Eyes Wide Shut

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I've never seen Vanilla Sky, but for some reason I thought that would be a similar character.

Josh in Chicago, Tuesday, 12 February 2019 02:09 (one year ago) link

I don't think so, from what I remember...Ships passing in the night: Kubrick's last film, P.T. Anderson's third. If you had to single out one director today who's closer to Kubrick than any other, I think it'd be Anderson. Not a perfect fit, but I can't think of a better match.

clemenza, Tuesday, 12 February 2019 02:13 (one year ago) link

Christopher Nolan is jumping up and down in his seat with his hand raised

an incoherent crustacean (MatthewK), Tuesday, 12 February 2019 02:43 (one year ago) link

ugh, NEXT

flappy bird, Tuesday, 12 February 2019 03:44 (one year ago) link

I agree that PTA is the closest analogue to Kubrick today (at least in America).

flappy bird, Tuesday, 12 February 2019 03:44 (one year ago) link

Not US, but I'd argue for Jonathan Glazer as being closest to inheriting the Kubrick mantle. Similar framing, camera movement, themes, hollow characters, use of music. Less so in Glazer's debut Sexy Beast than in his Kidman feature Birth and in Under the Skin. As Kubrick had planned for decades, Glazer is presently filming a Holocaust film.

Nolan is another formalist, but working more in time/editing clockwork than in meticulous production design. He has none of Kubrick's cynicism, and relies heavily on screenwriting kludges that Kubrick would find risible. PTA genuinely seems to love his characters and his films are suffused with humanity. In some ways he's an anti-Kubrick.

no expense was incurred (Sanpaku), Tuesday, 12 February 2019 09:22 (one year ago) link

ilx in a laughable heretic mood

a Mets fan who gave up on everything in the mid '80s (Dr Morbius), Tuesday, 12 February 2019 11:53 (one year ago) link

Glazer's Kubrickian tendencies are, yeah, I think more formalist and self-conscious. Though Under the Skin is an example of a movie I could have totally seen Kubrick making had he come along a couple of decades later. Same thing with The Master or Phantom Thread. Maybe even There Will Be Blood.

Not Nolan.

Josh in Chicago, Tuesday, 12 February 2019 13:00 (one year ago) link

Nolan is a waste of celluloid, but Glazer and Anderson RULE and are pretty distinct from SK to me. Anderson's films are always about love, for starters. Glazer might be a better counterpart, in that respect.

an incoherent crustacean (MatthewK), Tuesday, 12 February 2019 13:19 (one year ago) link

I'm not really thinking about what Kubrick's films are about, per se. I really don't see a thematic through line.

Josh in Chicago, Tuesday, 12 February 2019 14:22 (one year ago) link

I think Kubrick was trying to suggest something about the duality of man.

tylerw, Tuesday, 12 February 2019 14:50 (one year ago) link

here or always?

Josh in Chicago, Tuesday, 12 February 2019 15:17 (one year ago) link

Haha just a little joke — paraphrase from full metal jacket.

tylerw, Tuesday, 12 February 2019 15:25 (one year ago) link

When I compared PTA to Kubrick, I was also--maybe mostly--thinking about stature. I think Anderson, among English-language directors, is the guy whose films are most anticipated right now and most automatic for acclaim, end-of-year lists, etc.

clemenza, Tuesday, 12 February 2019 15:30 (one year ago) link

He's, especially lately, the guy with big ideas, long takes, formidable (but no longer flashy) directing chops, etc.

Josh in Chicago, Tuesday, 12 February 2019 16:00 (one year ago) link

Kubrick ... I'm too young to remember, but at the time did The Shining or Full Metal Jacket generate much in the way of significant acclaim/year-end praise, let alone anticipation?

Josh in Chicago, Tuesday, 12 February 2019 16:01 (one year ago) link

full metal jacket very much so on both points; i'm too young to remember as far as shining is concerned

Fuck the NRA (ulysses), Tuesday, 12 February 2019 16:04 (one year ago) link

Was it? Not the the Oscars is *the* measure but it is *a* measure, and it was only nominated for best adapted screenplay (which it lost).

Josh in Chicago, Tuesday, 12 February 2019 16:06 (one year ago) link

i was a kid and even i was aware that it was much admired and anticipated.

Fuck the NRA (ulysses), Tuesday, 12 February 2019 16:09 (one year ago) link

yep

illegal economic migration (Tracer Hand), Tuesday, 12 February 2019 16:14 (one year ago) link

This interview around the time of Full Metal Jacket addresses the question of Kubrick and critical acclaim:

Initial reviews of most of your films are sometimes inexplicably hostile. Then there’s a reevaluation. Critics seem to like you better in retrospect.

That’s true. The first reviews of 2001 were insulting, let alone bad. An important Los Angeles critic faulted Paths of Glory because the actors didn’t speak with French accents. When Dr. Strangelove came out, a New York paper ran a review under the head Moscow could not buy more harm to America. Something like that. But critical opinion on my films has always been salvaged by what I would call subsequent critical opinion. Which is why I think audiences are more reliable than critics, at least initially. Audiences tend not to bring all that critical baggage with them to each film.

And I really think that a few critics come to my films expecting to see the last film. They’re waiting to see something that never happens. I imagine it must be something like standing in the batter’s box waiting for a fast ball, and the pitcher throws a change-up. The batter swings and misses. He thinks, “Shit, he threw me the wrong pitch.” I think this accounts for some of the initial hostility.

https://www.rollingstone.com/movies/movie-news/the-rolling-stone-interview-stanley-kubrick-in-1987-90904/

Ward Fowler, Tuesday, 12 February 2019 16:23 (one year ago) link

I totally agree that many (all?) of his films have grown or at least changed in estimation over the years. Or at least are frequently reassessed. That's something else.

I wasn't that much of a kid, old enough to remember when it came out, and I mostly remember Full Metal received as yet another Vietnam film (Hamburger Hill, Platoon, etc.) and that it was not considered one of Kubrick's best movies, tbh. Can't speak to its anticipation the way I can to that of EWS which of course followed decades of radio silence (as opposed to Full Metal, which followed only 6 or 7 years off), and arrived as a Big Deal.

Josh in Chicago, Tuesday, 12 February 2019 16:26 (one year ago) link

I recall Full Metal Jacket being a big deal, but 1) still pre-internet, so a big deal then wasn't as big a big deal as now, and, as you point out, 2) it landed in the middle of a bunch of Vietnam films all at once. Triggered by what, I don't know--it was the second Vietnam cluster after Deer Hunter/Coming Home/Apocalypse Now, only this one involved twice as many films. (The best of which, for me, had the bad luck to be released last: Casualties of War.)

clemenza, Tuesday, 12 February 2019 17:23 (one year ago) link

Same year as Born on the 4th of July iirc. And yeah, talk about a film (Casualties) that's been reassessed.

Josh in Chicago, Tuesday, 12 February 2019 17:38 (one year ago) link

When I compared PTA to Kubrick, I was also--maybe mostly--thinking about stature. I think Anderson, among English-language directors, is the guy whose films are most anticipated right now and most automatic for acclaim, end-of-year lists, etc.

― clemenza, Tuesday, February 12, 2019 10:30 AM (two hours ago) Bookmark Flag Post Permalink

Yeah this is where I see the similarity, also in how it takes a few years for PTA's films to be reevaluated - The Master & Inherent Vice specifically, which I remember left a lot of people scratching their heads. Though I suppose that's where the comparison ends, everything prior was well received and Phantom Thread pulled almost everyone that was alienated by the past two or three films back in. He's also taking less time now than he was post-PDL.

flappy bird, Tuesday, 12 February 2019 18:07 (one year ago) link

four months pass...

Abigail Good (the Mysterious Woman): They took this space which is now a really beautiful hotel in St. Pancras. A very grand building with a big staircase. It was all very surreal because we were doing these weird ceremonial movements for months. We would meet and rehearse and come up with ideas. And every day, Leon would record it and come back with feedback from Stanley.

Julienne Davis (Mandy): Stanley said, “It’s not gonna be any of this,” and he made a thrusting gesture. Instead, he said it would be more a kind of modern dance with the inference of sex.

Russell Trigg (dancer): Yolande’s practice involves lots of contact work and improvisation, so that guided the rehearsal. It’s a deliberate kind of movement. She was trying to get a more kind of sensual approach to it. One time, I was working with somebody else, and we had to move along a wall and against each other. There was another scene on beds or sofas. The pressure and resistance of bodies against bodies, bodies against tables or walls or other kinds of props.

Yolande Snaith (choreographer): I’m not sure that Stanley knew entirely what he wanted. It felt like a sort of research period, with me playing around with ideas and presenting them to him, and him looking at them and feeding back. Jocelyn Pook was a composer I knew, [who had a piece called] “Backwards Priests.” I was using that in the rehearsal studio because it felt very appropriate. When Stanley was looking at the tapes of rehearsal, he asked, “What is that music?”

Jocelyn Pook (composer): Stanley said, “I’ve heard this piece from your album. I’d love to hear more stuff.” I remember a car came within a few hours to collect the little cassette I made. And the next day, the car returned to pick me up, and I went to see him in Pinewood studio. He was really excited about some music he was listening to, and he talked me through the section he wanted me to work on. Of course, it was a very intimidating situation to be in, because I hadn’t ever scored a film before. At the beginning, he just asked me to try some ideas for the masked-ball scene and the orgy scene. I was asked later to do the rest of the original music.

Leon Vitali: We were taking so long that sometimes the leases ran out on where we could rehearse. I was having trouble holding on to some of the girls I’d found because they had other obligations and jobs. And then we had to find some more because we realized we didn’t have enough. It was all very Stanley.

YS: I think his vision of the orgy scene over the course of the time we worked on it became much more of a literal orgy. There was a problem because the models would have to be paid a lot more to do that, and some of them didn’t want to do it.

AG: Leon came back one day with pictures from the Kama Sutra and said, “Stanley would like you to draw inspiration from these images,” at which point we were all sort of like, “Okay, that’s not really what we signed up for.” But we knew each other very well at this point, so taking on more of a sexual nature was not so shocking.

https://www.vulture.com/2019/06/eyes-wide-shut-orgy-scene-oral-history.html

a Mets fan who gave up on everything in the mid '80s (Dr Morbius), Monday, 1 July 2019 15:37 (one year ago) link

Yolande Snaith is an anagram for Handy Toenails.

two weeks pass...

Opened 20 years ago today.

a Mets fan who gave up on everything in the mid '80s (Dr Morbius), Tuesday, 16 July 2019 23:53 (eleven months ago) link

I will now observe the occasion by watching Swing Time.

a Mets fan who gave up on everything in the mid '80s (Dr Morbius), Tuesday, 16 July 2019 23:54 (eleven months ago) link

Lol

Ask Heavy Manners (James Redd and the Blecchs), Tuesday, 16 July 2019 23:58 (eleven months ago) link

Nick Nightingale sounds like an Astaire character

a Mets fan who gave up on everything in the mid '80s (Dr Morbius), Wednesday, 17 July 2019 00:23 (eleven months ago) link

I will observe not knowing what date Swing Time opened by not watching Swing Time.

Pauline Male (Eric H.), Wednesday, 17 July 2019 00:32 (eleven months ago) link

Thought this bump was going to be related to the Laura Branigan thread.

Josh in Chicago, Wednesday, 17 July 2019 00:38 (eleven months ago) link

haha

Funky Isolations (jed_), Wednesday, 17 July 2019 00:55 (eleven months ago) link

so happy to have played a part in making that a thing.

Funky Isolations (jed_), Wednesday, 17 July 2019 00:56 (eleven months ago) link

From a 2002 profile of Jeffrey Epstein:

All the speculation and mystery has proved fertile ground for some alternative Jeffrey Epstein stories – the most bizarre of which has him playing the piano (he is classically trained) for high rollers in a Manhattan piano bar in the mid-eighties.

... (Eazy), Wednesday, 17 July 2019 02:34 (eleven months ago) link

This is great:

https://www.vulture.com/2019/06/eyes-wide-shut-orgy-scene-oral-history.html

xyzzzz__, Wednesday, 17 July 2019 09:51 (eleven months ago) link

as posted on July 1

I wasn't trying to dis EWS, I rewatched it last year

a Mets fan who gave up on everything in the mid '80s (Dr Morbius), Wednesday, 17 July 2019 11:15 (eleven months ago) link

Ah cool

xyzzzz__, Wednesday, 17 July 2019 11:19 (eleven months ago) link

What happened to Todd Field? He's made a whopping two films, both with tons of attention and award nominations, but Little Children was back in 2006 and nothing since then. Even his acting has been next to nothing.

Josh in Chicago, Wednesday, 17 July 2019 12:52 (eleven months ago) link

There were too many Todds at the time--Haynes, Solondz, Holland--so one of them had to go.

clemenza, Wednesday, 17 July 2019 13:01 (eleven months ago) link

I still think this is an extraordinary film

akm, Wednesday, 17 July 2019 13:04 (eleven months ago) link

The most.

Pauline Male (Eric H.), Wednesday, 17 July 2019 13:04 (eleven months ago) link

todd Holland?

a Mets fan who gave up on everything in the mid '80s (Dr Morbius), Wednesday, 17 July 2019 13:05 (eleven months ago) link

Directed most of the Larry Sanders episodes.

clemenza, Wednesday, 17 July 2019 13:09 (eleven months ago) link

What a weird oral history. These two things jumped out at me:

One of the problems was that they had to be totally natural. No Botox, no breast enhancements, anything like that. I made it very clear to everybody who came and their agents.

And that was because Stanley wanted this very particular body type, a sort of Barbie-doll type.

So everyone had to be "totally natural," but Kubrick wanted "Barbie-doll" types? OK. That whole scene is so dumb, and would have been better had it been more surreal or whatever word they kept throwing around. Like, I dunno, the sequence at the end of Gaspar Noe's "Love" or something. Because what hurts that whole scene in EWS is that, from memory, it is so cheesy Red Shoes Diaries or whatever. So ... mission accomplished? And failed?

Josh in Chicago, Wednesday, 17 July 2019 13:16 (eleven months ago) link

My wife and I saw this movie on our honeymoon on a hot day in Hawaii. Actually, we saw a third of it before the projector broker. Then we kind of looked at each other, shrugged, and went out to dinner instead.
― Josh in Chicago, Monday, June 25, 2012 12:23 AM (seven years ago)

perhaps it's a film about how marriage attracts the mutually tasteless
― Ward Fowler, Monday, June 25, 2012 3:12 AM (seven years ago)

It still plays beautifully.

Pauline Male (Eric H.), Wednesday, 17 July 2019 13:25 (eleven months ago) link

Eh, you know what? Fuck all y'all.

Josh in Chicago, Wednesday, 17 July 2019 13:38 (eleven months ago) link

I'll never marry, which makes sense because I don't understand the appeal of this movie even after three viewings.

TikTok to the (Alfred, Lord Sotosyn), Wednesday, 17 July 2019 13:38 (eleven months ago) link

It's tantamount to understanding the appeal of ILX after 16 years tbh.

Pauline Male (Eric H.), Wednesday, 17 July 2019 13:39 (eleven months ago) link


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