Francois Truffaut-let's get talking...

Message Bookmarked
Bookmark Removed
There’s been several Godard threads already (not that there is anything wrong with that), but what about that other Nouvelle Vague kingpin, Francois Truffaut? His stock has steadily risen over the years (being dead helps of course), but I doubt he has nearly the hip cachet of Godard, although it was pretty weird to hear Truffaut name-checked on “The O.C.” last week. I think this is owed to the fact that Truffaut was an obvious craftsman. His work doesn’t have that reckless fury or experimentation that came so easy to Godard. On the other hand, Truffaut generally didn’t let his personal politics bleed over into his pictures.

I’ve only seen his first four movies and I’ve liked them all. “400 Blows” really is one of the best coming of age films I’ve ever seen. “Shoot The Piano Player” is fairly Godard-like in balancing the dark and the light, as is “Jules and Jim.” “The Soft Skin” is overlong and unevenly paced. That said, the middle and the ending are pretty brilliant.

What say you?

Doobie Keebler (Charles McCain), Thursday, 27 January 2005 18:58 (fourteen years ago) link

there's that old cliche that all filmmakers are either lumiere directors or melies directors, and in many ways the world can just as reductively be split down the truffaut/godard divide. personally, i lean truffaut.

a spectator bird (a spectator bird), Thursday, 27 January 2005 19:25 (fourteen years ago) link

which is not to say that they're opposites, but that there are distinct differences that makes people tend to like clusters of one director's films over clusters of the other's. i think?

a spectator bird (a spectator bird), Thursday, 27 January 2005 19:35 (fourteen years ago) link

>His stock has steadily risen over the years

Among higherbrow critics, I think the reverse. Many suggest nowadays it was all downhill from 400B.

Aside from Stolen Kisses, I'mI like a couple he played the lead in, The Green Room and The Wild Child.

Dr Morbius (Dr Morbius), Thursday, 27 January 2005 20:01 (fourteen years ago) link

in many ways the world can just as reductively be split down the truffaut/godard divide.

i agree, only I'm definitely more aligned with godard.

jay blanchard (jay blanchard), Thursday, 27 January 2005 21:04 (fourteen years ago) link

i always align with godard, but i am currently taking a truffaut class... maybe i will get more into truffaut, i will document my progress.

t0dd swiss, Thursday, 27 January 2005 23:47 (fourteen years ago) link

a whole class on just truffaut?

ryan (ryan), Thursday, 27 January 2005 23:48 (fourteen years ago) link

sounds hellish....unless you just watch "jules and jim" over and over again. his later films just seem like french soap operas to me.

jay blanchard (jay blanchard), Friday, 28 January 2005 00:58 (fourteen years ago) link

a whole class on truffaut yes.

it should be fun... i havent seen many of his later films and i have no problem bashing films in a classroom setting. maybe i will be seen as the resident film snob.

also, i really didnt like jules et jim.

t0dd swiss, Friday, 28 January 2005 01:07 (fourteen years ago) link

>Among higherbrow critics, I think the reverse.

around here too, it looks like. i'll proudly wave the flag for 400 blows, antoine & collette, stolen kisses, jules et jim, day for night, etc. he has his duds, too, but who doesn't.

a spectator bird (a spectator bird), Friday, 28 January 2005 01:40 (fourteen years ago) link

I could except the large number of duds if the "classics" weren't so mediocre. "Jules and Jim" is his only really daring film IMO, and it's mainly just a rip-off of techniques Godard pioneered in "Breathless". I just find Godard way too sappy for my taste.

jay blanchard (jay blanchard), Friday, 28 January 2005 03:03 (fourteen years ago) link

I'm very ambivalent about J&J. Moreau, while hypnotic, is the template for an irresisible/crazy woman cliche, no?

Dr Morbius (Dr Morbius), Friday, 28 January 2005 16:58 (fourteen years ago) link

Exactly. There was a point when I was "scandalized" by Jules and Jim, then I loved it, now I think it is kind of boring and follows too much the blueprint of the art film. I much prefer another Truffaut film based on material from the same author, Henri-Pierre Roche- Two English Girls, in fact, that might be his best one. In general I tend to lean towards Godard- Truffaut made some boring glossy "coffee table" films and after the first few films never had a chance of crackling with the same electricity that Godard had. Jean Pierre Leaud has gone on record as saying he preferred working with Godard, but he may have said that to dissociate himself from Truffaut and heck- his best work may have been with another director, namely Eustache. Nonetheless, I think Truffaut gets a little too beaten up by the comparison with LJG (like Lennon vs. McCartney?), it's an easy way to avoid having to deal with his work. I don't have a big overview of him to express here- I'll just say that in addition to Two English Girls, I like Stolen Kisses, The Soft Skin and of course The 400 Blows and Shoot the Piano Player. I even like Mississippi Mermaid. I didn't like The Wild Child at first, but it has grown on me. Day for Night is a little boring, but has some very good things in it. I am going to try to watch Adele H again and see if I like it more than the first time I saw it.

And don't forget about Les Mistons!

Ken L (Ken L), Friday, 28 January 2005 18:18 (fourteen years ago) link

les mistons was just about the worst thing that i have ever seen. sloppy, too focused on the story, the voice-over was horrendous. the amateur actors were just plain terrible too.

t0dd swiss, Friday, 28 January 2005 18:46 (fourteen years ago) link

You didn't like Bernadette Lafont?!?

Ken L (Ken L), Friday, 28 January 2005 18:47 (fourteen years ago) link

a bad actress cant save a short film for me.

t0dd swiss, Friday, 28 January 2005 19:12 (fourteen years ago) link

Did you see a dubbed version in that class of yours? No, I'm sure it was in crystal clear French.

Ken L (Ken L), Friday, 28 January 2005 19:14 (fourteen years ago) link

No doubt Les Bonnes Femmes is another insult to your eyes.

Ken L (Ken L), Friday, 28 January 2005 19:15 (fourteen years ago) link

i am sorry if i offended you and your tastes, but i expect more than eye candy from french new wave directors. also, we saw the original french language version, fyi

t0dd swiss, Friday, 28 January 2005 19:26 (fourteen years ago) link

I don't know if you offended my tastes exactly. But the movie you are attacking is one of the first artifacts of the New Wave, with the object of desire being the actress who starred in what many consider the first New Wave feature( and the last!). I haven't seen it in a long time but I consider it a fragile little valentine. Furthermore it is not a sacred cow of the film canon so I don't know whether it deserves such a harsh attack- if you want to pick on someone your own size, go after The 400 Blows!

Ken L (Ken L), Friday, 28 January 2005 21:56 (fourteen years ago) link

"The Story of Adele H" is masterful, to be the best film of his autumn years. It's rather forgotten unfortunately, even though it got Isabelle Adjani an Oscar nomination; over the years only Pauline Kael and Charles Taylor have really championed it. I'd take it over "Two English Girls."

"Stolen Kisses" notwithstanding, I'm not fond of anything Jean-Pierre Leaud stars in. Or maybe I just find Leaud such a boring adult after being such a vivid kid.

Alfred Soto (Alfred Soto), Thursday, 3 February 2005 00:20 (fourteen years ago) link

I've watched Stolen Kisses and Bed & Board over the last couple days and have really enjoyed them. Loved them, even. Leaud and Jade (what a beautiful woman!) were an endearing team. Haven't seen Love On The Run yet. Jules & Jim , excellent film that it is, still seems somewhat overrated to me.

Jay Vee (Manon_70), Thursday, 3 February 2005 20:15 (fourteen years ago) link

one year passes...
Well, this board is about as dead as our subject here, but I’ve been meaning to revive this thread for awhile now, so here I go.

I’ve been checking out the catalog in fits and starts. I got into Day for Night (a picture I can’t say enough good things about) and the Doinel cycle summer before last. Then I received the Criterion versions of STPP and J&J (not to mention Masculin Feminin) for x-mas last year, and I finally got around to watching those editions this summer. STPP is still simply amazing. I actually had to pause J&J about 20 minutes in to catch my breath. Screw the characters (as fine as they are), this film has gotta be one of best “Look At Me!” showboating director’s films ever made. The sheer technique is just nuts. It’s gearhead heaven.

This viewing finally made me seek out Two English Girls, which (along w/the other Fox Lorber Truffaut titles, plus My Life To Live) is apparently OOP in the states right now. I got a hold of it though, and found the film to be quite lovely. Also, since it’s less showy, it cuts a bit deeper with me than J&J. After viewing it, I went to a used bookstore, where I was surprised to find a few remaindered copies of Truffaut’s correspondence. I bought a copy and have been dipping into it ever since.

I mention all this because yesterday 4 (unseen by me) Truffaut films (Wild Child, Adele H, Small Change, and The Green Room) arrived in my mailbox. I plan to watch ‘em over the next couple of weeks. I might report back.

Anybody got anything they want to add?

Orgy of Pragmatism (Charles McCain), Saturday, 7 October 2006 17:54 (twelve years ago) link

three months pass...
Happy 75th Birthday.

So, of course there’s an Amazon sale: http://www.amazon.com/gp/feature.html/ref=amb_link_4308262_4/105-0869837-3948434?ie=UTF8&docId=312611

Which is missing a couple essentials—namely Adele and Fahrenheit 451.

Has anybody seen Such A Gorgeous Kid Like Me? It’s a comedy-noir that Truffaut did in ‘72 with Bernadette Lafont that apparently was never put out on video or DVD in the states. It looks…interesting.

The Homeliness of The Long Distance Punner (Charles McCain), Tuesday, 6 February 2007 21:59 (twelve years ago) link

one year passes...

i went to see Jules et Jim last night. i think it's the third time i have seen it and each time i seem to forget that, aside from the first 30 minutes, i just find it gets increasingly boring. after about 45 minutes my boredom heightens into intense irritation and by thirty minutes from the end it develops into pure hatred. the film making itself has some real vigour and there are some genuinely funny parts in the first third but overall, gah: intensely unsympathetic and unbelievable characters and it is so repetitive but without any of the illumination that the repetitive technique can engender.

it's my own fault though, how can i watch a film 3 times and forget how much i dislike it? i dare say that ten years from now i'll watch it again having forgotten again.

jed_, Monday, 14 July 2008 14:49 (eleven years ago) link

Maybe you'll like in ten years? BTW, have you seen Two English Girls? It's a more considered and balanced version of a Roche novel. And Adele H is a terrific companion to both.

Funny, I dug out my copy of the correspondence book and thumbed through it for about an hour the other day. Really interesting stuff. The local MFA is doing a weekend double-feature presentation of 400 Blows & Bergman's Summer With Monika at the end of this month. I may rescreen some of his other features as a warm-up. I haven't seen any "new to me" Truffaut films since my post upthread from 10/06. I've been putting off watching The Man Who Loved Women and Mississppi Mermaid for some time now. Those, plus Such A Gorgeous... and the final three are all I've yet to see.

The Green Room is quietly powerful, though it helps a little if you know something about Truffaut's background when you go into it.

C. Grisso/McCain, Monday, 14 July 2008 22:23 (eleven years ago) link

Looking back over the thread, I wonder how t0dd swiss liked that class he took?

C. Grisso/McCain, Monday, 14 July 2008 22:29 (eleven years ago) link

one year passes...

Have any of you been reading this: http://notcoming.com/features/truffaut
Great overview of the guy's whole career ... (i contributed, but don't let that stop you from checking it out)

tylerw, Friday, 23 April 2010 18:33 (nine years ago) link

Oh wow. Thanks for the link. I'll probably be chipping away at those essays for the next few weeks.

Since my last post, I've seen Mississippi Mermaid and Confidentially Yours!. Both of these are considered homages , but I think Truffaut wasn't enough of a misanthrope to really "do" Hitchcock. MM is kinda underrated IMHO, I hate to again invoke the "G"-word but to me it comes off like his Pierrot le fou faithless love on the run epic. Given the backstory on both, I think it's funny that Truffaut made his break-up movie w/Deneuve before they were actually involved.

I've had the Criterion Last Metro for awhile now, still haven't found the right time to watch it.

Roomful of Moogs (C. Grisso/McCain), Friday, 23 April 2010 20:54 (nine years ago) link

yeah, i thought i had seen a ton of Truffaut, but there are a bunch I've yet to get to. A lot of the 70s stuff is hard to come by in the states it seems. I like Mississippi Mermaid -- it's a great looking film, and worth seeing on the big screen if you get a chance. Haven't seen Confidentially Yours ... good? I do like Fanny Ardant quite a bit, despite some horrible movies I've seen her in.

tylerw, Friday, 23 April 2010 21:03 (nine years ago) link

Those late Truffuat-Ardant films are handsome bores.

Throwing Muses are reuniting for my next orgasm! (Alfred, Lord Sotosyn), Friday, 23 April 2010 21:12 (nine years ago) link

the one i reviewed is the Woman Next Door, and yeah, it's not a masterpiece by any stretch of the imagination. I thought it was funnier than it should be.

tylerw, Friday, 23 April 2010 21:15 (nine years ago) link

Confidentially Yours! is...ok I guess. It's a old-fashioned detective story in modern drag. You could in a way see it as a finger-waving response to the Cinema du look crowd--shot in black & white, very old school storytelling pace. There's a seemingly tacked on epilogue I'm not crazy about. But I think what hurts it most is that it was his last movie and you wish he could have gone out with a stone classic. On that same note, Ardent is appealing and I can't help but think where that creative collaboration could have gone. It's not horrible though--just not top-drawer Truffaut.

Roomful of Moogs (C. Grisso/McCain), Friday, 23 April 2010 21:20 (nine years ago) link

As for finding the 70s stuff in the US, most of it I think is out of print. MGM has remaindered their titles (Adele H, Small Change, TMWLW) but I think they're still findable cheap but they don't always look so hot. The Green Room never got out on DVD here (IIRC it's still cheap on VHS). Warners got Day For Night out of legal limbo so it's easy to find again. The Fox Lorber stuff is all OOP. Criterion's got the Doinels locked up in their box set and they may rescue the others at some point. Such A Gorgeous... is owned by Sony and a long time ago online I asked a guy who worked for them what was up and he felt Criterion might pick it up someday.

Roomful of Moogs (C. Grisso/McCain), Friday, 23 April 2010 21:29 (nine years ago) link

"Handsome bores" is a good way to put it.

MM is kinda underrated IMHO
I grew to like this one, but I used to have a VHS of it so I had the the opportunity to watch it many times and see what he was getting at, the same way I grew to like Fassbinder's Chinese Roulette.

Just glanced at the front page of the url tylerw linked to- looks pretty good.

Blecch Generation (James Redd and the Blecchs), Friday, 23 April 2010 21:38 (nine years ago) link

Such A Gorgeous Kid Like Me wins, since it was a movie I'd never even *heard* of until this Not Coming series ... Review makes it sound fairly bizarre: http://notcoming.com/reviews/suchagorgeouskid/

tylerw, Friday, 23 April 2010 21:39 (nine years ago) link

The whole Not Coming site is awesome btw ... might skew a bit academic at times, but it's far and away my fave film site. (and not just because a few friends write/edit for it)

tylerw, Friday, 23 April 2010 21:42 (nine years ago) link

As a Jamesian I was really excited to see The Green Room....zzz....

Throwing Muses are reuniting for my next orgasm! (Alfred, Lord Sotosyn), Friday, 23 April 2010 21:42 (nine years ago) link

three months pass...

They're mentioned earlier in the thread, but I was stunned by how good "Adele H.," "Day for Night," and especially "The Wild Child" were.

jeevves, Wednesday, 11 August 2010 09:10 (eight years ago) link

one month passes...

finally saw stolen kisses, really sweet film
two english girls & story of adele h. underrated imo (or maybe they are rated just fine, truffaut isn't exactly hip these days so don't really hear much discussion about his films)

buzza, Saturday, 11 September 2010 07:21 (eight years ago) link

two months pass...

for me truffaut is the most compassionate & humanistic director, which renders comparisons to godard pointless, since his style is basically antithetical to this.

the doinel cycle in particular, is one of the most important pieces of art that the film form has produced imo. maybe not revolutionary, but the most complete depiction of a character i've seen in film (maybe not THE most), and its meta-qualities (biographical nature of the story, relationship between leaud/truffaut) make it the most complete, wholly realized example of auteurship.

marc iv, Sunday, 28 November 2010 06:22 (eight years ago) link

and therefore truffaut is the best new wave director. :o

marc iv, Sunday, 28 November 2010 06:22 (eight years ago) link

i think truffaut was as you say the most empathetic director of the new wave, the most humanistic. there is a great letter from truffaut to godard criticizing godard's many hypocrisies including the way in which godard presented himself as a marxist, but couldn't even be civil to his friends.

http://www.imdb.com/name/nm0000076/board/thread/37135203?d=37994599&p=1

jeevves, Wednesday, 8 December 2010 11:46 (eight years ago) link

sort of an unintelligible translation, but interesting still. i like the part where godard is a misogynist! hilarious.

marc iv, Monday, 13 December 2010 03:11 (eight years ago) link

eleven months pass...

i liked 'the soft skin' a lot, though the end is like 'fat girl'-level of tonal shift

johnny crunch, Wednesday, 16 November 2011 00:27 (seven years ago) link

His stock has steadily risen over the years (being dead helps of course)

ah, how quaint (Matt P), Wednesday, 16 November 2011 00:28 (seven years ago) link

rip Charles McCain, up there in heaven talking with truffaut

ah, how quaint (Matt P), Wednesday, 16 November 2011 00:29 (seven years ago) link

rip Charles McCain, up there in heaven talking with truffaut

Wait, waht? I'm not dead yet. In fact, I'll be presenting a Kinks poll on ILM in early 2012.

As for my "Stock risen/being dead" line, what I meant was that he passed away before he got a chance to really start sucking, and so that has only helped his filmography, which is unburdened by any late '80s-onward clunkers. I have a feeling he was growing into such a fuddyduddy kinda-sorta reactionary that wouldn't have weathered those years well.

The Man With The Flavored Toothpick (C. Grisso/McCain), Wednesday, 16 November 2011 01:39 (seven years ago) link

one year passes...

boy is The Story of Adele H good. Just the banality of watching Adjani ordering pen and paper at the stationary store and her interaction with the clerk.

the little prince of inane false binary hype (Alfred, Lord Sotosyn), Friday, 4 January 2013 00:30 (six years ago) link

Criterion shared this pic of Truffaut & Bunuel (on the set of Tristana?) today:

https://sphotos-b.xx.fbcdn.net/hphotos-ash4/p206x206/206044_10152427689270565_1744987658_n.jpg

re: Adele H--I really like the sequence when she's been trailing Pinson with his society girlfriend, and she's sneaked onto the woman's estate, following the couple as they pass by windows in the house. Adjani communicates this intense level of disgust just by running and staring.

Big Sambola & The Tailspinners (C. Grisso/McCain), Friday, 4 January 2013 20:04 (six years ago) link

Adjani was magnificent in that film. So beautiful and batshit insane. You can't keep your eyes off her. I can see why Truffaut was smitten.

That elusive North American wood-ape (Capitaine Jay Vee), Friday, 4 January 2013 21:21 (six years ago) link

As a gay man, I have more authority than most of you to claim that Adjani was one of the most sexiest women in the world as Adele.

the little prince of inane false binary hype (Alfred, Lord Sotosyn), Friday, 4 January 2013 21:22 (six years ago) link

I ain't gay but I sure agree with you haha!

That elusive North American wood-ape (Capitaine Jay Vee), Friday, 4 January 2013 21:25 (six years ago) link

I have a thing for bookish, slightly manic brunettes with porcelain skin who write on foolscap : )

That elusive North American wood-ape (Capitaine Jay Vee), Friday, 4 January 2013 21:26 (six years ago) link

less authority, as it turns out, over adverbs

the little prince of inane false binary hype (Alfred, Lord Sotosyn), Friday, 4 January 2013 21:27 (six years ago) link

two weeks pass...

Jeanne Moreau is 85 today!

Who remembers that for 2 years she was married to William Friedkin?

saltwater incursion (Dr Morbius), Wednesday, 23 January 2013 17:53 (six years ago) link

*raises hand*

Didn't know it was two years though.

The Teardrop ILXplodes (James Redd and the Blecchs), Wednesday, 23 January 2013 17:57 (six years ago) link

In that famous Biskind book, there's a story about the newlyweds seeing Star Wars together the week before Sorcerer opened.

Big Sambola & The Tailspinners (C. Grisso/McCain), Wednesday, 23 January 2013 22:40 (six years ago) link

six months pass...

Has anybody seen Such A Gorgeous Kid Like Me? It’s a comedy-noir that Truffaut did in ‘72 with Bernadette Lafont that apparently was never put out on video or DVD in the states. It looks…interesting.

― The Homeliness of The Long Distance Punner (Charles McCain), Tuesday, February 6, 2007 4:59 PM (6 years ago) Bookmark Flag Post Permalink

watched this. it's not good. not familiar w/ lafont but her character (& it's basically a character study of her) is painfully unconvincing, a manipulative sexpot who is so transparent i can only assume truffaut wants us to think every male on screen is 100% brainless & deserve their collective commuppance for each using her in their own way? which, idk, fine but im not sure the point.

johnny crunch, Friday, 26 July 2013 00:25 (five years ago) link

Gotta remember to see what's up TCM tomorrow, since I've so far forgotten every Friday.

Orpheus in Hull (James Redd and the Blecchs), Friday, 26 July 2013 01:16 (five years ago) link

ya ive grabbed a lot

tmrw im recording day for night, last metro, wild child - never seen any of them!

johnny crunch, Friday, 26 July 2013 01:24 (five years ago) link

seen the first and last of these, even stayed at the hotel in Nice where Day for Night was filmed.

Orpheus in Hull (James Redd and the Blecchs), Friday, 26 July 2013 01:25 (five years ago) link

RIP Bernadette Lafont ; (

http://www.guardian.co.uk/film/2013/jul/26/bernadette-lafont

Always one of my fave New Wave actors - and the most gorgeous IMHO.

That elusive North American wood-ape (Capitaine Jay Vee), Friday, 26 July 2013 18:27 (five years ago) link

^^Truth. Her first scene of Chabrol's A Double Tour-- http://31.media.tumblr.com/d3b9055f8e0ea5cb0e69db6a5620edcd/tumblr_mk6lzwvM7W1s5fvgyo1_250.gif

Uncle Cyril O'Boogie (C. Grisso/McCain), Saturday, 27 July 2013 01:06 (five years ago) link

i realize i mustve known her from les bonnes femmes hm yea i liked her there

johnny crunch, Saturday, 27 July 2013 01:12 (five years ago) link

one year passes...

Criterion Blu-Ray of The Soft Skin looks good.

The burrito of ennui (Alfred, Lord Sotosyn), Thursday, 2 July 2015 13:01 (four years ago) link

three weeks pass...

The DVD supplements are great! Lots about Hitch's influence on Truffaut, and Chabrol gets in a great dig about TSS's particularly inappropriate nod to Notorious (if you've seen both films, you probably remember the scene).

Found the film itself a minor letdown, though. The first hour, in particular, is terrifically paced, and the nods to Hitchcock kept me on my toes, at least until I figured out exactly where the film was going, but Truffaut's clear dislike of the two lead characters becomes an increasingly difficult obstacle to overcome. Truffaut himself seemed mildly dissatisfied with the film for this very reason, even pretty much saying so in the interview conducted around the time of the film's release that's included on the disc.

The New Gay Sadness (cryptosicko), Saturday, 25 July 2015 03:02 (three years ago) link

agree

The burrito of ennui (Alfred, Lord Sotosyn), Saturday, 25 July 2015 03:11 (three years ago) link

Okay but when is Two English Girls getting released on Criterion I'm ready

sbes114, Saturday, 25 July 2015 04:37 (three years ago) link

two years pass...
one year passes...

Last night saw one of the few Truffaut films I'd never seen before, La Chambre vert (1978). Per its reputation, moribund, lugubrious, and possessed of only the feeblest narrative drive; obviously, I liked it very much.

— 𝕿𝖗𝖔𝖚𝖇𝖑𝖊 𝕰𝖛𝖊𝖗𝖞 𝕯𝖆𝖞 (@NickPinkerton) August 23, 2018

a Mets fan who gave up on everything in the mid '80s (Dr Morbius), Thursday, 23 August 2018 20:20 (ten months ago) link

otm

The Silky Veils of Alfred (Alfred, Lord Sotosyn), Thursday, 23 August 2018 20:22 (ten months ago) link

eight months pass...

After a terrific opening fifteen minutes introducing the couple's environs, as cheerfully unrealistic as Jean Renoir's late films, Bed and Board gets weird, cute, and arch. Every scene with Doinel's Japanese mistress is terrible.

recriminations from the nitpicking woke (Alfred, Lord Sotosyn), Sunday, 5 May 2019 01:33 (two months ago) link

I don't know how I still haven't seen any Doinel films beyond The 400 Blows and the short.

Timothée Charalambides (cryptosicko), Sunday, 5 May 2019 01:34 (two months ago) link

Diminishing returns.

recriminations from the nitpicking woke (Alfred, Lord Sotosyn), Sunday, 5 May 2019 01:43 (two months ago) link

Stolen Kisses is pretty damn good.

a Mets fan who gave up on everything in the mid '80s (Dr Morbius), Friday, 10 May 2019 11:39 (two months ago) link

Yes.

recriminations from the nitpicking woke (Alfred, Lord Sotosyn), Friday, 10 May 2019 11:40 (two months ago) link

Very much so. I *like* the diminishing returns

call me cismale (Noodle Vague), Friday, 10 May 2019 11:57 (two months ago) link


You must be logged in to post. Please either login here, or if you are not registered, you may register here.