what's cooking? part 5: 2017-2027

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not because it really needs to go to 2027 because we'll all be under the ocean by then but because part 4 started in 2007

assawoman bay (harbl), Sunday, 8 January 2017 00:14 (nine months ago) Permalink

i made some pretty great tomato soup yesterday

san marzano toms + butter in pressure cooker w salt and baking soda
veggie stock + drained liquid from toms + a few bags of lapsang souchong
puree toms w stick blender, drain through sieve, combine with liquid ingredients
maple syrup + fish sauce to taste

jason waterfalls (gbx), Sunday, 8 January 2017 14:47 (nine months ago) Permalink

how do you get to the point in life where you're putting heterodox ingredients like tea, maple syrup and fish sauce in tomato soup? is this entirely your own invention or are you following some unknown and wild tradition?

ogmor, Sunday, 8 January 2017 16:29 (nine months ago) Permalink

its the food of my people

jason waterfalls (gbx), Sunday, 8 January 2017 18:12 (nine months ago) Permalink

bored single men who spend a lot of time on food blogs

jason waterfalls (gbx), Sunday, 8 January 2017 18:13 (nine months ago) Permalink

well I am impressed, it sounds delicious (though not sure about the tea). how long did you cook it for?

ogmor, Sunday, 8 January 2017 18:26 (nine months ago) Permalink

toms were in the pressure cooker for 20mins, which is the bulk of the cooking time

in the context of bold tomato flavor and stock, the tea adds primarily smokiness and some sweetness. it's worth trying, i think!

jason waterfalls (gbx), Sunday, 8 January 2017 18:31 (nine months ago) Permalink

Were these canned whole toms? Why pressure cooker? Why baking soda???

mom tossed in kimchee (quincie), Sunday, 8 January 2017 18:45 (nine months ago) Permalink

whole canned toms

pressure cooker reaches higher temperatures, which, in combination with the increased pH you get with baking soda, leads to caramelization that would be impossible otherwise

jason waterfalls (gbx), Sunday, 8 January 2017 18:52 (nine months ago) Permalink

i actually made a batch earlier in the week that i forgot to add baking soda to and the difference is pretty noticeable --- w/o it the soup is much brighter and more acidic/tomato-y (which might be what you want!)

jason waterfalls (gbx), Sunday, 8 January 2017 18:53 (nine months ago) Permalink

i have a bream in the oven, stuffed it with lemon, garlic and parsley, threw a few slices of potato around it and i've got cabbage braising in some stock on the hob. been roasting fish a lot in the last few months, feels like one of the nicest things to eat without much effort.

Bein' Sean Bean (LocalGarda), Sunday, 8 January 2017 19:22 (nine months ago) Permalink

Making a lamb shoulder tonight with broccoli and the serious eats roasted potatoes that I believe somebody posted on the other thread and have been intriguing me since.

joygoat, Sunday, 8 January 2017 20:21 (nine months ago) Permalink

how do you get to the point in life where you're putting heterodox ingredients like tea, maple syrup and fish sauce in tomato soup?

otm

its the food of my people

bored single men who spend a lot of time on food blogs

loltm

If authoritarianism is Romania's ironing board, then (in orbit), Sunday, 8 January 2017 21:31 (nine months ago) Permalink

What are these blogs? Are they instant pot propagandists?

weird woman in a bar (La Lechera), Monday, 9 January 2017 00:43 (nine months ago) Permalink

hey gbx do you do a natural release or quick release on the p.c. with this method?

call all destroyer, Monday, 9 January 2017 01:09 (nine months ago) Permalink

mine's electric so i just do a slow release

jason waterfalls (gbx), Monday, 9 January 2017 04:50 (nine months ago) Permalink

should I get an instant pot? it seems like more like an appliance of convenience rather than one of, like, some crazy new benefit (like sous vide)

Fluffy Saint-Bernard (Stevie D(eux)), Monday, 9 January 2017 15:22 (nine months ago) Permalink

rfi: what is yr favorite way to prepare fennel?
preferably side dish but i'll take all comers

Flamenco Drop (VegemiteGrrl), Tuesday, 10 January 2017 04:49 (nine months ago) Permalink

one place i worked at useda make a potato, fennel and leek gratin that was nice. other ideas: superthin sliced and put in a salad is great, too. or "melted", cooked slowly in olive oil with onions and garlic to get it really soft and borderline carmelised could be a nice side?

all the right notes of bitter, salty, sweet, and sour. (outdoor_miner), Tuesday, 10 January 2017 23:16 (nine months ago) Permalink

fennel is nice roasted

Islamic State of Mind (jim in vancouver), Tuesday, 10 January 2017 23:26 (nine months ago) Permalink

I like fennel raw in salads, sautéed with leeks & green beans, roasted & carved up with a piece of meat or fish

weird woman in a bar (La Lechera), Tuesday, 10 January 2017 23:51 (nine months ago) Permalink

Jim: it's good. Double and freeze, for all the effort.

rb (soda), Wednesday, 11 January 2017 00:15 (nine months ago) Permalink

thanks everyone! pretty new to fennel. i tried braising it in stock & vermouth last night & it turned out delicious, keen to try some of these recommendations

Flamenco Drop (VegemiteGrrl), Wednesday, 11 January 2017 00:26 (nine months ago) Permalink

http://www.seriouseats.com/recipes/2015/02/vegan-ramen-miso-creamy-vegan-vegetarian-food-lab-recipe.html

going to cook this at the weekend

― Islamic State of Mind (jim in vancouver), Tuesday, January 10, 2017 5:28 PM (yesterday) Bookmark Flag Post Permalink

oh man i've been wanting to try that but its daunting --- soda, you've done it? how long did it take?

jason waterfalls (gbx), Wednesday, 11 January 2017 12:49 (nine months ago) Permalink

i like fennel here are some things

fen risotto, maybe w/ salami
fen & chickpea broth w/ lemon zest and chilli
fen & potato soup
baked fen in like a puttanesca sauce w/ orange zest and feta
roast pork w fen (add fen seeds to pork herb rub too)
any bit of wite fish w/ fen, thyme, rosemary, lemon zest, capers etc

pernod good to have around just for fen

r|t|c, Wednesday, 11 January 2017 14:25 (nine months ago) Permalink

also if u ever want to parboil fen for anything do it in milk, or mostly milk, and keep for mash potato or gratin later

r|t|c, Wednesday, 11 January 2017 14:27 (nine months ago) Permalink

I don't like fennel because it is anise-y. I feel like I need to broaden my horizons tho w/r/t winter vegetables, I can't only eat potatoes all year, and I love kale but let's be honest it's not in season in February.

A friend is coming over on Sat bc she wants advice on cooking large hunks of meat. Considering a pot roast alongside a rolled stuffed pork loin -- one easy, one complicated.

If authoritarianism is Romania's ironing board, then (in orbit), Wednesday, 11 January 2017 15:14 (nine months ago) Permalink

try parsnips! one of our favorite winter things is just roasted winter veggies (beets, onions, carrots, garlic, parsnips, turnips, potatoes) mixed up with some olive oil, rosemary, and a bit of sausage, cover and bake.

sleeve, Wednesday, 11 January 2017 15:17 (nine months ago) Permalink

best way to enjoy fennel is to throw it in the damn garbage bcz it tastes like licorice and it is GROSS

Fluffy Saint-Bernard (Stevie D(eux)), Wednesday, 11 January 2017 15:20 (nine months ago) Permalink

I made a great pork dish with star anise the other night and the first time I made it I used like one star anise (recipe says 5) because I hate licorice but actually it's so subtle it's really good so I always use 5 now

kinder, Wednesday, 11 January 2017 15:26 (nine months ago) Permalink

THANK U STEVIE YOU <---> ME = SAME TEAM

If authoritarianism is Romania's ironing board, then (in orbit), Wednesday, 11 January 2017 15:28 (nine months ago) Permalink

anise and fennel are wonderful flavors

marcos, Wednesday, 11 January 2017 15:45 (nine months ago) Permalink

that said i have bought fennel bulbs in the past and they have rotted in my fridge bc i couldn't decide what to do with them fast enough :/

marcos, Wednesday, 11 January 2017 15:45 (nine months ago) Permalink

tbh I wish I didnt' loathe anise/fennel bcz it wd make things a lot easier but welp here we are, what can ya do

Fluffy Saint-Bernard (Stevie D(eux)), Wednesday, 11 January 2017 16:20 (nine months ago) Permalink

parsnips are the devil fyi

Flamenco Drop (VegemiteGrrl), Wednesday, 11 January 2017 17:54 (nine months ago) Permalink

hmph

sleeve, Wednesday, 11 January 2017 17:57 (nine months ago) Permalink

parsnips are fine, they're sweet and a lil weird but they're fine

Fluffy Saint-Bernard (Stevie D(eux)), Wednesday, 11 January 2017 20:58 (nine months ago) Permalink

quickest way to ruin a soup imo

THE DEVIL

Flamenco Drop (VegemiteGrrl), Wednesday, 11 January 2017 20:59 (nine months ago) Permalink

parsnips are good caramelized together with other vegetables as the base for a winter soup stock, they contribute a lot of complexity and are similar to carrots w/ their sweetness. im not a fan of plain parsnips though

marcos, Wednesday, 11 January 2017 21:19 (nine months ago) Permalink

for burly winter root vegetables i prefer celeriac

marcos, Wednesday, 11 January 2017 21:20 (nine months ago) Permalink

I stand with VG.

Jeff, Wednesday, 11 January 2017 21:20 (nine months ago) Permalink

Honey roast parsnips are my secret ingredient in a veggie soup

kinder, Wednesday, 11 January 2017 21:53 (nine months ago) Permalink

monsters, all of u

Flamenco Drop (VegemiteGrrl), Thursday, 12 January 2017 00:16 (nine months ago) Permalink

mushroom pizza that has a bunch of rehydrated porcinis sauteed with a load of criminis and garlic, on top of fontina, carmelized onions with rosemary playing the role of sauce on some bland-o plain white dough i made

all the right notes of bitter, salty, sweet, and sour. (outdoor_miner), Thursday, 19 January 2017 20:51 (eight months ago) Permalink

haven't had farinata in years, might attempt this recipe for saturday lunch http://www.seriouseats.com/2015/05/how-to-make-farinata-italian-chickpea-pancake.html

Islamic State of Mind (jim in vancouver), Thursday, 19 January 2017 21:07 (eight months ago) Permalink

we had my brother and his family over for dinner the other night. they love cooking indian and so do we, so we made a huge feast. i haven't cooked this much food in a while:

masoor dal
benghali green beans and potatoes
tomato sambal
summer squash w/ mustard seeds
saag tofu

marcos, Thursday, 19 January 2017 21:23 (eight months ago) Permalink

All the way at the other end of the vegetarian-omnivore spectrum, I'm making beef stock today.

aaaaaaaauuuuuuuuu (melting robot) (WilliamC), Thursday, 19 January 2017 21:33 (eight months ago) Permalink

I agree with VG that parsnips would not work well in any soup I know about, but they roast well and were quite acceptable in a beef and peanut stew recipe my wife made just a few days ago.

a little too mature to be cute (Aimless), Thursday, 19 January 2017 21:34 (eight months ago) Permalink

I really like roasted parsnips but they are such a damn awkward shape--the top fat part and the itty bitty skinny end make it diffcult to get evenly-roasting pieces.

mom tossed in kimchee (quincie), Thursday, 19 January 2017 22:53 (eight months ago) Permalink

filo pastry

Yoni Loves Chocha (VegemiteGrrl), Sunday, 20 August 2017 15:20 (one month ago) Permalink

^^^ also agree (though I might make gnocchi or gnudi again, no equipment needed)

Sushi is in the 'pay to have it made' category for me.

May contain peanuts, tree nuts, soy, wheat, pits or pit fragments. (WilliamC), Sunday, 20 August 2017 15:24 (one month ago) Permalink

I've started buying fresh pasta from the supermarket. It's not as good as the fresh pasta I had out the other week but a good little upgrade from dried. not as convenient though in terms of it lasting forever like dried.

kinder, Sunday, 20 August 2017 17:40 (one month ago) Permalink

I think of them as just different animals. Dried has a toothiness that u can't get from fresh and fresh is so delicate at it's best

freedom is not having to measure life with a ruler (outdoor_miner), Sunday, 20 August 2017 18:33 (one month ago) Permalink

disagree! It's easier to get an even toothiness with fresh. You barely have to cook it though. dried can get that slippery coating kind of thing. tbf I often have dried brown pasta which probably needs a bit more cooking than white.

kinder, Sunday, 20 August 2017 18:59 (one month ago) Permalink

Can I just say that the trend of overly patronizing instructions in online recipes is driving me bananas

The five-step method for an easy, tasty homemade enchilada sauce recipe turns into war & peace bc the author has to add all her concern-trolling
"now make sure you get all your spices measured before you start"
"heat the oil - dont walk away from the stove"

OMG. SHUT. UP.

Squeaky Fromage (VegemiteGrrl), Monday, 21 August 2017 01:31 (one month ago) Permalink

ugh that's even worse than recipes bloated with jokes
stfu

weird woman in a bar (La Lechera), Monday, 21 August 2017 12:29 (one month ago) Permalink

i finally unpacked my cookbooks after they were in attic storage for a year and it is so much more enjoyable browsing through them rather than food blogs and cooking websites

marcos, Monday, 21 August 2017 14:10 (one month ago) Permalink

two weeks pass...

What is the conventional ilxwisdom regarding preparing corn tortillas for enchiladas? Warm in dry pan? Warm over open flame? Quick dip in hot oil? Dip in sauce before rolling?

Enchiladas are a pain in the ass to make imo.

mom tossed in kimchee (quincie), Tuesday, 5 September 2017 23:04 (one month ago) Permalink

cheap fresh tortillas from masa harina, dip in sauce, and quick fry in oil on skillet imo

you are juror number 144 and we will excuse you (Sufjan Grafton), Tuesday, 5 September 2017 23:14 (one month ago) Permalink

it'd probably also work well making from better store bought masa. I just think fresh is best for avoiding tears, and a tortilla fancier than maseca probably won't make much difference in enchiladas.

you are juror number 144 and we will excuse you (Sufjan Grafton), Tuesday, 5 September 2017 23:19 (one month ago) Permalink

Dip before fry??? I assumed it was fry then dip.

mom tossed in kimchee (quincie), Tuesday, 5 September 2017 23:33 (one month ago) Permalink

yeah, i see that in recipes as well. my father-in-law has been making them for decades, and he dips in sauce before frying. it makes the skillet pretty messy.

you are juror number 144 and we will excuse you (Sufjan Grafton), Tuesday, 5 September 2017 23:40 (one month ago) Permalink

we also do not bake them, though. it looks like this may be a difference in assembly between enchiladas and enchiladas suizas

you are juror number 144 and we will excuse you (Sufjan Grafton), Tuesday, 5 September 2017 23:44 (one month ago) Permalink

i hate handling slimy sauced tortillas so i just make layered enchilada casserole now #lazy

Squeaky Fromage (VegemiteGrrl), Tuesday, 5 September 2017 23:46 (one month ago) Permalink

the method described in beloved ilx favorite the border cookbook is to heat 1/2" to 1" of oil in a small skillet till hot. dip the tortillas in until they go limp (happens almost immediately ime), then sauce them, fill them, and roll them.

this has worked great for me so far.

call all destroyer, Wednesday, 6 September 2017 00:28 (one month ago) Permalink

fry then dip imo

weird woman in a bar (La Lechera), Wednesday, 6 September 2017 12:29 (one month ago) Permalink

border cookbook is so great, could be my favorite cookbook tbh

marcos, Wednesday, 6 September 2017 16:06 (one month ago) Permalink

In Rick Bayless' Mexican Kitchen, he has recipes where he warms up the tortillas and then spoons sauce over, and then he has the "..."other" style of enchilada preparation: a cold tortilla is dipped in a robust red chile sauce, then seared quickly on an oiled surface. One taste and you'll understand why they're a favorite street food."

So I guess the dip-cold-and-fry method may be the street food style that is usually done with red sauce?

you are juror number 144 and we will excuse you (Sufjan Grafton), Friday, 8 September 2017 00:14 (one month ago) Permalink

taking that book out led to creamy beet greens, potatoes, and poblano tacos, as it usually does

you are juror number 144 and we will excuse you (Sufjan Grafton), Friday, 8 September 2017 03:25 (one month ago) Permalink

that pepper-infusion cacio e pepe method i reposted a little while ago worked pretty well. gradually building the sauce with pepper water and pasta water before adding the pasta seemed to prevent any major clumping. i will say that i would add pepper to finish much more aggressively than the recipe implies--the infusion is a nice backbone but it doesn't really kick your ass with black pepper like i want.

obv much better than any oil/butter method.

call all destroyer, Wednesday, 13 September 2017 23:10 (one month ago) Permalink

I don't understand the "keep the sauce warm, but not over direct heat." part. Does that imply that you should turn on your oven?

you are juror number 144 and we will excuse you (Sufjan Grafton), Wednesday, 13 September 2017 23:40 (one month ago) Permalink

honestly i didn't really do that part except for adding small amounts of warm pasta water until i was happy with the consistency

call all destroyer, Wednesday, 13 September 2017 23:45 (one month ago) Permalink

xp double boiler I assume?

sleeve, Thursday, 14 September 2017 00:20 (one month ago) Permalink

double boilers technically are direct (conductive) heat, their max temp is just limited to the 100C

i usually take "keep warm but not over direct heat" to mean "put it in the oven" (convective) or just keep it close to something that's hot (radiant)

gbx, Thursday, 14 September 2017 00:25 (one month ago) Permalink

maybe directly heat a pot of water on adjacent burner?

you are juror number 144 and we will excuse you (Sufjan Grafton), Thursday, 14 September 2017 00:29 (one month ago) Permalink

I would also normally put something in a low oven to "keep it warm". anyway cad skipped it and lived, so we are good.

you are juror number 144 and we will excuse you (Sufjan Grafton), Thursday, 14 September 2017 00:30 (one month ago) Permalink

i have an induction range so radiant heat isn't really around, also the oven was in use roasting some asparagus. could've used the warming drawer i guess but it did work out ok.

call all destroyer, Thursday, 14 September 2017 00:41 (one month ago) Permalink

btw if you want to skip the pasta-making portion technique i just subbed the 150g of pasta the recipe makes for 5 oz. of dry pasta and the proportions seemed totally reasonable.

call all destroyer, Thursday, 14 September 2017 00:43 (one month ago) Permalink

thanks, gonna try this one.

you are juror number 144 and we will excuse you (Sufjan Grafton), Thursday, 14 September 2017 02:35 (one month ago) Permalink

was in the mood for soup a couple days ago when it was cooler and dreary outside. just getting around to making but i like the look of this recipe (w cumin and cinnamon for a soup sounded nice and warming) https://cooking.nytimes.com/recipes/1017980-mushroom-spinach-soup-with-cinnamon-coriander-and-cumin?em_pos=medium&emc=edit_ck_20170916&nl=cooking&nlid=73417899

freedom is not having to measure life with a ruler (outdoor_miner), Friday, 22 September 2017 21:21 (three weeks ago) Permalink

made the popular NYT red lentil soup 2 days ago and it was perfect for the cooler, breezy afternoon yesterday. this one looks good to maybe try next. also pre-ordered that Soup Bible book somebody recommended in other thread. been making/freezing lots of stock. bring on the soup!

you are juror number 144 and we will excuse you (Sufjan Grafton), Friday, 22 September 2017 21:45 (three weeks ago) Permalink

tomato jam seems to be very popular rn. a very fancy (overpriced) bakery is selling biscuit, egg, cheese, and tomato jam sandwiches for $8, which is insane. But I've been making my own tomato jam and putting it on nearly every sandwich I eat. Really gives them a "this is a fancy and expensive sandwich" feel.

you are juror number 144 and we will excuse you (Sufjan Grafton), Monday, 2 October 2017 16:22 (two weeks ago) Permalink

Tomato jam a staple at my regular, too. Surprised by how sweet it is!

Daniel_Rf, Tuesday, 3 October 2017 10:42 (two weeks ago) Permalink

haven't baked any cookies in a few years iirc. saw this neat looking recipe where the pans get shaken while baking to create textural dynamics. they're in the oven now and are gonna rule. subbed guajillo chile mexican chocolate and reduced the amount of sugar in the batter by a fair bit to balance

freedom is not having to measure life with a ruler (outdoor_miner), Friday, 6 October 2017 00:09 (one week ago) Permalink

that's cool!

I was a pastry chef for years so I burned out on a lot of that, but I still make cookies. Mostly chocolate chip, sometimes oatmeal raisin or holiday varieties when appropriate. I prefer the melted butter version, wife prefers whipped, we split the difference.

how often do you shake them?

sleeve, Friday, 6 October 2017 00:46 (one week ago) Permalink

i've been making chocolate chip cookies lately w/ dorie greenspan recipe and they are the bomb dot com. haven't tried a cookie with melted butter yet.

assawoman bay (harbl), Friday, 6 October 2017 00:48 (one week ago) Permalink

I'm tired of tomato jam already

I'm turning into a flatbread pizza badass these days, so many good ready-made crusts available

El Tomboto, Friday, 6 October 2017 00:56 (one week ago) Permalink

i ended up shaking them a couple times after first putting them in for ten minutes. they don't look like the pic, but i bet they're deece. they look nice!
https://scontent-dft4-1.xx.fbcdn.net/v/t31.0-8/22289782_10214411195535333_7459497610865515378_o.jpg?oh=87796497b4e7e28bdcd8fbfc7e4e7a33&oe=5A430827

freedom is not having to measure life with a ruler (outdoor_miner), Friday, 6 October 2017 03:10 (one week ago) Permalink

don't think i've ever done cookies w melted butter but my fave brownie recipe uses that. mmmm oatmeal is the deal! xxpost

freedom is not having to measure life with a ruler (outdoor_miner), Friday, 6 October 2017 03:21 (one week ago) Permalink

mmm y'all choc chip cookies w/melted butter are the best, more caramelized and chewy, flatter and kinda translucent

melt 1 stick butter
whisk with 1/2C white and 1/2C brown sugar
add 1 tsp vanilla, 1 egg
sift 1C plus 2T AP flour with 1 tsp soda and 1/2 tsp salt
add at least 1/2C chips, or more to taste

bake 10-12 mins at 350

sleeve, Friday, 6 October 2017 13:59 (one week ago) Permalink

I usually put the dough in the fridge for a few minutes to set up, the heat of the butter can make the batter a bit loose right out of the bowl

sleeve, Friday, 6 October 2017 14:00 (one week ago) Permalink

gonna try these imo

Squeaky Fromage (VegemiteGrrl), Sunday, 8 October 2017 01:05 (one week ago) Permalink

help i impulse-bought some spanish (cured) chorizo what shd i do w it?

northwest pass-agg (Stevie D(eux)), Thursday, 12 October 2017 20:20 (six days ago) Permalink

soup!

you are juror number 144 and we will excuse you (Sufjan Grafton), Thursday, 12 October 2017 20:31 (six days ago) Permalink

Fry up with taters!

mom tossed in kimchee (quincie), Thursday, 12 October 2017 20:39 (six days ago) Permalink

Cook up with mussels or clams!

mom tossed in kimchee (quincie), Thursday, 12 October 2017 20:41 (six days ago) Permalink

Something like this, super good, really easy:

potato and chorizo stew

I also love it with fried eggs, and it’s been a long time but I used to frequently make sort of a chickpea and chorizo in saffron broth almost-soup with sautéed cod and garlic and smoked paprika butter plopped on top to melt at the end.

joygoat, Thursday, 12 October 2017 20:47 (six days ago) Permalink

oh that sounds delicious

marcos, Thursday, 12 October 2017 20:55 (six days ago) Permalink

ignore the spanish and put it in paella. it's v good in red lentil soups though

ogmor, Thursday, 12 October 2017 21:00 (six days ago) Permalink


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