Wherein We Elect Our Favourite Novels of 1915

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Bad news for some regular poll contributors: the English language list for this year had NO French novels. I switched to French wikipedia to find something, but that itself only had one - never heard of "Gaspard", doubt it will fit in w/ resident francophile tastes but hey I tried :)

Poll Results

OptionVotes
The Rainbow by D.H. Lawrence 3
The Good Soldier by Ford Maddox Ford 2
Of Human Bondage by Sommerset Maugham 2
Psmith, Journalist by P.G. Wodehouse 2
The Thirty Nine Steps by John Buchan 1
Knulp by Herman Hesse 0
Guy And Pauline by Compton MacKenzie 0
The Holy Flower by H. Rider Haggard 0
The Man Who Bought London by Edgar Wallace 0
The Pit by Alexander Kuprin 0
The Songs Of A Sentimental Bloke by C.J. Dennis 0
Pointed Roofs by Dorothy Richardson 0
The Underdogs by Mariano Azuela 0
Temno by Alois Jirasek 0
The Sea Hawk by Rafael Sabatini 0
The Strange Life Of Ivan Osokin by P.D. Ouspensky 0
The Valley Of Fear by Arthur Conan Doyle 0
Victory by Joseph Conrad 0
The Yellow Claw by Sax Rohmer 0
Anne Of The Island by Lucy Maud Montgomerey 0
The Golem by Gustav Meyrink 0
Gaspard by René Benjamin 0
The Game Of Liberty by E. Phillips Oppernheim 0
Doctor Syn by Russel Thorndike 0
The Lone Star Ranger by Zane Grey 0
The Little Lady Of The Big House by Jack London 0
K by Mary Roberts Rineheart 0
Herland by Charlotte Perkins Gilman 0
The "Genius" by Theodore Dreiser 0
The Forged Note by Oscar Micheaux 0
Fidelity by Susan Glaspell 0
Dear Enemy by Jean Webster 0
The Lost Prince by Frances Hodgson Burnett 0
The Man Who Rocked The Earth by Arthur C. Train and Robert W. Wood 0
Pellucidar by Edgar Rice Burroughs 0
The Bronze Eagle by Baroness Orczy 0
Bealby by H.G. Wells 0
A Sport From The Hollowlog Flag by Arthur Wright 0
The Trail Of The Hawk by Sinclair Lewis 0
The Song Of The Lark by Willa Cather 0
The Scarecrow Of Oz by L. Frank Baum 0
The Primrose Ring by Ruth Saywer 0
Pollyanna Grows Up by Eleanor H. Porter 0
The Voyage Out by Virgina Woolf 0


Daniel_Rf, Thursday, 22 October 2020 12:31 (one month ago) link

look at all these idle novelists. introduce conscription i say

imago, Thursday, 22 October 2020 12:34 (one month ago) link

also, woolf, already! had no idea

imago, Thursday, 22 October 2020 12:35 (one month ago) link

Interested in: Pointed Roofs (the first stream of conciousness novel, apparently!), The Forged Note.

Some heavy hitters showing up here - Woolf, Maugham.

"The Songs Of A Sentimental Bloke" sounds a bit too Ed Sheeran for me.

My vote goes to The Good Soldier, which I should reread some time.

Daniel_Rf, Thursday, 22 October 2020 12:36 (one month ago) link

lol good point imago, not even writing inspirational war novels even

Daniel_Rf, Thursday, 22 October 2020 12:37 (one month ago) link

look at all these idle novelists. introduce conscription I say

Cue Stoppard quote about what Joyce did during the Great War.

pomenitul, Thursday, 22 October 2020 12:42 (one month ago) link

I haven't read a single one of these. I recall starting The Rainbow around the time I got bored with Lawrence, so that spelled the end of it. Anyway, I'm curious about Meyrink's Der Golem.

Re: Pointed Roofs, that's quite interesting, I've always thought of Édouard Dujardin's Les lauriers sont coupés (1887) as the first, but then again, it is debatable whether 'le monologue intérieur' is the same thing as stream of consciousness.

pomenitul, Thursday, 22 October 2020 12:53 (one month ago) link

I won't vote for it since I haven't read any of the other books, but The Rainbow provided me with an epiphany when I read it more than 10 years ago. There's a long sequence where Ursula is stuck in a dead-end teaching job with students who don't understand her and colleagues who treat her coldly. At the time, I was feeling the same kind of hopelessness at work, and feeling the impossibility of taking action that Lawrence describes.

Eventually, she is able to change her circumstances and her way of living, but Lawrence doesn't explicitly underline this change. Instead he just describes the subsequent events, and we realize that Ursula's life is different than it was. What amazed me was his exactness at conveying both the hopelessness of being stuck and the way that time can change everything. It sounds banal in description because in The Rainbow it is all done by inference; although this attitude towards time passing has already been set up by the narrative starting years before Ursula's birth.

What's even more impressive is that none of this is what the book is supposedly "about". Anyway, it taught me that life is changing.

Halfway there but for you, Thursday, 22 October 2020 13:26 (one month ago) link

People fucking knew how to title a novel in those days

Guayaquil (eephus!), Thursday, 22 October 2020 17:03 (one month ago) link

Anyway, I remember nothing about "The Good Soldier" except I thought it was absolutely slamming when I read it so I voted for that.

Guayaquil (eephus!), Thursday, 22 October 2020 17:03 (one month ago) link

"The Songs Of A Sentimental Bloke" is an Australian classic -- epic love poems, etc, written in Australian slang. May not travel well to other nations.

Tsar Bombadil (James Morrison), Friday, 23 October 2020 01:24 (one month ago) link

Verse novel, i should say.

I've lorst me former joy in gettin' shick,
Or 'eadin' browns; I 'aven't got the 'eart
To word a tom; an', square an' all, I'm sick
Of that cheap tart
'Oo chucks 'er carkis at a feller's 'ead
An' mauls 'im . . . Ar! I wish't that I wus dead! . . .

Tsar Bombadil (James Morrison), Friday, 23 October 2020 01:25 (one month ago) link

I think The Good Soldier is the only one I read but I thought it was fantastic 12 or so years ago.

JoeStork, Friday, 23 October 2020 02:48 (one month ago) link

look at all these idle novelists. introduce conscription i say

― imago, Thursday, October 22, 2020 2:34 PM (yesterday) bookmarkflaglink

:-D

Surprised 'The Metamorphosis' by Kafka isn't on the list! I would've voted for that in an instant. As it stands, I've not read many others - and indeed it's a meagre French harvest - so I'll go with 'Of Human Bondage'.

Ilxor in the streets, Scampo in the sheets (Le Bateau Ivre), Friday, 23 October 2020 06:54 (one month ago) link

It was on wikipedia but come on, that's a short story.

Daniel_Rf, Friday, 23 October 2020 10:10 (one month ago) link

No I understand, just that it was published on its own that year, too. I’ve no complaints!

Ilxor in the streets, Scampo in the sheets (Le Bateau Ivre), Friday, 23 October 2020 12:13 (one month ago) link

Anyway, I'm curious about Meyrink's Der Golem.

If you're at all curious, you should definitely check it out. It's a kind of bonkers, occult-steeped fever dream of the Prague Jewish ghetto, only tangentially about the Golem myth. I've actually read three of these, the most of any year so far, I think. Besides The Golem, I also read and enjoyed The Good Soldier, and most recently The Song of the Lark. I still don't really feel qualified to vote though.

o. nate, Friday, 23 October 2020 15:50 (one month ago) link

Cool, thanks. I've been meaning to check it out as a companion piece to the work of another, considerably more famous early 20th century German-language Jewish writer from Prague, as there appear to be some surface similarities between the two.

Notorious white supremacist and antisemite H. P. Lovecraft was reportedly a fan, heh.

pomenitul, Friday, 23 October 2020 16:02 (one month ago) link

I've only read the Maugham, a long time ago, and remember it as pretty dreary.

jmm, Friday, 23 October 2020 16:08 (one month ago) link

The Rainbow is quite an incredible book

Mr. Cacciatore (Moodles), Friday, 23 October 2020 16:15 (one month ago) link

Automatic thread bump. This poll is closing tomorrow.

System, Sunday, 25 October 2020 00:01 (four weeks ago) link

<3 Maugham, so that.

Bidh boladh a' mhairbh de 'n láimh fhalaimh (dowd), Sunday, 25 October 2020 02:10 (four weeks ago) link

Automatic thread bump. This poll's results are now in.

System, Monday, 26 October 2020 00:01 (four weeks ago) link

Wherein We Elect Our Favourite Novels of 1916

Daniel_Rf, Monday, 26 October 2020 11:24 (four weeks ago) link


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