DSKY-DSKY Him Sad: Official ILB Thread For The Heroic Age of Manned Spaceflight

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Based on recent readings by myself and the real James of ILB, James Morrison, of Leaving Orbit: Notes from the Last Days of American Spaceflight, by Margaret Lazarus Dean and Ian Sales Apollo Quartet series, the latter of which does a very satisfying job of mixing alternate history with real Apollo hardware and jargon as well as making an concerted effort to describe what it felt like to be a part of it, to walk on the moon and hear your own breathing inside your helmet and your spacesuit, to have difficulty bending your knees or fingers inside that spacesuit despite the reduced lunar gravity.

If I am including fiction I suppose I should definitely count the relevant Ballard Memories of The Space Age stories although I haven't read them all, because I think he also took pains to think hard about the real space program, albeit the filter of his unique imagination, focusing on it being gone, like Raymond William's on the organic society.

Give 'Em Enough Rope Mother (James Redd and the Blecchs), Saturday, 20 June 2015 17:11 (three years ago) Permalink

The Margaret Lazarus Dean book mines a couple of interesting veins as she deftly compares her experiences watching space shuttle launches with that of Oriana Fallaci and Norman Mailer writing about the Apollo missions as well as befriending a NASA employee and his dad, a 30-year veteran of the shuttle program and respectfully telling the parts of their story she has access to. For me the parts involving the dad is some of the more interesting and affecting in the book,.

Give 'Em Enough Rope Mother (James Redd and the Blecchs), Saturday, 20 June 2015 17:15 (three years ago) Permalink

Here is some stuff I put on from RIP Neil Armstrong, there are some other recommends from others an that thread as well

After the good book with the title Moonshot, the one by Dan Parry, I read Moondust, by Andrew Smith, where he interviews all the surviving moonwalkers and tries to find out what it was like- rave review from Arthur C. Clarke and J. G. Ballard! Then Andrew Chaikin's A Man On The Moon, which is kind of a standard work that narrates all the Apollo missions which, although it has its longueurs when they are on the ground, does a really good job once they are in flight. Then the most excellent How Apollo Flew to the Moon, by W. David Woods, which goes into as much technical as you could want without reading the actual NASA manuals. Paged through Al Worden's Falling to Earth, saving up Mike Collin's Carrying The Fire, which is supposed to be the best of the "nose cone histories."

― Albee Thousand (James Redd and the Blecchs), Monday, December 31, 2012 9:44 PM (2 years ago) Bookmark Flag Post Permalink

Mike Collins. Lately my apostrophes have started floating in microgravity.

― Albee Thousand (James Redd and the Blecchs), Monday, December 31, 2012 9:45 PM (2 years ago) Bookmark Flag Post Permalink

Did not read Gene Cernan's book or Chris Kraft's, nor Deke!, although the last is supposed to be pretty good. Nor 2012's Forever Young.

Give 'Em Enough Rope Mother (James Redd and the Blecchs), Saturday, 20 June 2015 17:22 (three years ago) Permalink

I've got to get that Oriana Fallaci book. I'd never heard of it before reading Leaving Orbit, but it sounds marvellous.

James Redd, I can also recommend a film to you, 'Apollo 18', about a secret 18th Apollo mission, that finds hostile lifeforms on the Moon. Very, very good on all the 1970s tech and so forth, if a bit flawed because of being yet another "found-footage" movie.

Another excellent book is Jed Mercurio's 'Ascent', a novel about a Soviet Korean War pilot turned cosmonaut who is selected for a secret Moon mission to beat the US.

as verbose and purple as a Peter Ustinov made of plums (James Morrison), Sunday, 21 June 2015 08:47 (three years ago) Permalink

great thread title, btw

as verbose and purple as a Peter Ustinov made of plums (James Morrison), Sunday, 21 June 2015 08:48 (three years ago) Permalink

thx. Just read about two thirds of Ascent -can't put it down- and it is indeed excellent and perfect for this thread. The Korean War flying stuff reminded me a lot of the late James Salter's The Hunters, which obviously takes place on the other side of the Yalu River.

The Clones of Baron Funkhausen by Proxy Syndrome (James Redd and the Blecchs), Tuesday, 23 June 2015 03:01 (three years ago) Permalink

Yes, I loved The Hunters, and Ascent really captured the same atmosphere well.

as verbose and purple as a Peter Ustinov made of plums (James Morrison), Tuesday, 23 June 2015 08:26 (three years ago) Permalink

Ten pages left - will he make it?

The Clones of Baron Funkhausen by Proxy Syndrome (James Redd and the Blecchs), Wednesday, 24 June 2015 01:54 (three years ago) Permalink

it's... complicated

as verbose and purple as a Peter Ustinov made of plums (James Morrison), Wednesday, 24 June 2015 03:19 (three years ago) Permalink

*finishes, claps*

I knew that was going to happen.

That really hit the spot, thanks so much for Thw recommendation, James.

The Clones of Baron Funkhausen by Proxy Syndrome (James Redd and the Blecchs), Thursday, 25 June 2015 00:04 (three years ago) Permalink

My pleasure. it's a great book, weirdly little-known. But just beautifully done.

as verbose and purple as a Peter Ustinov made of plums (James Morrison), Thursday, 25 June 2015 00:41 (three years ago) Permalink

read both leaving orbit and ascent on a long flight a couple of days ago - thanks for the recommendations, guys, i really enjoyed both of them. i'll be visiting the kennedy space center in a few weeks and leaivng orbit was the perfect prep.

bizarro gazzara, Saturday, 27 June 2015 15:16 (three years ago) Permalink

Please report back on your visit.

Help Me, Zond 4 (James Redd and the Blecchs), Saturday, 27 June 2015 15:53 (three years ago) Permalink

will do!

bizarro gazzara, Sunday, 28 June 2015 05:54 (three years ago) Permalink

I so want to get into the vehicle assembly building!

as verbose and purple as a Peter Ustinov made of plums (James Morrison), Monday, 29 June 2015 23:58 (three years ago) Permalink

You know, I first became vaguely aware of Mercurio when I saw his JFK book on the new arrival shelf in the library. Was not in the mood to read that one at the time and wasn't sure he would be able to make it work, but dimly recall thinking I would want to read the one about the cosmonaut.

How I Wrote Matchstick Men (James Redd and the Blecchs), Saturday, 4 July 2015 17:11 (three years ago) Permalink

Yeah, the jfk one didnt appeal, but his first book, Bodies, is very good

as verbose and purple as a Peter Ustinov made of plums (James Morrison), Sunday, 5 July 2015 01:04 (three years ago) Permalink

I just picked up a copy of Ascent from my local public library. Looking forward to being gripped.

Aimless, Wednesday, 8 July 2015 01:37 (three years ago) Permalink

Have no idea whether it will be your cup of tea, but definitely interested to hear your opinion, as always.

How I Wrote Matchstick Men (James Redd and the Blecchs), Wednesday, 8 July 2015 23:34 (three years ago) Permalink

Started reading it last night. The Korean War has ended and our hero has just been banished to the Arctic.

It is hardboiled in a way that I find only moderately engaging, as opposed to, say Hammett or Chandler, but I just finished 400pp of late-stage Henry James, so this is a welcome change regardless. It's short enough I am sure I'll stick to the end.

Aimless, Wednesday, 8 July 2015 23:47 (three years ago) Permalink

You might prefer The Hunters. Salter writes of manly doings with little trace of macho posturing, having a warmer side that is pretty deftly managed, never feeling fake or forced.

How I Wrote Matchstick Men (James Redd and the Blecchs), Thursday, 9 July 2015 00:09 (three years ago) Permalink

He is such good writer that it is kind of intimidating to try to say anything about him without feeling that one is not measuring up to his standard and damning him with faint praise.

How I Wrote Matchstick Men (James Redd and the Blecchs), Thursday, 9 July 2015 00:21 (three years ago) Permalink

I enjoyed Ascent, but it was pretty obvious to me that the book was conceived as an ending in search of a beginning. Mercurio succeeded well enough in finding the beginning he needed that the book hops past some questionable transitions and gets you to the payoff ending. It's not the kind of book that requires pondering, so I won't inflict any on ILB. Suffice it to say I was adequately entertained.

Aimless, Friday, 10 July 2015 18:39 (three years ago) Permalink

Glad you liked it even that much.

Askeladden Sane (James Redd and the Blecchs), Saturday, 11 July 2015 01:21 (three years ago) Permalink

read the first three of ian sale's apollo quartet and half of the fourth on another long flight, again thanks to this thread.

i enjoyed the first two a fair bit, thought the third fizzled out a bit (and i wasn't entirely convinced by the characterisation of jerrie cobb, especially her christianity) and i'm struggling a bit with the self-conscious authorial interjections in the fourth. it's true he's definitely good on the tactile, sensory parts of spacefaring, but i wish he'd been a bit less obvious with flashing the fruits of his research via namechecking bits of equipment and endless acronyms.

bizarro gazzara, Monday, 13 July 2015 12:25 (three years ago) Permalink

From Subterranean Press:

https://d3pdrxb6g9axe3.cloudfront.net/uploads/The_Top_of_the_Volcano_by_Harlan_Ellison_500_719.jpg

We've just received a number of copies of Harlan Ellison's The Top of the Volcano back from one of our wholesale account. Some are perfect, some are slightly worn. We'll put new dust jackets on copies to bring them up to snuff, and are happy to offer them at only $25 per copy, a wholly great price for an oversize hardcover that clocks in north of 500 pages.

Have at them! Think I'll keep an eye peeled for *even* cheaper

dow, Monday, 13 July 2015 19:43 (three years ago) Permalink

Sorry, wrong thread!

dow, Monday, 13 July 2015 19:44 (three years ago) Permalink

Lol. Just don't let HE find out or he just might try to shut us down.

Crawling From The Blecchage (James Redd and the Blecchs), Monday, 13 July 2015 19:47 (three years ago) Permalink

Agree that the first two AQ books were the best and that there was a dip afterwards. Third one veered close to being the most obvious alternate history 101 inversion and therefore seemed the slightest. Fourth one though I thought was a satisfying wrap up of the whole thing and brought together a bunch of interesting stuff- golden age sf, women in sf, astronauts and their wives and nurses and Vehicle Assembly Buildings.

Crawling From The Blecchage (James Redd and the Blecchs), Saturday, 18 July 2015 18:00 (three years ago) Permalink

The more I read/think about the US manned space program the more depressing it is that such a vast, science-driven, hugely expensive state-funded enterprise was possible back then, mere decades ago, but not now when it's needed vs climate change

as verbose and purple as a Peter Ustinov made of plums (James Morrison), Friday, 24 July 2015 04:59 (three years ago) Permalink

if only putin would threaten to solve climate change

difficult listening hour, Friday, 24 July 2015 06:13 (three years ago) Permalink

yeah, what better way to reverse global warming than a cold war?

just picked up mike collins' carrying the fire, andrew chaikin's a man on the moon: the voyages of the apollo astronauts, and deborah cadbury's space race: the battle to rule the heavens. hoping to get them all finished before i make it to the kennedy space centre in a couple of weeks. which reminds me, i need to see if i can get tickets to have lunch with an astronaut while i'm there...

bizarro gazzara, Friday, 24 July 2015 08:43 (three years ago) Permalink

the cold war was prosecuted because the political and military leaders of the USA felt that the USSR was an existential threat to the nation, whereas climate change is merely an existential threat to the entire world.

Aimless, Friday, 24 July 2015 16:51 (three years ago) Permalink

two weeks pass...

finished a man on the moon: the voyages of the apollo astronauts a couple of days ago and i'm about halfway through carrying the fire at the moment. a man on the moon is a really good run-through of the apollo programme, based on late-80s interviews with most of the main players. chaikin sketches the characters of the astronauts really well and it gave me a much better appreciation of the achievements of the later missions. chaikin is also excellent at conveying the sensations of space travel: what it's like to wear a pressure suit on an eva, what moon dust smells like, etc

carrying the fire is fantastic so far - collins is a good writer with a dry wit, and he does a great job of delving into the roles each astronaut played in the development of apollo as well as explaining some of the technical aspects of spaceflight in an understandable way.

i also rewatched my blu-ray of for all mankind, which never ceases to make me emotional.

i'm off to the kennedy space center tomorrow. kinda think i might keel over at the sight of a saturn v or a shuttle.

bizarro gazzara, Monday, 10 August 2015 01:11 (three years ago) Permalink

saw the shuttle atlantis, cried

awesome

bizarro gazzara, Tuesday, 11 August 2015 00:15 (three years ago) Permalink

Do tell

Eternal Return To Earth (James Redd and the Blecchs), Tuesday, 11 August 2015 00:34 (three years ago) Permalink

sure!

atlantis has its own building at the space centre, and nasa has carefully stage-managed your experience before you see it for real for the first time. you watch a short dramatisation of the shuttle development process, then a really gorgeous montage of shuttle mission footage on a massive screen. then the screen lifts and behind it is the atlantis, lit dramatically and tilted on its side with the cargo bay doors open.

https://scontent-mia1-1.xx.fbcdn.net/hphotos-xtf1/t31.0-8/11864981_10153461127620638_7060066314462098229_o.jpg

it's smaller than i'd have guessed but it's absolutely gorgeous, all flowing, elegant lines contrasting with a surface which is pockmarked and rough-edged from 33 visits to space. the sight of it hit me like a ton of bricks and i was instantly teary. i spent a lot of time as a kid reading and thinking about the orbiters - i was six when the challenger disaster happened and i vividly remember crying while watching it on the tv - but i was still surprised by how moving it was to see a shuttle for real.

there's also an amazing full-scale model of the hubble telescope in there, along with some replica space suits:

https://scontent-mia1-1.xx.fbcdn.net/hphotos-xap1/t31.0-8/11816230_10153461126845638_808564544352120920_o.jpg

we also took a trip in the space shuttle simulator, which is cool as hell and does what feels like a reasonable job of recreating the experience of blasting off into orbit, including the lying-on-your-back wait for takeoff. then we took a guided bus tour around various locations including the mindbogglingly huge vehicle assembly building, which is every bit as massive as i expected and more, and launch complex 39, from which apollo and space shuttle missions took off and which is now leased to spacex:

https://scontent-mia1-1.xx.fbcdn.net/hphotos-xfp1/t31.0-8/11865348_10153461124950638_7321524299771301802_o.jpg

then we stopped off at the saturn v / apollo building to take a look at the actual control room from apollo 8:

https://scontent-mia1-1.xx.fbcdn.net/hphotos-xat1/t31.0-8/11823022_10153461124495638_4658601945709688007_o.jpg

and the saturn v stack, which is as intimidatingly huge as the shuttle is compact and friendly. it takes up a whole building and it is fucking massive:

https://scontent-mia1-1.xx.fbcdn.net/hphotos-xft1/t31.0-8/11856340_10153461124100638_2890088577621426801_o.jpg

even with a super-wide lens i couldn't fit the whole thing into the frame. it's insane and inspiring and terrifying to think that there's two million working parts in it, any one of which could malfunction and stop a launch (explosively or otherwise):

https://scontent-mia1-1.xx.fbcdn.net/hphotos-xpt1/t31.0-8/11807191_10153461123510638_216552785613825137_o.jpg

also on display: the apollo 14 command module and al shepard's moon-dust-crusted space suit:

https://scontent-mia1-1.xx.fbcdn.net/hphotos-xat1/t31.0-8/p960x960/11807352_10153461121975638_748753903730101738_o.jpg
https://scontent-mia1-1.xx.fbcdn.net/hphotos-xpf1/t31.0-8/11802685_10153461122435638_1461597965149089638_o.jpg

i have a million other pictures and things to say but this is too long already. it was an incredible experience and i loved every second of it.

bizarro gazzara, Tuesday, 11 August 2015 01:33 (three years ago) Permalink

I am so envious. Lovely write-up!

as verbose and purple as a Peter Ustinov made of plums (James Morrison), Tuesday, 11 August 2015 06:37 (three years ago) Permalink

thanks! one more thing: I was convinced at first the mercury and gemini capsules we saw must have been scale models, but nope, they actually are incredibly small and claustrophobic. mike collins called the gemini 'a flying men's room' - doing 14 days in orbit in a space only very slightly larger than the seat you're in while having to go to the bathroom right next to your copilot seems like a special kind of hell.

bizarro gazzara, Tuesday, 11 August 2015 11:34 (three years ago) Permalink

i meant to say how much i love the photos, too. is the spacesuit behind glass? I assume there's no way of touching it, getting a little bit of moon on your fingertips...

as verbose and purple as a Peter Ustinov made of plums (James Morrison), Wednesday, 12 August 2015 02:10 (three years ago) Permalink

yeah, it's behind glass unfortunately. there is a little chunk of moon rock you can touch, though!

bizarro gazzara, Friday, 14 August 2015 00:10 (three years ago) Permalink

if you've got the time, this massive five-part waitbutwhy.com piece on spacex's history and insane future ambitions is definitely worth a read: How (and Why) SpaceX Will Colonize Mars

bizarro gazzara, Wednesday, 19 August 2015 08:28 (three years ago) Permalink

i finished mike collins' autobio recently - it's really fantastic. goes in to a massive amount of detail about his flights but it's never dull or difficult to follow, and his occasional slightly catty asides about the other apollo astronauts are amusing (he really seemed to have it in for donn eisele for some reason)

i'm about halfway through deborah cadbury's space race: the battle to rule the heavens, which focuses on the work of wernher von braun and sergei korolev. there's a fantastic action-adventure movie waiting to be made about the race of the allied powers to track down and win over german rocket scientists after wwii ended, which cadbury goes over in detail in the opening chapters. she very effectively communicates the utter horror of the slave camps which produced the v-2 rockets, which i didn't know much about - 60,000 slaves worked on the programme, subsisting on 1,000 calories a day which the nazis calculated would keep them alive for six months. 20,000 of them died.

the thought that the heroic age of manned spaceflight was built on the horror of slave labour is something i knew about but reading about it in some detail is still pretty horrible.

bizarro gazzara, Wednesday, 19 August 2015 08:39 (three years ago) Permalink

I have a faint memory of that Clooney movie 'The Good German' looking as though it was going to be that film, and then going off into other, much more boring, directions

as verbose and purple as a Peter Ustinov made of plums (James Morrison), Thursday, 20 August 2015 00:49 (three years ago) Permalink

there's a fantastic action-adventure movie waiting to be made about the race of the allied powers to track down and win over german rocket scientists after wwii ended

it's gravity's rainbow

korolev had quite a story iirc. the revered father of soviet rocketry, called "the designer" like someone's called the godfather, died of complications following surgery that could not be successfully completed because of injuries sustained decades earlier in the gulag.

solzhenitsyn's the first circle a not-bad tolstovian novel about the relatively comfortable (as in, not actually designed to kill you) scientist-slave gulag camps. some truly nightmarish meetings about deadlines.

playlists of pensive swift (difficult listening hour), Thursday, 20 August 2015 01:28 (three years ago) Permalink

You just reminded me of this novel, http://www.theguardian.com/books/2012/feb/26/konstantin-tom-bullough-review, about Konstantin Tsiolkovsky, the first great Russian rocket scientist: it was very good
(https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Konstantin_Tsiolkovsky)

as verbose and purple as a Peter Ustinov made of plums (James Morrison), Thursday, 20 August 2015 05:26 (three years ago) Permalink

i've read and enjoyed gravity's rainbow but i dunno if 'fantastic action-adventure movie' would be my main choice of descriptor for it

called "the designer" like someone's called the godfather

the CHIEF designer no less!

never read the first circle, i'll add it to the list

bizarro gazzara, Thursday, 20 August 2015 08:22 (three years ago) Permalink

Apollo 18 is on Netflix but expiring on the 2nd, so watching now. Thanks for the extensive reporting, bg.

Exile's Return To Sender (James Redd and the Blecchs), Sunday, 30 August 2015 21:25 (three years ago) Permalink

Also just saw that Margaret Dean Lazarus is co-writing the memoirs of an Apollo astronaut: short interview with her here https://medium.com/the-ribbon/author-interview-margaret-lazarus-dean-a027b36fa2c9#.8avlganc8

I hear from this arsehole again, he's going in the river (James Morrison), Thursday, 22 September 2016 01:33 (two years ago) Permalink

Wonder which of the Apollo astronauts hasn't already written a memoir. Let's see.

Gravity Well, You Needn't (James Redd and the Blecchs), Thursday, 22 September 2016 01:47 (two years ago) Permalink

Um, Scott Kelly, born in 1964, was not part of the Apollo program. Would be interested to read her novel.

Gravity Well, You Needn't (James Redd and the Blecchs), Thursday, 22 September 2016 01:53 (two years ago) Permalink

Argh, i wondered if i had misremembered, and the link was down and i could not check, so i thought it would be fine, and here i am. Ashamed.

I hear from this arsehole again, he's going in the river (James Morrison), Thursday, 22 September 2016 02:38 (two years ago) Permalink

The novel is very good, btw

I hear from this arsehole again, he's going in the river (James Morrison), Thursday, 22 September 2016 02:38 (two years ago) Permalink

Argh, i wondered if i had misremembered, and the link was down and i could not check, so i thought it would be fine, and here i am. Ashamed.

C'mon, it's no big deal. Even Homais nods, as somebody said.

Gravity Well, You Needn't (James Redd and the Blecchs), Thursday, 22 September 2016 02:46 (two years ago) Permalink

three weeks pass...

Wonder which of the Apollo astronauts hasn't already written a memoir. Let's see.

John Young needs to write one.

Elvis Telecom, Wednesday, 19 October 2016 21:39 (two years ago) Permalink

I find it hard to believe he didn't.

Sketches by T-Boz (James Redd and the Blecchs), Wednesday, 19 October 2016 21:50 (two years ago) Permalink

It seems to be named after a song by a recent Nobel-prize recipient.

Sketches by T-Boz (James Redd and the Blecchs), Wednesday, 19 October 2016 21:52 (two years ago) Permalink

blowing in the wind -- an inexplicable late-life turn to conspiracy

difficult listening hour, Wednesday, 19 October 2016 22:22 (two years ago) Permalink

Eh, not quite.

Sketches by T-Boz (James Redd and the Blecchs), Wednesday, 19 October 2016 22:54 (two years ago) Permalink

Mentioned third post in

Sketches by T-Boz (James Redd and the Blecchs), Wednesday, 19 October 2016 23:35 (two years ago) Permalink

two months pass...

Hello, space-nerd checking in finally

I got "We Seven" for Christmas, haven't started it but timing turned out bittersweet with Glenn's passing.

Flamenco Drop (VegemiteGrrl), Tuesday, 17 January 2017 06:04 (one year ago) Permalink

that's the one that reprints the life magazine articles from the time of the mercury missions right? always meant tog et around to reading that one but i haven't yet, so looking forward to seeing what you think about it

gene cernan's passing has reminded me that i don't think we've talked about the last man on the moon anywhere else on ilx have we? i watched it when it came to netflix and thought it was a decent overview of the man and his career but it could have done with being longer - there was lots of stuff i'd have liked to have seen more on, and i wish there was more input from jack schmitt. i'm fascinated by the amount of important work he and cernan did on the moon during apollo 17, and their justified frustration that their discoveries were never followed up by other missions.

in other space-dork news i'm going to see chris hadfield lecture on friday. saw him (and met him!) last year and it was fantastic - he's such a charismatic ambassador for space

How To: Make the perfect summer jorts (bizarro gazzara), Tuesday, 17 January 2017 09:48 (one year ago) Permalink

exciting! i enjoy him in the interviews & other stuff i've seen - full report plz

Flamenco Drop (VegemiteGrrl), Tuesday, 17 January 2017 21:01 (one year ago) Permalink

I'm ashamed that I haven't posted more in this thread - (long story, all IRL nonsense) but James Redd nagged me over here after Gene Cernan's passing was noted on the obit. thread.

It worked like this - my mom was a mid-level apparatchik in the O.C. political establishment - somewhere in the early 70s she met Skylab astronaut (and O.C. resident) Jerry Carr at a function and got us (mom, dad, & me) VIP passes to see the launch of Apollo 17. I was seven years old and liked NASA more than ice cream - nevermind that we also flew on a Pan Am 747, my dad and I hung out at the plane upstairs bar. We also went to Disney World, but fuck that shit compared with a Saturn V launch.

After the mission was over the A17 crew took a meet-and-greet around the states and somehow my mom got us into the California stop. I can't really remember what I asked Cernan - I was way too self-conscious. Nevertheless everyone signed my stuff. I just unpacked everything at my new place and have to get it framed.

http://pbs.twimg.com/media/C2U1aSWUoAAkm5r.jpg

I watched The Last Man on the Moon - it's not necessarily a memorable documentary, but it is worth watching. It's entirely possible that the only answer to "what was it like to walk on the Moon and how did it change you?" will be whatever we can piece together from what these guys say and I'd watch it for that reason alone.

Elvis Telecom, Friday, 27 January 2017 10:13 (one year ago) Permalink

wow.

illegal economic migration (Tracer Hand), Friday, 27 January 2017 10:30 (one year ago) Permalink

Yeah, wow, thanks.

In Walked Bodhisattva (James Redd and the Blecchs), Friday, 27 January 2017 11:55 (one year ago) Permalink

holy shit elvis, that's amazing. that's gonna look fantastic in a frame.

We also went to Disney World, but fuck that shit compared with a Saturn V launch

seeing the saturn v on its side at kennedy space centre last summer was one of the more stunning things i've ever set eyes on in real life - i can't even imagine how incredible it must have been to see one of those things take off.

the greg evigan school of improvised explosive devices (bizarro gazzara), Friday, 27 January 2017 14:57 (one year ago) Permalink

thanks elvis! what an incredible experience.

in other news: 50th anniversary of Apollo 1 tragedy today :/

Flamenco Drop (VegemiteGrrl), Saturday, 28 January 2017 03:57 (one year ago) Permalink

thanks elvis! what an incredible experience.

in other news: 50th anniversary of Apollo 1 tragedy today :/

Flamenco Drop (VegemiteGrrl), Saturday, 28 January 2017 03:57 (one year ago) Permalink

Very envious and impressed

I hear from this arsehole again, he's going in the river (James Morrison), Saturday, 28 January 2017 06:40 (one year ago) Permalink

four months pass...

weirdly tempted to chip in some cash for that

heck i've even been an 'oyster pirate' (bizarro gazzara), Tuesday, 30 May 2017 08:26 (one year ago) Permalink

four months pass...

Greatly enjoyed the first four stories I read this weekend in The Dream Life of Astronauts, which are set on Merritt Island and read like a mix of New Yorker stories written by a Southerner like, say, Padgett Powell, with Ballard's Memories of the Space Age. Which may not be quite accurate and will probably put you off reading it but perhaps I can describe better upon reading the rest of the stories.

Two-Headed Shindog (Rad Tempo Player) (James Redd and the Blecchs), Monday, 2 October 2017 04:11 (one year ago) Permalink

Did not know of that book, but now i want

Mince Pramthwart (James Morrison), Monday, 2 October 2017 09:10 (one year ago) Permalink

three months pass...

RIP John Young

The Harmony Illustrated Encyclopedia of Blecch (James Redd and the Blecchs), Saturday, 6 January 2018 23:04 (eleven months ago) Permalink

;_;

Squeaky Fromage (VegemiteGrrl), Saturday, 6 January 2018 23:44 (eleven months ago) Permalink

dammit :(

pee-wee and the power men (bizarro gazzara), Saturday, 6 January 2018 23:46 (eleven months ago) Permalink

Crap

Mince Pramthwart (James Morrison), Sunday, 7 January 2018 01:35 (eleven months ago) Permalink

three weeks pass...

Curious about this new Apollo 8 book

The Sound of the City Slang (James Redd and the Blecchs), Wednesday, 31 January 2018 01:39 (ten months ago) Permalink

One of the most haunting radar images I think we'll ever see...the Space Shuttle Columbia debris field, 15 years ago today. pic.twitter.com/5Ba8IdBFLZ

— Matt Lanza ⛄️ (@mattlanza) February 1, 2018

mookieproof, Thursday, 1 February 2018 22:03 (ten months ago) Permalink

oof :(

Squeaky Fromage (VegemiteGrrl), Thursday, 1 February 2018 22:04 (ten months ago) Permalink

fuck that’s a real gut-punch

your skeleton is ready to hatch (bizarro gazzara), Thursday, 1 February 2018 22:10 (ten months ago) Permalink

the OPEN DSKY thing i mentioned above launched on kickstarter last week (and is already at 250% of goal)

https://www.kickstarter.com/projects/438986934/open-dsky-apollo-50th-anniversary-make-100

koogs, Friday, 2 February 2018 20:01 (ten months ago) Permalink

why do i want that

i gotta be a gazpacho man (bizarro gazzara), Friday, 2 February 2018 20:08 (ten months ago) Permalink

Why wouldn’t you?

The Sound of the City Slang (James Redd and the Blecchs), Saturday, 3 February 2018 01:49 (ten months ago) Permalink

tru

i gotta be a gazpacho man (bizarro gazzara), Saturday, 3 February 2018 08:21 (ten months ago) Permalink

three months pass...

RIP Al Bean :(

Squeaky Fromage (VegemiteGrrl), Saturday, 26 May 2018 20:06 (six months ago) Permalink

RIP

omgneto and ittanium mayne (James Redd and the Blecchs), Saturday, 26 May 2018 21:23 (six months ago) Permalink

O bum

Mince Pramthwart (James Morrison), Sunday, 27 May 2018 05:21 (six months ago) Permalink

He was top of my list of Apollo astronauts I would have loved to meet. Such a quirky, enthusiastic, genuine-seeming person.

There’s a lovely quote in the obituary about how he & Walt Cunningham were bffs & ate cheeseburgers together once a month <3

Squeaky Fromage (VegemiteGrrl), Sunday, 27 May 2018 06:50 (six months ago) Permalink

two weeks pass...

That is mental.

Mince Pramthwart (James Morrison), Friday, 15 June 2018 02:30 (five months ago) Permalink

wow

Squeaky Fromage (VegemiteGrrl), Friday, 15 June 2018 05:13 (five months ago) Permalink

three months pass...

There's some great stuff in NASA's historical archives, my fave is the oral history project - long interviews with everyone before they pass away A recent fave of mine are the 2004 interviews with Joe Engle - the X-15 pilot who got bumped from Apollo 17 by geologist (and later Senator and climate-change denier) Harrison Schmitt. More to the point, Engle talks about the life of being a badass-casual Air Force fighter/ test pilot - dogfighting & partying with Yeager, hand-wringing over stick-and-rudder vs. spam-in-a-can space travel, flight-testing every goddamn thing at Edwards, rolling the X-15, having to pee while you're in the middle of an abort, getting the phone call from Slayton, training for not going to the Moon and then finding a place in NASA and picking the Space Shuttle because it had wings and a stick-n-rudder.

Elvis Telecom, Friday, 28 September 2018 02:42 (two months ago) Permalink

ooo cool, thx elvis!

kinda heartbroken to hear harrison schmitt is a climate change denier, he and gene cernan are maybe my favourite apollo duo

heteroflexible pansexual polyamorous relationship anarchist (bizarro gazzara), Friday, 28 September 2018 09:30 (two months ago) Permalink

:/

Squeaky Fromage (VegemiteGrrl), Saturday, 29 September 2018 19:59 (two months ago) Permalink


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