Search/Destroy Every Nobel Prize Winner For Literature

Message Bookmarked
Bookmark Removed

1901 Sully Prudhomme
1902 Theodor Mommsen
1903 Bjørnstjerne Bjørnson
1904 Frédéric Mistral
José Echegaray y Eizaguirre
1905 Henryk Sienkiewicz
1906 Giosuè Carducci
1907 Rudyard Kipling
1908 Rudolf Christoph Eucken
1909 Selma Lagerlöf
1910 Paul Heyse
1911 Count Maurice Maeterlinck
1912 Gerhart Hauptmann
1913 Rabindranath Tagore
1915 Romain Rolland
1916 Verner von Heidenstam
1917 Karl Adolph Gjellerup
Henrik Pontoppidan
1919 Carl Spitteler
1920 Knut Hamsun
1921 Anatole France
1922 Jacinto Benavente
1923 William Butler Yeats
1924 Władysław Reymont
1925 George Bernard Shaw
1926 Grazia Deledda
1927 Henri Bergson
1928 Sigrid Undset
1929 Thomas Mann
1930 Sinclair Lewis
1931 Erik Axel Karlfeldt
1932 John Galsworthy
1933 Ivan Alekseyevich Bunin
1934 Luigi Pirandello
1936 Eugene O'Neill
1937 Roger Martin du Gard
1938 Pearl S. Buck
1939 Frans Eemil Sillanpää
1944 Johannes Vilhelm Jensen
1945 Gabriela Mistral
1946 Hermann Hesse
1947 André Gide
1948 T. S. Eliot
1949 William Faulkner
1950 Bertrand Russell
1951 Pär Lagerkvist
1952 François Mauriac
1953 Sir Winston Churchill
1954 Ernest Hemingway
1955 Halldór Laxness
1956 Juan Ramón Jiménez
1957 Albert Camus
1958 Boris Pasternak (declined the prize)
1959 Salvatore Quasimodo
1960 Saint-John Perse
1961 Ivo Andric
1962 John Steinbeck
1963 Giorgos Seferis
1964 Jean-Paul Sartre (declined the prize)
1965 Michail Sholokhov
1966 Shmuel Yosef Agnon
Nelly Sachs
1967 Miguel Ángel Asturias
1968 Yasunari Kawabata
1969 Samuel Beckett
1970 Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn
1971 Pablo Neruda
1972 Heinrich Böll
1973 Patrick White
1974 Eyvind Johnson
Harry Martinson
1975 Eugenio Montale
1976 Saul Bellow
1977 Vicente Aleixandre
1978 Isaac Bashevis Singer
1979 Odysseas Elytis
1980 Czesław Miłosz
1981 Elias Canetti
1982 Gabriel García Márquez
1983 William Golding
1984 Jaroslav Seifert
1985 Claude Simon
1986 Akinwande Oluwole Soyinka
1987 Joseph Brodsky
1988 Naguib Mahfouz
1989 Camilo José Cela
1990 Octavio Paz
1991 Nadine Gordimer
1992 Derek Walcott
1993 Toni Morrison
1994 Kenzaburo Oe
1995 Seamus Heaney
1996 Wisława Szymborska
1997 Dario Fo
1998 José Saramago
1999 Günter Grass
2000 Gao Xingjian
2001 Vidiadhar Surajprasad Naipaul
2002 Imre Kertész
2003 John Maxwell Coetzee
2004 Elfriede Jelinek
2005 Harold Pinter
2006 Orhan Pamuk
2007 Doris Lessing
2008 J. M. G. Le Clézio
2009 Herta Müller
2010 Mario Vargas Llosa
2011 Tomas Tranströmer
2012 Mo Yan
2013 Alice Munro
2014 Patrick Modiano
2015 Svetlana Alexievich
2016 Bob Dylan

scott seward, Friday, 14 October 2016 17:41 (two years ago) Permalink

Blood on the Tracks is great...

scott seward, Friday, 14 October 2016 17:41 (two years ago) Permalink

Search: Henrik Pontoppidan's hairdo...

https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/e/ea/Henrik_Pontoppidan_1913.jpg

scott seward, Friday, 14 October 2016 17:49 (two years ago) Permalink

poll!

F♯ A♯ (∞), Friday, 14 October 2016 17:50 (two years ago) Permalink

Destroy: Theodor Mommsen's hairdo...

http://www.nobelprize.org/nobel_prizes/literature/laureates/1902/mommsen_postcard.jpg

scott seward, Friday, 14 October 2016 17:53 (two years ago) Permalink

Maeterlinck got a Nobel prize?

still lists its address as the recently razed home of “Morris” the (Jon not Jon), Friday, 14 October 2016 17:59 (two years ago) Permalink

Also just seeing this name:

1965 Michail Sholokhov

Makes me smell unwanted shelves of mildewy goodwill hardcovers

still lists its address as the recently razed home of “Morris” the (Jon not Jon), Friday, 14 October 2016 18:01 (two years ago) Permalink

And Sholokhov apparently never even wrote "And Quiet Flows the Don"!

xyzzzz__, Friday, 14 October 2016 20:24 (two years ago) Permalink

wonder if the number of nazis in this list is statistically significant

legitimate concerns about ducks (Noodle Vague), Friday, 14 October 2016 20:27 (two years ago) Permalink

i still have never read Beloved...i should read it.

scott seward, Friday, 14 October 2016 20:30 (two years ago) Permalink

Excellent, good quality literature:

1907 Rudyard Kipling
1920 Knut Hamsun
1968 Yasunari Kawabata
1969 Samuel Beckett
1968 Yasunari Kawabata
1969 Samuel Beckett
1971 Pablo Neruda
1975 Eugenio Montale
1981 Elias Canetti
1982 Gabriel García Márquez
1987 Joseph Brodsky
1991 Nadine Gordimer
1994 Kenzaburo Oe
1995 Seamus Heaney
1996 Wisława Szymborska
1998 José Saramago
2004 Elfriede Jelinek
2007 Doris Lessing
2015 Svetlana Alexievich

Crap/indifferent/yet to see the fuss:

1913 Rabindranath Tagore
1929 Thomas Mann
1934 Luigi Pirandello
1946 Hermann Hesse
1947 André Gide
1948 T. S. Eliot
1949 William Faulkner
1952 François Mauriac
1955 Halldór Laxness
1958 Boris Pasternak (declined the prize)
1959 Salvatore Quasimodo
1957 Albert Camus
1963 Giorgos Seferis
1964 Jean-Paul Sartre (declined the prize)
1970 Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn
1972 Heinrich Böll
1973 Patrick White
1976 Saul Bellow
1979 Odysseas Elytis
1980 Czesław Miłosz
1985 Claude Simon
2008 J. M. G. Le Clézio
2009 Herta Müller
2011 Tomas Tranströmer

Read some, not enough to have a one word opinion on - actually going to check now:

1966 Nelly Sachs

Actually Evil:

1953 Sir Winston Churchill
2016 Bob Dylan

Not enough data in the bank to process to an onion.

xyzzzz__, Friday, 14 October 2016 20:39 (two years ago) Permalink

to process the rest of this list to an onion.

xyzzzz__, Friday, 14 October 2016 20:41 (two years ago) Permalink

and quiet flows the don is totally great.
some other sholokhov book i attempted to read was utter shit in the worst soviet social realist style

*-* (jim in vancouver), Friday, 14 October 2016 20:44 (two years ago) Permalink

"Not enough data in the bank to process to an onion."

gertrude stein fan...

scott seward, Friday, 14 October 2016 20:47 (two years ago) Permalink

Gabriela Mistral: first latin american winner.

is on the 5000 peso/5 lucas note in chile:

http://tomchao.com/sa/chile5fx.jpg

must be one of the only nobel laureates to be a school teacher of another

*-* (jim in vancouver), Friday, 14 October 2016 20:47 (two years ago) Permalink

p sure Halldór Laxness is in tartarus reading his own work forever

Roberto Spiralli, Friday, 14 October 2016 20:47 (two years ago) Permalink

i have never found the lessing...that i want to read. i've picked up quite a few.

scott seward, Friday, 14 October 2016 20:48 (two years ago) Permalink

i was such a bellow fanboy when i was young. need to re-read some to see if i still feel the same way.

scott seward, Friday, 14 October 2016 20:48 (two years ago) Permalink

this comes down to Mahfouz vs. IB Singer for me

Οὖτις, Friday, 14 October 2016 20:50 (two years ago) Permalink

i read the first two Canopus in Argos book but couldn't go on. i liked everything about them except actually reading them. i don't think they're exactly what doris got the prize for tho.

Roberto Spiralli, Friday, 14 October 2016 20:52 (two years ago) Permalink

ooh or Saramago

lots I don't know on here, none I actively dislike.

xp

Οὖτις, Friday, 14 October 2016 20:52 (two years ago) Permalink

im a bit ambivalent on lessing. golden notebook is pretty great. some of the other books - a proto "we need to talk about kevin" i had to read in school being the worst i can think of - not so good.

*-* (jim in vancouver), Friday, 14 October 2016 20:53 (two years ago) Permalink

also lessing basically the opposite of a fun read. good to read on a rainy sunday when you're feeling glum.

*-* (jim in vancouver), Friday, 14 October 2016 20:56 (two years ago) Permalink

a scottish person has never won the nobel prize for literature :'-(

*-* (jim in vancouver), Friday, 14 October 2016 21:17 (two years ago) Permalink

Bob Dylan?

legitimate concerns about ducks (Noodle Vague), Friday, 14 October 2016 21:18 (two years ago) Permalink

is not a true scotsman

Οὖτις, Friday, 14 October 2016 21:19 (two years ago) Permalink

apparently he's eligible for everything

legitimate concerns about ducks (Noodle Vague), Friday, 14 October 2016 21:22 (two years ago) Permalink

Is Pearl S. Buck still considered a major literary figure?

Foster Twelvetrees (Ward Fowler), Friday, 14 October 2016 21:23 (two years ago) Permalink

no, not really

a little too mature to be cute (Aimless), Friday, 14 October 2016 21:27 (two years ago) Permalink

i like kipling just fine but rating him over mann, camus, gide, solzhenitsyn, faulkner is a little hard to figure

i have an old abridgment of mommsen's history of rome but have never really cracked it

(The Other) J.D. (J.D.), Friday, 14 October 2016 21:47 (two years ago) Permalink

kipling isnt in the top 20 on this list for me tbh

*-* (jim in vancouver), Friday, 14 October 2016 21:56 (two years ago) Permalink

I probably should take Kipling out of there but I've been re-considering him at the mo. He isn't in the top 20 of mine (if I were to rank them which I won't as I'm not 21 anymore)

Mann - very boring technocratic prose in laying out of the issues in Magic Mountain. Musil was 10x better than this. I want to read his last novel tho'. Death in Venice is great and I do look for the edition of his diaries.

Solzhenitsyn - same but for Soviets. Shamolov and Platonov wrote better prose (partially because they believed in the USSR and were in conflict with it at the same time)

Camus - The Outsider was a bit lucky but I'm told he was v good looking.

Gide - got zilch from his stuff. Rejected the manuscript for Swann's Way, one of the worst literary judgements EVER.

Faulkner - the one guy I want to re-consider.

xyzzzz__, Friday, 14 October 2016 22:08 (two years ago) Permalink

the fall > the plague > the outsider

*-* (jim in vancouver), Friday, 14 October 2016 22:09 (two years ago) Permalink

Read all of those. Didn't hate it or anything..

xyzzzz__, Friday, 14 October 2016 22:16 (two years ago) Permalink

kipling was a friggin' genius. there isn't anyone alive who can do everything he could do. i need more kipling.

who is someone who could write fiction and poetry as well as he could? i can't think of anyone.

scott seward, Saturday, 15 October 2016 00:10 (two years ago) Permalink

i wanna stay in his house. not cheap but it's right up the road!

http://landmarktrustusa.org/properties/rudyard-kiplings-naulakha/

scott seward, Saturday, 15 October 2016 00:11 (two years ago) Permalink

God it's actually incredible how much better the Irish are than all the others

the kids are alt right (darraghmac), Saturday, 15 October 2016 00:15 (two years ago) Permalink

My keep list would be something like this: the only Harry Martinson I've read is an epic sci-fi poem set on a spaceship, and it was great

1907 Rudyard Kipling
1913 Rabindranath Tagore
1920 Knut Hamsun
1923 William Butler Yeats
1928 Sigrid Undset
1929 Thomas Mann
1930 Sinclair Lewis
1933 Ivan Alekseyevich Bunin
1934 Luigi Pirandello
1936 Eugene O'Neill
1947 André Gide
1948 T. S. Eliot
1951 Pär Lagerkvist
1952 François Mauriac
1955 Halldór Laxness
1957 Albert Camus
1961 Ivo Andric
1962 John Steinbeck
1964 Jean-Paul Sartre (declined the prize)
1968 Yasunari Kawabata
1969 Samuel Beckett
1971 Pablo Neruda
1972 Heinrich Böll
1973 Patrick White
1974 Harry Martinson
1978 Isaac Bashevis Singer
1980 Czesław Miłosz
1981 Elias Canetti
1983 William Golding
1986 Akinwande Oluwole Soyinka
1987 Joseph Brodsky
1988 Naguib Mahfouz
1995 Seamus Heaney
1996 Wisława Szymborska
1998 José Saramago
2002 Imre Kertész
2003 John Maxwell Coetzee
2004 Elfriede Jelinek
2005 Harold Pinter
2011 Tomas Tranströmer
2013 Alice Munro
2014 Patrick Modiano
2015 Svetlana Alexievich

I hear from this arsehole again, he's going in the river (James Morrison), Saturday, 15 October 2016 01:23 (two years ago) Permalink

Pre-Dylan, Muller and le Clezio seem like the last big mis-steps. Muller can be a good writer, but so utterly humourless, and le Clezio just seems like an overrated sadist.

I hear from this arsehole again, he's going in the river (James Morrison), Saturday, 15 October 2016 01:28 (two years ago) Permalink

i need to read more william golding. his post-piggy books always sound really interesting to me, but i always forget to look for them in used shops which is the only place i'd ever find them. plus, he had the best first edition covers ever.

https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/7/7f/FreeFall.jpg

https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/9/9c/WillianGolding_TheInheritors.jpg

https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/2/2f/TheSpire.JPG

https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/6/6d/PincherMartin.jpg

scott seward, Saturday, 15 October 2016 03:29 (two years ago) Permalink

Actually Evil:

1953 Sir Winston Churchill
2016 Bob Dylan

I LOLed

(SNIFFING AND INDISTINCT SOBBING) (Tom D.), Saturday, 15 October 2016 10:08 (two years ago) Permalink

Pre-Dylan, Muller and le Clezio seem like the last big mis-steps. Muller can be a good writer, but so utterly humourless, and le Clezio just seems like an overrated sadist.

― I hear from this arsehole again, he's going in the river (James Morrison), 15. oktober 2016 03:28 (eight hours ago) Bookmark Flag Post Permalink

I heard a lot of snickering at Modiano as well, or am I remembering it wrong?

Frederik B, Saturday, 15 October 2016 10:30 (two years ago) Permalink

I totally forgot until this second that Coetzee won the Nobel Prize, weird

Guayaquil (eephus!), Saturday, 15 October 2016 12:37 (two years ago) Permalink

Anyway, Laxness's "Independent People" is one of the most magnificent things I've ever read, thank you Nobel committee for bringing it to my attention.

Guayaquil (eephus!), Saturday, 15 October 2016 12:38 (two years ago) Permalink

Mann - very boring technocratic prose in laying out of the issues in Magic Mountain. Musil was 10x better than this. I want to read his last novel tho'. Death in Venice is great and I do look for the edition of his diarie

You might respond differently to the translator and Joseph and His Brothers, which I finished three weeks ago and wanted another 1500 pages of. The mountains of historical detail reinvented by a self-consciously 20th century narrator provoked the right kind of dialectical thinking.

otoh Thomas Mann exists so that he can win Nobel Prizes.

The burrito of ennui (Alfred, Lord Sotosyn), Saturday, 15 October 2016 12:41 (two years ago) Permalink

Kipling's short stories are rather good: terse little things with a good ear for dialect that I'll pick over Hemingway's these days.

The burrito of ennui (Alfred, Lord Sotosyn), Saturday, 15 October 2016 12:42 (two years ago) Permalink

who is someone who could write fiction and poetry as well as he could? i can't think of anyone.

― scott seward, Friday, October 14, 2016

Hardy and Lawrence.

The burrito of ennui (Alfred, Lord Sotosyn), Saturday, 15 October 2016 12:42 (two years ago) Permalink

1970 Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn
1972 Heinrich Böll
1973 Patrick White

boy have I given these three a number of chances. Am I reading the right White? What's a good start?

The burrito of ennui (Alfred, Lord Sotosyn), Saturday, 15 October 2016 12:46 (two years ago) Permalink

I feel like Kipling and Yeats are the most imperishable here, but I haven't read most of the list. Kawabata is one I want to check out.

jmm, Saturday, 15 October 2016 12:49 (two years ago) Permalink

otoh Thomas Mann exists so that he can win Nobel Prizes.

― The burrito of ennui (Alfred, Lord Sotosyn), Saturday, 15 October 2016 Bookmark Flag Post Permalink

He was born for it! Even now absolutely encapsulates what the Nobel for lit is about and...its not pretty.

I don't know, historical novels ain't my bag. My line on translation is that someone who speaks to me will do so even if I come across a translation that is regarded as bad. So if I'm not liking something its either because its something I am not disposed towards or its bad, or I am but I don't like the writing, or these are things I am not ready for just now (on that one Dostoevsky passed me by at 17 but now I'm good with him)

xyzzzz__, Saturday, 15 October 2016 12:54 (two years ago) Permalink

Historical novels aren't mine either, but I loved the Joseph story as a kid and read Harold Bloom's The Book of J in college.

The burrito of ennui (Alfred, Lord Sotosyn), Saturday, 15 October 2016 12:56 (two years ago) Permalink

I'm surprised Milan Kundera didnt get a Nobel Prize

Neptune Bingo (Michael B), Saturday, 15 October 2016 21:21 (two years ago) Permalink

or Joyce!

Neptune Bingo (Michael B), Saturday, 15 October 2016 21:22 (two years ago) Permalink

Saul Bellow is the only writer on the list I'm not keen on

Neptune Bingo (Michael B), Saturday, 15 October 2016 21:23 (two years ago) Permalink

Felix Krull is a hoot

salthigh, Saturday, 15 October 2016 21:32 (two years ago) Permalink

yep

The burrito of ennui (Alfred, Lord Sotosyn), Saturday, 15 October 2016 21:34 (two years ago) Permalink

one month passes...

making people listen to Patti Smith is kinda mean, Zim

Supercreditor (Dr Morbius), Sunday, 11 December 2016 16:17 (two years ago) Permalink

one year passes...

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3AxfGzW7AdY

this prize wasn't as unjustified as people were saying last year

treeship 2, Sunday, 7 January 2018 14:47 (one year ago) Permalink

Louise she's all right she's just near
She's delicate and seems like veneer
But she just makes it all too concise and too clear
That Johanna's not here

this is so mean. has to sting anyone who's been a "rebound"

treeship 2, Sunday, 7 January 2018 14:57 (one year ago) Permalink

this prize wasn't as unjustified as people were saying last year

It's more unjustified than people were saying last year, because in the interim Ashbery died and now can never win

Guayaquil (eephus!), Sunday, 7 January 2018 16:07 (one year ago) Permalink

Probably fairer to say he has won the only nobel prize that counts

very stabbable gaius (wins), Sunday, 7 January 2018 16:10 (one year ago) Permalink

one year passes...

An argument for giving Dril the Prize for Literature - though I suspect this would be complicated by the fact that, iirc, multiple people actually run that account.

The point of the Nobel Prize in Literature is — according to its own stated aims — to honor an author from any country who has produced, as the original Swedish puts it: “den som inom litteraturen har producerat det mest framstående verket i en idealisk riktning,” or, as this line is usually translated: “in the field of literature the most outstanding work in an ideal direction.”

In the past, this translation has been fraught with controversy. The Swedish word “idealisk” can apparently be translated either as “ideal” or “idealistic”, but either way, no one is quite sure what it means. In the award’s early years, writers who had dedicated their careers to aesthetic realism (as opposed to idealism) tended to be passed over. Thus the French poet and essayist Sully Prudhomme won the award in the Nobel's first year, 1901, but his countryman Emile Zola, whose work has proved far more enduring, was never honored. More recently, the phrase “ideal direction” has been interpreted to mean something more like the championing of certain liberal, humanitarian ideals, hence why so many laureates seem to be awarded the prize, at least in part, for their political commitments and beliefs — Russian novelist Alexander Solzhenitsyn or Nigerian playwright Wole Soyinka challenging the authoritarian regimes they lived under; British playwright Harold Pinter taking a vocal stance against the Iraq War.

So does Dril's work move in an “ideal direction”? Upon proper consideration of his work, it would be hard to argue that it doesn't. Dril is a remarkable writer whose work not only helps us understand but helps us to respond to the world in which we are forced to exist.

https://theoutline.com/post/7245/give-the-nobel-prize-to-dril

Simon H., Tuesday, 26 March 2019 14:12 (two months ago) Permalink

Thought it was one person.

In any case scientists often share the prize for a single discovery.

xyzzzz__, Tuesday, 26 March 2019 14:41 (two months ago) Permalink

Longtime co-authors or collectives should absolutely be eligible for a literature prize. dril is Luther Blissett

A funny tinge happened on the way to the forum (wins), Tuesday, 26 March 2019 17:16 (two months ago) Permalink

oh it's a twitter account? Lmao

brimstead, Tuesday, 26 March 2019 17:31 (two months ago) Permalink

give it simon hedges

PaulDananVEVO (||||||||), Tuesday, 26 March 2019 18:13 (two months ago) Permalink


You must be logged in to post. Please either login here, or if you are not registered, you may register here.