Baby Boomers vs. Generation X vs. Millennials

Message Bookmarked
Bookmark Removed

Comparing generations is a very easy, very useful way to understand culture. Generations comprise vast swaths of people all similar enough to be safely lumped together and discussed as a mass, almost as if they constituted a single individual. You can speak of a generation's values and even its beliefs. Most importantly, you can blame them for things.

Poll Results

OptionVotes
Generation X 27
Millennials 21
Baby Boomers 7


Treeship, Monday, 2 May 2016 12:47 (four years ago) link

Just in case you needed a refresher of who you're meant to be as a member of your generation.

Your Ass Is Grass And I Will Mow It With My Face (Old Lunch), Monday, 2 May 2016 12:55 (four years ago) link

Generation Y (1981-2000)

Confident, determined, upbeat...

if only

Treeship, Monday, 2 May 2016 12:58 (four years ago) link

i'd be more offended if i was an "old veteran" (1922-1945). "Patriotic, practical, dedicated, hierarchical, given to personal sacrifice and delayed gratification, economical." these people are not your slaves, target, sometimes they want stuff for themselves too.

Treeship, Monday, 2 May 2016 13:00 (four years ago) link

Intergenerational fairness hasn't really caught on substantively at the political level yet here in the UK, despite the Guardian and the Resolution Foundation trying to give it a good push.

But it's an issue whose time has come.

Half-baked profundities. Self-referential smirkiness (Bob Six), Monday, 2 May 2016 13:00 (four years ago) link

a rough estimation:

Baby Boomers = narcissistic
Generation X = depressed/apathetic
Millennial = anxious/fragile

ryan, Monday, 2 May 2016 13:12 (four years ago) link

i am seeing more and more pieces about how my generation's anxiousness and fragility is secretly manipulative, a way for us to get our way.

Treeship, Monday, 2 May 2016 13:22 (four years ago) link

It's interesting how quickly the narrative regarding millennials has shifted from 'hyper-confident and outgoing' to 'anxious and fragile'.

Your Ass Is Grass And I Will Mow It With My Face (Old Lunch), Monday, 2 May 2016 13:31 (four years ago) link

my favorite complaint about a generation of straight A students with tens of thousands in student debt they can't pay off with their dead end jobs was "entitled"

Treeship, Monday, 2 May 2016 13:35 (four years ago) link

Yeah, I'm much more copacetic about being called a slacker for the thousands in student debt I can't pay off with my dead end job.

Your Ass Is Grass And I Will Mow It With My Face (Old Lunch), Monday, 2 May 2016 13:42 (four years ago) link

i feel defensive about all the generations though. "baby boomer" culture has had a stranglehold on our country for too long, i guess, but still that's not the fault of the baby boomers themselves. there was some popular comment in that gawker article about how baby boomers who still work at target should be shamed because they were the most privileged generation in history and i wanted to reach into kinja and strangle that person, or at least log in and give them a good verbal dressing down

Treeship, Monday, 2 May 2016 13:43 (four years ago) link

I like my own tail-end of the boomer window (1961). (See? I'm narcissistic.) We love Highway 61 and "One Bad Apple," find Nine Inch Nails and Rage Against the Machine campy.

clemenza, Monday, 2 May 2016 13:50 (four years ago) link

It's interesting how quickly the narrative regarding millennials has shifted from 'hyper-confident and outgoing' to 'anxious and fragile'.

yeah really this is interesting, even though i dont think those personality types are necessarily opposites! i wonder if these generational traits tend to emerge as a result of the preceding generation's descriptions of them. the boomer = narcissism one is particularly interesting to me because i think the popularly of that term only emerged as way to describe boomers: see Christopher Lasch's "The Culture of Narcissism"--which is perhaps one of the first books i know of (would love to know of similar books) that adopts a kind generational framework (ie, "we are different (usually worse) than our parents"). that whole dynamic is itself pretty interesting.

ryan, Monday, 2 May 2016 14:59 (four years ago) link

like, i can't imagine (though it's certainly possible) someone in 1900 muttering "these kids today."

ryan, Monday, 2 May 2016 15:00 (four years ago) link

I wish the stock gen x descriptors didn't suit me as well as they do. But, pssh, whatever, like I even care about that authoritative, corporate bullshit anyway.

Your Ass Is Grass And I Will Mow It With My Face (Old Lunch), Monday, 2 May 2016 15:02 (four years ago) link

as a millenial, i think millenials are extremely good

ciderpress, Monday, 2 May 2016 15:04 (four years ago) link

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1wCXr_6wgns

Mordy, Monday, 2 May 2016 15:10 (four years ago) link

oh nice!

ryan, Monday, 2 May 2016 15:11 (four years ago) link

I am now embracing my millenial designation, even though pretty much every one of my peers was born a couple years before me and I was born at the beginning of '81

I mean, I got out of college when the prices were only starting to hike up, found gainful employment that I've retained since then, and generally am pretty ok

but, solidarity, my fellow millenials

μpright mammal (mh), Monday, 2 May 2016 15:11 (four years ago) link

i feel like growing up with the internet is the more definitive thing than the exact years

ciderpress, Monday, 2 May 2016 15:17 (four years ago) link

my own personal marker for Millennials is that they can't have actual, living memories of the 80s.

ryan, Monday, 2 May 2016 15:22 (four years ago) link

dang you got me

they were probably bad anyways

ciderpress, Monday, 2 May 2016 15:26 (four years ago) link

i was born in december '87 and have only vague memories of 1990-1993

ejemplo (crüt), Monday, 2 May 2016 15:32 (four years ago) link

i believe i arrived just in time for peak "bad to the bone"

ejemplo (crüt), Monday, 2 May 2016 15:33 (four years ago) link

I remember the 80s, so maybe I'm back out of the club

μpright mammal (mh), Monday, 2 May 2016 15:57 (four years ago) link

*listens to foreigner*

μpright mammal (mh), Monday, 2 May 2016 15:57 (four years ago) link

like, i can't imagine (though it's certainly possible) someone in 1900 muttering "these kids today."

― ryan, Monday, May 2, 2016 11:00 AM (1 hour ago) Bookmark Flag Post Permalink

no way, this has been a constant throughout human history

flappy bird, Monday, 2 May 2016 16:07 (four years ago) link

as an actual "generational" statement or just the folly of youth in general? I imagine even the latter depends on an idea of adolescence that is itself rather new in the scheme of things?

ryan, Monday, 2 May 2016 16:13 (four years ago) link

though yeah the idea of societal degeneration and "declension" is far older (and maybe these "newer" ideas simply glom on to those older ones)

ryan, Monday, 2 May 2016 16:15 (four years ago) link

I read a really bad late novel by Edith Wharton (Twilight Sleep, 1927) which is 100% on the theme of "this younger generation of people is feckless and useless, what will a world in their incapable hands be like"

Guayaquil (eephus!), Monday, 2 May 2016 16:17 (four years ago) link

i was born in december '87 and have only vague memories of 1990-1993

― ejemplo (crüt), Monday, May 2, 2016 11:32 AM (45 minutes ago) Bookmark Flag Post Permalink

i believe i arrived just in time for peak "bad to the bone"

― ejemplo (crüt), Monday, May 2, 2016 11:33 AM (43 minutes ago) Bookmark Flag Post Permalink

I remember the 80s, so maybe I'm back out of the club

― μpright mammal (mh), Monday, May 2, 2016 11:57 AM

http://45.media.tumblr.com/a85e5d7fc85bba23a7f3e09a3f1ca1a9/tumblr_neaqitaUoJ1roul0do4_400.gif

The burrito of ennui (Alfred, Lord Sotosyn), Monday, 2 May 2016 16:19 (four years ago) link

i'd feel pretty good about a world in the hands of my generation except for the part where it's already fucked beyond repair before we got here

ciderpress, Monday, 2 May 2016 16:19 (four years ago) link

I read a really bad late novel by Edith Wharton (Twilight Sleep, 1927) which is 100% on the theme of "this younger generation of people is feckless and useless, what will a world in their incapable hands be like"

― Guayaquil (eephus!),

ha – I read it last year and was pretty appalled.

The burrito of ennui (Alfred, Lord Sotosyn), Monday, 2 May 2016 16:19 (four years ago) link

i remember everyone remembering the 80s in 2002, fun times

yellow despackling power (Will M.), Monday, 2 May 2016 16:46 (four years ago) link

as a millennial born in the nineties, i learned a lot from VH1's I Love the 80's.

flappy bird, Monday, 2 May 2016 16:52 (four years ago) link

I first heard "Billie Jean" and "Blue Monday" as MIDI files in a freeware Pac-Man clone for Windows 95

ejemplo (crüt), Monday, 2 May 2016 17:00 (four years ago) link

This would be a whole lot easier if everybody was born in clumps. Like in 1945, someone decided: let's all fuck for a year and we'll have a generation of kids who all share a common experience. Then we'll take a breather to raise those kids so that they all have the same values, experiences, and cultural touchstones.

Okay, that went great. Now it's 1965, let's make another bunch. These ones will be totally tubular.

Hmmm. 1985. Where were we? Oh yeah, reproduction. Quick, everybody make some babies.

Instead, what we have is a continuous stream of births. Alas.

to bae or not to bae (Ye Mad Puffin), Monday, 2 May 2016 17:01 (four years ago) link

I don't really know any teenagers atm but I follow a few on twitter as an anthropological experiment, and I think I like this gen of highschoolers. they remind me much more of my gen than do the millennials.

always be charging (rip van wanko), Monday, 2 May 2016 17:08 (four years ago) link

I just bought two Wharton collections from Library of America and I think that book is included in the second one - can't wait!

Don Van Gorp, midwest regional VP, marketing (誤訳侮辱), Monday, 2 May 2016 17:13 (four years ago) link

dang there are kids in high school who weren't alive on 9/11

ciderpress, Monday, 2 May 2016 17:20 (four years ago) link

I just bought two Wharton collections from Library of America and I think that book is included in the second one - can't wait!

― Don Van Gorp, midwest regional VP, marketing (誤訳侮辱),

that's where I read it. The Mother's Recompense is better.

The burrito of ennui (Alfred, Lord Sotosyn), Monday, 2 May 2016 17:27 (four years ago) link

I just bought two Wharton collections from Library of America and I think that book is included in the second one - can't wait!

If The Bunner Sisters is in there, go straight to that one, wow.

Twilight Sleep not just bad but really different from the good stuff; to the point it was literally hard for me to get my head around the fact that the same person wrote it.

Guayaquil (eephus!), Monday, 2 May 2016 18:54 (four years ago) link

In good Wharton, by the way, generational differences are certainly an issue but I think the view from middle age is less "kids today are terrible let us explain to them how they should be" than "our time is done, we shall now graciously and regretfully fade into the expensive wallpaper"

Guayaquil (eephus!), Monday, 2 May 2016 18:55 (four years ago) link

Wharton's heroine in Summer is a teenage unwed mother

Brad C., Monday, 2 May 2016 19:03 (four years ago) link

i am totally Generation Wharton

Guayaquil (eephus!), Monday, 2 May 2016 20:45 (four years ago) link

Boy, Gen X's stock couldn't be much lower these days (b. 1968)...we truly are the Jan Brady of this bunch

Iago Galdston, Monday, 2 May 2016 20:49 (four years ago) link

i am seeing more and more pieces about how my generation's anxiousness and fragility is secretly manipulative, a way for us to get our way.

― Treeship, Monday, 2 May 2016 13:22 (7 hours ago) Bookmark Flag Post Permalink

Starting to believe this btw

Daithi Bowsie (darraghmac), Monday, 2 May 2016 20:49 (four years ago) link

lol

μpright mammal (mh), Monday, 2 May 2016 21:10 (four years ago) link

i'd read just about anything during my staying-at-dad's no-friend summers

haha yeah ... the time filling function that these large books filled -- that was me and the Lord of the Rings books. It was the original binge-watching ...

sarahell, Saturday, 25 July 2020 18:29 (one week ago) link

y'all had it so much easier than me, i grew up on the fucking bobbsey twins books

Kate (rushomancy), Saturday, 25 July 2020 18:42 (one week ago) link

It was the original binge-watching

It felt healthier somehow when I read The Lord of the Rings and even The Silmarillion for the first time, whereas with The Wheel of Time I remember thinking (probably around vol. 7): 'why the fuck am I inflicting this upon myself? And why do I want it to go on forever?' I think I quit after Winter's Heart, probably because I was 17 when the next volume dropped and by that time I had put away childish things (right).

pomenitul, Saturday, 25 July 2020 18:42 (one week ago) link

I had a babysitter as a child who'd had sons, so there were a shit-ton of old Hardy Boys and Tom Swift paperbacks still sitting around. I devoured those things.

but also fuck you (unperson), Saturday, 25 July 2020 18:43 (one week ago) link

y'all had it so much easier than me, i grew up on the fucking bobbsey twins books

Heh, I read so much Trixie Belden between ages seven and ten.

At one point I found a Bobbsey Twins book lying around my grandparents' cabin and I swear to God, the plot was that their uncle had gone off sailing with a teenage boy he wasn't related to (referred to as his "boy friend") and now they'd disappeared? So the entire Bobbsey family got on a boat and went off looking for them on deserted islands??? Do you remember this one?

Lily Dale, Saturday, 25 July 2020 19:00 (one week ago) link

a lot of my reading material came from the public library in the small town where i grew up and I read so much Hardy Boys and Nancy Drew and Agatha Christie

sarahell, Saturday, 25 July 2020 19:03 (one week ago) link

I read a ton of Clive Cussler Dirk Pitt novels, probably lucky that never crossed over into Tom Clancy.

Donald Trump Also Sucks, Of Course (milo z), Saturday, 25 July 2020 19:07 (one week ago) link

Where my James Clavell and Graham Greene kids at?
Also Robert R McCammon (completely unknown these days i think!) and a shitton of L Ron Hubbard's sci-fi.

Fuck the NRA (ulysses), Saturday, 25 July 2020 19:16 (one week ago) link

I only remember reading Raise the Titanic!, but I might have read another Cussler book at some point.

Somebody who rented my grandmother's house at the Jersey Shore left behind a copy of Brian Garfield's Wild Times, which was pretty much the greatest book I'd ever read at age 12. (It's a Western - a fictionalized version of the life of a guy named Doc Carver, who was a competitor of Buffalo Bill, running his own Wild West show in the 1800s.)

but also fuck you (unperson), Saturday, 25 July 2020 19:21 (one week ago) link

Oh yeah, my dad suggested I read Shōgun when I was 12, and so I did.

pomenitul, Saturday, 25 July 2020 19:23 (one week ago) link

all the talk about bobbsey twins is giving me flashbacks to my time cataloging an early 20th c YA collection, the sheer amount of them was astonishing. what didn't those rascals get up to

karl...arlk...rlka...lkar..., Saturday, 25 July 2020 19:23 (one week ago) link

Where my James Clavell and Graham Greene kids at?

I did really like Our Man in Havana when I was a kid.

Lily Dale, Saturday, 25 July 2020 19:26 (one week ago) link

Best Christopher pike novel is the weird surreal pro life one where the ghost of an aborted baby sends everyone to slasher purgatory as revenge

Rishi don’t lose my voucher (wins), Saturday, 25 July 2020 19:29 (one week ago) link

love aborted babies!

sarahell, Saturday, 25 July 2020 19:30 (one week ago) link

I read Shogun as a kid and also read some multi-part L. Ron Hubbard sci-fi series that still has me wondering wtf it was all about.

Mario Meatwagon (Moodles), Saturday, 25 July 2020 19:33 (one week ago) link

Reading your post I felt an irrepressible need to put this on:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZpTUhN__FRk

pomenitul, Saturday, 25 July 2020 19:36 (one week ago) link

such dulcet tones

all I remember about the books is that they were somewhat humorous and had a fair amount of graphic sex

Mario Meatwagon (Moodles), Saturday, 25 July 2020 19:38 (one week ago) link

I haven't read any of his, uh, works, but I plan on playing a Battlefield Earth (the movie) drinking game before I die.

pomenitul, Saturday, 25 July 2020 19:40 (one week ago) link

I read all the SE Hinton books, but I was definitely born a decade later than the generation for which they were intended. Loved bad boys and being bad lol.

blue light or electric light (the table is the table), Saturday, 25 July 2020 20:11 (one week ago) link

did you see the Outsiders movie and did you think any of them were cuet?

sarahell, Saturday, 25 July 2020 20:27 (one week ago) link

Ralph Macchio could get it

blue light or electric light (the table is the table), Saturday, 25 July 2020 20:39 (one week ago) link

cool -- i was fonder of rob lowe and emilio so we are not in hypothetical bad boy competition

sarahell, Saturday, 25 July 2020 20:39 (one week ago) link

The Mission Earth Dekalogy!

Fuck the NRA (ulysses), Saturday, 25 July 2020 21:20 (one week ago) link

I read the Thrawn trilogy and some other Star Wars novels before I saw any of the movies, they were disappointing in comparison.

Donald Trump Also Sucks, Of Course (milo z), Saturday, 25 July 2020 21:39 (one week ago) link

At one point I found a Bobbsey Twins book lying around my grandparents' cabin and I swear to God, the plot was that their uncle had gone off sailing with a teenage boy he wasn't related to (referred to as his "boy friend") and now they'd disappeared? So the entire Bobbsey family got on a boat and went off looking for them on deserted islands??? Do you remember this one?

― Lily Dale

no, i have mercifully repressed all memories of anything that actually happened in the books. i had kind of assumed that nothing, in fact, happened in them.

i can't remember if i read any clavell or not. i think i mostly just watched the tv miniseries, which again, i have no idea why any of that would be of the slightest bit of interest to me. i think i tried reading some michener. maybe a little "clan of the cave bear".

my favored tween doorstoppers were steven king books. even then, though, i think i drew the line at "the dark tower", although that might have been because there were only two of them at the time.

Kate (rushomancy), Saturday, 25 July 2020 21:58 (one week ago) link

The only age when it’s appropriate to read the end of IT

Donald Trump Also Sucks, Of Course (milo z), Saturday, 25 July 2020 21:59 (one week ago) link

Kind of wish IT was the read another book touchstone for dorky libs tbh

That or the pike book about the aborted baby ghost slasher limbo town

Rishi don’t lose my voucher (wins), Saturday, 25 July 2020 22:12 (one week ago) link

I saw a revisionist take that that book wasn't actually anti-choice but I call bullshit.

Donald Trump Also Sucks, Of Course (milo z), Saturday, 25 July 2020 22:33 (one week ago) link

The transition between RL Stine and Christopher Pike is an important moment in a young person's life.

Donald Trump Also Sucks, Of Course (milo z), Saturday, 25 July 2020 22:34 (one week ago) link

I remember a Pike story about a haunted song on a cassette, a teenage deathwish, it was really spooky and scary and I had nightmares about it for a while.

blue light or electric light (the table is the table), Sunday, 26 July 2020 00:04 (one week ago) link

a lot of my reading material came from the public library in the small town where i grew up and I read so much Hardy Boys and Nancy Drew and Agatha Christie

― sarahell, Saturday, 25 July 2020 19:03 (yesterday) link

This was me exactly. I read so many of the blue hardcover Hardy Boys and the small, pocket-sized Agatha Christie with the scary hardcovers in the early 80s.

Tōne Locatelli Romano (PBKR), Sunday, 26 July 2020 00:22 (one week ago) link

yes!!!!

sarahell, Sunday, 26 July 2020 05:00 (one week ago) link

As a 70s Australian kid my tastes were pretty Empire heavy: Doctor Who novelisations and the works of Capt. W. E. Johns:
https://cdn2.bigcommerce.com/server5900/7o6312a/products/3854/images/48678/P1350709__48399.1505115014.1280.1280.JPG

assert (MatthewK), Sunday, 26 July 2020 05:14 (one week ago) link

oh in retrospect i definitely did read huge chunks of agatha christie. and i think a lot of the james bond novels too, even though the only one i really remember is the one about baccarat, and also the one where fleming talks about trans people in japan doing the inguinal tuck (which is a good way of getting a hernia and is not generally a good idea)

read some doctor who novelizations as well - i remember "invasion of the dinosaurs" from the printings that had an utterly idiotic speech by harlan ellison from the '70s as a preface - but my only exposure to the biggles books is monty python's mention of "biggles combs his hair"

honestly "biggles combs his hair" seems hardly less exciting than "biggles flies to work". i'm imagining him trying, and failing, to get to sleep during an in-flight movie on the way to a sales conference.

Kate (rushomancy), Sunday, 26 July 2020 09:15 (one week ago) link

Roald Dahl, Tintin (and to a lesser extent Asterix, although I suppose that would be the hip choice now), Douglas Adams, Asimov, 2000AD are among the main stuffs I remember reading. Younger sibling born in '76 was mostly into novels with dragons and that on the (reflective) covers.

I watched that one HP film because Cuaron and it was notgood.

Stanley Halfbrick (Noel Emits), Sunday, 26 July 2020 10:10 (one week ago) link

Erik Davis has made a good point about how Gen Xers grew up surrounded by culture created by heads.

Stanley Halfbrick (Noel Emits), Sunday, 26 July 2020 10:28 (one week ago) link

I was obsessed with the Tintin books as a kid too.

blue light or electric light (the table is the table), Sunday, 26 July 2020 11:39 (one week ago) link

xp

This is very true. I think my parents looked at it as kind of normal that I would look at stuff like Freak Brothers comics or related 80s indie comic stuff when I was a kid, even though it was all wildly inappropriate. I suppose the fact that their formative years were in the 60s and 70s gave them a weird perspective on what was in retrospect pretty anomalous cultural artifacts.

Mario Meatwagon (Moodles), Sunday, 26 July 2020 13:00 (one week ago) link

kate he was the pilot do u see

assert (MatthewK), Sunday, 26 July 2020 13:23 (one week ago) link

Same with my parents and movies... I was lucky enough to grow up near a video store with a huge cult and foreign film section, and so naturally, I'd rent very weird films and my parents would be like 'oh sure, that played when I was in college' and in the meantime I was ten and watching Zabriskie Point.

blue light or electric light (the table is the table), Sunday, 26 July 2020 14:28 (one week ago) link

Erik Davis has made a good point about how Gen Xers grew up surrounded by culture created by heads.

― Stanley Halfbrick (Noel Emits)

i mean, i grew up with g.i. joe. the trippiest shit i knew as a kid was, like, c.s. lewis, who was not particularly a head that i know of. madeleine l'engle may possibly have been a head, i don't know, but childhood entertainment has always had a healthy dose of the surreal.

Kate (rushomancy), Sunday, 26 July 2020 14:31 (one week ago) link

I read all the Narnia books and never picked up that they were supposed to be Christian allegories until adulthood. To me they were just stories about kids in an imaginary world. And my mom dragged my brother and me to (Catholic) church every Sunday. I guess I just wasn't a particularly close reader...

but also fuck you (unperson), Sunday, 26 July 2020 14:40 (one week ago) link

Sid and Marty Krofft to thread.

santa clause four (suzy), Sunday, 26 July 2020 14:40 (one week ago) link

I imagine that was a common experience with CS Lewis, although my parents were pretty vociferously lapsed at the time. Not even sure if I was baptised come to think of it.

That reminds me when I read The Holy Blood And The Holy Grail I thought they seemed to have taken the whole thing from the Foundation series.

Stanley Halfbrick (Noel Emits), Sunday, 26 July 2020 16:02 (one week ago) link

Erik Davis has made a good point about how Gen Xers grew up surrounded by culture created by heads.

Heh, I met the dude a few times back in the late 90s -- he struck me as the kind of guy that tends just to focus on things that support his ideas -- more of an advocate than an analyst (Culturally we need both, so not a dig on the dude)

sarahell, Sunday, 26 July 2020 17:08 (one week ago) link

as in, I don't think his point is a good generalization for the entire generation though I'm sure it's true for a number of ppl

sarahell, Sunday, 26 July 2020 17:11 (one week ago) link

I think it's practically a truism tbh. Whether you personally picked up on overt freak culture stuff as young child (more likely as teens) or not. How can you not say that stuff wasn't around or influencing culture in the 70s unless you lived in some renunciate commune. Those youth cultures were simply (a major part of) the ones that immediately preceded our own.

He might have been a bit more (or less) to what he said, it seems an interesting bit of context to think about anyway.

Stanley Halfbrick (Noel Emits), Sunday, 26 July 2020 17:45 (one week ago) link

* There might have been

Stanley Halfbrick (Noel Emits), Sunday, 26 July 2020 17:46 (one week ago) link

I read all the Narnia books and never picked up that they were supposed to be Christian allegories until adulthood. To me they were just stories about kids in an imaginary world. And my mom dragged my brother and me to (Catholic) church every Sunday. I guess I just wasn't a particularly close reader...

― but also fuck you (unperson)

no, i think lewis was just bad at writing children's books. "hey, kids! allegory! subtext!"

if you'd told me aslan was supposed to be jesus when i was reading those books i would have told you that was stupid and that jesus wasn't a lion.

and that's what makes c.s. lewis tolerable for me, i try to read his stuff now and there's all this bloody awful subtext to everything and it's shit.

"That reminds me when I read The Holy Blood And The Holy Grail I thought they seemed to have taken the whole thing from the Foundation series.

― Stanley Halfbrick (Noel Emits)"

i read a lot of asimov too, he really wasn't a very good writer, "foundation" in particular is so much "whig history IN SPACE" bullshit

the main thing that gets me about holy blood, holy grail is that the guy who wrote it co-wrote the original yeti serials for doctor who (the second one was also a knockoff, this one of the film "zulu"), and then tanked his career with the show by doing an awful piece of anti-hippie tripe called "the dominators"

Kate (rushomancy), Sunday, 26 July 2020 18:51 (one week ago) link


You must be logged in to post. Please either login here, or if you are not registered, you may register here.