"Use other words please."

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"Scribes": Tom, for goodness' sake! (He drinks, you know...)

mark s, Thursday, 12 April 2001 00:00 (eighteen years ago) Permalink

'problematic', 'de rieguer (?)', 'mainstream', 'pretentious', 'glitchcore', 'Your round,Geordie !'

Geordie Racer, Saturday, 14 April 2001 00:00 (eighteen years ago) Permalink

'oeuvres' - why ?

Mr. Apologetic, Saturday, 14 April 2001 00:00 (eighteen years ago) Permalink

"Oeuvre": ulp, guilty! — tho not at ILM, I don't think, and (I hope) always in the service of gags like (the old ones are the best) the "oeuvre of Jive Bunny"... But you're right, Geordie. Out it goes.

mark s, Saturday, 14 April 2001 00:00 (eighteen years ago) Permalink

"Blimey!"

Where did I use 'scribes'? I dread to think.

Glitch is better than squirm at least. I'm too fond of 'glacial' by half.

Tom, Tuesday, 17 April 2001 00:00 (eighteen years ago) Permalink

'Glacial' is a very nice word, use it at every possible opportunity ("During sunday's match A.'s defense looked truely glacial." ;) IDM has to go though. I'm trying to cut the use of 'overrated'. Really.

Omar, Tuesday, 17 April 2001 00:00 (eighteen years ago) Permalink

Speaking of "glacial", "ethereal" is another word that gets kicked around far too often when talking about 4ad and kranky label bands. I don't think there has been ever been a Cocteau Twins related piece of journalism that has ever refrained from using this word.

Not that I'm about to read them all to find out, but you get the idea...

Nicole, Tuesday, 17 April 2001 00:00 (eighteen years ago) Permalink

Words I used to use a LOT which now make me squirm (I mean, er, no, squirm IS what I mean): provocative; radical; subversive

Revolutionary: I believe I was always already aware that this was a technical word, deployed by advertising agencies, to let you know that yr favourite supermarket product now came in packaging no longer cuboid, but TETRAHEDRAL! Yay.

Stunning: No it isn't. It's mildly amusing/surprising/diverting.

Ethereal: As noted over on Indie-a-Genre, this is now a corporate genre-name, acc. Tower records (i.e. like Reggae).

mark s, Tuesday, 17 April 2001 00:00 (eighteen years ago) Permalink

satire should never be referred to as either "biting" or "cutting."

i was thinking of this before the thread was posted, but now i've gone and forgotten all of them and, even worse, i've probably even used those examples in recent writing.

fred solinger, Tuesday, 17 April 2001 00:00 (eighteen years ago) Permalink

pre-packaged: cuz I'm bored with necessary kneejerk defence of anyone this lands on (some of them probably ARE divs)

pretentious: salvageable, actually, provided we can make the old big world use it as unalloyed praise

mark s, Tuesday, 17 April 2001 00:00 (eighteen years ago) Permalink

On the thoughts page a while back I used "ruefully" twice in a sentence. It doesn't get much more embarrassing than that ...

Robin Carmody, Tuesday, 17 April 2001 00:00 (eighteen years ago) Permalink

'Alternative' - this word is similar to the red cross painted on plague houses. From 15-year-old spazmo Green Day fans who say they like 'Alternative' music, to 'The 11 o'clock Show - The News Alternative', you just know its going to be cack of the highest order.

DG, Tuesday, 17 April 2001 00:00 (eighteen years ago) Permalink

'BONY'

Dixon , HARRY, Friday, 20 April 2001 00:00 (eighteen years ago) Permalink

I was recently forced to rebuke an associate of mine for using the word "stylee" in all seriousness. I had thought this practice had passed into history, seen? Safe.

Tim, Friday, 20 April 2001 00:00 (eighteen years ago) Permalink

Sorted.

mark s, Friday, 20 April 2001 00:00 (eighteen years ago) Permalink

"Surreal": just subbed an article in which the 'writer' used it THREE times in the FIRST THREE PARAS, basically to mean "ever so slightly odd" — I mean, I'm not a major fan of Aragon/Breton et al, cuz they had a careerist-hack dimension also etc etc, and I kind of like how this levels their pretensions, but but but [splutters off into his own zone again...]

mark s, Tuesday, 24 April 2001 00:00 (eighteen years ago) Permalink

When I was subbing for a litawawy magazine we had a list of formulations which sent us scrambling for the red pen... top of the list (TOM!) was "luminous prose" - what, you can read it in the dark??

stevie, Tuesday, 24 April 2001 00:00 (eighteen years ago) Permalink

Actually in this case the fanzine was punctuated with hand-stuck glow stars of the sort that were so popular among mid-90s kindercore types, so nyah ;)

But yeah, sorry.

Tom, Tuesday, 24 April 2001 00:00 (eighteen years ago) Permalink

One I've always hated....schtick. Not sure where it started, although I associate its arrival with late 70's NME.

David, Tuesday, 24 April 2001 00:00 (eighteen years ago) Permalink

I'm not a major fan of Aragon/Breton et al, cuz they had a careerist-hack dimension also etc etc

Sorry? since when did converting to glum stalinism just as your first work becomes a cause celebre (Aragon) or just attacking everyone who ever helped or admired you in print, and refusing lucrative commissions from all the major french newspapers (Breton) constitute a hack dimension? perhaps you're getting mixed up with Salvador Dali?

Patterson, Tuesday, 24 April 2001 00:00 (eighteen years ago) Permalink

Schtick I like because it conveys the predictability of the people it's applied to (major rock'n'pop stars, generally) quite nicely. I use it affectionately fairly often.

Tom, Tuesday, 24 April 2001 00:00 (eighteen years ago) Permalink

OK, "hack" not EXACTLY the best choice of words — the hacks are those present-day teachers-pet art crits and/or historians who sidle up to them so oozily-defensively.

But •assiduous• curators of their own gallery-of-the-future post-revolution reps: which I just seriously wanna get up between sometimes, and bugger about with. I tht of including Dali, but it wd have taken the heat off the others.

mark s, Tuesday, 24 April 2001 00:00 (eighteen years ago) Permalink

I see your point, Mark. I also see your point about how "surreal" is horribly over-used. But isn't the interesting thing about the "curators of their own gallery-of-the-future post-revolution reps" that they failed to fulfill their aims so miserably? Aside from under-read and fantastic, inspiring little books (Anthology of Black Humour, Paris Peasant) they were really only the creators of l'advertisement fou which, returning to the thread, is a coinage i sincerely hope never to see again.

Patterson, Tuesday, 24 April 2001 00:00 (eighteen years ago) Permalink

"'Nuff said". Ew.

Tim, Thursday, 26 April 2001 00:00 (eighteen years ago) Permalink

yes, I'll go along with "'nuff said". It really is one of the worst, isn't it?

x0x0

norman fay, Thursday, 26 April 2001 00:00 (eighteen years ago) Permalink

"et al"... "natch"...

stevie, Thursday, 26 April 2001 00:00 (eighteen years ago) Permalink

Anal.

I'm not sure what annoys me more: that it has become an ugly shorthand for 'anally retentive', or that it's only used in such a limited 'slag off' way, compared with the original Freudian sense. I'm not an expert on Freud, but I seem to recall an anally retentive character being about much more than alphabetising your CD collection and making lists.

Nick, Thursday, 26 April 2001 00:00 (eighteen years ago) Permalink

Po-faced. Is this a teletubbies reference or what?

Sterling Clover, Thursday, 26 April 2001 00:00 (eighteen years ago) Permalink

I quite like "et al".

Robin Carmody, Thursday, 26 April 2001 00:00 (eighteen years ago) Permalink

"Sampledelic" / "Sampladelic" (sorry Pete)

"myth" as in "the rock myth" - was about to use it in the Depeche/League thread and suddenly thought HOLD ON.

Tom, Friday, 27 April 2001 00:00 (eighteen years ago) Permalink

"cheese" - it's such a boring metaphor and it doesn't even work.

Tom, Tuesday, 1 May 2001 00:00 (eighteen years ago) Permalink

Correct again Tom, but maybe that's because I don't like erm...real cheese, so I don't like music getting associated with smell. I came across spiel again recently. As irritating as schtick.

Omar, Tuesday, 1 May 2001 00:00 (eighteen years ago) Permalink

"Rockist", especially when used to describe sounds, rather than a mindset.

Patrick, Tuesday, 1 May 2001 00:00 (eighteen years ago) Permalink

"mindset"

too easy and vague by half

Charlotte, Tuesday, 1 May 2001 00:00 (eighteen years ago) Permalink

Hmmm, all right Charlotte. How about "ideas", then ?

Patrick, Tuesday, 1 May 2001 00:00 (eighteen years ago) Permalink

"......... on acid" - too broad, lazy

K-reg, Wednesday, 2 May 2001 00:00 (eighteen years ago) Permalink

"Dinosaur" has been driving me crazy for years: can't believe I forgot it before. Dinosaur meaning what? Lumbering, badly designed, fit for doom and extinction, and deserving of it? So why does absolutely everyone LOVE dinosaurs: dinosaurs are TOTALLY cool, if you're a kid OR if you're a scientist, from Barney to Ankylosaurus (which is like a souped-up tortoise with spikes round its neck like punk rock and a great club of bone at the end of its tail for wacking raptors with).

(Kid vs scientist: who'd want to be anything else anyway?)

Dinosaurs rooled! For 70 million years!! Badly designed? To get rid of them, the cosmos had to hurl a rock the size of Birmingham — at Mexico!!!

Also (somewhat related, tho not somewhat rock-related): "FAT CATS"

I'm sorry, excuse me, just HOW is this headline shortcut going to help stir up class rage against capitalism?

Cats are great, fat cats are bigger, thus better QED.

Might as well call 'em Honey Bunnies or Wonky Donkeys...

mark s, Wednesday, 2 May 2001 00:00 (eighteen years ago) Permalink

On this 'tip' ("tip"!):

"Chameleon" (Tanya made this point once but she nicked it off me or Pete) - David Bowie a rock chameleon i.e. ever-changing, unpredictable BUT chameleons blend into the background, so it's more like Soup Dragons-y bandwagon jumping AND the only colours they can do are various shades of dull green yellow and brown so 'unpredictable' is a bit off too.

Tom, Wednesday, 2 May 2001 00:00 (eighteen years ago) Permalink

"Macca" is totally unacceptable, even served dripping with sarcasm.

mark s, Wednesday, 2 May 2001 00:00 (eighteen years ago) Permalink

Spawned: NO.

(And this word is doubly evil if used in the same sentence as "punk rock")

mark s, Wednesday, 2 May 2001 00:00 (eighteen years ago) Permalink

"can you say ... ?" - as in "can you say 'manipulation of the media' ?" (just used on another thread)

Like, yeah, I can even *say* it with a nice French Canadian accent. Where did that stupid expression come from ?

Patrick, Thursday, 3 May 2001 00:00 (eighteen years ago) Permalink

i think that particular bastard expression comes from mr.rogers, who would ask children if they could say the word he trying to teach them. it's now becomes lazy gen x shorthand for explaining a concept and i hate it.

ethan, Thursday, 3 May 2001 00:00 (eighteen years ago) Permalink

"wilfully perverse" - tautology, frequently used to describe electronica

K-reg, Thursday, 3 May 2001 00:00 (eighteen years ago) Permalink

Jacko. Risible. Seminal. Words ending with 'core'.

Post Schmaltz should be used more often.

Steven James, Thursday, 3 May 2001 00:00 (eighteen years ago) Permalink

Post-Schmaltz-Core Revivalists?

Sterling Clover, Thursday, 3 May 2001 00:00 (eighteen years ago) Permalink

six months pass...
"That says it all": no it doesn't you lazy fuckwit retard. Do some work for a change and PERSUADE us.

mark s, Sunday, 25 November 2001 01:00 (seventeen years ago) Permalink

Thank fuck nobody uses "(x) is worth the price of admission" any more.

dave q, Sunday, 25 November 2001 01:00 (seventeen years ago) Permalink

Spot on Dave, that one's always irritated the fuck out of me as well.

Robin Carmody, Sunday, 25 November 2001 01:00 (seventeen years ago) Permalink

High school journalism, featuring "Beg, borrow, or steal" "Run, don't walk" "I want my eight bucks back" and "classic" or worse, "perrenial classic" for a group's first album or something. In fact, perrenial classic for anything!

1 1 2 3 5, Sunday, 25 November 2001 01:00 (seventeen years ago) Permalink

Does anyone remember a Chinese cooking expert (=chef) from early 80s? His apron said "wok, don't fry" . Yes, I know...

Tracer Hand, Sunday, 25 November 2001 01:00 (seventeen years ago) Permalink

only should be used by evil wizards when describing cursed delicacies they are tempting our heroes with

illegal economic migration (Tracer Hand), Thursday, 24 August 2017 11:34 (one year ago) Permalink

*must not post Jon Anderson on this thread*

Wewlay Bewlay (Tom D.), Thursday, 24 August 2017 11:36 (one year ago) Permalink

i too hate wondrous

clouds, Sunday, 3 September 2017 22:01 (one year ago) Permalink

one month passes...

what do people mean by "vibey" wrt music? i know what a vibe is, but vibes can be anywhere, on any spectrum

rip van wanko, Tuesday, 10 October 2017 15:50 (one year ago) Permalink

I don't know if I've heard/seen that, but it reminds me of 'evocative' in its lack of specificity.

the scarest move i ever seen is scary move 4 (Old Lunch), Tuesday, 10 October 2017 16:02 (one year ago) Permalink

it means it's got a lot of bass, man

illegal economic migration (Tracer Hand), Tuesday, 10 October 2017 16:11 (one year ago) Permalink

Roy Ayers and Bobby Hutcherson and the like

IF (Terrorist) Yes, Explain (man alive), Tuesday, 10 October 2017 16:13 (one year ago) Permalink

its a dance thing

drugs

brimstead, Tuesday, 10 October 2017 16:14 (one year ago) Permalink

Sounds like I could use a refresher course in vibeology.

the scarest move i ever seen is scary move 4 (Old Lunch), Tuesday, 10 October 2017 16:20 (one year ago) Permalink

v-i-b-e-ology

weird woman in a bar (La Lechera), Tuesday, 10 October 2017 16:33 (one year ago) Permalink

i have no idea what vibey means

weird woman in a bar (La Lechera), Tuesday, 10 October 2017 16:33 (one year ago) Permalink

evocative sounds otm

weird woman in a bar (La Lechera), Tuesday, 10 October 2017 16:33 (one year ago) Permalink

paging Milt Jackson to thread

P as in pterodactyl (Ye Mad Puffin), Tuesday, 10 October 2017 16:36 (one year ago) Permalink

I agree with the vibe spectrum assessment. I would probably infer "vibey" to mean laid back and stoned - lots of reverb, modulation, synths. I don't think I've ever read this term in context though, so god knows.

how's life, Tuesday, 10 October 2017 16:40 (one year ago) Permalink

I'm hearing it everywhere

rip van wanko, Tuesday, 10 October 2017 16:44 (one year ago) Permalink

three months pass...

music called a "balm" and/or "tonic"

algorithm is a dancer (katherine), Thursday, 25 January 2018 20:24 (one year ago) Permalink

Last night I was listening to NPR and I started predicting and saying the cliched phrases along with the announcer like I was in a freestyle battle clowning the other guy for using trite rhymes.

IF (Terrorist) Yes, Explain (man alive), Thursday, 25 January 2018 20:27 (one year ago) Permalink

one year passes...

use non-other threads please

mark s, Wednesday, 30 January 2019 18:18 (four months ago) Permalink

one month passes...

"sticking out like a sore thumb" is an unsalvageable cliche. "sticking out like the proverbial sore thumb" is not a clever way round this fact.

mark s, Friday, 29 March 2019 17:09 (two months ago) Permalink

lol

while we're here can i express the confusion that arises whenever i hear someone say "to coin a phrase"? because they always say it after repeating some old chestnut. is it irony??

illegal economic migration (Tracer Hand), Friday, 29 March 2019 17:42 (two months ago) Permalink

in-built ambiguity in the term "coin" used as a verb i think: mint as in "new and fresh" versus the mint where every single identical coin is made year after repetitive year :)

mark s, Friday, 29 March 2019 17:45 (two months ago) Permalink

BAH

illegal economic migration (Tracer Hand), Friday, 29 March 2019 17:47 (two months ago) Permalink

it makes me so mad!!

illegal economic migration (Tracer Hand), Friday, 29 March 2019 17:49 (two months ago) Permalink

i mean basically they shouldn't say it at all: if anything using it wrongly is breaking out of the prisonhouse of cliché

(albeit into another prisonhouse, also ultimately of cliché)

mark s, Friday, 29 March 2019 17:53 (two months ago) Permalink

to coin the proverbial phrase

mick signals, Friday, 29 March 2019 18:04 (two months ago) Permalink

and take it to the bank

mark s, Friday, 29 March 2019 18:06 (two months ago) Permalink

I'm of the opinion that people in the main are much less interested in coining new and fresh phrases now than they were when "to coin a phrase" was a popular phrase in its non-ironic sense.

mick signals, Friday, 29 March 2019 18:09 (two months ago) Permalink

Love is so simple, to quote a phrase
You've known it all the time, I'm learnin' it these days

get your hand outta my pocket universe (morrisp), Friday, 29 March 2019 18:19 (two months ago) Permalink

I remember that The NME in the 1990s used the word "angular" a lot. A bit of googling throws up this feature in the NME from May 1995 in which they describe Radiohead guitarist Johnny Greenwood as angular. On the cover: Dodgy. They must have described Menswear as angular at some point but I'm not googling that. To be fair Jonny Greenwood does have thin arms.

"To be fair", or TBF, that's another one. I write "in their defence" instead. Amirite?

Ashley Pomeroy, Saturday, 30 March 2019 12:57 (two months ago) Permalink

How about “angular” to describe music — “Wire’s taut, angular post-punk,” etc.

get your hand outta my pocket universe (morrisp), Saturday, 30 March 2019 21:14 (two months ago) Permalink

Reminds me of the days when “muscular” drumming seemed to be everywhere.

weird woman in a bar (La Lechera), Saturday, 30 March 2019 22:14 (two months ago) Permalink

I mean, describing Greenwood as angular is a lot more tolerable than describing music that way!

alpine static, Monday, 1 April 2019 06:47 (two months ago) Permalink

Physically and musically angular: Jonny Greenwood, Tom Verlaine...

Sam Weller, Monday, 1 April 2019 07:35 (two months ago) Permalink

When the word "Because" is used as both a subordinating conjunction and a preposition. ("Sentences" that solely consist of "Because ____, I guess.", or a similar linguistic silliness.)

Prefecture, Monday, 1 April 2019 15:00 (two months ago) Permalink

____ is usually 'reasons'

or 'communism'

PPL+AI=NS (imago), Monday, 1 April 2019 15:17 (two months ago) Permalink

I feel like that was a cutesy Internet trend that has largely run its course?

get your hand outta my pocket universe (morrisp), Monday, 1 April 2019 15:32 (two months ago) Permalink

The use of it as a clever and unexpected sentence structure has largely run its course.
The use of it as a lazy joke is probably years from petering out.

enochroot, Monday, 1 April 2019 16:43 (two months ago) Permalink

Language is bad.

pomenitul, Monday, 1 April 2019 16:46 (two months ago) Permalink

howard cosell used to call philadelphia eagles wide receiver harold carmichael (who at 6'8" was the tallest WR in NFL history) 'the angular one'

mookieproof, Monday, 1 April 2019 16:52 (two months ago) Permalink

probably a topic for another less lawn-defensive thread but i'm intrigued how and why some usages pall and others just bed in for eternity w/o anyone minding

mark s, Monday, 1 April 2019 16:55 (two months ago) Permalink

"most ambitious work to date"

bendy, Wednesday, 3 April 2019 18:41 (two months ago) Permalink

For some reason "angular" to describe vaguely post-punk guitar riffs has never really bothered me. Yeah, it's a cliche, but I also know exactly what it means when someone uses it.

Mario Meatwagon (Moodles), Wednesday, 3 April 2019 18:48 (two months ago) Permalink

It's mentioned a bunch of times here, but "seminal" is the one that really bugs me. I always read as "this foundational work that was literally jizzed into existence."

Mario Meatwagon (Moodles), Wednesday, 3 April 2019 18:52 (two months ago) Permalink

my absolute least favorite is when musicians who are perpetual side players or have played with a lot of different bands are described as "promiscuous"
no.
and yes -- i am aware that the word can be used in a non-sexual way but according to the definitions i have found, all of them carry a vague to serious negative connotation.

demonstrating or implying an undiscriminating or unselective approach; indiscriminate or casual.
"the city fathers were promiscuous with their honors"
synonyms: indiscriminate, undiscriminating, unselective, random, irresponsible, haphazard, thoughtless, unthinking, unconsidered, casual, careless
"the promiscuous popping of antibiotics hasn't helped his T-cell count"
antonyms: careful, selective

weird woman in a bar (La Lechera), Wednesday, 3 April 2019 19:03 (two months ago) Permalink

"in-demand"?

mick signals, Wednesday, 3 April 2019 19:21 (two months ago) Permalink

sure beats "promiscuous" and is more accurate

weird woman in a bar (La Lechera), Wednesday, 3 April 2019 19:22 (two months ago) Permalink

I've complained about this before but "kiss-off." not every breakup song is a sassy emoji!

like, I’m eating an elephant head (katherine), Wednesday, 3 April 2019 19:30 (two months ago) Permalink

The phrase "torturous path" is an indication that with 95% probability, the author doesn't realize there is a separate adjective "tortuous" meaning "twisting, turning, winding".

anatol_merklich, Tuesday, 9 April 2019 09:01 (two months ago) Permalink

If cover blurbs are to be believed, every book of history is 'magisterial' and many history reviewers need to buy a thesaurus.

Oold Lunch (Old Lunch), Tuesday, 16 April 2019 01:39 (two months ago) Permalink


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