Pedro Costa?

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I saw Colossal Youth last spring and while it had some arresting images and a few of the long-take dynamics were intriguing, I was left kinda cold.

So shd I go see In Vanda's Room tonight?

http://daily.greencine.com/archives/004154.html

http://elusivelucidity.blogspot.com/2007/08/detritus.html

Dr Morbius, Thursday, 9 August 2007 13:28 (thirteen years ago) link

Did you end going to this? How was it? I'm sad this screened while I'm out of town; initially, I wasn't sure I liked Colossal Youth but there are a few moments and shots that I haven't been able to forget.

C0L1N B..., Friday, 10 August 2007 03:31 (thirteen years ago) link

I liked In V's Room a little better, or maybe I'm just warming up a bit to his DV-slum thing. He was there for Q&A after.

Dr Morbius, Saturday, 11 August 2007 15:58 (thirteen years ago) link

eleven months pass...

hi

admrl, Thursday, 17 July 2008 22:27 (twelve years ago) link

and...?

Dr Morbius, Friday, 18 July 2008 20:33 (twelve years ago) link

I just met him. Intense.

admrl, Saturday, 19 July 2008 00:07 (twelve years ago) link

Deadpan. Brooding.

admrl, Saturday, 19 July 2008 00:07 (twelve years ago) link

one year passes...

can i just speak my peace here, as a unquestioned film nerd, and say that this guy is straight up pretentious? his movies too. don't believe the hype.

by another name (amateurist), Tuesday, 6 April 2010 07:37 (eleven years ago) link

tell me interview quotes like this don't make you gag on his self-importance:

Yes, well, of course Akerman and Warhol and [Jean-Marie] Straub and Godard and more... Everything has its place in my filmhouse. Actually it's exactly like a house. It has the foundations that I cannot avoid—The Chaplins, The Fords, the Ozus and the Mizoguchis. You have to go there one way or another—every filmmaker does. Then you can go into the rooms. And a room that I'm very drawn to is that of Warhol.

by another name (amateurist), Tuesday, 6 April 2010 07:37 (eleven years ago) link

not that this necessarily translates to bad filmmaking, but the same preposterousness infects his movies, too. what a dick.

by another name (amateurist), Tuesday, 6 April 2010 07:38 (eleven years ago) link

you know all of those people actually live in his house, right?

come again?

by another name (amateurist), Tuesday, 6 April 2010 19:39 (eleven years ago) link

three weeks pass...

Just watching the supplements DVD from "Letters From Fontainhas" - REALLY good.

I don't really find the above quote all that preposterous. Find me the rare artist who can talk about his influences in an interesting way without resorting to the odd faintly ridiculous extended metaphor. It's an inflated answer to what was probably of a boring question. Scorsese talks like this all the time and nobody calls him out in the same way.

admrl, Tuesday, 27 April 2010 18:56 (ten years ago) link

its kinda preposterous because he's talking about all these cats and then... WARHOL is the guy who he's most drawn to? really? warhol?

he's actually selling himself short with that

this whole thing of linking ford and straub[-huillet but he doesn't mention her] bugs me too, it's super pretentious, but it's not that big of a deal

Norway, that's where I'm a viking! (history mayne), Tuesday, 27 April 2010 19:29 (ten years ago) link

Warhol isn't significant? Or a good touchstone for Pedro Costa?

I think I have a different definition of pretentiousness, maybe...

admrl, Tuesday, 27 April 2010 19:34 (ten years ago) link

i don't think warhol is significant -- obviously some people do, and of course he's a symptomatic figure and sort of "interesting", up to a point. he certainly isn't a good touchstone for anyone, though, as a filmmaker or artist or thinker.

the straub/ford thing originates with straub himself, and i do think it's a mystification, and yet another attempt by cinema's highbrows to appropriate for themselves the medium in general. can't really see ford or chaplin sitting through "colossal youth". i like it when artists invent traditions on the whole, but agree with amateurist on this one.

also im starting a "back to montage" movement.

Norway, that's where I'm a viking! (history mayne), Tuesday, 27 April 2010 19:42 (ten years ago) link

I think Griffith might like Pedro Costa!

Sorry, I just disagree with you about Warhol. Like him or not, he's significant in terms of inspiring the most characteristic tendencies of late-twentieth century "arthouse" (or whatever) film, and more besides. Whether or not anyone would sit through Empire or Colossal Youth or Jeanne Dielman is not really the issue. I love montage, but it's not exactly like we're lacking in that right now, or ever will be.

admrl, Tuesday, 27 April 2010 20:26 (ten years ago) link

i don't mean montage as in fast cutting, but as collision of ideas etc. we lack that, especially in art house cinema, which is sorta long take crazy from bucharest to beijing.

but is that true about warhol? which filmmakers do you mean, and which warhol films?

late 20C art house to me means: the iranian dudes, the taiwanese dudes, wong kar wai, jia, the dardennes, haneke, almodovar, bela tarr, von trier -- is warhol important for any of those guys? maybe to fellow charlatan von trier. and i can see that he mattered to some underground filmmakers, and to a fair number of US indie filmmakers, kinda.

for the taiwanese guys isn't ozu way more of a thing?

warhol's films are so bad.

rolling stupid fruity crazy frog (history mayne), Tuesday, 27 April 2010 20:39 (ten years ago) link

He's important at least to anyone that makes work that deals at all with extended duration, not in that he did it first or best but most visibly. So yeah, he's important when considering what any of Bela Tarr, Tsai Ming-liang, Chantal Akerman, James Benning, Jia Zhangke, Pedro Costa, Lisandro Alonso or the Straubs have done. Plenty of other filmmakers have used duration, but not so many have made it it a subject in itself and in such a popular context.

admrl, Tuesday, 27 April 2010 20:56 (ten years ago) link

I do kind of agree about montage but I feel like that is increasingly becoming a tendency in part of the art world, with the "video essay" and such. But there's also people like Harun Farocki and Gustav Deutsch working in that fashion.

admrl, Tuesday, 27 April 2010 20:58 (ten years ago) link

Also how "long" are the takes in "long take movies"? I sometimes feel like people confuse less dialogue and onscreen action with excessive running time.

admrl, Tuesday, 27 April 2010 21:02 (ten years ago) link

admrl i am on yr side fwiw, but i wld dispute the idea that warhol's investigations of duration is in any more of a 'popular context' than rivette's, or tarr's, or whoever. duration might even be something of a red herring, in terms of warhol's influence, i dunno. obv the whole thing abt 'stardom'/celebrity has proved to be at least as...enduring

nrq, at one point yr demanding that admrl be specific - "which warhol films"? - then a cpl of paras later you're off-handedly saying "warhol's films are so bad", w/out of course being in any way specific abt their badness (as spectacle? narrative? entertainment? as failed experiments or provocations?) or bothering to distinguish between say CHELSEA GIRLS or FLESH FOR FRANKENSTEIN (ie yr position doesn't acknowledge that there is more than one kind of warhol film, bad or o/wise.) i don't disdain the charlatan figure/role as much as you seem to - charlatans can be gd fun! - and i really really don't think the 'fact' that john ford wldn't sit through a pedro costa movie means or proves anything at all - i mean, so fuckin' what? ford had a public persona - perhaps costa has the public persona of a pretentious fop, or a dreamer, or a student of cinema, or maybe something has been lost in translation - but the tracking shot near the end of MY DARLING CLEMENTINE, the way the film frames ppl and landscape, is felt in a thousand subsequent tracking shots, in those austere arthouse moments of 'transcendental style', just as warhol is an inescapable figure for anyone making arthouse movies nowadays, even as someone to disavow, go the other way from.

Ward Fowler, Tuesday, 27 April 2010 21:49 (ten years ago) link

He's important at least to anyone that makes work that deals at all with extended duration, not in that he did it first or best but most visibly. So yeah, he's important when considering what any of Bela Tarr, Tsai Ming-liang, Chantal Akerman, James Benning, Jia Zhangke, Pedro Costa, Lisandro Alonso or the Straubs have done. Plenty of other filmmakers have used duration, but not so many have made it it a subject in itself and in such a popular context.

im not saying he's nothing to all of them, but i don't think he's much to tsai, tarr, jia, or straub-huillet. dunno about alonso. im pretty sure straub has explicitly said so. i was watching some tsai films this week. they're ok. but just because they use long takes... i don't see any connection with warhol, or the ones i've seen. the intricacy of movement within tsai's frame, the opening up of space within a static composition -- way above warhol's level. but yeah i'll fess, the idea of duration "as a subject" holds out no appeal whatever for me. not a mnml guy.

xp

rolling stupid fruity crazy frog (history mayne), Tuesday, 27 April 2010 21:56 (ten years ago) link

Yeah I know. Duration isn't what most people who have heard of Andy Warhol think about when they think about Andy Warhol, but it's a context I hear him mentioned in a lot! (you have to be there, I guess)

I didn't know history mayne was nrq!

admrl, Tuesday, 27 April 2010 21:56 (ten years ago) link

xp

admrl, Tuesday, 27 April 2010 21:56 (ten years ago) link

another key duration guy w/o much warhol in him: angelopous

or jean-louis comolli yo

rolling stupid fruity crazy frog (history mayne), Tuesday, 27 April 2010 21:57 (ten years ago) link

I've come around to duration-as-subject. Must be all the yoga.

admrl, Tuesday, 27 April 2010 21:58 (ten years ago) link

I didn't know history mayne was nrq!

holla

nrq, at one point yr demanding that admrl be specific - "which warhol films"? - then a cpl of paras later you're off-handedly saying "warhol's films are so bad", w/out of course being in any way specific abt their badness (as spectacle? narrative? entertainment? as failed experiments or provocations?) or bothering to distinguish between say CHELSEA GIRLS or FLESH FOR FRANKENSTEIN (ie yr position doesn't acknowledge that there is more than one kind of warhol film, bad or o/wise.)

yeah nah i mean CHELSEA GIRLS primarily. i haven't seen all of them, and won't: CG is the one that got distributed. and EMPIRE is famous in 4'33 stylee, as an idea rather than as s.thing ppl have necessarily "seen". i mean you have to ask if jia or hou or whoever could even have seen a warhol film.

but yeah the ones i have seen are... bad as all of those things. i don't say every film has to be a narrative, but i just don't think he repays the attention. time/reward ratio all screwed up. not trying to be iconoclastic or w/e, but i've put in the hours and it's a no from me.

the tracking shot near the end of MY DARLING CLEMENTINE, the way the film frames ppl and landscape, is felt in a thousand subsequent tracking shots, in those austere arthouse moments of 'transcendental style', just as warhol is an inescapable figure for anyone making arthouse movies nowadays, even as someone to disavow, go the other way from.

i think that's true for a lot of art-house long-takers. but not warhol! though it's economical, as 1920s-40s hollywood tended to be, it's still narrative cinema. and not really playing with duration. i don't think costa is being insincere, btw, just, yeah, kind of foppish.

another one: JANCSO.

rolling stupid fruity crazy frog (history mayne), Tuesday, 27 April 2010 22:30 (ten years ago) link

I'm finding it hard to believe you've actually seen much beyond (or before) Chelsea Girls (which was not "the one" that got distributed; many Warhol films got distribution even before Chelsea Girls, chief amongst them My Hustler). But if Empire, etc. is famous as an idea rather than something people have seen, then why would Jia or Hou or anyone really have had to have actually seen Warhol films in order to engage with his ideas of duration or whatnot? (Fwiw, people have actually seen Empire and, as usual with most Warhol films, it's been misdescribed, often hideously so.)

And why couldn't the tracking shot near the end of My Darling Clementine be plucked out of its narrative casing for inspiration? Countless avant-garde and art house directors take moments in narrative films as inspiration/modus operandi: Tracey Moffatt, Martin Arnold, Peter Tscherkassky, Ken Jacobs, on and on. Besides, Ford's strong point was never narrative to begin with, esp. in his greatest films ( Wagon Master, The Long Grey Line, How Green Was My Valley, etc.).

But the true director of durée in classical Hollywood cinema wasn't Ford; it was Preminger.

Kevin John Bozelka, Wednesday, 28 April 2010 11:22 (ten years ago) link

"chelsea girls" was way more seen than any of the earlier ones -- and we're talking about global distribution here anyway.

but if we're being asked to provide references, i've also seen vinyl, the velvet underground film, kiss, mario banana, blow job, bits of empire, and some of the portrait things. why do you find it "hard to believe"? i don't think i've ever read a piece explaining why warhol's films are worth seeing -- plenty that have made the effort.

anyway, yes, obviously some people have seen all of "empire", good for them, but i'm still right and it is still more famous as an idea. indeed, perhaps jia and hou got all they needed about duration from warhol (rather than ozu or whoever) -- need evidence for this though. the delicacy of hou's work makes the comparison especially unworthy imo.

think you're going full challops on ford's strong point but im not super-invested in that question, nor on preminger. can't recall a use of a "duree" in one of his films that comes close to any of the directors we've been talking about above.

rolling stupid fruity crazy frog (history mayne), Wednesday, 28 April 2010 11:32 (ten years ago) link

i don't think i've ever read a piece explaining why warhol's films are worth seeing -- plenty that have made the effort.

Let's fix this: "I've read many pieces explaining why Warhol's films are worth seeing. I just don't agree with any of them."

but i'm still right and it is still more famous as an idea.

Never said anything to the contrary and, in fact, pretty much agree(d) with you.

need evidence for this though

ugh here you go with this "evidence" thing again. Ok so Hou tells you he was waaay influenced by Warhol. Now what are you going to do with the rest of your life?

can't recall a use of a "duree" in one of his films that comes close to any of the directors we've been talking about above.

You talk as if Ford's films must be exactly like art house cinema in order for them to be an inspiration to any of the directors we've been talking about above. You really find it impossible to believe that an art film director could be inspired by, say, the tracking shot near the end of My Darling Clementine and use that inspiration to very different/art house/even non-narrative ends? Costa already said Ford inspired him. What kind of evidence do you require?

Kevin John Bozelka, Wednesday, 28 April 2010 12:14 (ten years ago) link

ugh here you go with this "evidence" thing again. Ok so Hou tells you he was waaay influenced by Warhol. Now what are you going to do with the rest of your life?

i'd probably still figure there were more important people in his formation. but you do need evidence for this sort of thing, seriously.

i don't think i've doubted costa, just that i find what he says (and what straub before him says) a bit pretentious, a bit eclectic, very auteurist.

rolling stupid fruity crazy frog (history mayne), Wednesday, 28 April 2010 12:26 (ten years ago) link

but you do need evidence for this sort of thing, seriously.

Seriously?

Kevin John Bozelka, Wednesday, 28 April 2010 12:37 (ten years ago) link

yup. it's a serious business. otherwise you're just pulling it from yer colon.

and i think getting the "real story" is more interesting anyway, coz it tells a story about how films and ideas circulate. did hou know of bazin? that sort of thing would interest me.

rolling stupid fruity crazy frog (history mayne), Wednesday, 28 April 2010 12:40 (ten years ago) link

otherwise you're just pulling it from yer colon.

Ah! This is way off topic now but that's the precise spot where evidence of homosexuality (supposedly) resides. You yourself said as much on some other thread.

Kevin John Bozelka, Wednesday, 28 April 2010 12:52 (ten years ago) link

four weeks pass...

thankig u

on a quick scan, lines like "von Trier’s dizzying talent and erudition" have me loling in anticipaish

long time listener, first time balla (history mayne), Wednesday, 26 May 2010 22:16 (ten years ago) link

one year passes...

this guy

flesh, the devil, and a wolf (wolf) (amateurist), Saturday, 22 October 2011 00:10 (nine years ago) link

amplify?

incredibly middlebrow (Dr Morbius), Saturday, 22 October 2011 00:28 (nine years ago) link

three months pass...

So great

De La Soil (admrl), Monday, 13 February 2012 23:33 (nine years ago) link

He should make a film in Iowa, or Wisconsin

De La Soil (admrl), Monday, 13 February 2012 23:33 (nine years ago) link

two weeks pass...

Not seen a film by him but he sounds like he'd be up my street (although if he's like Von trier count me out, but it doesn't look like it).

The interviews quote excerpts here are fine. I've seen worse by other filmmakers I like. Comes across a someone who is intense, knows a lot about cinema, happy to bullshit away. But not an attention seeker like Von Trier.

I don't think any of his films have ever been screened at the BFI but at the Tate? Anyone confirm?

xyzzzz__, Saturday, 3 March 2012 20:31 (nine years ago) link

He is not like Von Trier whatsoever. And if you'll allow me to namedrop, I have met him a few times and he is totally sincere, just very serious. I like his films a lot. The documentary about his process included in the recent DVD set is very illuminating.

My mouth was wiard shut! (admrl), Saturday, 3 March 2012 20:49 (nine years ago) link

Oops sorry I was just skimming the article above which talked a lot about VT, but looking again the analysis is in terms of career trajectory..

Excellent, I read an interview on n+1. 'serious' is how he came across and I totally don't mind that...look fwd to Colossal Youth.

xyzzzz__, Saturday, 3 March 2012 21:00 (nine years ago) link

hey xyzzzz, second run dvd have been promising casa de lava for some time now (you probably know that they they have already issued blood) but looking at their website it still seems tbc, and yeah, looking also forward to the MOC colossal youth set

Ward Fowler, Saturday, 3 March 2012 23:11 (nine years ago) link

'looking also forward' to going to sleep, gnight

Ward Fowler, Saturday, 3 March 2012 23:12 (nine years ago) link

Morning -- yeah, know about Blood, just keep not getting round to it.

Just struck me: isn't the reason Warhol might be a deal for Costa isn't so much static-ness as a way of working w/others? From what I've read he worked in commune like conditions in Colossal Youth and Vanda's room.

Isn't that analogous to the Factory? Except the former isn't going for an idea of Hollywood glamour. I've not seen any Warhol either, only excerpts.

xyzzzz__, Sunday, 4 March 2012 10:19 (nine years ago) link

two years pass...

http://filmcomment.com/entry/interview-pedro-costa

new flick was gonna be co-written w ... gil scott heron

schlump, Thursday, 4 September 2014 03:29 (six years ago) link

two months pass...

I've written a bit on Horse Money: http://centrifugue.blogspot.com/2014/11/cphdox-day-9-lack-horse-money.html

Frederik B, Tuesday, 18 November 2014 17:01 (six years ago) link

nine months pass...

Watching this on Friday (Q&A with Costa and Laura Mulvey). Love the song on the trailer, going all Ghost Town organ.

xyzzzz__, Wednesday, 16 September 2015 14:04 (five years ago) link

so Horse Money then...its not just the way he uses light and the effects he achieves with digital (his stuff really looks so much better than a lot of much digital work I've seen) but also how impressive he achieves an unity of tech + politics, i.e. the context and something I realised whilst watching but confirmed during the Q&A after as an intention, which is to capture light as the thing these people -- exhausted and brutalised as they are by where they have been placed and how they've been treated -- have left. And that is literally ALL they have left.

Costa is very serious (as Adam said above), pessimistic, and ambivalent about what he has achieved. Laura Mulvey (who chaired the Q&A, and someone else in the audience) was trying to talk up his films as an act of resistance, that something so beautiful could emerge from the chaos but...he wasn't buying it. The thing I got from it is he has spent so long trying to get into Ventura and Fontainhas' other inhabitants -- like their heads and psyche -- that he just can't help and carry the weight of their world on his shoulders. It was sorta chilling how he described that he has had to "become a bit like them".

Yet there he was at the ICA, presenting this film to us. So you do wonder the way by which he carries himself is his own way of dealing with certain questions that he is well aware of, that of being from the other of the fence. I attended a talk by Valerie Wilmer (jazz writer and photographer etc.) a few weeks ago and she was describing how she got a grant from the Arts Council to go to Mississippi and do a project with the locals there and she gave up in the end as she felt it was tourism, basically. Not suggesting its so much like that with Costa, the circumstances in which he got there were different and allowed him to stay for a while. But you can tell it rankles, like he used Fontainhas to get out of more commercial film and saving himself in the process BUT IS HE? Has he not found his perfect zombies instead for that Tourneu remake he hated? Costa is emphasized the 'concrete' of the doc aspect ("film is for the bed, you don't dream in the cinema") but you can't forget the pacing of some of the scenes, disjointedness of plot, the look. All these things that are taken to such an extent that make him tough to screen at even yer local arthouse cinema.

xyzzzz__, Saturday, 19 September 2015 20:12 (five years ago) link

("film is for the bed, you don't dream in the cinema")

Sorry that should be "dreams are.." etc

xyzzzz__, Saturday, 19 September 2015 20:14 (five years ago) link

HM is one of my favorites of the year thus far (ran exactly one week in cosmopolitan film capital NYC)

skateboards are the new combover (Dr Morbius), Saturday, 19 September 2015 20:26 (five years ago) link

Do you need to have seen the previous films? Because I haven't, and our cinema is screening them, but after the new one has finished its run.

the siteban for the hilarious 'lbzc' dom ips (wins), Sunday, 20 September 2015 10:03 (five years ago) link

I think it might actually be better to start with the new one. I still think it's slightly depressing to see Ventura aged so much after his commanding presence in Colossal Youth. I might recommend checking the carnation revolution on wikipedia to understand all of that, though. His last five films are kinda connected, and watching them all adds something, but they're also perfectly stand alone

(Casa de Lava more important than Ossos, imo, though it's not part of the 'Fontainhais quartet', but it's filmed on Cape Verde and introduces a letter which plays a big role in Colossal Youth. The whole fixation on Fontainhais by critics misses a lot of what makes these films special, the digital imagery and the transitive nature of the experiences shown. imo it should either be the digital trilogy or the cape verde quintet, but who cares)

Also it's awesome, but I need to watch it again. Have watched it twice but both times at the end of festivals, and while I think I got a lot of it, I was very tired both times.

Frederik B, Sunday, 20 September 2015 10:52 (five years ago) link

wins - try and get the DVD of Colossal Youth if you can before otherwise its fine to see it retrospectively.

xyzzzz__, Sunday, 20 September 2015 11:46 (five years ago) link

Its a v dense and draining film - friend I was with just didn't have the energy for a drink after (although drinks before didn't help).

I still think it's slightly depressing to see Ventura aged so much after his commanding presence in Colossal Youth.

See what you mean but I can't highlight this enough: few films capture that utter exhaustion w/life and what it throws at you. It was exemplified by Ventura the most but its there in the atmosphere and the others and how they walk and talk - Vitalina's whisper.

Most of us here don't need to be reminded but this is the migrant's lot. Weird to see this during the Syrian crisis although the people in the film come from the post-colonial end of exploitation.

xyzzzz__, Sunday, 20 September 2015 11:59 (five years ago) link

Colossal youth isn't screening till october but I think I'll hang on for it & just see the latest one first. It's remiss of me but I only vaguely recall cy coming around & don't know costa at all, but the new one played at the recent fest here & I loved the poster and the title cavallo dinheiro, but I skipped it cause I try not to go to things during the festival that will have proper distribution later. totally get the fatigue thing Fred alludes to, and don't see nearly as many films during the 2 weeks of the fest

the siteban for the hilarious 'lbzc' dom ips (wins), Sunday, 20 September 2015 12:07 (five years ago) link

The solution to festival-fatigue, btw, is to travel to another festival somewhere! Two weeks to AFFR!

Frederik B, Sunday, 20 September 2015 12:43 (five years ago) link

you crazy cat

the siteban for the hilarious 'lbzc' dom ips (wins), Sunday, 20 September 2015 12:47 (five years ago) link

It's only a couple of days. I'm still not able to go to more than three bigger festivals a year (the ones right by) though I got a few I'd love to go to.

Back to Costa, xyzzzz, you're absolutely right that exhaustion is the point, and it's an important point. It's also a depressive point, and seeing it documentary-style is doubly depressing. On the other hand, apparently Vanda from In Vanda's Room is doing much better now.

Frederik B, Sunday, 20 September 2015 13:05 (five years ago) link

Saw HM this afternoon with a friend (and about five other people in the cinema oh dear), who joked afterwards that it was like a Portuguese remake of Britannia Hospital.

sʌxihɔːl (Ward Fowler), Sunday, 20 September 2015 17:47 (five years ago) link

7 ppl in the theater; well, the rest of the world also views Fury Road as the ultimate in cinema aesthetics, it's not just ILX.

skateboards are the new combover (Dr Morbius), Sunday, 20 September 2015 18:21 (five years ago) link

You guys should come to Gothenburg in january. Not really Copenhagen, but in Gothenburg, it was pretty full for an early morning showing.

Frederik B, Sunday, 20 September 2015 18:27 (five years ago) link

aside from comedies, my ideal audience situation is me alone in a 300-seat theater.

skateboards are the new combover (Dr Morbius), Sunday, 20 September 2015 18:40 (five years ago) link

xpost

I actually prefer a small number of silent people to a bigger crowd - the handful of us who sat through the last Diaz at the same cinema had a ball - but it can't be good business

I have yet to achieve the dream of seeing a film entirely alone

sʌxihɔːl (Ward Fowler), Sunday, 20 September 2015 18:43 (five years ago) link

The film itself, I'm adding to my list of horror films that aren't horror films - many of the shots are very scary - great faces and bodies suddenly looming out of the darkness, the brokeness and decay of everything. Yes to 'dense and draining' - and dark literally figuratively - in its way a kind of 'terminal cinema' like godard's weekend (of course another hf that isn't a hf.)

sʌxihɔːl (Ward Fowler), Sunday, 20 September 2015 18:50 (five years ago) link

I saw Wong Kar-wai's The Grandmaster completely alone. That is, right before it started a couple came in and asked 'Is this where Before Midnight is screened?' Then there was a woman who saw the first ten minutes, and then left. The rest of the time I was alone. When I saw Journey to the West at DOX we were just a handful, and it seemed as if half the people left while the camera was still filming Levant's eyes. In Gothenburg I had to sit in front row, because it was so packed, to the same film.

We showed Colossal Youth this year at CAF, where I work, and apparently there were very few people. But it overlapped with the 5,5 hour showing of Jonas Mekas' As I Was Moving Ahead Occasionally I Saw Brief Glimpses of Beauty, so the film buffs went to see that one, I think.

Frederik B, Sunday, 20 September 2015 18:56 (five years ago) link

“There’s no use to try and make a film about the past; it’s stupid and impossible. Cinema is always the present. Old mistakes are today’s failures. History is always now. That’s what the Spanish writer Unamuno used to call the tragic sense of life. Horse Money will always play in an everlasting present.”

http://whitecitycinema.com/2015/09/21/our-films-should-avenge-an-interview-with-pedro-costa/

skateboards are the new combover (Dr Morbius), Tuesday, 22 September 2015 16:38 (five years ago) link

five years pass...

Anyone watch Vitalina Varela yet?

Patriotic Goiter (Alfred, Lord Sotosyn), Monday, 23 November 2020 21:59 (four months ago) link

caught it at last years lff, a really remarkable work. made everything else i saw at the festival seem rather trivial. had been hoping to catch again when it released but the cinema's closed before i could.

devvvine, Monday, 23 November 2020 22:50 (four months ago) link

makes clear he's as much an heir to ford as to straub/huillet

devvvine, Monday, 23 November 2020 22:52 (four months ago) link

I haven't seen his latest, but I've seen all the others except for his first. I'm not excited that he's still filming the same locations with the same actors/people; it feels almost like a hairshirt he's donning to prove that this is Heavy Cinema about Real Issues. Ossos and Vanda's Room were his first films in that milieu, and his best.

The extended elevator scene (with the soldier) in Horse Money was so jarringly off-kilter with the rest of the movie, it made me wonder if he realizes he needs to change things up but no longer knows which way to go.

Halfway there but for you, Tuesday, 24 November 2020 01:20 (four months ago) link

VV is the only one I've seen but I liked it a lot. I might have struggled with a solo home viewing, though.

it bangs for thee (Simon H.), Tuesday, 24 November 2020 01:21 (four months ago) link

Criterion's streaming most of them; Casa de Lava is a change, practically a Rohmer film.

Patriotic Goiter (Alfred, Lord Sotosyn), Tuesday, 24 November 2020 01:26 (four months ago) link

It's really excellent, think I had it as top 3.

xyzzzz__, Friday, 27 November 2020 15:49 (four months ago) link


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