Let's have a heated debate about At Swim-Two-Birds

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I think it's overrated and not particularly funny, although it does have a few good lines in it. But I don't find the "characters" compelling, and there's too much of Finn McCool's poetry in it, which rapidly ceases to be amusing once you've got the joke (he talks funny! He's from yore!). I'm not even going to say 'maybe it's just me', because everyone else seems to love the book, which makes it fairly obvious that it is just me, but really. I've tried to get through it three times now, and I just don't see the point.

accentmonkey (accentmonkey), Friday, 26 March 2004 12:43 (fourteen years ago) Permalink

It's not about the characters but the mood conveyed through the playfulness of the language and the send-up of classical storytelling. By the time the characters begin rebelling against the author, you should feel grateful you've been blessed by the presence of this book in your life.

otto, Friday, 26 March 2004 15:14 (fourteen years ago) Permalink

I kind of agree with accentmonkey. I think the beginning and ending are great, but a lot of the middle stuff doesn't do much for me.
Accentmonkey you haven't said whether you've read anything else by Flann O' Brien/Myles nagCopaleen. I think 'The Third Policeman' and 'The Poor Mouth' (An Beal Bocht) are better and funnier. And the collections of his columns for The Irish Times(Best of Myles) are very funny in parts also. So don't give up on him just because of At-Swin-Two-Birds

Joe Kay (feethurt), Friday, 26 March 2004 16:25 (fourteen years ago) Permalink

Thanks Joe. Now at least I know it's not just me. I have read some of his other stuff, though not The Third Policeman. The Poor Mouthis wonderful, but I think it's wonderful partly because it's short. It really does a great job of sending up the life stories of the apron-wringing, potato-boiling, headscarf-wearing, two-teeth-having people who apparently were Ireland's sole inhabitants during the early part of the twentieth century.

The main thing I do like about At Swim-Two-Birds is the feeling of Dublin as a claustrophobic place which manages to beat everyone into this sort of strange torpor where all they can do is drink and look for money to buy more drink. I seem to remember my college years being not a million miles away from this. But again, I'm not sure that he sustains it across the whole book all that well.

Still, never mind. I have at least finished it this time and so it no longer needs to be one of those books I'm embarrassed to say I haven't read.

accentmonkey (accentmonkey), Friday, 26 March 2004 16:56 (fourteen years ago) Permalink

Let's have a heated debate about At Swim-Two-Birds (3 new answers)

tom west (thomp), Sunday, 28 March 2004 00:31 (fourteen years ago) Permalink

Forget Dublin, forget Ireland, forget reality and incidental treatments of it in ASTB. What I appreciate reading it is the feeling I get that all life's a ridiculous text in which I'm an unwitting character. With his particular brand of wit, Flann wakes me up to the choice I have of being character in or the author of my life. That may sound somewhat Stuart Smalley, but whatever.

otto, Sunday, 28 March 2004 01:26 (fourteen years ago) Permalink

Kudos to O'Brien for trying. (Nice Michael) Failed. (Naughty Michael) Read 'The Brother' or the "The Best of Myles'.

Michael White (Hereward), Sunday, 28 March 2004 05:21 (fourteen years ago) Permalink

When I clicked on the link I thought I'd read this, but no. I've read "At Swim, Two Boys" by Jamie O'Neill (which I think is wonderful, but is not the subject of this thread). I shall have to look O'Brien's book up.

Sara L (Tara Too), Monday, 29 March 2004 04:16 (fourteen years ago) Permalink

I thought that the Finn parts were the best parts of At-Swim-Two-Birds, it seemed to me that there was a great modernist take on the Finn MacCool stories. But perhaps that was just people, given that I have some familiarity with those. hmm, I just reread the third Policeman this weekend, maybe I should reread this one too.

bryan, Thursday, 1 April 2004 16:44 (fourteen years ago) Permalink

The book is harder than you - for instance, I - would think.

the finefox, Thursday, 1 April 2004 17:58 (fourteen years ago) Permalink

eight months pass...
Monkey possibly overstated the importance of the Finn MacCool passages? They rather dominate the first 20pp or so, but many other pleasures lie beyond (I do not imply that the Monkey has not discovered them; the Monkey is convincing about Dublin and university; though didn't she go to Trinity?).

the finefox, Thursday, 2 December 2004 21:33 (fourteen years ago) Permalink

It's a great book. I too remember getting bogged down in the Finn MacCool stuff and getting confused by some of the other tomfoolery but over the years I have grown to like it more and more. Maybe it's one of those books it's best to have read one time and then dip back into later. I think he really had the knack of ordering his words for maximum combination of high register fastidious grammatical correctness and deadpan hilarity.

I certainly remember some of the catchphrases: the stuff from the tip-sheet about the CAST-IRON PLUNGERS and of course "A pint of plain is your only man."

Ken L (Ken L), Thursday, 2 December 2004 22:48 (fourteen years ago) Permalink

three weeks pass...
I think At Swim is great fun if you are in an indulgent mood. The Finn bits are tedious because he's an epic Irish bore, but I found the interjections of his weary audience during the Sweeny yarn were timed with sufficent hilarity to make it worth the slog.

Bren (Bren), Tuesday, 28 December 2004 23:01 (thirteen years ago) Permalink

accentmonkey wrote:

I've tried to get through it three times now, and I just don't see the point.

There is no point to the book. It is a tour de force of invention, with a plot that makes no sense at all, characters who don't mesh and never existed, and random opinionizing off the cuff. If you don't find it funny, then it is probably because you do not share enough of the frame of reference - Ireland as O'Brien experienced it.

Humor often doesn't travel well. You generally need to be one of the victims of the thing that is being skewered to appreciate its being toppled off its high horse, given a few swift kicks in the head and made to cross-dress. I'm sure if you'd been a student at Trinity College, Dublin in 1940 or thereabouts, you'd find it howlingly funny - or profoundly offensive. Either one works.

Aimless (Aimless), Thursday, 30 December 2004 19:26 (thirteen years ago) Permalink

eight months pass...
i wonder sometimes if i find some books hard to take much interest in not because they're really that uninteresting but because they have certain parts that i'm so overjoyed with, like the student-narrator passages at the beginning of 'at swim', that i'm ruined for the rest of it. so that perhaps the way for me to eventually get the book will be to become considerably cooler toward the hot passages.

Josh (Josh), Tuesday, 30 August 2005 06:35 (thirteen years ago) Permalink

Does this problem carry over into your romantic life, as well?

Casuistry (Chris P), Tuesday, 30 August 2005 17:40 (thirteen years ago) Permalink

I'm someone else who has never managed to finish At Swim-Two-Birds, largely from being put off by the Finn passages. It's still one of those books that I feel I ought to read.

It did lead me into reading both The Third Policeman - which is wonderful but also tricky to get into - and The Best Of Myles, which I just love for its silliness: inventions like alcoholic ink, or the pointy things on the front of trains to avoid head-on collisions. Occasionally, on my old blog, I would interrupt myself with an interjection from The Plain People Of The Internet, but I'm not sure anyone ever got the reference.

(incidentally, I originally got hold of ASTB because it's described very neatly in one of my favourite obscure novels ever, Zeno Was Here by Jan Mark.)

Forest Pines (ForestPines), Wednesday, 31 August 2005 10:24 (thirteen years ago) Permalink

I just bought this a week or two ago so I hope to join the debate soon. I have read The Dalkey Archives but no other O'Brien.

n/a (Nick A.), Wednesday, 31 August 2005 13:04 (thirteen years ago) Permalink

I read this relatively recently, not really knowing anything about it, just picking it up at the library on a whim.
Tons of fun! Oh I missed references left and right (I had no clue who Finn MacCool was, only after finishing it did I find that he wasn't invented by the author) but I had a jolly good time throughout.

It makes me wonder to what extent being slightly intimidated by a book prior to actually opening it can ruin the reading for me, as I've had the same thing happen with other supposedly "tough" books, while others I were more aware of prior to reading got tougher. Some ridiculous self-respect performance anxiety thing?
Maybe it's simply that this way I didn't end up stopping and trying to figure out every little thing, and just enjoyed the ride.
I'm a real sucker for the whole metafiction thing with books in books and realities/fantasies switching or merging etc as well, so that helped.
And when I was done I was tempted to just start the whole thing over again, which is a rare thing for me.
With this mindset, it's clearly a good thing that I didn't end up studying literature like I wanted to at one point (I'm one of those soulless IT guys now)

Øystein (Øystein), Wednesday, 31 August 2005 13:51 (thirteen years ago) Permalink

the dalkey archive and the third policeman are almost the same book; third policeman might be a little bit more "complete" in it's greatness though.

i really liked that collection of puns o'brien wrote that's the adventures of keats and somebody.... it was all one-page stories with contrived setups, all to drop a silly pun at the end.

j fail (cenotaph), Wednesday, 31 August 2005 17:44 (thirteen years ago) Permalink

The puns etc are Keats and Chapman, originally part of the Cruiskeen Lawn column for the Irish Times.

I thoroughly recommend this page: http://www.themodernword.com/scriptorium/obrien.html which, even as a fan of themodernword, I had only just spotted. Some good anecdotes I didn't already know.

I also recommend yer man Brooker's brief intro
http://www.amazon.co.uk/exec/obidos/ASIN/0746310811/qid=1125526714/sr=8-1/ref=sr_8_xs_ap_i1_xgl/026-6865451-1849263

Interesting to read Josh's comment about bits he loves preventing him from reading the rest. In my experience, it's the complete opposite: if I find a passage, or even a paragraph, that's great I will perservere to absurd lengths to find that quality in stuff that's less immediately appealing.

My favourite character in A S-T-B is The Pooka.

Jerry the Nipper (Jerrynipper), Wednesday, 31 August 2005 21:26 (thirteen years ago) Permalink

five years pass...

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-northern-ireland-14105242

hm.

j., Thursday, 14 July 2011 08:47 (seven years ago) Permalink

of all the people i'd like to see involved in a flann o'brien movie, sure, him

thomp, Thursday, 14 July 2011 16:17 (seven years ago) Permalink

so, yeah, this:

accentmonkey wrote:
I've tried to get through it three times now, and I just don't see the point.

There is no point to the book. It is a tour de force of invention, with a plot that makes no sense at all, characters who don't mesh and never existed, and random opinionizing off the cuff. If you don't find it funny, then it is probably because you do not share enough of the frame of reference - Ireland as O'Brien experienced it.

Humor often doesn't travel well. You generally need to be one of the victims of the thing that is being skewered to appreciate its being toppled off its high horse, given a few swift kicks in the head and made to cross-dress. I'm sure if you'd been a student at Trinity College, Dublin in 1940 or thereabouts, you'd find it howlingly funny - or profoundly offensive. Either one works.

― Aimless (Aimless), Thursday, 30 December 2004 19:26 (6 years ago) Bookmark

which i don't know about. i feel like this book (more than his others, even) seems like the evidence of a seriously talented person who's .. not quite going all the way with it. my boss thinks he's the great genius of 20th century letters and it's hard not to wonder why, i don't know. i think i have a lot of trouble with people whose work 'has no point' or aims at mere (mere!) delight -- o'brien is a bit like wodehouse plus modernism

thomp, Thursday, 14 July 2011 16:19 (seven years ago) Permalink

Wodehouse + Modernism not wholly fair - I don't really like what I remember of At Swim (I read it once, a long time ago, don't have much patience with metafictional tricks), but I think the Third Policeman goes a lot further, and isn't a book with no point: its horror at the futility of its own imagination + giddiness at recursive voids make it a working vision of hell for me. And if it had been published when it was written we'd prob have a different, more literary O'B.

you don't exist in the database (woof), Thursday, 14 July 2011 18:32 (seven years ago) Permalink

Been re-reading, prompted by this thread. About halfway. Mad energy – one of those young man first books that just keeps throwing more and more stuff that seems a brilliant idea on the page, because the author can, and he's entertaining himself. Really wearing though, and page-by-page inconsistent – not just 'oshit, mock Irish epic, bored again, get back to the biographical fragments', but even his renditions of blather jump from perfect but pointless mimicry to v funny high strangeness rendered in obsessively observed idiom and cadence. Still not a real fan of this particular book, but it doesn't dim my love for O'B.

you don't exist in the database (woof), Thursday, 28 July 2011 10:24 (seven years ago) Permalink

The signing of a movie co-production treaty between Ireland and Luxembourg

Provoked a chuckle, I must admit

R. Stornoway (Tom D.), Thursday, 28 July 2011 10:52 (seven years ago) Permalink

one year passes...

Flew through it without any drag. read tiresome poetic mccool yarns as v pointed critique of yeats/gregory style cultural nationalism appropriated mythologies and, having studied the fair share of that stuff at school, found it skilfully done and funny.

bob_sleigher (darraghmac), Tuesday, 28 May 2013 22:13 (five years ago) Permalink

maccool stuff is my favourite in the book. vaguely recall some line about his size being so great that (number) of people could have played (sport) against the breadth of his backside, that was my favourite line.

the bitcoin comic (thomp), Tuesday, 28 May 2013 22:59 (five years ago) Permalink

though i guess all sort of an extrapolation from 'cyclops', a bit

i should reread this

the bitcoin comic (thomp), Tuesday, 28 May 2013 23:01 (five years ago) Permalink

"My only problem with Brian O'Nolan (two of whose pseudonyms are Flann O'Brien and Myles na Gopaleen) is that he seemed too satisfied to be Irish to be sane"

too busy s1ockin' on my 乒乓 (wins), Tuesday, 28 May 2013 23:09 (five years ago) Permalink

(I don't think I agree w that)

too busy s1ockin' on my 乒乓 (wins), Tuesday, 28 May 2013 23:09 (five years ago) Permalink

yah i don't think i agree with either of the premises there

what's that touristy pub in dublin with all the myles paraphernalia, i like that pub

the bitcoin comic (thomp), Tuesday, 28 May 2013 23:12 (five years ago) Permalink

would be a tourist in that pub

too busy s1ockin' on my 乒乓 (wins), Tuesday, 28 May 2013 23:18 (five years ago) Permalink

above quote is gass btw (I'm nothing if not predictable)

too busy s1ockin' on my 乒乓 (wins), Tuesday, 28 May 2013 23:19 (five years ago) Permalink

ah see from gass i imagine he's just after the lols so

the bitcoin comic (thomp), Tuesday, 28 May 2013 23:26 (five years ago) Permalink

one month passes...

A gass man surely

mundane peaceable username (darraghmac), Monday, 22 July 2013 12:09 (five years ago) Permalink

two months pass...

Bleurgh just read this, hated it, discovered it's a so-called masterpiece, am grateful for the existence of this thread.

Metafiction like this is so bloodless unless you end up caring about the crafting of the story – like in Borges. He liked this book apparently but I find his metafictional stuff so much more enticing...

Piggy (omksavant), Tuesday, 8 October 2013 09:04 (five years ago) Permalink

O'Brien's sense of humour just doesn't work for everybody

Bap & Ounge (Noodle Vague), Tuesday, 8 October 2013 09:12 (five years ago) Permalink

not sure that its status as masterpiece is in question tbph, but other than that you didn't like it obv commiserations back on the horse tho the next book u read could change your life

unblog your plug (darraghmac), Tuesday, 8 October 2013 10:03 (five years ago) Permalink

"sir, the pictures are not on trial"

Bap & Ounge (Noodle Vague), Tuesday, 8 October 2013 10:33 (five years ago) Permalink

i don't like it either. there are funny parts but it is kinda paddywhackery.

there are so many great writers that are amusing about irishness and ireland, the competition is pretty high, most are funnier than this imo and they make interesting observations as well as being witty.

Evil Juice Box Man (LocalGarda), Tuesday, 8 October 2013 10:39 (five years ago) Permalink

i always mean to try third policeman tho.

Evil Juice Box Man (LocalGarda), Tuesday, 8 October 2013 10:39 (five years ago) Permalink

i mean someone like beckett, his novels and stories are really funny without needing a big band of dancing leprechauns to hammer home the joke just in case you missed it the first 1000 times.

Evil Juice Box Man (LocalGarda), Tuesday, 8 October 2013 10:40 (five years ago) Permalink

Third Policeman is an utterly different gig and well worth yr time. tbh, Swim-Two-Birds isn't much like any of his other books, bar his voice

Bap & Ounge (Noodle Vague), Tuesday, 8 October 2013 10:40 (five years ago) Permalink

Making lighthearted and less begrudgingly embittered observations about ireland in the thirties/forties/fifties would seem to be missing the mark imo

Try third policeman, very different tone and approach imo, more wonder and space to it vs astb

unblog your plug (darraghmac), Tuesday, 8 October 2013 10:42 (five years ago) Permalink

Any further recommendations for paddywhackery and other writers being amusing about irishness and ireland? I think that's what I enjoyed most about this. Have read and enjoyed Dubliners and some JP Donleavy.

+ +, Tuesday, 8 October 2013 10:45 (five years ago) Permalink

yeah i mean, i totally accept at the time it was different.

i kinda came to o'brien last after some joyce and a lot of beckett, i dunno, astb was the first irish classic i didn't enjoy.

obv a lot later but have any of you read much behan? i picked up "brendan behan's island" at a second-hand stall a while back, it's brilliant, just full of great stories.

xpost

the above, and samuel beckett - murphy. i find portrait of an artist p funny too in places.

Evil Juice Box Man (LocalGarda), Tuesday, 8 October 2013 10:47 (five years ago) Permalink

Donleavy fans – this was fun:
http://www.nowness.com/day/2010/4/5/517/ink-and-canvas

Definitely will give Third Policeman a try, of course I got the sense in ASTB that a lot of it would be much more funny if you were familiar with the Irish Epics and literary trends at that time, which admittedly I am not.

Totally different writer and period but I've always enjoyed John McGahern on irishness. More bleak than funny though. ASTB also made me think of The Hounds of the Morrigan by Pat O Shea. It's a kids book but does similar things... characters from Irish folklore misbehaving and being silly in a contemporary, domestic setting.

Piggy (omksavant), Tuesday, 8 October 2013 12:18 (five years ago) Permalink

i've only dipped into behan and probably before i was old enough to get a lot of the language and nuance

frank o'connor, obv

unblog your plug (darraghmac), Tuesday, 8 October 2013 13:00 (five years ago) Permalink

even having said that i may be thinking of jb keane for behan there.

unblog your plug (darraghmac), Tuesday, 8 October 2013 13:01 (five years ago) Permalink

pat mccabe kinda fits the bill too.

Old Boy In Network (Michael B), Tuesday, 8 October 2013 13:48 (five years ago) Permalink

i was a little disappointed by astb too tbh.

Old Boy In Network (Michael B), Tuesday, 8 October 2013 13:49 (five years ago) Permalink

I will stan for astb forever, but I think it might be one of those books that you only love if you came to it as a teenager. Definitely not at the level of Joyce/Beckett in terms of soul, but it is its own unique beautiful artifice.

Luigi Nono, le petit robot (seandalai), Tuesday, 8 October 2013 13:55 (five years ago) Permalink

i think the only Behan i've read is Borstal Boy and i don't remember very much at all, but i'd guess it isn't especially representative of his creative work?

Bap & Ounge (Noodle Vague), Tuesday, 8 October 2013 14:03 (five years ago) Permalink

Came to astb six months ago or so.

I dunno would i regard it as lacking in soul. Maybe whether or not one feels kindred with the type of soul on display might well have a bearing on how one responds to the novel?

unblog your plug (darraghmac), Tuesday, 8 October 2013 14:07 (five years ago) Permalink

tbh this thread is giving me the yen to re-read ATSB

Bap & Ounge (Noodle Vague), Tuesday, 8 October 2013 14:13 (five years ago) Permalink

except, y'know, with the initials in the right order

Bap & Ounge (Noodle Vague), Tuesday, 8 October 2013 14:13 (five years ago) Permalink

ATSB was one of the tom clancy game reboots iirc rip fallen eagle ;_;

unblog your plug (darraghmac), Tuesday, 8 October 2013 16:25 (five years ago) Permalink

two years pass...

I'm as well to say that I'm profoundly disappointed in ilxs lack of clamour for this most perfect of works. I've decided that.

The difficult earlier reichs (darraghmac), Friday, 8 January 2016 01:45 (two years ago) Permalink

Then perhaps you've not noticed the bagging and shine at the knees of my trousers from kneeling to genuflect at its altar, now have you? I should say not.

a little too mature to be cute (Aimless), Friday, 8 January 2016 01:53 (two years ago) Permalink

A pint or suggest ban is your only man, darrahmac.

Green Dolphin Street Hassle (James Redd and the Blecchs), Friday, 8 January 2016 01:59 (two years ago) Permalink

To say its not enough is a criticism of your limited numbers being in and of yourself only yourself, man.

The difficult earlier reichs (darraghmac), Friday, 8 January 2016 02:00 (two years ago) Permalink

xp

I think fob would have been strongly for the sb and furthermore as myles would have written a scorcher setpiece about modding if his sketches on courtrooms are anything to go by

The difficult earlier reichs (darraghmac), Friday, 8 January 2016 02:01 (two years ago) Permalink

I am put in mind to say, was not Finn MacCool a man of breadth, of height, of reach, of parts, of skill with the bow, the staff and fist, quick to fury, gentle as a lamb with the softer sex, determined as a limpet and alert as a fine hound, in short a man worth a multitude? Would you also account him too few in number, being but one, is the question I would be asking you and think it worth your while to answer.

a little too mature to be cute (Aimless), Friday, 8 January 2016 02:11 (two years ago) Permalink

A fine man to ask it,indeed! But is it not the case, and well acknowledged, that under the modern system (and I need not remind you under which lot THAT was brought in!) the vote of such a man, or any man, can be set aside by the single perpendicular vote of any common guttersnipe, marauder, barroom solicitor, thief, local councillor or essayist?

The difficult earlier reichs (darraghmac), Friday, 8 January 2016 02:58 (two years ago) Permalink

I mean to say, whether a yarn is tall or small I like to hear it well told. I like to meet a man that can take in hand to tell a story and not make a balls of it while he's at it. I like to know where I am, do you know. Everything has a beginning and an end.

as verbose and purple as a Peter Ustinov made of plums (James Morrison), Friday, 8 January 2016 03:17 (two years ago) Permalink

(ie I love this book too)

as verbose and purple as a Peter Ustinov made of plums (James Morrison), Friday, 8 January 2016 03:18 (two years ago) Permalink

I've put enough of these posts in my mouth for a fortnight's chewing

got a long list of ilxors (fgti), Friday, 8 January 2016 03:24 (two years ago) Permalink

Do you tell me that? It is very baffling to hear it, and will certainly have dire implications if it ever gets as far as the fourcourts.

The difficult earlier reichs (darraghmac), Friday, 8 January 2016 03:29 (two years ago) Permalink

one year passes...

I mean to say, whether a yarn is tall or small I like to hear it well told. I like to meet a man that can take in hand to tell a story and not make a balls of it while he's at it. I like to know where I am, do you know. Everything has a beginning and an end.

― as verbose and purple as a Peter Ustinov made of plums (James Morrison), Friday, 8 January 2016 03:17 (one year ago) Bookmark Flag Post Permalink

Good post

This is the best book

jk rowling obituary thread (darraghmac), Wednesday, 23 August 2017 22:56 (one year ago) Permalink

five months pass...

I mean the scene where the good fairy calls to the pooka and he still abed

There is no scene to match it

i,CloudiOS (darraghmac), Saturday, 27 January 2018 01:43 (ten months ago) Permalink

Relate us further, for the love of God.

Who put all those zings in your thread? (James Redd and the Blecchs), Saturday, 27 January 2018 01:46 (ten months ago) Permalink

Don't be doing this to me now boys, I've just come to bed and I'll be buggered if I'm getting up again to hunt down the book.

hard to be a spod (Noodle Vague), Saturday, 27 January 2018 01:52 (ten months ago) Permalink

Of the noodles you have ever got, which have you found the vaguest?

The Sound of the City Slang (James Redd and the Blecchs), Saturday, 27 January 2018 01:59 (ten months ago) Permalink

There is finer stuff in that suit than was ever in any angels eye is the stone coldest drawing of a metaphorical blade that ever was conceived. Olivier buck naked locked out of Scott's tent would fall miles short of the frigidity of tone demanded

i,CloudiOS (darraghmac), Saturday, 27 January 2018 02:00 (ten months ago) Permalink

Nature of thread: civil, perfunctory, uninformative

The Sound of the City Slang (James Redd and the Blecchs), Saturday, 27 January 2018 02:40 (ten months ago) Permalink

The conclusion of your syllogism is fallacious, being based upon licensed premises.

mahb, Friday, 2 February 2018 14:50 (ten months ago) Permalink

I saw that my witticism was unperceived and quietly replaced it in the treasury of my mind.

Some Dusty in Here (James Redd and the Blecchs), Tuesday, 6 February 2018 04:23 (ten months ago) Permalink

five months pass...

So about the collected letters.

Pwn Goal Picnic (James Redd and the Blecchs), Saturday, 7 July 2018 20:32 (five months ago) Permalink

Apparently a right miserable so-and-so, Brian O'Nolan.

Alan Alba (Tom D.), Saturday, 7 July 2018 20:34 (five months ago) Permalink

Recommended read?

mick signals, Saturday, 7 July 2018 21:07 (five months ago) Permalink

reviewed poorly by a cunt with an axe to grind in the sunday times a few weeks back but that doesnt negate the review neither

repartee is deft (darraghmac), Saturday, 7 July 2018 23:23 (five months ago) Permalink

Also reviewed poorly in the Lit Review, basically saying it starts well, but there's too much repetitious bulk from the later, bitter, less talented years.

Mince Pramthwart (James Morrison), Sunday, 8 July 2018 06:07 (five months ago) Permalink

Ugh.

Pwn Goal Picnic (James Redd and the Blecchs), Sunday, 8 July 2018 10:16 (five months ago) Permalink

Which of us could not be thus reviewed?

mick signals, Sunday, 8 July 2018 15:40 (five months ago) Permalink

I am going to review them.

the pinefox, Tuesday, 10 July 2018 14:27 (five months ago) Permalink


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