Wherein We Elect Our Favourite Novels of 1951

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what was that you said about not getting to vote for Durrenmatt again, xyzz?

Poll Results

OptionVotes
The Catcher In The Rye by J.D. Salinger 10
The Day Of The Triffids by John Wyndham 7
Memoirs Of Hadrian by Marguerite Yourcenar 5
Molloy by Samuel Beckett 4
The End Of The Affair by Graham Greene 2
A Question Of Upbringing by Anthony Powell 2
Beat The Devil by James Helvick 1
The Daughter Of Time by Josephine Tey 1
Hangsman by Shirley Jackson 1
From Here To Eternity by James Jones 1
The Master Of Go by Yasunari Kawabata 0
Suspicion by Friedrich Durrenmatt 0
Malone Dies by Samuel Beckett 0
Les Grands Chemins by Jean Giono 0
The Second Scroll by A.M. Klein 0
The Thin Line by Edward Atiyah 0
The Opposing Shore by Julien Gracq 0
The Holy Sinner by Thomas Mann 0
She Who Was No More by Bolieau-Narcejac 0
Forbbiden Colours by Yukio Mishima 0
Fires On The Plain by Ooka Shohei 0
The Conformist by Alberto Moravia 0
The Chinese Maze Murders by Robert Van Gulik 0
The Astronauts by Stanislaw Lem 0
Meeting In Vienna by Margit Soderholm 0
Maigret And The Burglar's Wife by Georges Simenon 0
The Questionnaire by Ernst Von Salomon 0
My Grandfather Had An Elephant by Vaikom Muhammad Basheer 0
Prince Caspian by C.S. Lewis 0
My Cousin Rachel by Daphne du Maurier 0
The Hidden Valley Of Oz by Frank L. Baum 0
The Grass Harp by Truman Capote 0
Foundation by Isaac Asimov 0
Ellen Tebbits by Beverley Cleary 0
Camilla Dickinson by Madeleine L'Engle 0
The Caine Mutiny by Herman Wouk 0
Barbary Shore by Norman Mailer 0
The Lonely Voyage by John Harris 0
Hold Back The Night by Pat Frank 0
The Morning Watch by James Agee 0
Requiem For A Nun by William Faulkner 0
The Masters by C.P. Snow 0
A Ghost In Monte Carlo by Barbara Cartland 0
A Game Of Hide And Seek by Elizabeth Taylor 0
Festival At Farbridge by J.B. Priestley 0
The Cruel Sea by Nicholas Monsarrat 0
The Blessing by Nancy Mitford 0
Wine Of The Dreamers by John D. MacDonald 0
Spartacus by Howard Fast 0
Lie Down In Darkness by William Styron 0


Daniel_Rf, Thursday, 18 March 2021 11:28 (four months ago) link

Lots of Big Beasts in this one.

A Catcher In The Rye might actually be underrated now, after decades of serving as everyone's lazy go-to for why white boy lit is bad.

I included the Frank L. Baum just to let you guys know that, after all these decades, he is still at it and has been since he first showed up in these polls.

Daniel_Rf, Thursday, 18 March 2021 11:33 (four months ago) link

I love Catcher In The Rye, but it's up against Molloy here, so

Bastard Lakes (Camaraderie at Arms Length), Thursday, 18 March 2021 11:36 (four months ago) link

Just for fun, the ILX 20th century canon so far:

1900-"Lord Jim", Joseph Conrad
1901-"Kim", Rudyard Kipling
1902-"Heart Of Darkness", Joseph Conrad*
1903-"The Call Of The Wild", Jack London
1904-"The Phoenix & The Carpet", E. Nesbit/"The Golden Bowl", Henry James
1905-"The House Of Mirth", Edwith Wharton
1906-"The Jungle", Upton Sinclair
1907-"The Secret Agent", Joseph Conrad
1908-"Anne Of Green Gables", Lucy Maud Montgomerey/"The House On The Borderland", William Hope Hodgson/"The Wind In The Willows", Kenneth Grahame/"Why did you spoil my life making me do my M. A.?", Amrit Keshav Nayak
1909- "Jakob Von Gunten", Robert Walser
1910- "The Notebooks Of Malte Laurids Brigge", Rainer Maria Rilke
1911- "Ethan Frome", Edith Wharton/"The Secret Garden", Frances Hodgson Burnett
1912- "A Princess Of Mars", Edgar Rice Burroughs
1913- "Swann's Way", Marcel Proust
1914- "Locus Solus", Raymond Roussel
1915- "The Rainbow", D.H. Lawrence
1916- "A Portrait Of The Artist As A Young Man", James Joyce
1917- "Summer", Edith Wharton/"Growth Of The Soil", Knut Hamson/"Jap Herron: A Novel Written From The Ouija Board", dictated by the spirit of Mark Twain/"Moonchild", Aleister Crowley/"Under Fire", Henri Barbusse**
1918- "My Antonia", Willa Cather
1919- "In The Shadow Of Young Girls In Flower", Marcel Proust
1920- "The Age Of Innocence", Edith Wharton
1921- "The Good Soldier Švejk", Jaroslav Hašek
1922- "Ulysses", James Joyce
1923- "Leave It To Psmith", P.G. Wodehouse
1924- "The Magic Mountain", Thomas Mann
1925- "The Trial", Franz Kafka
1926- "The Castle", Franz Kafka
1927- "To The Lighthouse", Virginia Woolf
1928- "Decline And Fall", Evelyn Waugh/"Nadja", André Breton
1929- "The Sound And The Fury", William Faulkner/"Berlin Alexanderplatz", Alfred Doblin
1930- "As I Lay Dying", William Faulkner
1931- "The Waves"m Virginia Woolf/"Night Flight", Antoine de Saint-Exupéry/"After Leaving Mr.Mackenzie", Jean Rhys
1932- "Journey To The End Of The Night", Louis-Ferdinand Céline
1933- "Man's Fate", André Malraux
1934- "Tender Is The Night", F. Scott Fitzgerald/"Tropic Of Cancer", Henry Miller/"Right Ho Jeeves", P.G. Wodehouse
1935- "Mr.Norris Changes Trains", Christopher Isherwood
1936- "Absalom, Absalom", William Faulkner
1937- "The Hobbit", J.R.R. Tolkien
1938- "Rebecca", Daphne du Maurier
1939- "At-Swim-Two-Birds", Flann O' Brien
1940- "Native Son", Richard Wright
1941- "Thomas The Obscure", Maurice Blanchot/"The Real Life Of Sebastian Knight", Vladimir Nabokov/"Mildred Pierce", James M. Cain
1942- "Put Out More Flags", Evelyn Waugh/"The High Window", Raymond Chandler
1943- "The Man Without Qualities", Robert Musil
1944- "The Horse's Mouth", Joyce Cary
1945- "Animal Horse", George Orwell
1946- "Titus Groan". Mervyn Peake
1947- "The Plague", Albert Camus
1948- "I Capture The Castle", Dodie Smith
1949- "1984", George Orwell
1950- "The Martian Chronicles", Ray Bradbury

* or "The Hound Of The Baskervilles" if you want to decry that as a novella
** all of them with an impressive one vote each

Daniel_Rf, Thursday, 18 March 2021 11:58 (four months ago) link

Molloy. I've read at least five of these so I feel informed enough to vote.

Halfway there but for you, Thursday, 18 March 2021 11:59 (four months ago) link

Baum died in 1919!

Cocteau Twinks (jed_), Thursday, 18 March 2021 12:00 (four months ago) link

lol ah fuck, wikipedia lead me down an errouneus path, these were all written by his successors!

Daniel_Rf, Thursday, 18 March 2021 12:06 (four months ago) link

somewhat less impressive

Daniel_Rf, Thursday, 18 March 2021 12:06 (four months ago) link

Oof, this one's rough. I should go with either Molloy or Malone Dies but I think I'll save my Beckett vote for The Unnamable and/or How It Is. Otherwise, it's a toss-up between Gracq and Yourcenar, with a slight preference for the latter.

I loathed The Catcher in the Rye in my teens because Holden sounded like a phony himself and baseball elicits no emotional response from me whatsoever. Years later, I was frankly baffled to discover that it's long been held up as a classic tale of teenage rebellion. I wish!

pomenitul, Thursday, 18 March 2021 13:56 (four months ago) link

One of the Onion's best moments imo:

https://www.theonion.com/bunch-of-phonies-mourn-j-d-salinger-1819571282

Daniel_Rf, Thursday, 18 March 2021 14:37 (four months ago) link

Wow, I've actually read a handful of these. Memoirs of Hadrian and The Catcher in the Rye are favourites.

jmm, Thursday, 18 March 2021 15:14 (four months ago) link

I feel like it basically sums up my personality and aesthetic that I'm torn between Catcher and Molloy here

Guayaquil (eephus!), Thursday, 18 March 2021 15:18 (four months ago) link

I'm glad that Why did you spoil my life making me do my M. A.? is in the ILX canon. Absolutely fundamental document for understanding the ILXor mindset.

jmm, Thursday, 18 March 2021 15:32 (four months ago) link

i love The End of the Affair, but gotta vote Catcher here

horseshoe, Thursday, 18 March 2021 15:33 (four months ago) link

i am perpetually irritated by those periodical twitter posts about how Catcher is terrible and shouldn't be taught to kids. i teach it every year, but i appreciate it even more as an adult than i did as a kid, when i liked it.

horseshoe, Thursday, 18 March 2021 15:34 (four months ago) link

i am also fond of Camilla Dickinson and Ellen Tebbits, tbf. but none of them is Catcher

horseshoe, Thursday, 18 March 2021 15:35 (four months ago) link

Yeah it rules but I also fully understand what gets up people's nose about it (and the same qualities are present in Salinger's other stuff too, I would say even more so in fact.) A great book it's totally OK not to like.

Guayaquil (eephus!), Thursday, 18 March 2021 15:36 (four months ago) link

Triffids vs Hadrian for me. (A film I'd pay to see.)

Ignore the neighsayers: grow a lemon tree (ledge), Thursday, 18 March 2021 15:37 (four months ago) link

everything is okay not to like, but the reasons given for disliking Catcher by adults who haven't read it since they were 13 indicate that they do not remember the book or did not understand the book.

xp

horseshoe, Thursday, 18 March 2021 15:37 (four months ago) link

Holden sounded like a phony himself

the point of the book

mellon collie and the infinite bradness (BradNelson), Thursday, 18 March 2021 15:38 (four months ago) link

There's something remarkable about the fact that few people seem to have a distanced reaction to it. It's very love or hate. (Though high school standards are often fraught in that way.)

jmm, Thursday, 18 March 2021 15:38 (four months ago) link

no one can be an adult and avoid being a phony! also Holden knows he's a phony sometimes and hates himself for it!

horseshoe, Thursday, 18 March 2021 15:39 (four months ago) link

Molloy, yes. I still had to double-check which one of the 'single name Beckett titles' this was, FFS Beckett man, but yes, it is magnificent.

Catcher In The Rye might actually be underrated now, after decades of serving as everyone's lazy go-to for why white boy lit is bad.

I kind of agree with this. It's been aeons since I read it, but to my mind it's been pilloried to an extent it doesn't deserve (tbh I probably read it at the 'right' age, being younger than Holden Caulfield himself at the time, so I'm not sure how much I'd hate it re-reading as an adult).

Kid me is really really wanting me to vote for Wyndham though, he was a big name in my younger reading. But no! It shall not be.

emil.y, Thursday, 18 March 2021 15:39 (four months ago) link

the point of the book

Yeah, well it angered me when I was 15.

pomenitul, Thursday, 18 March 2021 15:40 (four months ago) link

i have no critical distance from this novel and will fite anyone about it

horseshoe, Thursday, 18 March 2021 15:40 (four months ago) link

my poor students who dislike it

horseshoe, Thursday, 18 March 2021 15:40 (four months ago) link

I was taking ages composing that post so missed most of the Catcher talk and everything's been said more eloquently now, oh well.

emil.y, Thursday, 18 March 2021 15:41 (four months ago) link

Should vote for Beckett but would like to vote for Elizabeth Taylor or Anthony Powell. I feel oddly affectionate for Barbary Shore.

Vanishing Point (Chinaski), Thursday, 18 March 2021 15:41 (four months ago) link

also the serious objects of Holden's criticism (not when he's throwing the word "phony" around at nothing, but when he really means it) totally deserve it! rich white dudes who view life as a game because it's rigged in their favor! he's right!

xxp

horseshoe, Thursday, 18 March 2021 15:41 (four months ago) link

xp I voted Powell, Dance is my favourite work of fiction.

Sven Vath's scary carpet (Neil S), Thursday, 18 March 2021 15:42 (four months ago) link

i realize not everyone itt can be expected to have reread Catcher yearly for the past six years because they teach it, but i have opinions4u

horseshoe, Thursday, 18 March 2021 15:42 (four months ago) link

I am 100% here for horseshoe-defends-Holden.

emil.y, Thursday, 18 March 2021 15:44 (four months ago) link

I have no idea how I'd respond to it now but I also hated the fact that it was set in a decade I didn't give a shit about and the whole thing was just way too American for comfort. (I'm drawing on my shallow teenage memories here.)

pomenitul, Thursday, 18 March 2021 15:46 (four months ago) link

a decade I didn't give a shit about

War notwithstanding, obv.

pomenitul, Thursday, 18 March 2021 15:47 (four months ago) link

It also goes without saying that *I* was not a phony and therefore had nothing in common with Holden.

pomenitul, Thursday, 18 March 2021 15:49 (four months ago) link

it is v American, for sure!

xp i also think i literally didn't get as a kid that it's a novel about grief. as an adult, it destroys me.

horseshoe, Thursday, 18 March 2021 15:49 (four months ago) link

It's funny to imagine that anyone was ever shocked by it on a moral level due to the profanity and cigarette-smoking and such, when the themes of family and home are so strong. It's a very sentimental book for me, rather than any kind of emblem of rebellion.

jmm, Thursday, 18 March 2021 15:53 (four months ago) link

i think Holden is a nascent anti-capitalist though lol. also, i liked it as a kid because of the profanity and the thrill of someone daring to flunk out of school etc.

horseshoe, Thursday, 18 March 2021 15:54 (four months ago) link

but yes, it is v sentimental. i can never read the passage where Holden recounts how he reacted to Allie's death aloud because it makes me cry. after he tells us he punched out the windows in his garage, he says something like "it was a very stupid thing to do, i admit, but i didn't hardly know i was doing it, and you didn't know Allie." sob!

horseshoe, Thursday, 18 March 2021 15:57 (four months ago) link

sorry, should i have spoilered that?

horseshoe, Thursday, 18 March 2021 15:58 (four months ago) link

This is really making me want to reread it! I haven't read it since I was twelve and now I'm realizing I don't really remember it at all.

Lily Dale, Thursday, 18 March 2021 16:02 (four months ago) link

I voted Daughter of Time because it's such an irresistible comfort read, but there's so much here that I either haven't read or don't remember.

Lily Dale, Thursday, 18 March 2021 16:05 (four months ago) link

i recommend it! as an adult who teaches kids, Lily, i think you will find the whole "i want to catch kids before they fall off a cliff" thing very moving.

xp

horseshoe, Thursday, 18 March 2021 16:05 (four months ago) link

I will read it! That does sound like something I would respond to as an adult.

Lily Dale, Thursday, 18 March 2021 16:11 (four months ago) link

It was my first Salinger, when I was 15 or 16 (would have floored me at 12?!), and I think I found it effective as an opening blast of bad-breath, zit-and-cig-ridden teen attitude, incl the sentiment tangled up in blue and booo, but soon came to prefer Nine Stories and "Franny" ("Zooey" was too much of a lecture). And that's as far as I got w Salinger, though I (kinda) hope to get back to the other books, and re-read Catcher(Seemingly no need to likewise Nine, the hooks of which are stuck in my head).

dow, Thursday, 18 March 2021 17:25 (four months ago) link

But, if it's not too soon to move own, I'll vote, as always, for the one I remember best and most favorably: From Here To Eternity is an epic (not just long, but panoramic and zoom lens) blast of attitude, incl. adult experience, ripened and yet *ripe* (like, a pungent pageant, Pops)swoop through life at Pearl Harbor and Honolulu, with some flashes back to Great Depression mainland, before, during and after the Japanese attack---which, in context, ain't that big a surprise, and is something of a release, for the moment. A novel centered on 1941, published in 1951, and seeming as Beat as for instance the hardiest parts of Ginsberg's "America" "Go fuck your self with your Atom Bomb...My mind is made up, there's going to be trouble/America I'm putting my queer shoulder to the wheel" (minus the neurosis of AG as narrator, although some/most of Jones's characters are pretty messed up)---to the extent that I wondered how he and the publishers managed such a Highly Acclaimed best seller in early Cold War (also early Korean War).
The Kindle and a subsequent print edition are even more uncut, w even more about interface of gay white men of means from the mainland, now residing in Honolulu, and military guys just tryin' to make a little more beer-and-cig money, see?
Not the deepest, but pretty good on gender and race and class and war for a brash white male author of the era, and of course a lot that got left out of the movie, although Montgomery Clift's and Ernest Borgnine's characters, as written and portrayed, are true to the original.

dow, Thursday, 18 March 2021 17:51 (four months ago) link

Hangsaman by Shirley Jackson is less eventful on the surface than some of her other novels, but the undercurrent is strong, it sits in me in a physical way, and even though less 'horror' things happen it's perhaps even more unsettling than your Haunting of Hill House or 'Castle'. I dare you to find a subtler exploration of horror in the ordinary that still sends chills down your spine in a 'let's keep the light on' kind of way than this.

abcfsk, Thursday, 18 March 2021 20:22 (four months ago) link

I don't know that I'd nominate it as best in this company, but The End of the Affair has always been a very special book to me.

It's really, really Catholic. I should say that upfront in case that puts people off, or they're intrigued by his Catholic works.

It's a gorgeously written tale of infidelity, longing that curdles to pain then to anger and it's set in London during the Blitz - the lovers are separated by a bomb hitting the house they are in. My mind keeps turning to this again and again during this time because a lot of it is about loving someone you can't see, but in the end it is not really about that either.

Hatred seems to operate the same glands as love: it even produces the same actions. If we had not been taught how to interpret the story of the Passion, would we have been able to say from their actions alone whether it was the jealous Judas or the cowardly Peter who loved Christ?

For all the high-mindedness about faith and belief and the struggle for both, it is the mundane details that stay with me. Sarah deliberately eating onions when they dine together for the first time, although her husband hates them.

And the simplicity with which Greene details his agony just makes it tear at you more. Like smiling through bitter tears.

I had the security of possessing nothing. I could have no more than I had lost, while he still owned her presence at the table, the sound of her feet on the stairs, the opening and closing of doors, the kiss on the cheek - I doubt if there was much else now, but what a lot to a starving man is just that much.

I need to read this again properly so I can write a better post about it than this.

Scamp Granada (gyac), Thursday, 18 March 2021 23:34 (four months ago) link

it’s a great book, and I love it

horseshoe, Thursday, 18 March 2021 23:34 (four months ago) link

always makes me wish i were Catholic tbh

horseshoe, Thursday, 18 March 2021 23:35 (four months ago) link

I am Catholic and let me tell you, it’s pretty accurate in some parts but you’re not missing anything.

Scamp Granada (gyac), Thursday, 18 March 2021 23:44 (four months ago) link

The Catcher In The Rye by J.D. Salinger -- don't hate it but definitely read it too late in life to really like it

Foundation by Isaac Asimov -- this book has cast too long a shadow over too much SF, given that it's not very good

The Grass Harp by Truman Capote -- books you know you've read but even when you read the Wikipedia summary you can't remember

Hangsaman by Shirley Jackson -- HangsAman, not Hangsman: wonderful lurid gothic dark comedy

The Morning Watch by James Agee -- really quietly beautiful little novel, wish he's written more fiction

The Blessing by Nancy Mitford -- eh, it's OK, minor Mitford

The Cruel Sea by Nicholas Monsarrat -- good stiff-upper-lip WW2 melodrama, most of the characters are rather more likeable than seems realistic

The Day Of The Triffids by John Wyndham -- absolutely impossible to be objective about this, the first book I actually stayed up all night reading with a torch under the blankets

The End Of The Affair by Graham Greene -- one of his best books, I love it, the perfect people-getting-on-with-grubby-love-life-while-bombs-drop book

A Game Of Hide And Seek by Elizabeth Taylor -- she can do no wrong

Prince Caspian by C.S. Lewis -- did not recapture the LWW magic, no matter how much I tried to make it do so as a kid

Malone Dies by Samuel Beckett -- almost as fucking amazing as...

Molloy by Samuel Beckett -- fucking amazing

She Who Was No More by Bolieau-Narcejac -- this is pretty great but Les Diaboliques, the film that came from it, is even better

Maigret And The Burglar's Wife by Georges Simenon -- typically excellent

Suspicion by Friedrich Durrenmatt -- quite good, a bit bonkers

Going Wyndham for reason listed above

Tsar Bombadil (James Morrison), Friday, 19 March 2021 00:05 (four months ago) link

Even made some triffids recently:

Made some tiny triffids:
(made from polyclay, bits of coathanger, bits of thread, floral wire, paper and old plastic flowers) pic.twitter.com/tkOyhGuOlh

— Caustic Cover Critic 📚 (@Unwise_Trousers) March 10, 2021

Tsar Bombadil (James Morrison), Friday, 19 March 2021 00:06 (four months ago) link

Just so. Put those triffids on my grave, all my life I've been concave.
The Morning Watch by James Agee -- really quietly beautiful little novel, wish he's written more fiction Just what I came back to post! Just this and A Death In The Family, right? Must check.

dow, Friday, 19 March 2021 00:52 (four months ago) link

Yeah, I think those are the only two. He also wrote the best film review ever:
https://i.ibb.co/GJ73ph0/DJ-gd90-VYAII4n-S.jpg

Tsar Bombadil (James Morrison), Friday, 19 March 2021 02:47 (four months ago) link

bless you for these posts, horseshoe; i always feel so alone when the cool twitter kids start trying to outdo each other in their disdain for catcher.

(The Other) J.D. (J.D.), Friday, 19 March 2021 03:06 (four months ago) link

He would have killed it on letterboxd.

xp

emil.y, Friday, 19 March 2021 03:06 (four months ago) link

Day of the Triffids is class. Probably my choice too.

I also appreciated Catcher In The Rye and horseshoe’s posts about it and instinctively bridle at people who try to kid on that it’s shit, I read it at exactly the right age but there’s still a lot to love there even thinking it back years later. The title scene is one that sticks with me in detail almost two decades later.

Scamp Granada (gyac), Friday, 19 March 2021 07:17 (four months ago) link

Day of the triffids was such a gripping read as a teenager so it’s probably that but I have to put in a mention for the cruel sea which was my grandfather’s favourite book and movie (he was in the merchant navy on North Atlantic convoys). I should read it again.

American Fear of Scampos (Ed), Friday, 19 March 2021 08:36 (four months ago) link

haha we are not alone! Twitter posts deriding Catcher (and other books) always piss me off.

horseshoe, Friday, 19 March 2021 12:48 (four months ago) link

I'm voting Catcher. I reread all the Salinger stories over Christmas - so good. A Backlisted episode from a few months ago helped me rethink Catcher when they framed Holden as a young man having a nervous breakdown rather than a cool teenage rebel. I really liked Franny & Zooey and RHtRB,C + Seymour too.

cajunsunday, Friday, 19 March 2021 13:37 (four months ago) link

thanks horseshoe, lots of stuff I've been thinking but pur much better than I could. Also just rewatched the film Six Degrees of Separation and there is a speech defending Catcher in there, love that film too.

My ranking of Narnia books is H&HB>VOTDT>MN>>SC>>>LW&W>>>PC>>>LB - haven't read any since childhood and wondering if my kids would like them.

Bastard Lakes (Camaraderie at Arms Length), Friday, 19 March 2021 14:15 (four months ago) link

I always thought "Prince Caspian" was one of the weaker Narnia books. Though, strangely, it seems to be the best of the recent big-budget, film versions. Let me see, I've read a few of these. Most recently I re-read "Malone Dies", after taking a crack at re-reading "Molloy" but finding I was not in the mood for some of the more tedious slapstick business. It was okay. I think "Foundation" may be Asimov's best novel, at least of the ones I've read. I also read "Catcher in the Rye" perhaps a bit too late in life, but I enjoyed it nonetheless. I read Styron's "Lie Down in Darkness" a few years ago. It was also okay. I don't remember much about it. Actually not sure which one I'd vote for.

o. nate, Friday, 19 March 2021 21:40 (four months ago) link

The main thing I remember about Foundation is that it's a novel set in the future that has zero women in it, even in minor roles. Even as a kid I found that weird.

Lily Dale, Friday, 19 March 2021 21:49 (four months ago) link

"what was that you said about not getting to vote for Durrenmatt again, xyzz?"

what I meant was that The Judge is probably the best of his novellas and I probably wouldn't vote for anything else.

This is what I have read:

Malone Dies by Samuel Beckett
Molloy by Samuel Beckett
Forbbiden Colours by Yukio Mishima
The Conformist by Alberto Moravia
The Master Of Go by Yasunari Kawabata
Memoirs Of Hadrian by Marguerite Yourcenar

I want to go for one of the Becketts but I will get to vote for one of the later ones (I love Mercier and Camier a lot), so its between Yourcenar and Moravia and I am going for Hadrian, its a very good historical recreation.

I will read Catcher in the Rye one day, if only to satisfy my curiosity.

xyzzzz__, Saturday, 20 March 2021 13:21 (four months ago) link

(I love Mercier and Camier a lot),amen

dow, Saturday, 20 March 2021 16:43 (four months ago) link

We should've probably included it in the 1946 poll but I suppose it's too late now.

pomenitul, Saturday, 20 March 2021 16:53 (four months ago) link

It was published in the 70s so was thinking it could be included then

xyzzzz__, Saturday, 20 March 2021 17:38 (four months ago) link

Automatic thread bump. This poll is closing tomorrow.

System, Sunday, 21 March 2021 00:01 (four months ago) link

Automatic thread bump. This poll's results are now in.

System, Monday, 22 March 2021 00:01 (four months ago) link

I didn’t vote for The End of the Affair despite what I said about it itt but I’m pleased two of you did.

Scamp Granada (gyac), Monday, 22 March 2021 00:32 (four months ago) link

Of the zero votes, Forbidden Colours is a very well-written novel where it's hard to tell to what extent it is an exploration of a misogynist and/or by a misogynist.
Malone Dies is not much weaker than Molloy but I guess it suffers from middle-of-the-trilogy neglect, like Three Colours: White.

Halfway there but for you, Monday, 22 March 2021 01:14 (four months ago) link

Right, I thought that was late for L Frank Baum if he had started in teh previous century. So good to hear I had my timeline about right if he died in 191.
THought that was odd. THough of course there are always unpublished works released way posthumously.

Stevolende, Monday, 22 March 2021 09:30 (four months ago) link

Wherein We Elect Our Favourite Novels of 1952

Daniel_Rf, Monday, 22 March 2021 11:53 (four months ago) link

foundation has a neat idea but it's horribly written and doesn't even do justice to the idea

mookieproof, Monday, 22 March 2021 23:09 (four months ago) link


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