Baby Boomers vs. Generation X vs. Millennials

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Comparing generations is a very easy, very useful way to understand culture. Generations comprise vast swaths of people all similar enough to be safely lumped together and discussed as a mass, almost as if they constituted a single individual. You can speak of a generation's values and even its beliefs. Most importantly, you can blame them for things.

Poll Results

OptionVotes
Generation X 27
Millennials 21
Baby Boomers 7


Treeship, Monday, 2 May 2016 12:47 (three years ago) Permalink

Just in case you needed a refresher of who you're meant to be as a member of your generation.

Your Ass Is Grass And I Will Mow It With My Face (Old Lunch), Monday, 2 May 2016 12:55 (three years ago) Permalink

Generation Y (1981-2000)

Confident, determined, upbeat...

if only

Treeship, Monday, 2 May 2016 12:58 (three years ago) Permalink

i'd be more offended if i was an "old veteran" (1922-1945). "Patriotic, practical, dedicated, hierarchical, given to personal sacrifice and delayed gratification, economical." these people are not your slaves, target, sometimes they want stuff for themselves too.

Treeship, Monday, 2 May 2016 13:00 (three years ago) Permalink

Intergenerational fairness hasn't really caught on substantively at the political level yet here in the UK, despite the Guardian and the Resolution Foundation trying to give it a good push.

But it's an issue whose time has come.

Half-baked profundities. Self-referential smirkiness (Bob Six), Monday, 2 May 2016 13:00 (three years ago) Permalink

a rough estimation:

Baby Boomers = narcissistic
Generation X = depressed/apathetic
Millennial = anxious/fragile

ryan, Monday, 2 May 2016 13:12 (three years ago) Permalink

i am seeing more and more pieces about how my generation's anxiousness and fragility is secretly manipulative, a way for us to get our way.

Treeship, Monday, 2 May 2016 13:22 (three years ago) Permalink

It's interesting how quickly the narrative regarding millennials has shifted from 'hyper-confident and outgoing' to 'anxious and fragile'.

Your Ass Is Grass And I Will Mow It With My Face (Old Lunch), Monday, 2 May 2016 13:31 (three years ago) Permalink

my favorite complaint about a generation of straight A students with tens of thousands in student debt they can't pay off with their dead end jobs was "entitled"

Treeship, Monday, 2 May 2016 13:35 (three years ago) Permalink

Yeah, I'm much more copacetic about being called a slacker for the thousands in student debt I can't pay off with my dead end job.

Your Ass Is Grass And I Will Mow It With My Face (Old Lunch), Monday, 2 May 2016 13:42 (three years ago) Permalink

i feel defensive about all the generations though. "baby boomer" culture has had a stranglehold on our country for too long, i guess, but still that's not the fault of the baby boomers themselves. there was some popular comment in that gawker article about how baby boomers who still work at target should be shamed because they were the most privileged generation in history and i wanted to reach into kinja and strangle that person, or at least log in and give them a good verbal dressing down

Treeship, Monday, 2 May 2016 13:43 (three years ago) Permalink

I like my own tail-end of the boomer window (1961). (See? I'm narcissistic.) We love Highway 61 and "One Bad Apple," find Nine Inch Nails and Rage Against the Machine campy.

clemenza, Monday, 2 May 2016 13:50 (three years ago) Permalink

It's interesting how quickly the narrative regarding millennials has shifted from 'hyper-confident and outgoing' to 'anxious and fragile'.

yeah really this is interesting, even though i dont think those personality types are necessarily opposites! i wonder if these generational traits tend to emerge as a result of the preceding generation's descriptions of them. the boomer = narcissism one is particularly interesting to me because i think the popularly of that term only emerged as way to describe boomers: see Christopher Lasch's "The Culture of Narcissism"--which is perhaps one of the first books i know of (would love to know of similar books) that adopts a kind generational framework (ie, "we are different (usually worse) than our parents"). that whole dynamic is itself pretty interesting.

ryan, Monday, 2 May 2016 14:59 (three years ago) Permalink

like, i can't imagine (though it's certainly possible) someone in 1900 muttering "these kids today."

ryan, Monday, 2 May 2016 15:00 (three years ago) Permalink

I wish the stock gen x descriptors didn't suit me as well as they do. But, pssh, whatever, like I even care about that authoritative, corporate bullshit anyway.

Your Ass Is Grass And I Will Mow It With My Face (Old Lunch), Monday, 2 May 2016 15:02 (three years ago) Permalink

as a millenial, i think millenials are extremely good

ciderpress, Monday, 2 May 2016 15:04 (three years ago) Permalink

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1wCXr_6wgns

Mordy, Monday, 2 May 2016 15:10 (three years ago) Permalink

oh nice!

ryan, Monday, 2 May 2016 15:11 (three years ago) Permalink

I am now embracing my millenial designation, even though pretty much every one of my peers was born a couple years before me and I was born at the beginning of '81

I mean, I got out of college when the prices were only starting to hike up, found gainful employment that I've retained since then, and generally am pretty ok

but, solidarity, my fellow millenials

μpright mammal (mh), Monday, 2 May 2016 15:11 (three years ago) Permalink

i feel like growing up with the internet is the more definitive thing than the exact years

ciderpress, Monday, 2 May 2016 15:17 (three years ago) Permalink

my own personal marker for Millennials is that they can't have actual, living memories of the 80s.

ryan, Monday, 2 May 2016 15:22 (three years ago) Permalink

dang you got me

they were probably bad anyways

ciderpress, Monday, 2 May 2016 15:26 (three years ago) Permalink

i was born in december '87 and have only vague memories of 1990-1993

ejemplo (crüt), Monday, 2 May 2016 15:32 (three years ago) Permalink

i believe i arrived just in time for peak "bad to the bone"

ejemplo (crüt), Monday, 2 May 2016 15:33 (three years ago) Permalink

I remember the 80s, so maybe I'm back out of the club

μpright mammal (mh), Monday, 2 May 2016 15:57 (three years ago) Permalink

*listens to foreigner*

μpright mammal (mh), Monday, 2 May 2016 15:57 (three years ago) Permalink

like, i can't imagine (though it's certainly possible) someone in 1900 muttering "these kids today."

― ryan, Monday, May 2, 2016 11:00 AM (1 hour ago) Bookmark Flag Post Permalink

no way, this has been a constant throughout human history

flappy bird, Monday, 2 May 2016 16:07 (three years ago) Permalink

as an actual "generational" statement or just the folly of youth in general? I imagine even the latter depends on an idea of adolescence that is itself rather new in the scheme of things?

ryan, Monday, 2 May 2016 16:13 (three years ago) Permalink

though yeah the idea of societal degeneration and "declension" is far older (and maybe these "newer" ideas simply glom on to those older ones)

ryan, Monday, 2 May 2016 16:15 (three years ago) Permalink

I read a really bad late novel by Edith Wharton (Twilight Sleep, 1927) which is 100% on the theme of "this younger generation of people is feckless and useless, what will a world in their incapable hands be like"

Guayaquil (eephus!), Monday, 2 May 2016 16:17 (three years ago) Permalink

i was born in december '87 and have only vague memories of 1990-1993

― ejemplo (crüt), Monday, May 2, 2016 11:32 AM (45 minutes ago) Bookmark Flag Post Permalink

i believe i arrived just in time for peak "bad to the bone"

― ejemplo (crüt), Monday, May 2, 2016 11:33 AM (43 minutes ago) Bookmark Flag Post Permalink

I remember the 80s, so maybe I'm back out of the club

― μpright mammal (mh), Monday, May 2, 2016 11:57 AM

http://45.media.tumblr.com/a85e5d7fc85bba23a7f3e09a3f1ca1a9/tumblr_neaqitaUoJ1roul0do4_400.gif

The burrito of ennui (Alfred, Lord Sotosyn), Monday, 2 May 2016 16:19 (three years ago) Permalink

i'd feel pretty good about a world in the hands of my generation except for the part where it's already fucked beyond repair before we got here

ciderpress, Monday, 2 May 2016 16:19 (three years ago) Permalink

I read a really bad late novel by Edith Wharton (Twilight Sleep, 1927) which is 100% on the theme of "this younger generation of people is feckless and useless, what will a world in their incapable hands be like"

― Guayaquil (eephus!),

ha – I read it last year and was pretty appalled.

The burrito of ennui (Alfred, Lord Sotosyn), Monday, 2 May 2016 16:19 (three years ago) Permalink

i remember everyone remembering the 80s in 2002, fun times

yellow despackling power (Will M.), Monday, 2 May 2016 16:46 (three years ago) Permalink

as a millennial born in the nineties, i learned a lot from VH1's I Love the 80's.

flappy bird, Monday, 2 May 2016 16:52 (three years ago) Permalink

I first heard "Billie Jean" and "Blue Monday" as MIDI files in a freeware Pac-Man clone for Windows 95

ejemplo (crüt), Monday, 2 May 2016 17:00 (three years ago) Permalink

This would be a whole lot easier if everybody was born in clumps. Like in 1945, someone decided: let's all fuck for a year and we'll have a generation of kids who all share a common experience. Then we'll take a breather to raise those kids so that they all have the same values, experiences, and cultural touchstones.

Okay, that went great. Now it's 1965, let's make another bunch. These ones will be totally tubular.

Hmmm. 1985. Where were we? Oh yeah, reproduction. Quick, everybody make some babies.

Instead, what we have is a continuous stream of births. Alas.

to bae or not to bae (Ye Mad Puffin), Monday, 2 May 2016 17:01 (three years ago) Permalink

I don't really know any teenagers atm but I follow a few on twitter as an anthropological experiment, and I think I like this gen of highschoolers. they remind me much more of my gen than do the millennials.

always be charging (rip van wanko), Monday, 2 May 2016 17:08 (three years ago) Permalink

I just bought two Wharton collections from Library of America and I think that book is included in the second one - can't wait!

Don Van Gorp, midwest regional VP, marketing (誤訳侮辱), Monday, 2 May 2016 17:13 (three years ago) Permalink

dang there are kids in high school who weren't alive on 9/11

ciderpress, Monday, 2 May 2016 17:20 (three years ago) Permalink

I just bought two Wharton collections from Library of America and I think that book is included in the second one - can't wait!

― Don Van Gorp, midwest regional VP, marketing (誤訳侮辱),

that's where I read it. The Mother's Recompense is better.

The burrito of ennui (Alfred, Lord Sotosyn), Monday, 2 May 2016 17:27 (three years ago) Permalink

I just bought two Wharton collections from Library of America and I think that book is included in the second one - can't wait!

If The Bunner Sisters is in there, go straight to that one, wow.

Twilight Sleep not just bad but really different from the good stuff; to the point it was literally hard for me to get my head around the fact that the same person wrote it.

Guayaquil (eephus!), Monday, 2 May 2016 18:54 (three years ago) Permalink

In good Wharton, by the way, generational differences are certainly an issue but I think the view from middle age is less "kids today are terrible let us explain to them how they should be" than "our time is done, we shall now graciously and regretfully fade into the expensive wallpaper"

Guayaquil (eephus!), Monday, 2 May 2016 18:55 (three years ago) Permalink

Wharton's heroine in Summer is a teenage unwed mother

Brad C., Monday, 2 May 2016 19:03 (three years ago) Permalink

i am totally Generation Wharton

Guayaquil (eephus!), Monday, 2 May 2016 20:45 (three years ago) Permalink

Boy, Gen X's stock couldn't be much lower these days (b. 1968)...we truly are the Jan Brady of this bunch

Iago Galdston, Monday, 2 May 2016 20:49 (three years ago) Permalink

i am seeing more and more pieces about how my generation's anxiousness and fragility is secretly manipulative, a way for us to get our way.

― Treeship, Monday, 2 May 2016 13:22 (7 hours ago) Bookmark Flag Post Permalink

Starting to believe this btw

Daithi Bowsie (darraghmac), Monday, 2 May 2016 20:49 (three years ago) Permalink

lol

μpright mammal (mh), Monday, 2 May 2016 21:10 (three years ago) Permalink

anyway, Capricorns are obv badasses

sarahell, Wednesday, 5 September 2018 19:24 (eight months ago) Permalink

see this is a perfect example of being portrayed as a fucking dick

aloha darkness my old friend (katherine), Wednesday, 5 September 2018 19:25 (eight months ago) Permalink

"please believe in this thing we made up, also we hate you"

aloha darkness my old friend (katherine), Wednesday, 5 September 2018 19:26 (eight months ago) Permalink

it is definitely true that no generation has learned different lessons from the same event because it happened when they were in daycare at the time, instead of watching the same event happen as they got ready to start their first full-time job or go off to college.

we have been at war in Afghanistan for 17 years. this has had no substantially different effect on people whether they were born in 1980 or born in 2000. totally provable statement.

Paleo Weltschmerz (El Tomboto), Wednesday, 5 September 2018 19:30 (eight months ago) Permalink

Obama would totally be the same person if he had been born during the 1930s. Makes no difference. People are all different and also the same! Shrug a lot and wave your hands around at the uselessness of trying to model anything with less than absolute precision.

Paleo Weltschmerz (El Tomboto), Wednesday, 5 September 2018 19:32 (eight months ago) Permalink

But wait so what if Obama had been born with a Kuato, what if that

Digital Squirts (Old Lunch), Wednesday, 5 September 2018 19:40 (eight months ago) Permalink

that makes him a gemini right? that makes the most sense

Paleo Weltschmerz (El Tomboto), Wednesday, 5 September 2018 19:41 (eight months ago) Permalink

i'm upper mississippi and i'm on the go
my zodiac sign is the virgo

The Desus & Mero Chain (upper mississippi sh@kedown), Wednesday, 5 September 2018 19:43 (eight months ago) Permalink

xxp - so many ilxors adore "angry goat on roof"

also the newspaper memes are all kinda like that

sarahell, Wednesday, 5 September 2018 19:45 (eight months ago) Permalink

the uselessness of trying to model anything with less than absolute precision.

The difficulty is not that the models derived do not apply broadly to tens of millions of people in aggregate, but that they are often presented as saying something valuable about individuals within that aggregate. A statement such as 'Gen Xers want this, hate that, or view this other thing with suspicion' is so ill-formed that it is either without useful content or else simply a falsehood, depending on how you interpret it. A statement such as Gen Xers are 15% more likely than other cohorts to say they want this, hate that, or view this other thing with suspicion, has some value.

A is for (Aimless), Wednesday, 5 September 2018 19:45 (eight months ago) Permalink

generations and astrology are both horseshit y'all fyi lol

A True White Kid that can Jump (Granny Dainger), Wednesday, 5 September 2018 19:49 (eight months ago) Permalink

TBF, so are most other means by which we aspire to condense the sum of a person or a people.

Digital Squirts (Old Lunch), Wednesday, 5 September 2018 19:53 (eight months ago) Permalink

I am undescribible.

Digital Squirts (Old Lunch), Wednesday, 5 September 2018 19:54 (eight months ago) Permalink

this is a board in which we are trying to settle on the exact definition of a "New Jersey," let people have their memes

aloha darkness my old friend (katherine), Wednesday, 5 September 2018 19:54 (eight months ago) Permalink

New Jersey is a Virgo too :)

The Desus & Mero Chain (upper mississippi sh@kedown), Wednesday, 5 September 2018 19:57 (eight months ago) Permalink

generational differences can include things like "before and after the polio vaccine," but I can understand how that might seem abstract to most people here

astrology is closest to the longitudinal "hey everybody acts like this if you watch them long enough" Saturn's Return dumbassery

but yes latitude and longitude same thing shrug lol

Paleo Weltschmerz (El Tomboto), Wednesday, 5 September 2018 19:57 (eight months ago) Permalink

they're both just lines right

challops trap house (Will M.), Wednesday, 5 September 2018 20:00 (eight months ago) Permalink

don't try to tell me any different i don't have time for your explanation i'm a goddamn moon in aries you son of a gun

challops trap house (Will M.), Wednesday, 5 September 2018 20:01 (eight months ago) Permalink

okay so here's another mean meme

https://78.media.tumblr.com/04f6c3734e17535b66071d104422a7c1/tumblr_p5givgAp0T1x95nrqo1_1280.jpg

sarahell, Wednesday, 5 September 2018 20:02 (eight months ago) Permalink

Slippery When Wet is a Leo just looked it up

The Desus & Mero Chain (upper mississippi sh@kedown), Wednesday, 5 September 2018 20:02 (eight months ago) Permalink

The version of generational differences that (I think?) you're describing makes enough sense (I think?) if I read through the sarcasm but that's not really what I understand 'generational theory' to be. xp to Tombot

The nexus of the crisis (Sund4r), Wednesday, 5 September 2018 20:03 (eight months ago) Permalink

Or if it is, that's not what I take issue with.

that's true that e.g. people who go through a world war or depression together may have some major shared life-changing experience but I don't think there's enough like this to support the idea of 'Generation X', 'Millennials', and a generation that is being defined before it even has much life experience.

The nexus of the crisis (Sund4r), Wednesday, 5 September 2018 20:05 (eight months ago) Permalink

here's one for tauruses (notice free space in middle is food)

http://geekxgirls.com/images/_articles/zodiac-bingo-02.jpg

sarahell, Wednesday, 5 September 2018 20:06 (eight months ago) Permalink

i'm upper mississippi and i'm on the go
my zodiac sign is the virgo

I respect ums' commitment to bringing hip hop back to its roots

Οὖτις, Wednesday, 5 September 2018 20:09 (eight months ago) Permalink

what sign amongst us does not appreciate a robe, i ask

challops trap house (Will M.), Wednesday, 5 September 2018 20:12 (eight months ago) Permalink

good ass eyebrows?

The Desus & Mero Chain (upper mississippi sh@kedown), Wednesday, 5 September 2018 20:15 (eight months ago) Permalink

assbrows?

Hunt3r, Wednesday, 5 September 2018 20:30 (eight months ago) Permalink

I recently interviewed a 19 year old who told me "I am an old soul, so I tend to identify with millennials."

— Liam Stack (@liamstack) September 14, 2018

oooooooof

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mcZZlQ4Tmrc (Karl Malone), Friday, 14 September 2018 23:26 (eight months ago) Permalink

👌

faculty w1fe (silby), Friday, 14 September 2018 23:33 (eight months ago) Permalink

one month passes...

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=entVpj_IT6M

are people born in 1998 really self-identifying as millennials/gen-y'ers these days? is this the future Ella O'Connor fought and died to secure?

it's a good song (especially by youtube musician standards) though I don't think any of his concerns are unique to his generation except for the bit about climate change really hitting the fan

ghood ghravie (unregistered), Monday, 15 October 2018 20:00 (seven months ago) Permalink

two months pass...

Does it still count as having millennial burnout if I've never come close to optimizing anything?

jmm, Wednesday, 9 January 2019 14:39 (four months ago) Permalink

https://pbs.twimg.com/media/DxdPH_VV4AAyp9N.jpg:small

oh well, whatever, nevermind

mookieproof, Tuesday, 22 January 2019 15:12 (four months ago) Permalink

three months pass...

A mistrust of science isn’t new — it’s been around since science really started picking up steam, and the thought that it’s definitive of our age is just wrong. Noticing that we should be skeptical of the thought that we are going through some particularly new and baleful moment in the history of ideas. We’re not: we’re just retracing arguments that humans seem, perhaps just as a matter of temperament, to be inclined to trace. The contemporary leftist who responds to those who want to use, e.g. blockchains for social good by pointing out bitcoin’s ecological cost, or who responds cynically to data about how fewer people are living in extreme poverty thanks to capitalism by pointing out that, well, thanks to capitalism, in not so long, fewer people will be living full stop thanks to climate change can, I think, be viewed as giving voice to the same sort of anti-progress viewpoint as Rousseau. It didn’t take Derridean differance to enable people to wonder about the negative effects that progress entrains.

https://medium.com/@mittmattmutt/millennials-as-romantics-not-postmodernists-b678818d84ad

Hat tip michael B for the link

Trϵϵship, Wednesday, 15 May 2019 12:05 (one week ago) Permalink

Obviously it’s a super pop, super surface level example of intellectual history, but I think it’s more accurate than, for instance, jordan peterson’s fuming over “postmodern neo-marxists.” There is some truth to the observation that so-called social justice warriors are more interested in perspectives than facts, but this isn’t a point against them. We live in a period of uncertainty—the irrationality of our society is impossible to overlook at this point and there aren’t “pragmatic” answers to things like climate change, only revolutionary ones. In these condtions it makes sense for people to turn to ideologies that from the outside might seem factional or non-constructive to older generations.

Trϵϵship, Wednesday, 15 May 2019 12:15 (one week ago) Permalink

It’s not a coincidence that Diogenes is one of the heroes of Jenny Odell’s buzzworthy book about “resisting in place.”

Trϵϵship, Wednesday, 15 May 2019 12:16 (one week ago) Permalink

every moment has its same profile

deemsthelarker (darraghmac), Wednesday, 15 May 2019 13:53 (one week ago) Permalink

i find the present moment is spoiled for choice in terms of language, and while the attendant imprecision can be difficult i appreciate the richness of, particularly, queer language.

you can call such people - they can call themselves - post-modernists or romantics or counter-enlightenment (this is _completely different_ from "dark enlightenment") or any number of other things; the words themselves are less important to me than the diversity of thought engendered thereby.

i find that when alt-right types use the trappings of rationalist, enlightenment discourse - when they attempt to affix concrete and immutable _meanings_ to words - this is often an attempt to create new epithets and slurs they can use against people they disagree with. when faced with people like peterson who so clearly show the limitations of rationalist thought, why should one attempt to rationally debate them? my refusal to rationally engage with these ideas and those who espouse them is not an opposition to reason, but merely the recognition that the preconditions for rational discourse do not exist. hence productive and useful activity requires alternatives to poisoned discourse, requires re-framing.

Burt Bacharach's Bees Made Honey In The Lion's Skull (rushomancy), Wednesday, 15 May 2019 13:54 (one week ago) Permalink

I think there's a differentiation between scientific realism and practical implementation that's hinted at but not realized in there. Very few people are going to fault Isaac Newton for publishing on a theoretical cannonball that's able to fire far enough to orbit the planet because it was technologically impossible at the time and purely a thought experiment. Comparing that to the blockchain, where the practical implementation is not only possible but the effects of popularization predictable in the near term, are two different matters.

You could counter that the tendency toward questioning social positions is a more hypothesis-centered approach in that social cause and effect are taken into account. I think claiming it's a romantic viewpoint blows past the stance that ethics have a role in the application of science, and so-called objective thought is often anything but. It's not vague forces that move from materials science to a glut of plastic objects floating in the ocean, and it's not "bad feelings" coming from racist ideologues that people are worried about. It's the adoption and unfettered growth of seemingly innocuous things far beyond their original scope, and you can make epistemic arguments showing exactly how these things have played out historically.

mh, Wednesday, 15 May 2019 15:12 (one week ago) Permalink

When people talk about a rationalistic worldview they don’t just mean a position that believes in science’s ability to answer questions about the material world. They mean the Enlightenment position that human reason is the tool can overcome all obstacles—so like Steven Pinker. It’s a normative view not an epistemological one, but it disguises itself as such.

Trϵϵship, Wednesday, 15 May 2019 15:41 (one week ago) Permalink

Peterson is a weird example because he is a true reactionary—he doesn’t think we should “mess with” thing like the market or language, as this would be dangerous social engineering. But nevertheless he is interpreting the romantic or postmodernist tendencies of millennials as dangerous to civilization.

Trϵϵship, Wednesday, 15 May 2019 15:43 (one week ago) Permalink

I think the main issue with JP is he has no idea what he's actually saying and just has a punchlist of things he thinks are bad while bumbling on about human reason

mh, Wednesday, 15 May 2019 15:47 (one week ago) Permalink

I agree with the author of the medium piece that we’re in an era of skepticism in america. People are more likely to describe social problems as intractable, or constitutive of our society in a way—a society that is wasteful and destructive in its essence, requiring new paradigms. This kind of structural critique used to be confined to academia or certain pockets of radicals or whatever but now it’s mainstream.

Trϵϵship, Wednesday, 15 May 2019 15:51 (one week ago) Permalink

And it is a romantic outlook. It demands you stand apart from received values. It’s not especially new either—there was a wave of this kind of thinking after world war i and in other periods.

Trϵϵship, Wednesday, 15 May 2019 15:53 (one week ago) Permalink

I haven't read the article yet (sorry) but I take issue with the equation 'postmodernism = Romanticism' (give or take a few qualia). While the latter has unquestionably informed the former, and not just chronologically, it doesn't ramp up suspicion towards metanarratives to the same self-defining extent, especially in the field of politics. Postmodernism has always been about embracing subversively blurred boundaries over and above urgent revolutionary impulses, deemed overly teleological in the then-dying wake of Marxism/Hegelianism. If we are to buy into the idea that the current generation is more neo-Romantic than not (and this thesis does hold some amount of water), I think it's equally safe to say that it too is a reaction to postmodernist playfulness and ambiguous (dis)engagement. Few things are as un-pomo as so-called 'identity' politics.

pomenitul, Wednesday, 15 May 2019 16:01 (one week ago) Permalink

He’s not saying they’re the same. He’s saying the attitudes of millennials attributed to postmodernism could more aptly be tied to a deeper tendency—the outlook that people started calling romantic in the late 18th century.

Trϵϵship, Wednesday, 15 May 2019 16:04 (one week ago) Permalink

It’s not a coincidence that Diogenes is one of the heroes of Jenny Odell’s buzzworthy book about “resisting in place.”

― Trϵϵship, Wednesday, May 15, 2019 5:16 AM (nine hours ago)

it's weird when someone on ilx namedrops someone I know personally

sarahell, Wednesday, 15 May 2019 21:41 (one week ago) Permalink

I thought you might know her! I think her book is really good—she articulated a lot of the concerns I have attempted to explain on ilx in a flailing fashion.

Trϵϵship, Wednesday, 15 May 2019 21:44 (one week ago) Permalink

i do her taxes ... her bf is also cool and a writer ... he looks a little like you ... not like eerily similar, but kinda

sarahell, Wednesday, 15 May 2019 21:47 (one week ago) Permalink

Ha, this thread revive comes at an opportune time for me; see, at the beginning of the week I encountered a very young-looking paramedic and she just about made my month when she swore I didn't look a day over thirty. Considering I'm about a decade older than that and I'd worried my maternal bloodline's predilection for preserving their external youth beyond belief had passed me by, this was very heartening, not only because I'm an aging member of a cusp generation that doesn't exactly know where to slot ourselves (mine is the "Xennials", i.e. half-Generation X and half-Millennial) and am keenly aware of how comparatively superannuated I am to a great many people, it also enables me to effectively claim I can "pass" for a full member of a generation (the Millennials) and thus feel a sort of kinship with a specific generation, even if it's via artifice and sneaky trickery.

I'm not at all surprised the Gen X'ers won out in this poll considering the generational makeup of this forum; when I was more of a regular around these parts, there were a great many ILXors who were at least a handful of years older than me and thus more fully entrenched with "Generation X" and all that means. I suspect that legacy influenced the results of the voting back when this poll was first posted.

The Colour of Spring (deethelurker), Friday, 17 May 2019 03:30 (one week ago) Permalink


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