Wherein We Elect Our Favourite Novels of 1907

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Poll Results

OptionVotes
The Secret Agent by Joseph Conrad 4
Les Onze Mille Verges by Guilliaume Appolinaire 3
The Longest Journey by E.M. Forster 1
The Enchanted Castle by E. Nesbit 1
The Man Who Was Thursday by G.K. Chesterton 1
The Hill Of Dreams by Arthur Machen 1
The Travels Of Lao Can by Liu E. 1
Ozma Of Oz by L. Frank Baum 1
The White Feather by P.G. Wodehouse 0
The War In The Air by H.G. Wells 0
Three Weeks by Elinor Glyn 0
The Secret Of The League by Ernest Bramah 0
Not George Washington by P.G. Wodehouse 0
The Measure Of The Rule by Robert Barr 0
La 628-E8 by Octave Mirbeau 0
Sanin by Mikhail Artsybashev 0
Sandokan To The Rescue by Emilio Salgari 0
Quest For A Throne by Emilio Salgari 0
Under The Free Sun by Fran Saleški Finžgar 0
Nowaki by Natsume Soseki 0
Motl, Peysi the Cantor's Son by Sholem Aleichem 0
Anino ng Kahapon by Francisco Laksamana 0
The Thompson Travel Agency by Michel Verne 0
The Mystery Of The Yellow Room by Gaston Leroux 0
De vlaschaard by Stijn Streuvels 0
Lord Of The World by Robert Hugh Benson 0
Jerry Junior by Jean Webster 0
A Horse's Tale by Mark Twain 0
Queen Silver-Bell by Frances Hodgson Burnett 0
The Cave Boy Of The Age Of Stone by Margaret A. McIntryre 0
Before Adam by Jack London 0
Aunt Jane's Nieces Abroad by L. Frank Baum 0
Alice in Blunderland: An Iridescent Dream by John Kendrick Bangs 0
Pip by Ian Hay 0
Policeman Bluejay by L. Frank Baum 0
The Shepherd Of The Hills by Harold Bell Wright 0
The Boats Of The Glen Carrig by William Hope Hodgson 0
Fair Margaret by H. Rider Haggard 0
The Chance Of A Lifetime by Nathaniel Gould 0
Beau Brocade by Baroness Orczy 0
Barbary Sheep by Robert Hitchens 0
Through The Eye Of The Needle by William Dean Howells 0
The Story Of Sir Launcelot And His Companions by Howard Pyle 0
The Shuttle by Frances Hodgson Burnett 0
Keane of Kalgoorlie by Arthur Wright 0


Daniel_Rf, Monday, 21 September 2020 14:35 (one month ago) link

I have read two: The Man Who Was Thursday, which I found hectoring and obnoxious, and The Longest Journey, which used to be my fav Forster, by virtue of being my first and identifying with the saddo protagonist; I read/re-read all of Forster last year and it didn't quite hold up, but still gets my sentimental vote.

Now let's talk about this "Secret Of The League" book:

The Secret of the League is a 1907 dystopian novel by Ernest Bramah, which describes the overthrow of a democratically elected British Labour Party Government through a carefully prepared plot by members of the upper classes, and depicts such an overthrow as being a positive and desirable outcome.

George Orwell credited the book with having given a considerably accurate prediction of the rise of Fascism, and also with reflecting "the mentality of the middle classes" and the brutal measures which members of these classes might condone or actively support, should they feel threatened with a revolution -"even such a decent and kindly writer as Ernest Bramah", in Orwell's words.[1]

Daniel_Rf, Monday, 21 September 2020 14:38 (one month ago) link

Going with Les onze mille verges, which is just ridiculously fun.

pomenitul, Monday, 21 September 2020 14:41 (one month ago) link

Finally able to vote for Apollinaire! 'Les onze milles v(i)erges' is unchaste and very funny.

Monte Scampino (Le Bateau Ivre), Monday, 21 September 2020 14:42 (one month ago) link

lol xp's vmic

Monte Scampino (Le Bateau Ivre), Monday, 21 September 2020 14:43 (one month ago) link

*fist bump*

pomenitul, Monday, 21 September 2020 14:46 (one month ago) link

The Secret Agent > The Man Who Was Thursday in the battle of terrorist bombing novels

The Leroux novel is an early locked-room mystery that was much admired by later exponents of the form; it's still fun if you enjoy genre fiction of this era.

Brad C., Monday, 21 September 2020 14:48 (one month ago) link

^ Watched a movie adaptation of that with my wife's (French) family over x-mas, was fun.

Daniel_Rf, Monday, 21 September 2020 14:49 (one month ago) link

Yeah, that was an entertaining film adaptation. The 'totes-not-Ravel' soundtrack was amusing as well.

pomenitul, Monday, 21 September 2020 14:51 (one month ago) link

It'd have to be the Machen over Chesterton. These lists are reminding me I should read more Conrad. And some Forster.

Vanishing Point (Chinaski), Monday, 21 September 2020 15:35 (one month ago) link

Enchanted Castle all the way. E. Nesbit's masterpiece. She has such incredible control over her atmosphere: it's an extraordinary blend of humor, prosaic realism, flashes of transcendent beauty, and this deepening sense of the uncanny that keeps the story walking the border between fantasy and horror.

Lily Dale, Monday, 21 September 2020 16:30 (one month ago) link

Now let's talk about this "Secret Of The League" book:

The Secret of the League is a 1907 dystopian novel by Ernest Bramah, which describes the overthrow of a democratically elected British Labour Party Government through a carefully prepared plot by members of the upper classes, and depicts such an overthrow as being a positive and desirable outcome.

i want to read this now -- you sold me.

sarahell, Monday, 21 September 2020 16:53 (one month ago) link

i've only read ozma of oz and the man who was thursday. i kind of like chesterton's writing but something about this book didn't sit right with me. i assume his worldview and mine are fairly incompatible but i guess i did enjoy the book well enough right up until the denouement. so i guess i'm going with ozma, which was my favorite of the oz books back in the day (also the source of most of the plot of return to oz).

(The Other) J.D. (J.D.), Monday, 21 September 2020 20:31 (one month ago) link

Leroux's Yellow Room is a great mystery but boy is the prose in the English translation bad.

wasdnous (abanana), Monday, 21 September 2020 21:46 (one month ago) link

Here's the start of a paragraph from a random page: "The boy-faced reporter speedily made himself many friends, for he was serviceable and gifted with a good humour that enchanted the most severe-tempered and disarmed the most zealous of his companions."

wasdnous (abanana), Monday, 21 September 2020 21:57 (one month ago) link

The original flows a bit better but its sequence of tenses is clumsy, to say the least:

Tout de suite, le rédacteur imberbe se fit beaucoup d'amis, car il était serviable et doué d'une bonne humeur qui enchantait les plus grognons, et désarma les plus jaloux.

pomenitul, Monday, 21 September 2020 22:03 (one month ago) link

xpost: can't help but read that paragraph in mr burns's voice

(The Other) J.D. (J.D.), Monday, 21 September 2020 22:52 (one month ago) link

Automatic thread bump. This poll is closing tomorrow.

System, Wednesday, 23 September 2020 00:01 (four weeks ago) link

I feel guilty about not knowing any of these

Guayaquil (eephus!), Wednesday, 23 September 2020 01:09 (four weeks ago) link

Automatic thread bump. This poll's results are now in.

System, Thursday, 24 September 2020 00:01 (four weeks ago) link

Wherein We Elect Our Favourite Novels of 1908

Daniel_Rf, Thursday, 24 September 2020 16:10 (four weeks ago) link


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