film noir

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I'm just starting to get into film noir, and i'd like a few recommendations. so far all i've seen are a few jules dassin flicks (night and the city, rififi) and touchez pas au grisbi.

can anyone recommend their favourites?

pppp, Tuesday, 14 February 2006 03:13 (thirteen years ago) link

'the asphalt jungle' is my favorite, but 'out of the past' & 'double indemnity' & 'the big sleep' are pretty awesome as well. also, if you want some hallucinatory uber-noir, try clouzot's 'the wages of fear'

Haikunym (Haikunym), Tuesday, 14 February 2006 04:05 (thirteen years ago) link

Yes yes I can.

The Killing
Cape Fear
Night of the Hunter
Out of the Past
Underworld USA
Touch of Evil
The Third Man
The Big Heat
Fury
Kiss Me Deadly
Quai des Orfevres
Pickup on South Street
Mildred Pierce
The Big Clock
Nightmare Alley
The Killers
Tight Spot
Thieves Highway

Alex in SF (Alex in SF), Tuesday, 14 February 2006 06:30 (thirteen years ago) link

Plus the stuff Haikunym mentions above (we both said Out of the Past! See it first!)

Alex in SF (Alex in SF), Tuesday, 14 February 2006 06:32 (thirteen years ago) link

'the maltese falcon'! and i think 'the strange love of martha ivers' counts, and most of 'laura' too. 'kill the piano player' is good, if strange; i also highly recommend the two best film commentaries about noir: 'alphaville' and 'dead men don't wear plaid.'

Haikunym (Haikunym), Tuesday, 14 February 2006 07:05 (thirteen years ago) link

I forgot the one ESSENTIAL prison noir: Le Trou. Seriously puts all the rest to shame!

Alex in SF (Alex in SF), Tuesday, 14 February 2006 07:12 (thirteen years ago) link

Do you mean Shoot The Piano Player? Cuz yeah that's great too.

So is Bob Le Flambeur for more good frenchy stuff.

Alex in SF (Alex in SF), Tuesday, 14 February 2006 07:14 (thirteen years ago) link

shoot, kill, it's all the same to a gumshoe like me

Haikunym (Haikunym), Tuesday, 14 February 2006 14:08 (thirteen years ago) link

This list is pretty good so far, but if you've got The Killers, you should probably also have

Criss Cross

Much as I love Out of The Past and much as everybody always calls it the noir of noirs, to me it seems to have a more langorous, elegiac pacing than most noirs - it's like the Vertigo to their Notorious.

What about something like Cagney in White Heat- I guess that's usually classified more as gangster pic than a noir, but there's a little bit of a grey area.

Redd Harvest (Ken L), Tuesday, 14 February 2006 14:38 (thirteen years ago) link

Polonsky's Force of Evil with John Garfield

Gun Crazy (Joseph H. Lewis, right?)

Fury is way too early for noir.

Dr Morbius (Dr Morbius), Tuesday, 14 February 2006 16:32 (thirteen years ago) link

clouzot's 'the wages of fear'
Also his Occupation Era anonymous poison pen letter
Le Corbeau

Redd Harvest (Ken L), Tuesday, 14 February 2006 16:40 (thirteen years ago) link

oooh don't forget 'the set-up' !

Haikunym (Haikunym), Tuesday, 14 February 2006 18:40 (thirteen years ago) link

"Fury is way too early for noir."

It's definitely proto-noir though.

Alex in SF (Alex in SF), Tuesday, 14 February 2006 18:43 (thirteen years ago) link

Sure, so's a number of German expressionist films.

The Big Combo

Dr Morbius (Dr Morbius), Tuesday, 14 February 2006 18:52 (thirteen years ago) link

"oooh don't forget 'the set-up'!"

Even better get Requiem for a Heavyweight!

Alex in SF (Alex in SF), Tuesday, 14 February 2006 18:58 (thirteen years ago) link

"Sure, so's a number of German expressionist films."

Well most of those films are pretty essential too!

Alex in SF (Alex in SF), Tuesday, 14 February 2006 19:02 (thirteen years ago) link

criss cross, mentioned above, is great. the scene where burt lancaster is laying in bed, hoping/dreading that yvonne de carlo will return to love him/kill him is uber-classic.

it also reminds me to mention scarlet street, where edward g. robinson plays a character named chris cross.

a spectator bird (a spectator bird), Tuesday, 14 February 2006 19:54 (thirteen years ago) link

also, if you like dassin, try brute force--it's only vaguely a noir (more a "social problem" drama) but it's got a great performance by hume cronyn (in one of his few villainous roles).

a spectator bird (a spectator bird), Tuesday, 14 February 2006 19:56 (thirteen years ago) link

Criss Cross
What percentage of the movies listed feature Dan Duryea, do you think?

Redd Harvest (Ken L), Tuesday, 14 February 2006 20:25 (thirteen years ago) link

duryea's so great in scarlet street, especially.

a spectator bird (a spectator bird), Tuesday, 14 February 2006 21:50 (thirteen years ago) link

Brute Force is good. I haven't seen a bad Dassin film.

Alex in SF (Alex in SF), Tuesday, 14 February 2006 22:05 (thirteen years ago) link

More awesome Melville noir:

Le Doulos
Le Samourai

After you've tried the classics, try some Neo-Noir:

Chinatown
The Long Goodbye
Mean Streets
Night Moves
Bring Me The Head of Alfredo Garcia
Diva

Chairman Doinel (Charles McCain), Wednesday, 15 February 2006 00:38 (thirteen years ago) link

the box for kurosawa's high and low describes it as an "exemplary film noir." i haven't watched it yet.

inert false cat (sleep), Wednesday, 15 February 2006 16:25 (thirteen years ago) link

It's good, but that description is a bit of a stretch.

Redd Harvest (Ken L), Wednesday, 15 February 2006 16:30 (thirteen years ago) link

Well as the list goes on and on the definition of noir IS getting a bit stretched (Mean Streets? The Long Goodbye is practically an ANTI-noir--is there a single shadow in the entire film? Diva?!?!??)

Alex in SF (Alex in SF), Wednesday, 15 February 2006 16:59 (thirteen years ago) link

But "The Long Goodbye" is all ABOUT noir, or at least the Degraded Epic, the impossibility of true noir in our modern world, which automatically means the world of the 1930s and 1940s too. (Shadows != noir.)

Haikunym (Haikunym), Wednesday, 15 February 2006 17:21 (thirteen years ago) link

Um no film noir pretty much does = shadows and darkness. It's a genre which is represented almost entirely by stylistic markers and The Long Goodbye deliberately inverts or discards all those markers. That may make it all about noir, but it's still very much an anti-noir.

"the impossibility of true noir in our modern world, which automatically means the world of the 1930s and 1940s too."

This makes no sense.

Alex in SF (Alex in SF), Wednesday, 15 February 2006 17:43 (thirteen years ago) link

It's a genre which is represented almost entirely by stylistic markers

Um, no. The look of a film noir is crucial, yes, but theme and tone are just as important.
http://www.filmsite.org/filmnoir.html

Also: narrative.
http://www.moderntimes.com/palace/inv_noir.htm

This makes no sense.

I have always read "The Long Goodbye" like this:
1. This is a Raymond Chandler novel set in 1970s California.
2. It couldn't really be taken seriously now, because of sexual liberation and changes in the culture; this story could never happen now.
3. But noir never really "happened", it was a film movement based on books and Geman Expressionist films to begin with.
4. Therefore, the whole idea of people buying into that aesthetic is bullshit. There was never any code, there were never hardboiled detectives serving as knights-errant in the degraded landscape of America.
5. Which is why, if Terry Lennox really treated Marlowe the way he does in Chandler's original novel, Marlowe TOTALLY would have shot him to death. In a heartbeat.

Haikunym (Haikunym), Wednesday, 15 February 2006 17:54 (thirteen years ago) link

So yeah, I could have expressed my point about that better. But I love that movie because it is so (as you put it) anti-noir. But its central character is still a noir antihero, and I think it's a brilliant commentary on both film history and American culture. Also, it's slightly boring.

Haikunym (Haikunym), Wednesday, 15 February 2006 17:58 (thirteen years ago) link

I'll respond to the rest of this later, but this is total bullshit:

"Which is why, if Terry Lennox really treated Marlowe the way he does in Chandler's original novel, Marlowe TOTALLY would have shot him to death. In a heartbeat."

Nothing in any of the Marlowe novels indicate to me that he would have done that.

Alex in SF (Alex in SF), Wednesday, 15 February 2006 17:59 (thirteen years ago) link

Sure, in the novel of The Long Goodbye, Marlowe doesn't shoot Lennox at all, just bitches him out. To that extent, you're right.

But they are both fictional characters. They don't exist. There's a whole code and mythology there, but it's not like we are actually examining the actions of real people. In fact, I'm always surprised that the novel was written in 1953, which was really late for Chandler, Marlowe, and this genre in general.

I think what Altman is saying in the movie (and what I was trying to say above) is that if there was a REAL Terry Lennox and he REALLY treated a REAL Marlowe like that, and it was a film 1973 instead of a film 1953, there would be more than just a bitch session and a disgusted sigh.

Alex I'm not trying to be an asshole here

Haikunym (Haikunym), Wednesday, 15 February 2006 18:12 (thirteen years ago) link

Short Answer (for my list): "Neo-Noir" is (from a style standpoint) different than "Classic Noir"

X-Post: For what it's worth, I figured Marlowe did what he did in the movie as a way of punishing Lennox for everything he was directly and indirectly responsible for that had happened. Lennox would have gotten off scot-free.

Chairman Doinel (Charles McCain), Wednesday, 15 February 2006 18:18 (thirteen years ago) link

Also, IIRC, Lennox was merely framed for his wife's death in the book. This element was absent from the film.

Chairman Doinel (Charles McCain), Wednesday, 15 February 2006 18:25 (thirteen years ago) link

Um no film noir pretty much does = shadows and darkness
That's another thing that sets Out Of The Past apart - it's low on shadows!

Redd Harvest (Ken L), Wednesday, 15 February 2006 18:45 (thirteen years ago) link

If you don't believe me, read Dark City: The Lost World Of Film Noir, by Eddie Muller. If you do, read it anyway.

Redd Harvest (Ken L), Wednesday, 15 February 2006 18:46 (thirteen years ago) link

More suggestions...

Nightmare Alley and Detour - both about as uber-classic as it gets

Blood On The Moon - an odd one because it's a noir western, but it works for two reasons: 1. Robert Mitchum. 2. Robert Wise directs.

The Equator Lounge (Chris Barrus), Wednesday, 15 February 2006 19:02 (thirteen years ago) link

Search: DOA (original)
Destroy: DOA (remake)

Chairman Doinel (Charles McCain), Wednesday, 15 February 2006 19:16 (thirteen years ago) link

"For what it's worth, I figured Marlowe did what he did in the movie as a way of punishing Lennox for everything he was directly and indirectly responsible for that had happened. Lennox would have gotten off scot-free."

Marlowe punishes him in the book by not being his friend basically.

"I think what Altman is saying in the movie (and what I was trying to say above) is that if there was a REAL Terry Lennox and he REALLY treated a REAL Marlowe like that, and it was a film 1973 instead of a film 1953, there would be more than just a bitch session and a disgusted sigh."

And that's one of the reasons why the film is a failure, because I think that Altman is WRONG.

"Sure, in the novel of The Long Goodbye, Marlowe doesn't shoot Lennox at all, just bitches him out. To that extent, you're right."

Also I could be wrong here, but I don't think Marlowe ever shoots ANYONE in any of the novels!

"In fact, I'm always surprised that the novel was written in 1953, which was really late for Chandler, Marlowe, and this genre in general."

It was the second to last Marlowe novel and it was far more ambitious in scope and (dare I say it) less noir-ish than his previous ones.

"That's another thing that sets Out Of The Past apart - it's low on shadows!"

But high on darkness!

Also I have that book you mention and I have read it.

"Search: DOA (original)
Destroy: DOA (remake)"

You can destroy the remake of Out of the Past, Against All Odds while you are at it hah.

Alex in SF (Alex in SF), Wednesday, 15 February 2006 19:22 (thirteen years ago) link

"Um, no. The look of a film noir is crucial, yes, but theme and tone are just as important."

And The Long Goodbye (the movie) is about as far from most noir in theme and tone as can be!

Alex in SF (Alex in SF), Wednesday, 15 February 2006 19:28 (thirteen years ago) link

But it features the greatest of noir heroes, in a story by the best noir writer (screenplays as well as stories/novels), so it can't really be all that far away after all. It's still a story about a man pitted against society, out of touch with the vulgarity of his time, trying to do the right thing in an ugly world, which is one of the major noir themes. Granted, Altman's being a provocateur, but still. A lot of films are a lot farther away from noir than "The Long Goodbye," even ones on this list.

But I understand your reservations about it all.

Haikunym (Haikunym), Wednesday, 15 February 2006 19:51 (thirteen years ago) link

The Long Goodbye is practically an ANTI-noir--is there a single shadow in the entire film?

I recall the summit meeting with Marty Augustine being kinda shadowy...

Among Gould's most essential dialogue is "This is where I say ... then you say..."

Anyone seen the trailer for the Sundance noir where Joseph Gordon-Levitt is the dick -- in HIGH SCHOOL?

Dr Morbius (Dr Morbius), Wednesday, 15 February 2006 21:21 (thirteen years ago) link

"But it features the greatest of noir heroes, in a story by the best noir writer (screenplays as well as stories/novels), so it can't really be all that far away after all."

The greatest of noir heroes in a novel about the greatest of noir heroes crumbling and becoming disillusioned and irrelevant by the best noir writer (this is debateable btw) who was fumbling at the time with his own direction/pretensions. And anyway whatever the source material, Altman completely pulled it away from that anyway.

"It's still a story about a man pitted against society, out of touch with the vulgarity of his time, trying to do the right thing in an ugly world, which is one of the major noir themes."

But I see only a little of the first (certainly Gould's Marlowe is no more pitted against it than say any of the counter-culture figures of the moment), none of the second (he seems totally of and comfortable with his time), and gah-wha? I guess but on the final one that's pretty much the theme of like "life" ya know and not real exclusive to noir

Alex in SF (Alex in SF), Wednesday, 15 February 2006 21:26 (thirteen years ago) link

As has been said, it is a post- meta- anti-noir. In the way that it foregrounds an ugliness that had been heretofore been made more palatable by extreme stylization, it is Psycho to the earlier noir's Thirty-Nine Steps.

Redd Harvest (Ken L), Wednesday, 15 February 2006 21:33 (thirteen years ago) link

I don't really know if I like it that much, but I like it a little bit and accept it and view it as kind of inevitable. If they had tried to adhere too much to the earlier conventions, it might have ended up looking like Agatha Christie. Well, Ellery Queen maybe.

Redd Harvest (Ken L), Wednesday, 15 February 2006 21:35 (thirteen years ago) link

Note: I cannot STAND The Long Goodbye. It's not the best of the Marlowe books anyway (people who think it is are not to be trusted--like people who think Valis is the best Philip K Dick book) but I find Altman's treatment of it painfully dull, really poor plotted and badly acted (esp. by Elliot Gould who apparently thinks that he's always playing Trapper John--Jim Bouten is also terrible, but I am more forgiving cuz of like Ball Four and all that.)

Alex in SF (Alex in SF), Wednesday, 15 February 2006 21:43 (thirteen years ago) link

Then count me as someone not to be trusted, because I think it contains some of his most beautiful passages (outside of "Red Wind") and the whole business about how to make a proper gimlet is ace, and I love the way Marlowe at this point has lived so long and seen so much that he's willing to put his ass on the line one more time just because he likes a guy. But I'm already getting the sense that you are pretty set in your ways, so it's okay if you don't give a rat's ass what I think. No one else does, I'm used to it.

But I do have a question: who's a better noir writer? James Cain is the only other real candidate, right? And I love Cain, so if that's yr choice I can get behind that.

Haikunym (Haikunym), Wednesday, 15 February 2006 22:04 (thirteen years ago) link

Well if you are talking early Black Mask-era, I think there is a good case for Hammett, but yeah otherwise only James Cain has a better case (unless you count Paul Cain too!) If you are talking all time and allow for up to the 50s and even early 60s then Goodis, Thompson, Himes and maybe even Highsmith and Willeford.

Alex in SF (Alex in SF), Wednesday, 15 February 2006 22:40 (thirteen years ago) link

If you are talking purely hard-boiled detective fiction though it's not even close, I mean Chandler practically invented that shit and he's miles ahead of everyone (until you get to Himes anyways.)

Alex in SF (Alex in SF), Wednesday, 15 February 2006 22:49 (thirteen years ago) link

Another Neo-Noir:

The Driver

Chairman Doinel (Charles McCain), Wednesday, 15 February 2006 22:56 (thirteen years ago) link

The Big Book of Noir, which is edited by, among others, Lee Server, who wrote a Robert Mitchum bio, is a reader that seems to be full of interesting material, if cheaply printed. Among other things, it has an interview with Daniel Mainwaring, author of Build My Gallows High aka Out Of The Past (I think another name appears in the credits because of the blacklist) and Leigh Brackett, screenwriter on both The Big Sleep and The Long Goodbye! I bought it a while back at teh Strand, but never really got around to reading it.


White Heat is on TCM tonight in teh wee hours.

Redd Harvest (Ken L), Thursday, 16 February 2006 00:34 (thirteen years ago) link

I disagree, Chrissie. Best things about The Big Sleep (movie), to me: 1) the nympho sister; 2) the sexy bookseller (we assume she and Marlowe have sex, right?); 3) the colonel in his greenhouse which stands for his willful blindness and attachment to Sean -- hey, harbinger of Marlow's attachment to Terry Lennox! --; 4) the fact that no one knows what the hell is going on at any one moment.

Haikunym (Haikunym), Tuesday, 21 February 2006 18:21 (thirteen years ago) link

"I don't rate the film high on the noir scale, though. Sans Bogie and Bacall, it'd be a pretty minor effort."

Oh no way. HOWARD HAWKS! It would have been fantastic whoever was in it.

Alex in SF (Alex in SF), Tuesday, 21 February 2006 19:00 (thirteen years ago) link

I'm not that sold on Howard Hawks, though, if you'll excuse the sacrilege. I guess I always think of The Thing -- which I never could embrace as the classic so many people say it is.

I didn't assume there was any sex with the bookseller, either. Maybe I missed something. :-/ I thought she kind of offered herself, but he was too preoccupied to take her up -- albeit with some regret? Oh no, I didn't miss an obvious visual metaphor anywhere, did I?!

Anyway, the film is lots of fun, don't get me wrong. But to me, not quite up there with Double Indemnity, Maltese Falcon, even Lady from Shanghai. (NTS: must watch that one again soon.)

What I'm looking forward to massively is this fab box-set of Mr. Arkadin from Criterion. (Um, Euro-noir?)

_chrissie (chrissie1068), Tuesday, 21 February 2006 19:38 (thirteen years ago) link

I'm not that sold on Howard Hawks, though, if you'll excuse the sacrilege. I guess I always think of The Thing

Jeez, he's not even credited with directing that, and the degree to which he did is uncertain.

btw the high school noir, Brick, is being released next month. Richard Roundtree is in it.

Dr Morbius (Dr Morbius), Wednesday, 22 February 2006 14:38 (thirteen years ago) link

Oh no, I didn't miss an obvious visual metaphor anywhere, did I?!
Maybe you missed the part where she pulled down the shade? And said "we're closed for the afternoon"?

Redd Harvest (Ken L), Wednesday, 22 February 2006 14:45 (thirteen years ago) link

What about The Lady in the Lake? No one wants to stand up for Robert Montgomery's weird Marlowe's-eye-view movie?

Haikunym (Haikunym), Wednesday, 22 February 2006 14:46 (thirteen years ago) link

No, I prefer Dark Passage for that kind of stuff. Where the trick serves a purpose I guess, since you can't see Bogey's face before the plastic surgery.

Redd Harvest (Ken L), Wednesday, 22 February 2006 14:51 (thirteen years ago) link

yeah, imagine what he must have looked like before!

i'm borrowing the lady in the lake from the library to remind myself if I feel like championing it or not

Haikunym (Haikunym), Wednesday, 22 February 2006 14:53 (thirteen years ago) link

I think it was motivated by reasons of identity, not vanity.

Redd Harvest (Ken L), Wednesday, 22 February 2006 15:06 (thirteen years ago) link

what, the surgery? oh, yeah, totally. i'm just saying that i always wondered what that character would have looked like...although now that i think of it, they probably show his picture somewhere, no?

anyway, in high school, when my friend kip and i used to hang out at his brother's condo and watch movies all night, dark victory came on; kip was bored and went to sleep, but i stayed up and watched the whole thing, because it was AWESOME

Haikunym (Haikunym), Wednesday, 22 February 2006 15:18 (thirteen years ago) link

Yeah, that sounds like fun.

I just read on ILM that the picture in the newspaper of Lauren Bacall's dad is of the director, Delmer Daves.

Redd Harvest (Ken L), Wednesday, 22 February 2006 15:20 (thirteen years ago) link

No, I didn't miss that bit. I guess I'm more innocent than I realised. ;-)

_chrissie (chrissie1068), Wednesday, 22 February 2006 22:55 (thirteen years ago) link

Has anyone ever seen the SNL Out Of The Past sketch with Robert Mitchum and Jane Greer that I just became aware of?

Redd Harvest (Ken L), Tuesday, 28 February 2006 16:41 (thirteen years ago) link

Is there a slip-up, baby?

Redd Harvest (Ken L), Tuesday, 28 February 2006 16:53 (thirteen years ago) link

From what year?

Dr Morbius (Dr Morbius), Tuesday, 28 February 2006 17:26 (thirteen years ago) link

From some real dark year, I think, 1987 or something, some Alfafa but no Buckwheat kind of year. I don't have high hopes, but I'm still extremely curious.

Redd Harvest (Ken L), Tuesday, 28 February 2006 17:29 (thirteen years ago) link

Looks like Simply Red was what Don Pardo would call the "MUUSICAL GUEST"

Simply Redd (Ken L), Tuesday, 28 February 2006 17:45 (thirteen years ago) link

We owe it all to Jose Rodriguez. I wonder if he ever knew what a bad guide he really was.

Redd Harvest (Ken L), Tuesday, 28 February 2006 17:46 (thirteen years ago) link

(OK, I guess I'd better stop. I guess I'd better drop this Junior League patter)

Redd Harvest (Ken L), Tuesday, 28 February 2006 17:47 (thirteen years ago) link

I almost just bought the companion volume to Dark City called Dark City Dames at The Mysterious Bookshop.

Redd Sherlock (Ken L), Tuesday, 28 February 2006 20:25 (thirteen years ago) link

The idea of teh Academy montage/tribute was nice, but execution lacking.

Redd Scharlach (Ken L), Monday, 6 March 2006 05:17 (thirteen years ago) link

Yeah, exactly.

Redd Scharlach (Ken L), Monday, 6 March 2006 15:30 (thirteen years ago) link

Search:
The Narrow Margin

Redd Scharlach (Ken L), Wednesday, 8 March 2006 04:13 (thirteen years ago) link

"Oh wake up, Brown, this train's headed straight for the cemetery. But there's another one coming along, the gravy train. Let's get on it."

Redd Scharlach (Ken L), Wednesday, 8 March 2006 04:22 (thirteen years ago) link

two weeks pass...
Hm. the director of The Narrow Margin, Richard Fleischer, just died. Please forgive him his later filmography.

The Day The World Turned Dayglo Redd (Ken L), Monday, 27 March 2006 18:08 (thirteen years ago) link

two weeks pass...
cool thread, love the Scarlet Street mentions.

I recently saw John Boorman's Point Blank. I'm assuming maybe it doesn't exactly fit into the "noir" category, maybe neo-noir, "hollywood rennaissance"? I love how lots of people die in it and the main character's motivation is violence and revenge, but nobody gets killed by him. Such a fantastic movie with some very funny/brutal parts.

-rainbow bum- (-rainbow bum-), Wednesday, 12 April 2006 16:10 (thirteen years ago) link

I'd call it maybe a "daylight revisionist noir." Lots of sunshine, anomie and bitter laughs.

Dr Morbius (Dr Morbius), Wednesday, 12 April 2006 17:08 (thirteen years ago) link

re: The Narrow Margin, i love that once marie windsor's true identity as a cop is revealed, charles mcgraw could care less that she died.

a spectator bird (a spectator bird), Wednesday, 12 April 2006 20:05 (thirteen years ago) link

er, couldn't care less.

http://www.austinchronicle.com/issues/vol17/issue09/screens.windsor.3.gif

a spectator bird (a spectator bird), Wednesday, 12 April 2006 20:06 (thirteen years ago) link

Yeah, I agree, although some people say that the movie is prevented from being truly great because there is no scene of him seeing her dead body being removed from the train, some people being William Friedkin on the DVD commentary and Eddie Muller in his book.

In The Court Of The Redd King Harvest (Ken L), Friday, 14 April 2006 02:57 (thirteen years ago) link

eleven months pass...
"Two things I can smell inside a hundred feet: burning hamburger and a romance."

James Redd and the Blecchs, Wednesday, 21 March 2007 03:51 (twelve years ago) link

five months pass...

"I bet your the kind of man that does push-ups every morning just to keep his belly hard."
"..You got something against good health?"

poortheatre, Friday, 31 August 2007 09:28 (twelve years ago) link

five months pass...

Just saw something about Richard Fleischer by Dave Kehr in the Times- a few films showing at the Walter Reade and Film Comment in the coming weeks.

James Redd and the Blecchs, Sunday, 17 February 2008 01:32 (eleven years ago) link

Oh man just saw Night and the City starring Richard Widmark. One of the bleakest noir films I've ever seen. Widmark is amazing in it.

brownie, Wednesday, 20 February 2008 19:39 (eleven years ago) link

Richard Fleischer thing starts on Friday at FF. It's in color- in Cinemascope!

James Redd and the Blecchs, Tuesday, 26 February 2008 16:47 (eleven years ago) link

one year passes...

Wow this 1948 UK film Daughter of Darkness was just given dvd reissue by Redemption films. It's both British noir and femme fatale wrapped in one with plenty of chiaroscuro and gothic vibe. Definitely recommended.

http://www.thelmagazine.com/images/blogimages/2009/09/30/1254335093-daughterofdarkness.jpg

Nate Carson, Sunday, 29 November 2009 22:40 (nine years ago) link

two months pass...

I think I'm noir illiterate. Watching the big sleep - drunk, granted - and I can't make a lick of sense out of it.

pithfork (Hurting 2), Friday, 19 February 2010 05:17 (nine years ago) link

iirc an actor approached hawks before filming the scene for his death. "i know my lines, howard," he said, "but who kills me?" and hawks thinks for a second and says "well hell, i'm not sure. hang on." so he rings faulkner, who wrote the screenplay, and he asks him "hey bill, who kills this guy?" and faulkner says "damn howard, I'm not sure. hang on." and he telegrams chandler "who killed butler STOP hawks wants to know STOP"

next day hawks gets a telegram: "hell if i know--ray"

BIG HOOS aka the steendriver, Friday, 19 February 2010 05:38 (nine years ago) link

iyigd

vag gangsta (k3vin k.), Friday, 19 February 2010 05:41 (nine years ago) link

why chandler had to telegram hawks when they were in the same city is beyond me, but i fuckin love that story

BIG HOOS aka the steendriver, Friday, 19 February 2010 05:45 (nine years ago) link

I thought Chandler's line was actually "who cares?" which I think is funnier.

Fig On A Plate Cart (Alex in SF), Friday, 19 February 2010 14:10 (nine years ago) link

Isn't there some companion story of Hawks saying something to the effect that making that movie taught him that the plot didn't really have to make sense?

the clones of tldr funkenstein (James Redd and the Blecchs), Friday, 19 February 2010 14:13 (nine years ago) link

the studio thought the original was boring and made him do reshoots. the result capitalized on the bogart-bacall relationship but made less sense.

hawks continued to make films whose scripts were well-crafted by conventional standards.

later people began to interview this great maestro, this incomparable innovator of cinematic form, and he made up some stories that made him sound cool but don't really accord with the facts.

sharter the unstoppable ilx machine (history mayne), Friday, 19 February 2010 14:22 (nine years ago) link

I'll buy that.

the clones of tldr funkenstein (James Redd and the Blecchs), Friday, 19 February 2010 14:43 (nine years ago) link

the original cut is on the US DVD and it gives an explanation for the chauffeur's death.

abanana, Saturday, 20 February 2010 15:22 (nine years ago) link

Anyone seen Nightmare Alley? I have seen most of the classics save, Detour and this. Think I like Kiss Me Deadly or Gun Crazy best.

Hinklepicker, Sunday, 28 February 2010 05:15 (nine years ago) link

Spent last week at the Noir City festival - always tremendous, especially with Eddie Muller's commentary.

Jaq, Sunday, 28 February 2010 05:28 (nine years ago) link

nightmare alley is good, tyrone power trying to ditch the pretty boy rep

velko, Sunday, 28 February 2010 05:34 (nine years ago) link

nine years pass...

AFI Silver has just announced its 2019 Noir City DC lineup: https://silver.afi.com/Browsing/EventsAndExperiences/EventDetails/0000000010

Not sure yet which screenings I plan to attend, but a couple of them will be free co-presentations with the National Gallery of Art. And last year I liked Muller's intro to both versions of The Killers.

Anne Hedonia (j.lu), Friday, 13 September 2019 17:05 (one month ago) link


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