This Be The Pocket Universe: Post Here When You Realize Or Are Reminded That An SF Title Is From The Canon Of English Poetry

Message Bookmarked
Bookmark Removed

Such as Kuttner and Moore's "Two-Handed Engine," from Milton's "Lycidas."

Archaic Buster Poindexter, Live At The Apollo (James Redd and the Blecchs), Friday, 31 July 2015 01:13 (three years ago) Permalink

Or their "Clash By Night," from Matthew Arnold's "Dover Beach."

Archaic Buster Poindexter, Live At The Apollo (James Redd and the Blecchs), Friday, 31 July 2015 01:14 (three years ago) Permalink

Andrew Marvell's "To His Coy Mistress" supplies the title of Ursula K. LeGuin's "Vaster Than Empires And More Slow," as well as this Star Trek fan series episode, featuring an extended performance by George Takei himself as Mr. Sulu: https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=l4TC5wl0IzE#

Archaic Buster Poindexter, Live At The Apollo (James Redd and the Blecchs), Friday, 31 July 2015 01:20 (three years ago) Permalink

Sorry, I meant to use "Poetry" instead of "Verse" at end of thread to avoid duplication

Archaic Buster Poindexter, Live At The Apollo (James Redd and the Blecchs), Friday, 31 July 2015 01:40 (three years ago) Permalink

Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind (if movies count, and this one should, since I went because of who wrote it)

dow, Friday, 31 July 2015 04:11 (three years ago) Permalink

Sorry, I meant to use "Poetry" instead of "Verse" at end of thread to avoid duplication

― Archaic Buster Poindexter, Live At The Apollo (James Redd and the Blecchs), Friday, July 31, 2015 1:40 AM (9 hours ago) Bookmark Flag Post Permalink

mod request that shit imo because now it's gonna drive me crazy too

Heroic melancholy continues to have a forceful grip on (bernard snowy), Friday, 31 July 2015 11:18 (three years ago) Permalink

alfred bester's the stars my destination's alternate title, tiger! tiger! is a ref to blake's the tyger, and the original title is a reference to some verse by magick-dabbling rocket scientist jack parsons

bizarro gazzara, Friday, 31 July 2015 11:54 (three years ago) Permalink

Flow, my tears, fall from your springs,
Exiled for ever, let me mourn
Where night's black bird her sad infamy sings,
There let me live forlorn.

John Dowland. tbf Dick references the song in the novel

The Hunt for Gene October (Noodle Vague), Friday, 31 July 2015 12:00 (three years ago) Permalink

dick's a scanner darkly is a ref to 'for now we see through a glass, darkly, but then face to face' if we can stretch the canon of english verse a bit

bizarro gazzara, Friday, 31 July 2015 12:03 (three years ago) Permalink

er, from corinthians in the bible, i should have said there

bizarro gazzara, Friday, 31 July 2015 12:04 (three years ago) Permalink

time out of joint, too, roughly from Hamlet.

woof, Friday, 31 July 2015 12:39 (three years ago) Permalink

fp for dating to suggest there is a canon iirc

irl lol (darraghmac), Friday, 31 July 2015 13:14 (three years ago) Permalink

taking "canon" here to mean "all verse ever written in English" tbh

The Hunt for Gene October (Noodle Vague), Friday, 31 July 2015 13:23 (three years ago) Permalink

Well then, "Mimsy Were The Borogroves," "The Children's Hour," and familiar phrases that authors may or may not have primarily associated with the King James Bible or Shakespeare, for instance.

dow, Friday, 31 July 2015 13:44 (three years ago) Permalink

*borogoves*, sorry

dow, Friday, 31 July 2015 13:46 (three years ago) Permalink

All good contributions so far. Thread title was deliberately overspecific, will except verse as title source, of course, especially WS and KJB, for works of film, of sf or non.

Been waiting to post Kate Wilhelm's Where Late The Sweet Birds Sang, from Shakespeare's Sonnet 73. Like how she is referred to as "some German" in The Fifth Head of Cerberus.

Archaic Buster Poindexter, Live At The Apollo (James Redd and the Blecchs), Saturday, 1 August 2015 11:54 (three years ago) Permalink

Michel Faber's The Crimson Petal and the White gets its title from a sonnet of Alfred, Lord Tennyson which appeared in his The Princess: A Medley

Now sleeps the crimson petal, now the white;
Nor waves the cypress in the palace walk;
Nor winks the gold fin in the porphyry font:
The firefly wakens: waken thou with me.

Archaic Buster Poindexter, Live At The Apollo (James Redd and the Blecchs), Saturday, 1 August 2015 12:04 (three years ago) Permalink

just remembered Iain M. Banks's Consider Phlebas, from Eliot's The Waste Land

the lion tweets tonight (Noodle Vague), Saturday, 1 August 2015 16:47 (three years ago) Permalink

Had forgotten that one too. Also been meaning to post that Christopher Priest's "Palely Loitering" got its title from Keats's "La Belle Dame sans Merci":

O what can ail thee, knight-at-arms,
Alone and palely loitering?
The sedge has withered from the lake,
And no birds sing.

This and many of the above can be found at poetryfoundation.org: http://www.poetryfoundation.org/learning/guide/242698

Archaic Buster Poindexter, Live At The Apollo (James Redd and the Blecchs), Saturday, 1 August 2015 18:13 (three years ago) Permalink

Honorable Mention to Joanna Russ's "I Gave Her Sack and Sherry," which derives its title from a Henry Purcell song, "I Gave Her Cakes and I Gave Her Ale."

Archaic Buster Poindexter, Live At The Apollo (James Redd and the Blecchs), Saturday, 1 August 2015 18:23 (three years ago) Permalink

What has also been nagging at my unconscious for a while, that James Tiptree, Jr. also took a title from "La Belle Dame sans Merci," namely "And I Awoke and Found Me Here on the Cold Hill's Side."

Archaic Buster Poindexter, Live At The Apollo (James Redd and the Blecchs), Saturday, 1 August 2015 18:45 (three years ago) Permalink

just remembered Iain M. Banks's Consider Phlebas, from Eliot's The Waste Land

+ look to winward, from the same bit

woof, Sunday, 2 August 2015 14:54 (three years ago) Permalink

nine months pass...

Tiptree:

Brightness Falls from the Air: Nashe

'Faithful to Thee, Terra, in Our Fashion': pun on Dowson
'And I Have Come Upon This Place by Lost Ways': MacLeish
'And I Awoke and Found Me Here on the Cold Hill's Side': Keats
'The Milk of Paradise': Coleridge
'Through a Lass Darkly': pun on Corinthians
'Her Smoke Rose Up Forever': Revelations
'A Momentary Taste of Being': Khayyam/Fitzgerald
'She Waits for All Men Born': Swinburne
'With Delicate Mad Hands': Dowson
'In Midst of Life': Corinthians
'The Earth Doth Like a Snake Renew': Shelley

'Backward, Turn Backward': this is from a once-popular poem by Elizabeth Akers Allen (1832-1911), hardly canonical

alimosina, Sunday, 8 May 2016 00:38 (two years ago) Permalink

three weeks pass...

Andrew Marvell's "To His Coy Mistress" supplies the title of Ursula K. LeGuin's "Vaster Than Empires And More Slow," as well as this Star Trek fan series episode, featuring an extended performance by George Takei himself as Mr. Sulu: https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=l4TC5wl0IzE🔗#

Just saw that John T. Sladek wrote an Oulipo-like transformation of this poem called "Down His Alarming Blunder."

Why You Wanna Treeship Borad? (James Redd and the Blecchs), Sunday, 29 May 2016 01:16 (two years ago) Permalink

so does this phenom tell us anything about anything

the ghost of tom, choad (thomp), Sunday, 29 May 2016 06:05 (two years ago) Permalink

This issue of asimov's that i found for free has a story called "hold now behemoth" in it

Οὖτις, Sunday, 29 May 2016 21:25 (two years ago) Permalink

Er Behold Now Behemoth

Οὖτις, Sunday, 29 May 2016 21:25 (two years ago) Permalink

so does this phenom tell us anything about anything

It tells us why the title is sometimes far better written than anything else in the story.

Why You Wanna Treeship Borad? (James Redd and the Blecchs), Sunday, 29 May 2016 22:56 (two years ago) Permalink

so does this phenom tell us anything about anything

anchoring speculative writing in old canon might be interpreted as a need for legitimacy.

other possibilities:

1) an inherent lyricism (cosmos and humanity/what are the things that make us human) speak from 20thC SF to pre-realism romanticism and renaissance verse.

2) Parallel between New World, subject of much renaissance verse, and New Worlds. (explicitly too - pioneering as US founding principle, renewed in post WWII SF.)

3) imaginative requirement to work off cosmic or mythological fundamentals as shared base for meaningful alien worlds mean bible and biblical literature v handy.

4) well known or fundamental/proverbial phrases handy for suggesting alien familiarity - "through a scanner darkly"

5) magical and fecund thesaurus/word hoard of renaissance lit good for ideas (ie writer gets title and then thinks up plot?)

well there's probably more and some of those are prob duplicate or overlapping?

Fizzles, Sunday, 29 May 2016 23:18 (two years ago) Permalink

^^^yes, that was great!

Why You Wanna Treeship Borad? (James Redd and the Blecchs), Sunday, 29 May 2016 23:23 (two years ago) Permalink

bank holiday weekend plus alcohol definitely a winner for ilx posting.

Fizzles, Sunday, 29 May 2016 23:26 (two years ago) Permalink

i guess "communication with the heavens" feels like a relevant parallel between SF and romrenbib lit too.

Fizzles, Sunday, 29 May 2016 23:33 (two years ago) Permalink

tho that's prob contained in 1). I'll go to bed once I've finished this wine i promise.

Fizzles, Sunday, 29 May 2016 23:35 (two years ago) Permalink

two weeks pass...

Surely the title of Richard McKenna's "Casey Agonistes" is a nod to Eliot's "Sweeney Agonistes" if not Milton's "Samson Agonistes."

Secondary Modern Prometheus (James Redd and the Blecchs), Friday, 24 June 2016 02:42 (two years ago) Permalink

Couple of these in Dangerous Visions.

Frankie Teardrop Explodes (James Redd and the Blecchs), Friday, 1 July 2016 21:51 (two years ago) Permalink

the weirdness of reading sonnet 73 and going oh, wait, i know that from somewhere, is a weirdness i find interesting

the ghost of tom, choad (thomp), Sunday, 3 July 2016 14:27 (two years ago) Permalink

the whitman poem i've never been able to disentangle from what bradbury seems to want it to mean

the ghost of tom, choad (thomp), Sunday, 3 July 2016 14:28 (two years ago) Permalink

the weirdness of reading sonnet 73 and going oh, wait, i know that from somewhere, is a weirdness i find interesting

Exactly

Frankie Teardrop Explodes (James Redd and the Blecchs), Sunday, 3 July 2016 18:50 (two years ago) Permalink

two weeks pass...

Reading David Graham's 1979 nuclear war novel 'Down to a Sunless Sea', and it took the epigraph for me to remember it was from Coleridge

🐸a hairy howling toad torments a man whose wife is deathly ill (James Morrison), Thursday, 21 July 2016 23:48 (two years ago) Permalink

Feel a little weird about the timing of my previous screenname ott.

The Professor of Hard Rain (James Redd and the Blecchs), Friday, 22 July 2016 00:31 (two years ago) Permalink

I mean itt

The Professor of Hard Rain (James Redd and the Blecchs), Friday, 22 July 2016 00:58 (two years ago) Permalink

was really pleased with that visual pun for 5 seconds, now realise probably makes no sense

🐸a hairy howling toad torments a man whose wife is deathly ill (James Morrison), Friday, 22 July 2016 01:40 (two years ago) Permalink

three weeks pass...

C. L. Moore's "No Woman Born" presumably gets its title from Macbeth.

Wavy Gravy Planet Waves (James Redd and the Blecchs), Saturday, 13 August 2016 20:42 (two years ago) Permalink

two weeks pass...
one month passes...

Ah, I just came across an academic discussion of this:

An intriguing epiphenomenon of the paradoxically absent omnipresence of lyric in narrative science fiction is the prevalence of lyric intertexts and paratexts in SF novels and short stories.  Paratexts and intertexts are themselves paradoxical spaces:  a book’s title, for instance, is at once central to the book and overtly peripheral; an intertextual allusion is neither fully here nor exclusively there yet definitely present in both texts simultaneously.  Such paradoxical textual spaces are frequently the same places where the absent presence of lyric manifests itself most explicitly in narrative SF.  Titles of SF narratives, for example, often allude intertextually to specific poems.

SCIENCE FICTION AND LYRIC POETRY, by Seo-Young Jennie Chu, in Sense of Wonder: A Century of Science Fiction, edited by Leigh Ronald Grossman . Wildside Press LLC.

Easy, Spooky Action! (James Redd and the Blecchs), Tuesday, 11 October 2016 02:47 (two years ago) Permalink

John Brunner:

The hungry sheep look up, and are not fed,
But, swoll'n with wind and the rank mist they draw,
Rot inwardly, and foul contagion spread

alimosina, Tuesday, 11 October 2016 16:15 (two years ago) Permalink

So that's makes at least two from that poem.

Easy, Spooky Action! (James Redd and the Blecchs), Tuesday, 11 October 2016 16:39 (two years ago) Permalink

So now Norman Spinrad's "No Direction Home" I guess. *ducks*

LL Cantante (James Redd and the Blecchs), Thursday, 13 October 2016 14:50 (two years ago) Permalink

lol

I hear from this arsehole again, he's going in the river (James Morrison), Thursday, 13 October 2016 23:44 (two years ago) Permalink

That article I mentioned points out that Philip José Farmer get a title from John Donne's Holy Sonnet VII
http://www.luminarium.org/sevenlit/donne/holysonnet7.php

From death, you numberless infinities
Of souls, and to your scattered bodies go

and Ray Bradbury got "There Will Come Soft Rains" from a Sara Teasdale poem with the same title
https://www.poets.org/poetsorg/poem/there-will-come-soft-rains

There will come soft rains and the smell of the ground,
And swallows circling with their shimmering sound;

Special Derrida Blues (James Redd and the Blecchs), Sunday, 16 October 2016 00:39 (two years ago) Permalink

Reverse engineering: Hamlet's "tomorrow and tomorrow and tomorrow" had to be used by someone. Sure enough, Charles Sheffield wrote a novel called "Tomorrow and Tomorrow," and Kurt Vonnegut used all three tomorrows for the title of a short story.

alimosina, Monday, 17 October 2016 16:09 (two years ago) Permalink

Anyone can do this. "All our yesterdays"? Yup, a time-travel novel by Cristin Terrill.

alimosina, Monday, 17 October 2016 16:13 (two years ago) Permalink

Not Hamlet, Macbeth. Christ.

alimosina, Monday, 17 October 2016 16:17 (two years ago) Permalink

Anyone can do this. "All our yesterdays"? Yup, a time-travel novel by Cristin Terrill.

Also a Star Trek TOS episode.

Special Derrida Blues (James Redd and the Blecchs), Monday, 17 October 2016 16:53 (two years ago) Permalink

They used "dagger of the mind" on Star Trek too.

alimosina, Monday, 17 October 2016 17:53 (two years ago) Permalink

This is getting ridiculous. There's the movie "Star Trek VI: The Undiscovered Country," and the Star Trek TNG novel "Perchance to Dream."

alimosina, Monday, 17 October 2016 18:06 (two years ago) Permalink

Upthread is a link to a webpage with a list of Star Trek Shakespeare references.

Special Derrida Blues (James Redd and the Blecchs), Monday, 17 October 2016 18:35 (two years ago) Permalink

If we broaden the parameters to include science fact, we get this newly eligible entry:
https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/5149pA0D6DL._SX331_BO1,204,203,200_.jpg

Sketches by T-Boz (James Redd and the Blecchs), Wednesday, 19 October 2016 21:54 (two years ago) Permalink

four months pass...

The Dry Salvages, by Caitlín R. Kiernan, derives its title from the T.S. Eliot poem of the same name, which is quoted in the beginning.

Disco Blecch and His Exo-Planettes (James Redd and the Blecchs), Thursday, 23 February 2017 18:27 (one year ago) Permalink

Tiptree: Brightness Falls from the Air: Nashe

― alimosina, Saturday, May 7, 2016 8:38 PM (ten months ago)

Margaret St. Clair also has a short story by that title. I bought her Best Of collection recently, thinking that I was vaguely familiar with her work due to the inclusion of that story and 'The Man Who Sold Rope to the Gnoles' (a pastiche of Dunsany's 'How Nuth Would Have Practised His Art upon the Gnoles'). turns out it's all new to me, but I'm not complaining.

I Ville Valo HIM (unregistered), Thursday, 9 March 2017 03:57 (one year ago) Permalink

Fritz Leiber's Our Lady of Darkness (from De Quincy's 'Levana and Our Ladies of Sorrow')

I Ville Valo HIM (unregistered), Thursday, 9 March 2017 04:28 (one year ago) Permalink

*De Quincey

I Ville Valo HIM (unregistered), Thursday, 9 March 2017 04:30 (one year ago) Permalink

Sinkah to thread

Nesta Leaps In (James Redd and the Blecchs), Thursday, 9 March 2017 18:20 (one year ago) Permalink

one month passes...

> just remembered Iain M. Banks's Consider Phlebas, from Eliot's The Waste Land

"O you who turn the wheel and look to windward,
Consider Phlebas, who was once handsome and tall as you."

"Look To Windward" also...

koogs, Wednesday, 19 April 2017 20:02 (one year ago) Permalink

ten months pass...

Ah, Moon of my Delight who know'st no wane,
The Moon of Heav'n is rising once again;
How oft hereafter rising shall she look
Through this same Garden after me -- in vain!

alimosina, Monday, 26 February 2018 00:50 (nine months ago) Permalink


You must be logged in to post. Please either login here, or if you are not registered, you may register here.