what are the foods you're snobby about?

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uncondensed milky way (remy bean), Sunday, 1 July 2012 02:36 (five years ago) Permalink

what foods, specifically, do you care deeply about? what do you refuse to eat if it's not perfect, or doesn't meet some (admittedly) arbitrary standard of goodness or taste?

uncondensed milky way (remy bean), Sunday, 1 July 2012 02:38 (five years ago) Permalink

I'm really fussy about oatmeal
- got to be Bob's Red Mill
- got to be cooked with 1:1 water:oatmeal ratio so it's kind of dry and the oats are chewy individual units with no slime
- I eat this every day

chupacabra seeds (Abbbottt), Sunday, 1 July 2012 02:43 (five years ago) Permalink

that is some good oatmeal. oatmeal is horrible when it turns to mush. on the other hand, i love congee/jook, especially when it turns to mush. i am snobby about

– corn
- the freshness of atlantic fish
- strawberries, raspberries, peaches
– coffee being dark, but not dark roast

uncondensed milky way (remy bean), Sunday, 1 July 2012 02:48 (five years ago) Permalink

my girlfriend is snobby about

– jasmine rice
– pho
– red vines (fuck you, twizzlers)
– apples

uncondensed milky way (remy bean), Sunday, 1 July 2012 02:54 (five years ago) Permalink

i don't really eat room temperature sandwiches under any circumstances. sandwiches should be pressed or grilled.

call all destroyer, Sunday, 1 July 2012 03:00 (five years ago) Permalink

i don't know if snobby is the right word for me, probably more like pedantic

- toast
- tea

toast must be perfectly crisp all over, no soft bits, but no burnt bits either.
there is a perfect balance of tea strength, sweetness and milkiness that is impossible for anyone to achieve except me.

just1n3, Sunday, 1 July 2012 03:02 (five years ago) Permalink

Off the top of my head -- grits, vinegar, tomatoes. I'll think of others.

Biff Wellington (WmC), Sunday, 1 July 2012 03:21 (five years ago) Permalink

what is it about vinegar you're snobby about, out of curiosity?

uncondensed milky way (remy bean), Sunday, 1 July 2012 11:54 (five years ago) Permalink

pizza

dis civilization and its contents (nakhchivan), Sunday, 1 July 2012 12:01 (five years ago) Permalink

Yeah I'll say pizza as well, I've been racking my brains. Soups too - have to be home made or gtfo.

Pureed Moods (Trayce), Sunday, 1 July 2012 12:05 (five years ago) Permalink

Remy, I like the different flavors of different vinegars, have about 7 or 8 different ones in the pantry, and try to take care to use the one in a dish that matches best with the other ingredients. I guess that's a little snobby instead of a lot snobby?

Biff Wellington (WmC), Sunday, 1 July 2012 13:28 (five years ago) Permalink

i guess i'm snobby abt vinegar cuz someone gave me a small £10 bottle of aceto balsamico di modena which seemed altogether excessive, but rly it was EXCELLENT even if i only ever used it on fish and chips and supermarket bags of rocket salad

dis civilization and its contents (nakhchivan), Sunday, 1 July 2012 13:31 (five years ago) Permalink

Was thinking about this thread as I fell asleep last night, and really I'm snobby about everything, even though I'm willing to eat crappy food in between the great, carefully planned meals. I'm judgmental about every bite, just not judgmental enough to try to make every meal omg wonderful. Sometimes I just need to shovel some coal into the furnace because I've got too much non-food stuff on my mind.

Biff Wellington (WmC), Sunday, 1 July 2012 13:44 (five years ago) Permalink

I guess I'm snobby about soy sauce in the way you are about vinegar, WmC. I'm not sure that I know - academically – the differences between the types, but I'm very aware of their different flavors and relative usefulness in recipes of different stripes.

I once had pizza covered in nettle (With JBR and Treppel and Ned, maybe?) and didn't like it. It *tasted* great, but it just seemed a waste? Pretentious? Over-wrought? That may have been the bridge too far – the moment I found out exactly how much I /do/ and /don't/ appreciate haut cuisine.

uncondensed milky way (remy bean), Sunday, 1 July 2012 16:36 (five years ago) Permalink

That sounds like the kind of pizza you'd be forced to eat in a Grimm Bros story as punishment!

chupacabra seeds (Abbbottt), Sunday, 1 July 2012 16:38 (five years ago) Permalink

pseudy pizza with random things on it ≠ haut cuisine

dis civilization and its contents (nakhchivan), Sunday, 1 July 2012 16:38 (five years ago) Permalink

I was sorting through a pantry shelf (looking to see if we still had the bottle of Datu Puti coconut vinegar) the other day and came across an unopened bottle of Healthy Boy Soy Sauce I had completely forgotten buying.

Neil Jung (WmC), Sunday, 1 July 2012 16:40 (five years ago) Permalink

falafel and hummus are two that for the most part i have to make myself. what i find in and around town just doesn't do it for me.

i don't get why a nettle pizza seems random or pretentious. kinda seems like something chez panisse's cafe could have on the menu (i.e. local/seasonal ideas)

making plans for nyquil (outdoor_miner), Sunday, 1 July 2012 18:14 (five years ago) Permalink

I'm not snobby about any food, but I'm snobby about the price of food. A $5 pad thai has to be pretty bad for me to hate it. Meanwhile, a David Chang ramen dish just makes me SO MAD why would you pay such a stupid price when you can get A+++ ramen for way less.

Have a lot of vinegar, too; apple cider for cooking, unfiltered raw apple cider for medicine, white vinegar for french fries, champagne vinegar for salad dressing, expensive balsamic vinegar for strawberries and ice cream, umeboshi vinegar for everything, rice vinegar for adobo

manditory fun. day (Ówen P.), Sunday, 1 July 2012 18:20 (five years ago) Permalink

What soy sauces? I only use cheap Chinese light, cheap Chinese dark and one nice Japanese one. My inlaws (Filipino) prefer my cooking when I use cheap soy sauce, or, best of all, Maggi.

manditory fun. day (Ówen P.), Sunday, 1 July 2012 18:23 (five years ago) Permalink

Maggi is excellent. I've got a Viet soy/fish sauce blend that I buy in a bottle that has no English on it. It's my go-to for anything fatty, but it's too acid for poultry and seafood, or anything with coconut milk. I'd recommend it, but I can't read the bottle and I just buy it b/c of the nice red cap.

uncondensed milky way (remy bean), Sunday, 1 July 2012 19:42 (five years ago) Permalink

I went to someone's house once and they were serving sushi with chinese dark soy sauce, I just about gagged

now all my posts got ship in it (dayo), Sunday, 1 July 2012 19:43 (five years ago) Permalink

i'm like wmc in that I have strong opinions about tons of food but I will eat just about anything

now all my posts got ship in it (dayo), Sunday, 1 July 2012 19:44 (five years ago) Permalink

falafel and hummus are two that for the most part i have to make myself. what i find in and around town just doesn't do it for me.

This is a good reminder that I'm really snobby about pesto. A big 'no' to store-bought, esp. with how easy it is to make.

Neil Jung (WmC), Sunday, 1 July 2012 19:46 (five years ago) Permalink

oh hell yes, pesto's so easy to make and to riff on (like adding/subbing tarragon or arugula or whatever). and canned pesto shouldn't exist, period. blech.
i could prolly make a big list, but winter tomatoes are another one i kinda can't stand with VERY few exceptions. same with goddamn berries shipped from South America in the winter/spring

try to take care to use the one in a dish that matches best with the other ingredients. I guess that's a little snobby instead of a lot snobby?

xxpost: to me that's just good common sense....

making plans for nyquil (outdoor_miner), Sunday, 1 July 2012 20:24 (five years ago) Permalink

I'll eat jar pesto but only the Sacla brand, anything else is always adulterated with cheap veggie oils or too much of something or shitty cheap walnuts or the pinenuts are in chunks.

I could make my own, but I never get round to it.

Pureed Moods (Trayce), Monday, 2 July 2012 00:13 (five years ago) Permalink

We've talked pesto before. Some people have gardens, the rest of us have to get jars.

Yeah, Maggi is so good. When it used to contain MSG it was the best, I grew up putting it on everything (scrambled eggs especially, holy crap so good). I'd be interested to see this Viet fish thing

manditory fun. day (Ówen P.), Monday, 2 July 2012 00:21 (five years ago) Permalink

i just make a big batch of pesto and freeze it in ice cube trays, then put the little blocks into ziploc bags.

just1n3, Monday, 2 July 2012 00:23 (five years ago) Permalink

Oh, weirdly: I'm very snobby about vegan and vegetarian food. If it's bland or badly cooked I get real annoyed, as if it's an affront to vegetarians, confirming carnivores' accusations.

manditory fun. day (Ówen P.), Monday, 2 July 2012 00:25 (five years ago) Permalink

WmC how do you make good grits

manditory fun. day (Ówen P.), Monday, 2 July 2012 18:26 (five years ago) Permalink

butter, cheese, salt, pepper, hot sauce?

40oz of tears (Jordan), Monday, 2 July 2012 18:31 (five years ago) Permalink

i'm snobby about po boys

40oz of tears (Jordan), Monday, 2 July 2012 18:31 (five years ago) Permalink

Ówen, it's all about getting good product. Bill Kte'pi recommended Nora Mill and I didn't care for them -- too many husk remnants. (I still have 4 1/2 lbs. in the fridge that I might as well just toss.) I get the yellow grits sold in bulk at the Dekalb Farmers Market whenever I go to Atlanta. I doubt they grind their own, and they don't ID the source, but these grits are really good. "Quick grits" are crap, obv.

Start with 4 parts liquid to 1 part grits. (Breakfast: half milk, half water. Savory, like for shrimp & grits or something: 3 parts water, vegetable broth or chicken broth, 1 part milk.) Bring the liquid and a bit of salt to a simmer and whisk in the grits, then drop the heat to low. Since good grits are a bit more coarsely ground than grocery store junk, they'll try to stick, so whisk often and don't leave them unattended.

After about 15 minutes, start taste-testing for doneness, and you can also adjust salt at this point. If they are really thick but not tender yet, whisk in a little more water, starting with 1/4 cup or so.* When they're done, you can whisk in a bit of butter and/or cheese if you want cheesy grits. Cheddar's good; a mix of cheddar and parmesan is great. If these are going to be savory grits as the starch underlying grillades, fish or shrimp, a squirt of Sriracha or several squirts of Tabasco are definitely called for here.

*Final ratio for me is closer to 4.5:1 liquid to grits.

Neil Jung (WmC), Monday, 2 July 2012 19:45 (five years ago) Permalink

Thanks WmC I will try it. I'm in shrimp country next week and can do the scrimp just great but my grits haven't been so hot

is capybara gay? (Ówen P.), Monday, 2 July 2012 22:28 (five years ago) Permalink

If you'll be anywhere in the Carolinas you should be set on finding A+ grits from a local mill. But again, I can't recommend Nora Mill.

Neil Jung (WmC), Monday, 2 July 2012 22:44 (five years ago) Permalink

spices, not so much snobby about freshness, but I always buy them at the Indian grocer for like 2 bucks for a boatload as opposed to mccormicks thimblefull for 5 bucks or whatever

m bison, Monday, 2 July 2012 22:57 (five years ago) Permalink

I'll be in Charleston SC. You'll see me next week on the "too effing hot" thread for sure

is capybara gay? (Ówen P.), Tuesday, 3 July 2012 14:05 (five years ago) Permalink

Yeah, Maggi is so good. When it used to contain MSG it was the best,

?? is this a varies-by-country thing? mine still has msg in it (thank god)

just sayin, Tuesday, 3 July 2012 17:54 (five years ago) Permalink

I am an outdoor cooking snob, which is not to say a BBQ bore. A well-grilled sausage or hamburger or piece of fish is always good and no science and you will get props from me for it regardless. But I will have to try very hard not to feel superior to you if you serve me any grilled goods with store-bought sauces or which came pre-marinated, I will lecture you if you precook anything before throwing it on the grill or if you never stop moving that poor steak for even a second, and I will mock you if you own a really expensive gas grill.

And I do become a barbeque bore on the subject of ribs, especially in Europe.

Three Word Username, Tuesday, 3 July 2012 18:01 (five years ago) Permalink

Yknow, I guess I am a snob about octopus/squid. It has to be really good, and accompanied just so; I won't accept lesser substitutes. Once you've had the best, it's kind of hard to go back.

nicest bitch of poster (La Lechera), Tuesday, 3 July 2012 18:09 (five years ago) Permalink

That sounds particularly snobby because I'm talking about such a comparatively novelty food item. Oh well. It's not really that expensive or exotic or even difficult to cook. It's just difficult to get it just right imo and I value that highly. Snobbily.

nicest bitch of poster (La Lechera), Tuesday, 3 July 2012 18:13 (five years ago) Permalink

I am a snob abt tea and also pasta; not so much brands of pasta but rather cooking it. I find myself thinking cruelly condescending things abt people who cook it past al dente and/or don't salt the water, or like people making a pasta-based casserole like baked ziti or mac & cheese who cook the pasta to eating-doneness before they even bake it.

Natalie Portmanteau (Stevie D(eux)), Tuesday, 3 July 2012 21:32 (five years ago) Permalink

I don't even care how you dress the pasta; I will probably seriously respect you more for cooking it right and putting butter/powdered garlic/sprinkle cheese on it than cooking it to mush in unsalted water and topping it with a homemade lamb ragout

Natalie Portmanteau (Stevie D(eux)), Tuesday, 3 July 2012 21:35 (five years ago) Permalink

I will lecture you if you precook anything before throwing it on the grill

what about potatoes???

now all my posts got ship in it (dayo), Tuesday, 3 July 2012 23:21 (five years ago) Permalink

Yknow, I guess I am a snob about octopus/squid. It has to be really good, and accompanied just so; I won't accept lesser substitutes. Once you've had the best, it's kind of hard to go back.

― nicest bitch of poster (La Lechera), Tuesday, July 3, 2012 2:09 PM (5 hours ago) Bookmark

that reminds me, deep fried octopus/squid is only ever good one it's at one point of texture on the spectrum between chewy and rubbery

now all my posts got ship in it (dayo), Tuesday, 3 July 2012 23:22 (five years ago) Permalink

Right, which is why I mostly prefer it grilled. I have only had one or two instances of fried calamari that was truly delicious and worth eating. Otherwise it was chewy material ensconced in "fried" which is not desirable.

nicest bitch of poster (La Lechera), Tuesday, 3 July 2012 23:34 (five years ago) Permalink

I'm at a loss as to what would be precooked before going on a BBQ grill anyway (except, as D says, potatoes I guess maybe). Surely no one would precook meat?

Pureed Moods (Trayce), Tuesday, 3 July 2012 23:39 (five years ago) Permalink

Some folks slow-roast pork ribs and finish them on the grill, otherwise, not sure what.

Jaq, Tuesday, 3 July 2012 23:40 (five years ago) Permalink

A lot of sparerib recipes involve doing most of the heavy lifting in the oven and just finishing them on the grill to get a sticky saucy glaze. xp

Neil Jung (WmC), Tuesday, 3 July 2012 23:41 (five years ago) Permalink

and in fruit salad

Peppermint Patty Hearst (VegemiteGrrl), Friday, 6 July 2012 18:31 (five years ago) Permalink

mmmm i love mint pureed into a paste/sauce on seafood (scallops esp, but tilapia ok too) or on a curry

nicest bitch of poster (La Lechera), Friday, 6 July 2012 18:33 (five years ago) Permalink

mojitos man

chupacabra seeds (Abbbottt), Friday, 6 July 2012 18:55 (five years ago) Permalink

you know what... mojitos are one of my least favourite cocktails :O

just sayin, Friday, 6 July 2012 23:42 (five years ago) Permalink

D:

Peppermint Patty Hearst (VegemiteGrrl), Friday, 6 July 2012 23:48 (five years ago) Permalink

dry vs fresh herbs - each has their use

if you're making something long-cooked w/ herbs that's not a stock, you want to add the dry herbs w/ the aromatics

if you're adding at the end it's gotta be fresh herbs unless it's going in with an acid (like dry thyme w/ lemon and butter)

s1ocki you are wrong about italian dry pasta *but* there are non-imported ones which are as good. i would say there's actually a big difference between expensive and cheap pasta, but it depends a lot on how you cook it and what you're cooking it for, and like hardcore italian pizza it might not necessarily be to your taste.

like i understand why people use fresh pasta but in general i don't like fresh pasta dishes and i hate it when they substitute fresh pasta for what should be dry or vice versa

the late great, Saturday, 7 July 2012 01:03 (five years ago) Permalink

i will stump for dried thyme, dried rosemary and dried parsley, especially if they are going in soup or stock or sauce or something else w/ lots of water

i think fresh rosemary is way too waxy and strong for anything but roasting and grilling and if you end up using too much the food gets a chemical taste (like menthol but not minty)

fresh thyme you sometimes need for exotic circumstances like finishing fish or fancy salad but i rarely keep it around.

dried parsley is okay if it goes in at the start of a soup or sauce.

remember to always use

Also I roasted a chicken for the first time a few weeks ago and, as per Cook's Illustrated, I sautéed it in a Dutch oven w some vegs for like 5 min on each side, then put it in the oven covered at 225* for 1h and it was perfection. Used some the drippings + lemon juice to make a jus and it was maybe the best chicken I've ever had.

yeah this is how my mom taught me, perfect

the late great, Saturday, 7 July 2012 01:10 (five years ago) Permalink

Grits were great tonight, thanks. Used a local Charleston mill, there were some husks but overall brilliant. Fried some chopped Kentucky bacon, removed, fried fresh caught shrimp in the fat, added grunions, parsley, lemon juice, garlic.

is capybara gay? (Ówen P.), Saturday, 7 July 2012 01:52 (five years ago) Permalink

Sounds great! Maybe I could become the Johnny Appleseed of grits evangelism.

Neil Jung (WmC), Saturday, 7 July 2012 04:03 (five years ago) Permalink

like i understand why people use fresh pasta but in general i don't like fresh pasta dishes and i hate it when they substitute fresh pasta for what should be dry or vice versa

― the late great, Friday, July 6, 2012 9:03 PM (Yesterday) Bookmark Flag Post Permalink

this is otm, unless its like, a fresh ravioli in a restaurant in italy somewhere

funny-skrillex-bee_132455836669.gif (s1ocki), Saturday, 7 July 2012 05:23 (five years ago) Permalink

i use the cheap imported

the late great, Saturday, 7 July 2012 05:25 (five years ago) Permalink

formulated for very salty pasta water and the timing on the bag is properly al dente

the late great, Saturday, 7 July 2012 05:26 (five years ago) Permalink

what brand

funny-skrillex-bee_132455836669.gif (s1ocki), Saturday, 7 July 2012 05:32 (five years ago) Permalink

barilla for me

Peppermint Patty Hearst (VegemiteGrrl), Saturday, 7 July 2012 07:06 (five years ago) Permalink

durum semolina

dececco and barilla are relatively cheap ($2-$5), same price as domestic organic

rustichella if spendy or on sale

i'm not super picky - fuck a chittarra or trenne - but i find bucatini makes a big difference

i just found a cheaper brand of bucatini by delallo that was as good as rustichella. their penne and basic noodles are pretty good too.

the late great, Saturday, 7 July 2012 07:09 (five years ago) Permalink

i think the toughest to pull off (and least necessary to use) are fusilli and orecchiette, i try to go large or go home if i need to use those

the late great, Saturday, 7 July 2012 07:11 (five years ago) Permalink

orecchiette - my fav type :D

(✿◠‿◠) (ENBB), Saturday, 7 July 2012 11:42 (five years ago) Permalink

they are tricky though

(✿◠‿◠) (ENBB), Saturday, 7 July 2012 11:42 (five years ago) Permalink

bread, pasta, rice, grains, oatmeal (cereal) - i'm a carb snob. also have attitude wrt fruit in season & abhor jarred tomato sauces

(REAL NAME) (m coleman), Saturday, 7 July 2012 11:48 (five years ago) Permalink

orecchiette are fabulous w/ peas and spring onions. not sure what else you'd make em with, anything roughly pea-sized i guess

the late great, Saturday, 7 July 2012 12:29 (five years ago) Permalink

bread, pasta, rice, grains, oatmeal (cereal) -

i think w/some of these it's cost that makes me semi-snobby; the same with tea, i think it's bad economics to skimp on something you get so much out of, to buy the cheaper kind & take a hit on your next forty cups. rice is pretty cheap in the scheme of things, even nice thai jasmine or w/e, so splashing out for something that's <£1/serving is weird (obviously unless you totally have to).

blossom smulch (schlump), Saturday, 7 July 2012 12:41 (five years ago) Permalink

i'm not into artisanal (hate that word) grains or anything i just hate indifferently prepared white rice. living in nyc i shop around for snob bargains

(REAL NAME) (m coleman), Saturday, 7 July 2012 12:46 (five years ago) Permalink

Is Barilla really better than like Ronzoni or Rienzi or any of those?

Drew Careymore (Stevie D(eux)), Saturday, 7 July 2012 13:14 (five years ago) Permalink

De Cecco > Barilla > Ronzoni, imo. Ronzoni lasagne noodles are OK

(REAL NAME) (m coleman), Saturday, 7 July 2012 13:39 (five years ago) Permalink

marcella hazan says that italian-made pasta is better than american-made because they use metal rather than teflon to make it so the texture is rougher outside and whatever you put on it sticks better. i like the whole foods pasta.

kneel aurmstrong (harbl), Saturday, 7 July 2012 14:09 (five years ago) Permalink

I always get Barilla.

(✿◠‿◠) (ENBB), Saturday, 7 July 2012 20:11 (five years ago) Permalink

yes, it's better

the late great, Saturday, 7 July 2012 20:11 (five years ago) Permalink

i do orrechiette carbonara sometimes

funny-skrillex-bee_132455836669.gif (s1ocki), Monday, 9 July 2012 04:09 (five years ago) Permalink

i think i generally buy italian stuff already i guess?

funny-skrillex-bee_132455836669.gif (s1ocki), Monday, 9 July 2012 04:09 (five years ago) Permalink

i make carbonara with the fat bucatini tubes because they're made to catch the egg cheese and fat and stiffen

for tomato sauce perciatelli noodles (hollow bucatini) are fun because they slurp up the sauce for you like straws

the late great, Monday, 9 July 2012 04:26 (five years ago) Permalink

thats good for bolognese too cuz chunks get stuck in there

funny-skrillex-bee_132455836669.gif (s1ocki), Monday, 9 July 2012 04:36 (five years ago) Permalink

mm want to make pasta now

Peppermint Patty Hearst (VegemiteGrrl), Monday, 9 July 2012 04:47 (five years ago) Permalink

depends how chunky you like it

if you're really chunky you want rigatoni

the late great, Monday, 9 July 2012 04:54 (five years ago) Permalink

I do get annoyed how p much every pasta brands shapes are different. Some stuff they call rigatoni is v slightly wider penne

alan is more upset (Stevie D(eux)), Monday, 9 July 2012 12:16 (five years ago) Permalink

Gemelli rules and is v under appreciated. Excellent chew.

alan is more upset (Stevie D(eux)), Monday, 9 July 2012 12:17 (five years ago) Permalink

I really hate buccatini, it stays all dry and sauceless within! I'm American, damn it. I like sauce more than pasta.

how did I get here? why am I in the whiskey aisle? this is all so (Laurel), Monday, 9 July 2012 13:34 (five years ago) Permalink

Pretty much almost always buy De Cecco. I know there are non-mass-market brands that cost £££ but I've never ventured in that direction, maybe out of fear that I will get hooked and go broke that way.

recordbreaking transfer to Lucknow FC (seandalai), Monday, 9 July 2012 13:41 (five years ago) Permalink

depends how chunky you like it

if you're really chunky you want rigatoni

― the late great, Monday, July 9, 2012 12:54 AM (9 hours ago) Bookmark Flag Post Permalink

i always ask my butcher to grind the meat on the extra-big setting

funny-skrillex-bee_132455836669.gif (s1ocki), Monday, 9 July 2012 14:02 (five years ago) Permalink

rowr

uncondensed milky way (remy bean), Monday, 9 July 2012 14:09 (five years ago) Permalink

Man I need a local butcher. Also rigatoni is the best and I never would have known if not for out very own best beloved surm

alan is more upset (Stevie D(eux)), Monday, 9 July 2012 15:09 (five years ago) Permalink

I thought you were a vegan for some reason. huh.

(✿◠‿◠) (ENBB), Monday, 9 July 2012 15:41 (five years ago) Permalink

I was for a while but then I stopped like maybe a year and a half ago and the "Wait aren't you vegan??"s haven't stopped since

alan is more upset (Stevie D(eux)), Monday, 9 July 2012 19:10 (five years ago) Permalink

Oh, sorry. I didn't realize.

(✿◠‿◠) (ENBB), Monday, 9 July 2012 19:15 (five years ago) Permalink

being snobby is not something to brag about

congratulations (n/a), Monday, 9 July 2012 19:16 (five years ago) Permalink

who's being snobby now

the late great, Monday, 9 July 2012 19:17 (five years ago) Permalink

who's snobbing who?
take another look now, baby
who's snobbing who?

I see you, Pineapple Teef (DJP), Monday, 9 July 2012 19:39 (five years ago) Permalink

Snobby about beer, olive oil to an extent, see no need in using horrible supermarket sea salt as opposed to maldon, when a box of maldon still lasts me a year. Always try to have good soy and fish sauce.

I am snobby about meat and fish but don't have a non-supermarket butcher or fishmonger that is handy for me.

Know how Roo feel (LocalGarda), Wednesday, 18 July 2012 06:38 (five years ago) Permalink

if it's dinner time, i basically have to have perrier. even if i'm eating like top ramen slathered hot sauce, i still want perrier on ice.

also i'm a pickle snob.

the decline and fall of me, Monday, 23 July 2012 18:09 (five years ago) Permalink

I just finished lunch -- two tomato sandwiches -- and thought snobby thoughts as the juice ran down to my wrists.

Neil Jung (WmC), Monday, 23 July 2012 18:27 (five years ago) Permalink


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