HEY JEWS

Message Bookmarked
Bookmark Removed
Not all messages are displayed: show all messages (1836 of them)

The Torah instructs a Jew not to eat (or even possess) chometz all seven days of Passover (Exodus 13:3). "Chometz" is defined as any of the five grains (wheat, spelt, barley, oats, and rye) that came into contact with water for more than 18 minutes. This is a serious Torah prohibition, and for that reason we take extra protective measures on Passover to prevent any mistakes.

Which brings us to another category of food called "kitniyot" (sometimes referred to generically as "legumes"). This includes rice, corn, soy beans, string beans, peas, lentils, peanuts, mustard, sesame seeds and poppy seeds. Even though kitniyot cannot technically become chometz, Ashkenazi Jews do not eat them on Passover. Why?

The Smak (Rabbi Moshe of Kouchi, 13th century, France) explains that products of kitniyot appear like chometz products. For example, it can be hard to distinguish between rice flour (kitniyot) and wheat flour (chometz). Therefore, to prevent confusion, all kitniyot was prohibited.

mizzell, Monday, 6 April 2009 16:40 (eight years ago) Permalink

I'm throwing myself in with the Sephardic camp this year.

quincie, Monday, 6 April 2009 16:42 (eight years ago) Permalink

Take a Hot Dog
and make it Kosher

the drummer from the hilarious 1990's Britpop act Gay Dad (wanko ergo sum), Monday, 6 April 2009 16:45 (eight years ago) Permalink

Oh makes more sense, and yes, I know the story, but I'm wondering why go so much further than just bread, I mean, Matzah is just unleavened bread, still has wheat in it and all, it's not like they didn't have enough time to cook pasta when escaping Egypt.

mehlt, Monday, 6 April 2009 16:46 (eight years ago) Permalink

Keep hearing the spoken intro to "One Step Beyond" when I see this thread title.

•--• --- --- •--• (Pleasant Plains), Monday, 6 April 2009 16:47 (eight years ago) Permalink

Which is to say, eating corn is a long ways away from letting bread rise.

mehlt, Monday, 6 April 2009 16:48 (eight years ago) Permalink

Keep hearing the spoken intro to "One Step Beyond" when I see this thread title.

Don't eat that - EAT THIS

This Board is a Prison on Planet Bullshit (Shakey Mo Collier), Monday, 6 April 2009 16:51 (eight years ago) Permalink

passover is a great holiday.
G R E A T

BUT, the Haggadahs have not arrived in the mail from my grandfather yet and I'm also getting a bit nervous about seating... also, anyone have a good veggie matzoh ball soup recipe? vegetarians certainly won't eat teh brisket.

ian, Monday, 6 April 2009 16:55 (eight years ago) Permalink

good god how do vegetarians ever survive during Passover without the grains?

quincie, Monday, 6 April 2009 16:58 (eight years ago) Permalink

apparently quinoa is ok.

mizzell, Monday, 6 April 2009 16:59 (eight years ago) Permalink

good to qui-know-a

rip dom passantino 3/5/09 never forget (max), Monday, 6 April 2009 17:00 (eight years ago) Permalink

Seven days of quinoa and matzah sounds . . . constipating.

quincie, Monday, 6 April 2009 17:00 (eight years ago) Permalink

Can we turn this thread also into a list of all of the awesome things about being jewish in general?

quincie, Monday, 6 April 2009 17:01 (eight years ago) Permalink

1. Chosen people.
2. Latkes

ian, Monday, 6 April 2009 17:02 (eight years ago) Permalink

3. Talmud

ian, Monday, 6 April 2009 17:03 (eight years ago) Permalink

4. hot sabbath sex

This Board is a Prison on Planet Bullshit (Shakey Mo Collier), Monday, 6 April 2009 17:03 (eight years ago) Permalink

5. Neuroses

This Board is a Prison on Planet Bullshit (Shakey Mo Collier), Monday, 6 April 2009 17:04 (eight years ago) Permalink

6. control of the media/money

good god how do vegetarians ever survive during Passover without the grains?

― quincie, Monday, April 6, 2009 11:58 AM (2 minutes ago) Bookmark Suggest Ban Permalink

This may explain my increased secularism that started around the time I became vegetarian.

mehlt, Monday, 6 April 2009 17:04 (eight years ago) Permalink

6. Noodle kugel

quincie, Monday, 6 April 2009 17:05 (eight years ago) Permalink

7. Tikkun olam as commandment

quincie, Monday, 6 April 2009 17:07 (eight years ago) Permalink

7. anything heimische...

suggest bánh mi (suzy), Monday, 6 April 2009 17:08 (eight years ago) Permalink

8. Lady rabbis (in non-Orthodox movements)

quincie, Monday, 6 April 2009 17:08 (eight years ago) Permalink

9. All our base

the drummer from the hilarious 1990's Britpop act Gay Dad (wanko ergo sum), Monday, 6 April 2009 17:08 (eight years ago) Permalink

Tikkun olam is my favorite part of Judaism ever. Concept and metaphor equally awesome.

guys i need to eliminate this business associate and im really nervous (Laurel), Monday, 6 April 2009 17:09 (eight years ago) Permalink

The Golders Green and St. Louis Park eruvs.

suggest bánh mi (suzy), Monday, 6 April 2009 17:09 (eight years ago) Permalink

10. sense of humor

cutty, Monday, 6 April 2009 17:11 (eight years ago) Permalink

what's the deal with "rabbi jose" btw

CNTFACE (omar little), Monday, 6 April 2009 17:29 (eight years ago) Permalink

11. Woody Allen movies

This Board is a Prison on Planet Bullshit (Shakey Mo Collier), Monday, 6 April 2009 17:31 (eight years ago) Permalink

vicky cristina barcelona?

Blackout Crew are the Beatles of donk (jim), Monday, 6 April 2009 17:32 (eight years ago) Permalink

12. Tongue (not explicitly Jewish I know)

ian, Monday, 6 April 2009 17:32 (eight years ago) Permalink

13. Philip Roth
14. Having an entire holiday dedicated to alcohol (Purim)
15. Klezmer

Mordy, Monday, 6 April 2009 17:35 (eight years ago) Permalink

14. Having an entire holiday dedicated to alcohol (Purim)

^^^this

This Board is a Prison on Planet Bullshit (Shakey Mo Collier), Monday, 6 April 2009 17:37 (eight years ago) Permalink

13. Philip David Lee Roth

fixed

This Board is a Prison on Planet Bullshit (Shakey Mo Collier), Monday, 6 April 2009 17:38 (eight years ago) Permalink

Today there's a blessing you can make on the sun that can only be made like once every 25 years. That's pretty cool.

Mordy, Monday, 6 April 2009 17:38 (eight years ago) Permalink

Yeah, klezmer wildly OTM but I find Roth totally 100% repellent.

ian, Monday, 6 April 2009 17:39 (eight years ago) Permalink

according to the brooklyn paper this is only the 3rd time in history that the sun is in the same position during passover that it was when it was first created

rip dom passantino 3/5/09 never forget (max), Monday, 6 April 2009 17:39 (eight years ago) Permalink

^^^^ awesome

ian, Monday, 6 April 2009 17:41 (eight years ago) Permalink

going to an orthodox seder as a favor to moms, not looking forward to it (mostly because it goes well past midnight, is an hour and a half away, and i have to work in the morning)

Ømår Littel (Jordan), Monday, 6 April 2009 17:45 (eight years ago) Permalink

One sucky thing about being Jewish: Often (like this Passover), the two days of Chag run into Shabbat, which means that observant Jews (including my family) will be keeping three days straight of no electricity and such. Almost everyone always secretly cheats around the second day to take showers.

Mordy, Monday, 6 April 2009 17:46 (eight years ago) Permalink

You can take a shower, I thought, you just can't dry off? What if you stood with your arms out until you air dried?

guys i need to eliminate this business associate and im really nervous (Laurel), Monday, 6 April 2009 17:48 (eight years ago) Permalink

Or put on a big fluffy bathrobe?

guys i need to eliminate this business associate and im really nervous (Laurel), Monday, 6 April 2009 17:48 (eight years ago) Permalink

my dad is currently trying to make me feel guilty for not going to a sedar

iatee, Monday, 6 April 2009 17:53 (eight years ago) Permalink

according to the brooklyn paper this is only the 3rd time in history that the sun is in the same position during passover that it was when it was first created

― rip dom passantino 3/5/09 never forget (max), Monday, April 6, 2009

you and i both know that there is no significance whatsoever to this, though. i read it in the paper.

he sounded italian enough to give me something (the schef (adam schefter ha ha)), Monday, 6 April 2009 17:54 (eight years ago) Permalink

what did the paper say?

Ømår Littel (Jordan), Monday, 6 April 2009 17:56 (eight years ago) Permalink

14. Tallits look comfy. Not so different from a snuggy.

quincie, Monday, 6 April 2009 17:56 (eight years ago) Permalink

xxpost the significance is awesomeness

iatee, Monday, 6 April 2009 17:57 (eight years ago) Permalink

So kosher for pesach is stricter than regular kosher, right? That would explain why the jewish bagel store down the shops had a big sign saying "NONE OF OUR PRODUCTS ARE KOSHER FOR PASSOVER PLEASE NOTE" which I didn't quite understand til now.

I've said this before, but I'm fascinated by all these traditions and rituals in Judaism. It is very odd, now I think on it, but I grew up knowing absolute zero about Jewish culture. There just werent any orthodox jews in the city I grew up in. Where I live now OTOH is an area concentrated with mainly Hassids and Lubavicts (I think thats right?).

one art, please (Trayce), Tuesday, 7 April 2009 00:06 (eight years ago) Permalink

having just finished six months of judaism class i'm ready to drop science at my gf's family's passover

CNTFACE (omar little), Tuesday, 7 April 2009 00:08 (eight years ago) Permalink

hahaha... make sure you explain the whole "all the days of our lives" thing

s1ocki, Tuesday, 7 April 2009 00:12 (eight years ago) Permalink

i'm gonna guess yes. and in any case, the price is def the problem there.

removed from the rain drops and drop tops of experience (ulysses), Friday, 24 February 2017 22:44 (three months ago) Permalink

That show sounds fkin cool
Signed a goy

his eye is on despair-o (Jon not Jon), Friday, 24 February 2017 23:08 (three months ago) Permalink

Goys welcome

i believe that (s)he is sincere (forksclovetofu), Saturday, 25 February 2017 05:36 (three months ago) Permalink

two months pass...

this speech was given by one of my yeshiva rabbis last week. it's v much addressed to the orthodox community and some of the challenges facing it (particularly what is known as the "off the derech" or "off the road" aka "leaving Judaism" crisis and a related drug addiction and overdose crisis). because of that i'm not sure if the language will be a huge barrier to ilx posters (and some of the ways of speaking are not at the level of sophistication, particularly about non-orthodox communities, or sophistication of secular humanism, that ilxors might expect) but i thought it was beautiful and i cried multiple times watching it. the ideas being floated in it are not something that are super prevalent within the orthodox community yet but that's why i went to learn w/ him many years ago - bc i thought he was onto something new about the value and meaning of judaism to people's actual lived lives and relationships. at one pt during the speech there's a gasp bc some of the things he's saying are shocking to hegemonic orthodoxy and someone asks if they can record the lecture. from an anthro-social value alone i think it's worth checking out even if u get nothing else out of it: https://www.theyeshiva.net/item/4151

Mordy, Wednesday, 3 May 2017 04:08 (one month ago) Permalink

ive been reading Moses Maimonides "The Guide for the Perplexed" and 45 pages in i am quite enjoying it. how prevalent is the idea that God is incorporeal? it is a point he keeps returning to, indeed it is a major theme of the work, which so far has been tasked with introducing the concept of homonyms and words having multiple, contextual, meanings that tend to be reduced to a literalization.

lol and he keeps making fun of people who think the world is flat. this is in the 12th century!

AdamVania (Adam Bruneau), Wednesday, 17 May 2017 00:32 (one month ago) Permalink

God being incorporeal is broadly accepted in Judaism I can't think of any serious denomination that contradicts that tenet. Maimonides (aka the Rambam) is probably the most canonical figure in the Jewish world (particularly the Orthodox world) and penned the 13 principles of faith that essentially delineate the borders of traditional Judaism. Guide to the Perplexed is fantastic. You'd probably dig this as well - a letter he wrote about Jewish belief in the resurrection of the dead: http://rambam.merkaz.com/Class%2013%20-%20Letter%20on%20Resurrection.pdf

Mordy, Wednesday, 17 May 2017 00:35 (one month ago) Permalink

he was also a physician (and some say advisor) to Sultan Saladin. he lived in Cairo and signed all his letters as (paraphrasing), "The one who is sinning by living in Egypt."

Mordy, Wednesday, 17 May 2017 00:39 (one month ago) Permalink

yeah i am loving this book! he is really a brilliant thinker, he seems quite hip to the current scientific theories for so long ago. i really like how he talks about the anthropomorphize-ing that usually takes place wrt God. the idea being that we say "God sees" but it is not the same as saying a person sees. he goes on about the different bodily organs involved in perception and the senses, how this is related to sin, how this must be regulated for the goal of worldly moral perfection. he doesn't go deeply into addiction but at one point he notes often people have a peculiar appetite for a particular sense. on the contrary God needs no bodily organs because creation requires nothing that is outside of him. he is incorporeal where we need an ear to hear and an eye to see. his "sight" is a completely different thing than, humans or animals, who are both material and organ-based.

AdamVania (Adam Bruneau), Wednesday, 17 May 2017 02:05 (one month ago) Permalink

https://www.wdl.org/en/item/3962/#q=maimonides

incredibly ornate illuminated manuscript version of his "Mishneh Torah". really neat psychedelic doodles all over the place. that site is so cool. they have also an original of the "Guide for the Perlexed".

AdamVania (Adam Bruneau), Wednesday, 17 May 2017 15:08 (one month ago) Permalink

two weeks pass...

https://www.thejc.com/lifestyle/features/it-s-an-all-jewish-town-but-no-it-s-not-in-israel-1.25044

my brother went to yeshiva with a kid from azerbaijan

Mordy, Friday, 2 June 2017 15:56 (three weeks ago) Permalink

https://kavvanah.wordpress.com/2017/06/04/interview-with-yuval-harari-jewish-magic-before-the-rise-of-kabbalah/

- maybe of interest to some here (adam b?)

Mordy, Monday, 5 June 2017 18:06 (two weeks ago) Permalink

that is very cool! i had heard of the Sword of Moses. so neat to see a new translation!

AdamVania (Adam Bruneau), Monday, 5 June 2017 19:29 (two weeks ago) Permalink

6) Why are you personally interested in magic?

Some ten years ago, when I was sitting in an Oxford coffeehouse and pondering about the book I was about to complete, the following sentence came to my mind: magic is a rather boring matter. I knew immediately that these were going to be its opening words. And indeed, in itself, “magic is a rather boring matter: practical action, supernatural technology. In its simple version, a few words are uttered, some of them meaningless. In more developed versions, some acts are performed and then the words are uttered.”

I’ve studied philosophy, Jewish thought, Early Christianity, Gnosticism, Kabbalah and comparative religion. I encountered profound thinking, ideological systems, myths, ethics and sophisticated means of expression. Magic technology is very far from that. It was like turning to the study of Ritual Engineering. Nevertheless, as I also wrote there, something in it captures the imagination. But there is much more than that.

First, there are people behind the praxis. Magic recipe literature is a broad map of human fears and anxieties, distresses and needs, aspirations and desires. It is a practical literature that, focusing on daily needs of the individual, slips beneath the radar of social supervision and reflects life itself in a fascinating way.

Second, magic is highly democratic. It focuses of the individual and, indifferent to religion, race or gender, takes personal needs of all kinds very seriously. It supports the individual at times of crises and assists him or her in fulfilling personal wishes. Bronislaw Malinowski viewed magic as ritualization of human optimism and I totally agree with him. Belief in magic is an expression of human optimistic decision to act rather than to despair and give up.

Unfortunately, power always involves potential aggression and the promise of magical power also has a destructive facet. Books of magic recipes reflect that facet with instructions of how to harm and abuse the other. Painful as it is, here too magic literature mirrors life itself.

Finally, because of the vague borderline between magic and the power of “true religion,” magic discourse is political by its very nature. It concerns knowledge and power, ideology and hegemony, exclusion and reproduction of social structures. That is true concerning all times – past and present.

AdamVania (Adam Bruneau), Monday, 5 June 2017 21:19 (two weeks ago) Permalink

I’ve studied philosophy, Jewish thought, Early Christianity, Gnosticism, Kabbalah and comparative religion. I encountered profound thinking, ideological systems, myths, ethics and sophisticated means of expression. Magic technology is very far from that. It was like turning to the study of Ritual Engineering. Nevertheless, as I also wrote there, something in it captures the imagination. But there is much more than that.

this has always bugged me a little. what is he talking about wrt "magic technology"? he says he has studied all of these fields of knowledge that are all about rituals and magic and the secret sophisticated meaning of these perhaps superficially silly myths and yet says magic is "very far" from sophistication. i wonder if it has to do with the writer. he also admits to being an atheist and sort of condescending towards the mystical aspects of those spiritual fields. it is my understanding that "magic technology" in its time was a sort of practical folk craft/conceptual art form/role-playing game that was canonically (through the mystical/esoteric post-Xtian Talmudic commentary) integrated into the theological and philosophical sophistication he praises in the Abrahamic religions.

mostly i don't understand why he can say he has studied the Kabbalah and found it "profound... and sophisticated" and then say that magic, the speaking of magical worlds, is not. it seems like he is holding two conflicting opinions at once. i thought the Kabbalah was all about magical words, didn't he just do a translation of The Sword of Moses? maybe he is talking strictly pagan (folk practices w no references to Abrahamic whatsoever) but he does not specify as such.

i am reading Maimonides right now and he is talking about prophets, how prophecy is closely tied to imagination, that the imagination is an important force that can be hampered during times of depression or emotional turmoil (or helped, as some claim). he talks about there being different levels of prophets, from the miracles-producing saint to the streetside fortune teller, and how Moses is sort of the pinacle of the human prophet, above all others, simply due to his superior nearness to God. my understanding is that classical magic is a holy thing, that everyone from the post-Xtian mystics to medieval cosplay theorists to Golden Dawn hipsters treated it as such, with respect to prior ideological/theological systems, myths, ethics, and sophistication.

AdamVania (Adam Bruneau), Friday, 9 June 2017 16:51 (two weeks ago) Permalink

magic technology = things like amulets, spells, etc. things meant to accomplish real world tasks (heal illness, help fertility, vex an enemy, etc). by contrast kabbalah and other ideological systems generally do not have any practical element.

Mordy, Friday, 9 June 2017 16:58 (two weeks ago) Permalink

well, there's the golem

Οὖτις, Friday, 9 June 2017 17:02 (two weeks ago) Permalink

supposedly created with sefer yetzirah but it's unclear to me to what extent they were extrapolating from mystical concepts to practical magic and to what extent it actually has guidelines for creating a golem. my impression is it's more the former.

Mordy, Friday, 9 June 2017 17:05 (two weeks ago) Permalink

by contrast kabbalah and other ideological systems generally do not have any practical element.

this would make sense as the act of Creation occurred through speech alone and required no external elements technology or tools. lol its hard to keep your head wrapped around where the line is wrt what is to be taken literally vs as a framework for theoretical/spiritual/philosophical inquiry. a debate as old as time i suppose. probably best to assume the latter as a baseline though all of these traditions incorporate elements and themes from others so yes it can get messy. if so he's talking more about the daily "get lucky in love and money" potions than the mystical concepts then sure. i think the line can get pretty blurry tho.

AdamVania (Adam Bruneau), Friday, 9 June 2017 18:36 (two weeks ago) Permalink

yeah well that's what the babylonian bowls were - getting healthy, luck, fertility, removing curses, etc

Mordy, Friday, 9 June 2017 18:48 (two weeks ago) Permalink


You must be logged in to post. Please either login here, or if you are not registered, you may register here.