the rights of the reader

Message Bookmarked
Bookmark Removed

https://www.theguardian.com/books/2006/oct/28/featuresreviews.guardianreview28

Pennac's main point is very simple: no one is ever going to read a book if they don't want to. Reading, he says, is mostly about pleasure. From that, other things will follow. If people choose to spend their time doing something else, that's their right. He looks on them with sorrow, not contempt: without books, they are condemned to lead "a life without answers ... and before long without questions too".

- -

In its preface, the book by Daniel Pennac called Comme un roman (Paris: Editions Gallimard/Folio, 1992), begs its reader not to use the book as an "instrument de torture pedagogique." Pennac enumerates 10 Inalienable Rights of the Reader:

Poll Results

OptionVotes
The right to read anything, 6
The right to not finish a book, 4
The right to be silent. 1
The right to read out-loud, and, 1
The right to reread, 1
The right to read anywhere, 1
The right to sample and steal ("grappiller") 0
The right to "Bovary-ism," a textually-transmitted disease, 0
The right to skip pages, 0
The right to not read, 0


j., Friday, 3 February 2017 05:00 (two years ago) link

excellent

the late great, Friday, 3 February 2017 05:24 (two years ago) link

reading out loud is my favorite

the late great, Friday, 3 February 2017 05:24 (two years ago) link

It seems to me that the right to read anything is the foundational right, for if all potential readers are freely granted this right, then surely all who will ever find pleasure and instruction in reading will be able to discover it.

a little too mature to be cute (Aimless), Friday, 3 February 2017 05:25 (two years ago) link

also a huge fan of "read anywhere", especially books divided into short pieces that you can browse out of order

the late great, Friday, 3 February 2017 05:26 (two years ago) link

tell me more about bovary-ism

mookieproof, Friday, 3 February 2017 07:35 (two years ago) link

...c'est moi?

no lime tangier, Friday, 3 February 2017 07:49 (two years ago) link

This reminds me of the "readers' liberation movement" (or "semiotic democracy") proposed by the television theorist John Fiske in the 1990s, which "asserts the reader's right to make, out of the program, the text that connects the discourses of the program with the discourses through which he/she lives his/her social experience, and thus for program, society and reading subject to come together in an active, creative living of culture in the moment of reading."

Bongo Herbert (Ward Fowler), Friday, 3 February 2017 09:06 (two years ago) link

Pierre Bayard's amusing 'How to Talk About Books You Haven't Read' also seems relevant;

https://www.theguardian.com/books/2008/jan/06/fiction.society

Bongo Herbert (Ward Fowler), Friday, 3 February 2017 09:08 (two years ago) link

tell me more about bovary-ism

― mookieproof, Friday, February 3, 2017 1:35 AM (ten hours ago)

...c'est moi?

― no lime tangier, Friday, February 3, 2017 1:49 AM (nine hours ago)

i don't actually know what pennac sez about it, i haven't seen the book, but i assume it is as nlt indicates, a reader-response disease a la emma b

: a conception of oneself as other than one is to the extent that one's general behavior is conditioned or dominated by the conception; especially : domination by such an idealized, glamorized, glorified, or otherwise unreal conception of oneself that it results in dramatic personal conflict (as in tragedy), in markedly unusual behavior (as in paranoia), or in great achievement

Today, Bovarism is understood to mean fleeing tedium and melancholy into an impossible world of dreams, but there is still no consensus over whether Emma deserves sympathy for trying to break free from the 19th-century bourgeois constraints or merits condemnation for going to any length to fulfill her desires. Alad Riding, "It's 'Bovary.' It's French. Don't Expect Harmony." New York Times, April 9, 1991

I do not believe that any writer has ever exposed this bovarysme, the human will to see things as they are not, more clearly than Shakespeare. T.S. Eliot, "Shakespeare and the Stoicism of Seneca," Selected Essays, 1932

j., Friday, 3 February 2017 17:45 (two years ago) link

Automatic thread bump. This poll is closing tomorrow.

System, Monday, 13 February 2017 00:01 (two years ago) link

In my opinion, half of those aren't rights at all.

alimosina, Monday, 13 February 2017 20:41 (two years ago) link

The rights framework is a gimmick to tie together a bunch of related thoughts.

a little too mature to be cute (Aimless), Monday, 13 February 2017 20:49 (two years ago) link

Automatic thread bump. This poll's results are now in.

System, Tuesday, 14 February 2017 00:01 (two years ago) link

the right to break the DRM on your Amazon purchases

the right to download an ebook on b00kzz when you already own a hardback copy but it's too heavy/awkward to lug around outside your bedroom

the right to download fanmade R. A. Lafferty compilations on b00kzz because have you seen how much his books are going for on Amazon it's ridiculous

the right to add a short story collection to your 'read in 2017' list even though you didn't bother to reread the stories you had previously read in other collections

schrute dwyte (unregistered), Tuesday, 14 February 2017 00:49 (two years ago) link

two years pass...

"grappiller"

j., Sunday, 7 July 2019 00:19 (two weeks ago) link


You must be logged in to post. Please either login here, or if you are not registered, you may register here.