in response to customers thanking us because management asserted that some customers calling from outside of Texas would not understand what we meant.

"have a good one" makes me think of this from Blade Runner:

https://getyarn.io/yarn-clip/4c5dfecd-190c-4849-84c8-1f78e26b0be8

the girl from spirea x (f. hazel), Wednesday, 13 February 2019 23:39 (five days ago) Permalink


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