Movies are too fucking long these days imho

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suggest banish

mdskltr (blueski), Wednesday, 16 June 2010 13:28 (seven years ago) Permalink

ya 2001 has a pretty sweet intermission card with the (ligeti?) music playing over it

delanie griffith (s1ocki), Wednesday, 16 June 2010 13:39 (seven years ago) Permalink

i saw Superman 2 with a friend and his family as a kid (having already seen it once in full thank god) and they made us go in half way through the film just as Lex is waving his white hankie at Zod in the White House. Then we watched 'til the end, sat through the rest of the 'programme' (trailers, a short film about solar energy etc) and then left just after Zod and Co start tearing up the place. Didn't understand it then, don't understand it now. But yeah i agree that it's become a meme that this happened.. but then i also was part of it happening!

piscesx, Wednesday, 16 June 2010 14:52 (seven years ago) Permalink

That's grounds for arrest. Superman II is at the top of the heap for comic book movie sequels.

Filmmaker, Author, Radio Host Stephen Baldwin (Alfred, Lord Sotosyn), Wednesday, 16 June 2010 14:53 (seven years ago) Permalink

i don't understand the meme part

delanie griffith (s1ocki), Wednesday, 16 June 2010 14:54 (seven years ago) Permalink

Not to mention that I don't wanna be there when Zod finds out you walked out of the movie.

Filmmaker, Author, Radio Host Stephen Baldwin (Alfred, Lord Sotosyn), Wednesday, 16 June 2010 14:57 (seven years ago) Permalink

Meme part was in response to
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up to a point people turned up mid-programme, and stayed on to "where they came in".

i mean, this is what people say happened, but programme start-times were given in newspapers etc. -- imho this became a meme because postmodernist movie critics/historians like the idea of people just like turning up and not caring about narrative man.

― sites.younglife.org:8080 (history mayne), Tuesday, 15 June 2010 09:57 (Yesterday)
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piscesx, Wednesday, 16 June 2010 15:12 (seven years ago) Permalink

ah

delanie griffith (s1ocki), Wednesday, 16 June 2010 15:28 (seven years ago) Permalink

if that's a meme so is the world series

progressive cuts (Tracer Hand), Wednesday, 16 June 2010 15:40 (seven years ago) Permalink

but it's more said of the thirties than 1980

dat nigga del griffith (zvookster), Wednesday, 16 June 2010 15:44 (seven years ago) Permalink

the meme part is not turning up whenever, which probably happened (though was definitely unusual in the extreme by 1980), but people later on saying that "turning up whenever" was better than the fascist, time-table-ist modern way of doing things. idk, none of the olds in my family thought it was a good way to see films, and people turning up halfway through was and is annoying as balls. though some of these same olds say that they always preferred the b-picture -- which is kind of a meme.

ultra nate dogg (history mayne), Wednesday, 16 June 2010 16:51 (seven years ago) Permalink

they sure loved memes. back then

delanie griffith (s1ocki), Wednesday, 16 June 2010 16:53 (seven years ago) Permalink

no they didn't, that's just a meme

progressive cuts (Tracer Hand), Wednesday, 16 June 2010 16:54 (seven years ago) Permalink

most ppl from the 30s-50s seem to recall it fondly when they recall it, but i guess that's more printable nostalgic than bitching abt it. i'm not sure abt individual start times in the bill being advertised routinely btw: i know Rank had to specifically try to get exhibitors in Britain to advertise start times for Henry V in 1944.

dat nigga del griffith (zvookster), Wednesday, 16 June 2010 17:04 (seven years ago) Permalink

among the uninformed shit i've heard people say in my long career as a film academic is that until the 60s ppl didn't know when films started, and just showed up and took their chances, staying round till when they came in (if they wanted to, man, if they cared about plots and all that mess). it's true that in most cinemas they'd let you stay in once you were there, but it just isn't true that people didn't know start-times.

xpost

you'd get programme start times back in the '20s, routinely. as with today, you could make a calculaish based on how long the main film was likely to be, etc., if you just wanted the main film. of course, there were many more suburban cinemas etc etc, and there's no really good sampling.

ultra nate dogg (history mayne), Wednesday, 16 June 2010 17:07 (seven years ago) Permalink

among the uninformed shit i've heard people say in my long career as a film academic is that until the 60s ppl didn't know when films started

what the hell. why would anyone believe this.

goole, Wednesday, 16 June 2010 17:09 (seven years ago) Permalink

it's fun

mdskltr (blueski), Wednesday, 16 June 2010 17:13 (seven years ago) Permalink

i don't think it's uninformed shit, it's abt moviegoing in the days of continuous programs, where a bill of newsreels, shorts, b feature and main feature would show on loop!

dat nigga del griffith (zvookster), Wednesday, 16 June 2010 17:17 (seven years ago) Permalink

so ppl get programme start times & then in mayne's take they turn up at the start of the loop or calculate as opposed to "turning up in the middle"...they were turning up in the midde of something even if they were calculating abt likelihoods... so it's a reach calling the "took their chances" take on this moviegoing uninformed shit in contrast. u must really hate the postmodernists to be so dogmatic abt this minor grist to their mill.

dat nigga del griffith (zvookster), Wednesday, 16 June 2010 17:19 (seven years ago) Permalink

it was a loop of a basically fixed length, with given start times, and a work-out-able time at which the main feature would begin. even modern cinemas (where i live) don't give the actual movie start-time. im saying that ppl who turned up 45 minutes into 'casablanca' and got their arses in everyone's face finding a seat would not have been super-popular.

there were (iirc) theatres that only really showed news, cartoons, shorts, etc: obviously they were different.

xpost

ultra nate dogg (history mayne), Wednesday, 16 June 2010 17:21 (seven years ago) Permalink

the literature is full of accounts of ppl & by ppl who just showed up in the middle, postmodernists weren't guessing based on the fact continuous programs existed.

think your olds were just the morbz of their day tbh, as was morbz obv

dat nigga del griffith (zvookster), Wednesday, 16 June 2010 17:30 (seven years ago) Permalink

the literature isn't that full, and lol at the postmodernists using evidence n e way. i hear enough completely made-up garbage from non-philosophers. think of it practically: people back then weren't stupid, they enjoyed stories, etc. people did go late, sure, but in the main? it would have been a p lame experience once the feature film became a thing.

ultra nate dogg (history mayne), Wednesday, 16 June 2010 17:39 (seven years ago) Permalink

anyway:

brooklyn's finest: 132 fucking minutes

ultra nate dogg (history mayne), Wednesday, 16 June 2010 17:41 (seven years ago) Permalink

this is where i get all reactionary and say that a default position of opposition to business has rendered these "po mo academics" (if they exist in the way HM is describing them) unable to think straight.

why would film distributors and exhibitors be content with their public being totally ignorant of when shit was going to be on? it doesn't make any sense at all, from a business perspective.

i mean, fine, ppl went to a shitload more movies in the first half of the century and so showing up late or whatever was prob more common. but this implication that teh cinema used to be some kind of free zone of time-un-delimited viewer experience, and now is a rigid oppressive airport of kapitalist kontrol, eh, i'd need some more data to believe that.

lol xp

goole, Wednesday, 16 June 2010 17:43 (seven years ago) Permalink

bored now

delanie griffith (s1ocki), Wednesday, 16 June 2010 17:44 (seven years ago) Permalink

I remember thinking Bad Boys II should have tacked on 30 minutes of Will Smith rapping and gone full Bollywood. That's true of just about every blockbuster now.

da croupier, Wednesday, 16 June 2010 18:47 (seven years ago) Permalink

uh i kinda went off there didn't i :/

goole, Wednesday, 16 June 2010 18:48 (seven years ago) Permalink

Stephen Fry says in the '...Washpot' book that he and a mate bunked off school, went to London, stayed in a cheap hotel and spent 4 days watching the same few films over and over and over. Basically he bought the 1 ticket at the start of the day and sat there watching again and again. Cabaret, Godfather and A Clockwork Orange in fact. That's something i've read/ heard many an indolent adolescent say they did back in the day.

piscesx, Wednesday, 16 June 2010 18:59 (seven years ago) Permalink

I'm just curious which PoMo academics are writing/believing/arguing this. I've been out of school for a while, and my major allowed me to be a bit of a dilettante, but I still hadn't heard about this at all, even in the requisite critiques/responses to Adorno's condemnation of popular film as the new opiate of the masses.

sarahel, Wednesday, 16 June 2010 20:39 (seven years ago) Permalink

Coming in in the middle seems like it would be a product of the cable era - flipping channels, might as well watch the last half of Jurassic Park. Or Rounders is on again, maybe I'll catch the weird-ass Malkovich scene and then go on my way.

a cross between lily allen and fetal alcohol syndrome (milo z), Wednesday, 16 June 2010 20:46 (seven years ago) Permalink

I fell asleep during several crucial parts of 4 Months 3 weeks... and for awhile I thought it was a comedy about awkward family dinners.

Philip Nunez, Wednesday, 16 June 2010 21:02 (seven years ago) Permalink

yeah having a lot of movie channels on cable has made me pretty careless about how i watch a lot of movies, sometimes i'll turn it on in the middle and get hooked and watch til the end, then watch the first half a couple days later and piece together anything that didn't make sense about the end the first time.

Mr. Srehtims (some dude), Wednesday, 16 June 2010 21:28 (seven years ago) Permalink

Basically he bought the 1 ticket at the start of the day and sat there watching again and again

At least they actually watched the movies--back in the days of cheap urban fleapit theaters, many homeless people bought tickets just so that could have a warm/cool and rainless place to sleep.

xp I've heard about (and seen old advertising for) theaters devoted to newsreels, but I've never heard of theaters just for short subjects*.

*Insert your own Terror of Tiny Town joke here.

Christine Green Leafy Dragon Indigo, Wednesday, 16 June 2010 21:40 (seven years ago) Permalink

That *they* could, I mean.

Christine Green Leafy Dragon Indigo, Wednesday, 16 June 2010 21:41 (seven years ago) Permalink

I'm just curious which PoMo academics are writing/believing/arguing this. I've been out of school for a while, and my major allowed me to be a bit of a dilettante, but I still hadn't heard about this at all, even in the requisite critiques/responses to Adorno's condemnation of popular film as the new opiate of the masses.

― sarahel, Wednesday, June 16, 2010 9:39 PM (1 hour ago) Bookmark

s1ocki is right, it's too boring to get into, but anyway it's a thing, not really put about by big-name postmodernists that i can recall, but it is a thing. i dunno if it would come up w/r/t adorno, let alone the "requisite" (lol) critiques/responses thereto.

ultra nate dogg (history mayne), Wednesday, 16 June 2010 22:24 (seven years ago) Permalink

s1ocki is right, it's too boring to get into, but anyway it's a thing, not really put about by big-name postmodernists that i can recall, but it is a thing. i dunno if it would come up w/r/t adorno, let alone the "requisite" (lol) critiques/responses thereto.

I don't think it's boring, but it just seems kinda a hard-to-stomach stretch of logic that esp. based on the most prevalent behavior and perception of people doesn't really seem relevant or accurate. Again, I'm a total dilettante, but from what I remember, "back in the day" people would go to see a particular movie, take note of the time it started which would be advertised on the marquee and in the newspaper, and show up on time.

current course offerings in my major where i went to college

sarahel, Wednesday, 16 June 2010 22:34 (seven years ago) Permalink

you ee-diots.

Nobody said that MOST people did this ROUTINELY! It was just KNOWN to happen! One example wd be teenage couples turning up and going in whenever bcz, oh, maybe they weren't gonna watch a whole lot of the movie?

Unless it's one of those apocryphal Psycho stories, Hitchcock was worried about spectators entering after Janet Leigh's exit and wondering where she was.

kind of shrill and very self-righteous (Dr Morbius), Thursday, 17 June 2010 00:33 (seven years ago) Permalink

guys

delanie griffith (s1ocki), Thursday, 17 June 2010 00:58 (seven years ago) Permalink

what's going on here

Filmmaker, Author, Radio Host Stephen Baldwin (Alfred, Lord Sotosyn), Thursday, 17 June 2010 01:01 (seven years ago) Permalink

people who weren't ALIVE when movie theaters would admit you in the middle of the feature are claiming IT DIDN'T HAPPEN.

kind of shrill and very self-righteous (Dr Morbius), Thursday, 17 June 2010 01:02 (seven years ago) Permalink

good thing you're here!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

congratulations (n/a), Thursday, 17 June 2010 01:06 (seven years ago) Permalink

!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

congratulations (n/a), Thursday, 17 June 2010 01:06 (seven years ago) Permalink

!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

congratulations (n/a), Thursday, 17 June 2010 01:06 (seven years ago) Permalink

hey guys just turned up in the middle of the thread, what's happening

dmr, Thursday, 17 June 2010 01:11 (seven years ago) Permalink

an argument so boring my conscious mind can barely contain it has somehow broken out in the middle of my beautiful thread

delanie griffith (s1ocki), Thursday, 17 June 2010 01:12 (seven years ago) Permalink

guess I'll keep reading until it's over then catch up on the beginning tomorrow

dmr, Thursday, 17 June 2010 01:12 (seven years ago) Permalink

anyway movies are too fucking long these days imo. sometimes this even applies to short movies, I see a lotta 90 minute documentaries that I wish were one-hour cable TV shows (being serious here)

dmr, Thursday, 17 June 2010 01:13 (seven years ago) Permalink

no good comes of any thread where "meme" surfaces

kind of shrill and very self-righteous (Dr Morbius), Thursday, 17 June 2010 01:24 (seven years ago) Permalink

^t bomb

hope this helps (Granny Dainger), Thursday, 17 June 2010 01:37 (seven years ago) Permalink


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