John Lennon / Plastic Ono Band or Yoko Ono / Plastic Ono Band?

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.... and why?

Stewart Osborne (Stewart Osborne), Friday, 27 September 2002 09:59 (fourteen years ago) Permalink

both self-indulgent, narcissistic toss.

...and why? just listen to them.

michael wells (michael w.), Friday, 27 September 2002 10:17 (fourteen years ago) Permalink

they're both great

the yoko ono one is a teeth cutter, you'll lose friends over it, you'll go back to it, it's the LP that allowed meatheads everywhere to turn Yoko Ono into a pillar of salt

steve k, Friday, 27 September 2002 14:35 (fourteen years ago) Permalink

An absolute pile of crap. Destroy it all.

Andrew (enneff), Friday, 27 September 2002 15:45 (fourteen years ago) Permalink

For all "JL/POB"'s soul baring and honesty, nothing quite gets to the heart of the matter as quickly as "YO/POB"'s opening track "Why?" which howls and screams like little before it and expresses pain, rage and horror far more accurately. Makes you wonder quite what Yoko got out of Primal Scream therapy, 'cos we all know what John got out of it.

Rob M, Friday, 27 September 2002 16:21 (fourteen years ago) Permalink

John Lenon Plastic Ono Band is classic stuff. It's been a while since I've heard much of this music, however, so it's that much more difficult to say why I like it. Raw, stripped down, etc.

Rockist Scientist, Friday, 27 September 2002 19:23 (fourteen years ago) Permalink

If you were expecting a Beatles record you've been had :-) Live Peace in Toronto, 1969 Side 2 is even better.

brg30 (brg30), Friday, 27 September 2002 21:05 (fourteen years ago) Permalink

yoko ono's, for reasons that are painfully obvious if you listen to it without all that "ehh, she's toss, she destroyed the beatles" bullshit cluttering up your mind. puck as funk, no wave-ish shriek before no wave's time.

your null fame (yournullfame), Friday, 27 September 2002 23:38 (fourteen years ago) Permalink

JL/POB's 'angry' tracks like "Well Well Well" haven't aged well. However, the way Lennon sings the last verse of "God" may be the best singing of his career.

Justyn Dillingham (Justyn Dillingham), Saturday, 28 September 2002 00:04 (fourteen years ago) Permalink

four years pass...
Revive. The song "God", to me, feels like the best work John Lennon has done, Beatles or otherwise.
The drumming (was it Keltner?) on that song is great, too. It's like he out-Ringo'd Ringo.

God is a concept
By which we can measure
Our pain
I'll say it again
God is a concept
By which we can measure
Our pain
I don't believe in magic,
I don't believe in I-ching,
I don't believe in bible,
I don't believe in tarot,
I don't believe in Hitler,
I don't believe in Jesus,
I don't believe in Kennedy,
I don't believe in Buddha,
I don't believe in mantra,
I don't believe in Gita,
I don't believe in yoga,
I don't believe in kings,
I don't believe in Elvis,
I don't believe in Zimmerman,
I don't believe in Beatles,
I just believe in me,
Yoko and me,
And that's reality.
The dream is over,
What can I say?
The dream is over,
Yesterday,
I was dreamweaver,
But now I'm reborn,
I was the walrus,
But now I'm John,
And so dear friends,
You just have to carry on,
The dream is over.

-- Yes!

Z S, Sunday, 8 April 2007 18:45 (ten years ago) Permalink

The worst crap ever released by an ex-Beatles. And that even includes Ringo Starr's "Sentimental Journey" and "Stop And Smell The Roses".

Geir Hongro, Sunday, 8 April 2007 18:51 (ten years ago) Permalink

Someone pick my jaw off the floor, please.

Z S, Sunday, 8 April 2007 19:03 (ten years ago) Permalink

both are forehead-slappingly great, but the real standout on both is ringo. he shows not even the slightest trace of apprehension at yoko and john's flights on yo/pob; he sounds as emotionally invested in the music as john and yoko do. and for what it's worth, john has said that he considered his own guitar playing on yo/pob to be his best.

in a way, these records get much closer to the beatles' hamburg roots than the get back project ever could have.

Lawrence the Looter, Sunday, 8 April 2007 19:12 (ten years ago) Permalink

The Beatles' Hamburg roots brought them no fame. For a reason. It wasn't until they started composing their own tunes that The Beatles became the greatest and most important thing ever to happen to music. And Paul McCartney was the most important musical brain in the group, proving a touch of true musical sophistication to the otherwise way too raw and simple R&B roots.

Geir Hongro, Sunday, 8 April 2007 19:15 (ten years ago) Permalink

That's a bunch of crap. The Beatles' "Hamburg roots" (i.e., their ability to REALLY PLAY ROCK AND ROLL - to know it and DO IT) were one of the main ingredients in their appeal. Read Greil Marcus' Beatles entry in the original Rolling Stone Illustrated History of Rock and Roll.

Tim Ellison, Sunday, 8 April 2007 19:48 (ten years ago) Permalink

"simple R&B" - fuck you

Tim Ellison, Sunday, 8 April 2007 19:49 (ten years ago) Permalink

fuck you seconded.

anyway, these are amazingly good records, different but complementary expressions of the same impulse, both nuanced and fully realized and, while it's sort of impossible to use language like this non-choadishly, "real." the realness doesn't make them good, but it's there and undeniable and a big part of why they hit so hard. "why" is the crisis, "i found out" is what you find yourself left with after (btw i don't know why people don't single that one out more often - it's so fucking angry and the music is GREAT, i love lennon's scratch-noise guitar even when it's deployed sparingly).

pretzel walrus, Sunday, 8 April 2007 19:54 (ten years ago) Permalink

man, isolation. what a song.

ghost rider, Sunday, 8 April 2007 20:07 (ten years ago) Permalink

And Paul McCartney was the most important musical brain in the group, proving a touch of true musical sophistication to the otherwise way too raw and simple R&B roots.

um...kind of a contradiction there, you know, given that said sophistication was cribbed from the various motown songwriting styles (critics at the time mistook certain beatle chord progressions as mahler-influenced; nope, it was holland/dozier/holland, smokey robinson, etc.)

it's also demonstrably untrue that their hamburg roots "brought them no fame." they got so good in hamburg that the clubowners in liverpool who had previously ignored them finally let them pack the local clubs. for a reason.

Lawrence the Looter, Sunday, 8 April 2007 22:11 (ten years ago) Permalink

McCartney had a family background that meant he didn't only know "rock" but also other styles. Even on early Beatles albums he would cover non-rock songs such as "Till There Was You", later he'd come up with obvious non-"rock" masterpieces such as "Yesterday", "Michelle" and "She's Leaving Home". He had something the others (and other "rock" musicians) did, which is why The Beatles were so much better than everything from the past.

Motown didn't learn to vary chords, modulations and harmonics until late 1963-64, the first few Motown singles were just as oversimple and harmonically boring as most R&B had been before them.

Geir Hongro, Sunday, 8 April 2007 22:39 (ten years ago) Permalink

JL/POB by about fifty billion light years. Man I fucking hate Yoko Ono.

Mr. Snrub, Monday, 9 April 2007 00:16 (ten years ago) Permalink

He had something the others (and other "rock" musicians) did, which is why The Beatles were so much better than everything from the past.

it is true that mccartney had a relatively unique perspective; he greatly admired such artists as AMM and Albert Ayler. i assume you must have explored their work extensively as well; out of curiosity, what's your take on them?

Motown didn't learn to vary chords, modulations and harmonics until late 1963-64, the first few Motown singles were just as oversimple and harmonically boring as most R&B had been before them.

i'm not sure which standard for "oversimple" you're applying here; i'm assuming it's one that places western standards of harmony and tonality at the forefront of musical invention. so, by that standard, mary wells' "you beat me to the punch" and "two lovers"; eddie holland's "jamie"; and marvin gaye's "stubborn kind of fellow", to name just the obvious examples, use harmonic ideas and chordal modulations that the beatles were never able to approach (not in 1964, not in 1969, not ever), and these were all recorded and released prior to 1963. this isn't meant as a criticism of the beatles; obviously, looking at only the theoretical aspects of any artist's work divorced from context is as point-missingly hilarious as is possible. but sure, i'll grant that it can be a fun little diversion at times.

the irony, of course, is that the yo/pob record is far more harmonically complex than anything mccartney was able to dream up (excepting possibly "carnival of light," though i've never heard it).

Lawrence the Looter, Monday, 9 April 2007 01:14 (ten years ago) Permalink

"Plastic Ono Band" is mostly either three chord R&B or completely atonal bollocks. McCartney was able to come up with the latter too, but obviously didn't see the point too often. Instead he gave the world such harmonic masterpieces as the aforementioned "Michelle" and "Golden Slumbers".

Geir Hongro, Monday, 9 April 2007 01:28 (ten years ago) Permalink

Generally, John Lennon stopped writing good songs around 1968. He may have come up with the occasional exception ("Because", "Across The Universe", "Imagine", "Jealous Guy", "Oh My Love" and several of the "Double Fantasy" tracks), but mostly it was just R&B rubbish and exaggerated "anger" at the time, mostly given an annoyingly grainy "wall of sound"-production.

Geir Hongro, Monday, 9 April 2007 01:31 (ten years ago) Permalink

That being said, the three best McCartney solo albums were all written and produced at a time when Lennon wasn't even around to compete anymore.

Geir Hongro, Monday, 9 April 2007 01:33 (ten years ago) Permalink

I pick Yoko's.

Krautrock!

Shakey Mo Collier, Monday, 9 April 2007 01:40 (ten years ago) Permalink

Geir was so much more fun before Marcello took over his name here on nu-ILM.

CheddKass, Monday, 9 April 2007 01:57 (ten years ago) Permalink

there's some pretty great film from some of the Let It Be outtakes of Yoko fronting the Beatles, and they're playing "Why" (or something very close). Ringo's playing like a maniac and Paul's making 100% feedback, huddled over his amp and moving his bass around slowly about a foot away from it. George has left the room.

My favorite of all of John's guitar playing is on Yoko's POB & Fly. Though even without him, they'd still be amazing records.

Milton Parker, Monday, 9 April 2007 02:09 (ten years ago) Permalink

I mean, that really should go without saying actually, but when Geir's on a thread you tend to want to underline your point

Milton Parker, Monday, 9 April 2007 02:10 (ten years ago) Permalink

"Plastic Ono Band" is mostly either three chord R&B or completely atonal bollocks.

which pob, john's or yoko's? what are the specific elements that make it "r&b"? (i'm honestly just curious, as those records never struck me as "r&b" per se). how are you defining "r&b"? and just a slight correction to your typo, it's pantonal, not atonal. as george russell definied it, pantonal = all of the keys (western & non-western), atonal = none of them. as such, even from your point of view (for the sake of argument) those records are, by definition, more harmonically complex than any of mccartney's solo records, and most of his beatles work.

McCartney was able to come up with the latter too, but obviously didn't see the point too often. Instead he gave the world such harmonic masterpieces as the aforementioned "Michelle" and "Golden Slumbers".

how does stringing together a series of major chords constitute a "harmonic masterpiece"? i'm not saying it doesn't; just wanting to know how it does. as for mccartney not wanting to engage in pantonality, his officially-released examples are fewer than lennon's, but his experiments dwarf john's. paul seriously immersed himself in stuff like ayler and stockhausen when lennon was still wandering around muttering "avant-garde is french for 'bullshit.'"

exaggerated "anger" at the time, mostly given an annoyingly grainy "wall of sound"-production.

the sparseness/spareness of pob = "wall of sound"? ah yes, who could forget the echoey choirs and string section on "working class hero," the hordes of percussionists on "i found out," and the massive brass section on "well well well"?

Lawrence the Looter, Monday, 9 April 2007 03:38 (ten years ago) Permalink

I pick Yoko's.

Krautrock!


otm

Lawrence the Looter, Monday, 9 April 2007 03:39 (ten years ago) Permalink

there's some pretty great film from some of the Let It Be outtakes of Yoko fronting the Beatles, and they're playing "Why" (or something very close). Ringo's playing like a maniac and Paul's making 100% feedback, huddled over his amp and moving his bass around slowly about a foot away from it. George has left the room.

this better be on the dvd. if there ever is a dvd.

Lawrence the Looter, Monday, 9 April 2007 03:40 (ten years ago) Permalink

Instead he gave the world such harmonic masterpieces as the aforementioned "Michelle"...

Of all the songs to choose.

Does no one else think that Michelle is a twee joke record?

Bob Six, Monday, 9 April 2007 09:54 (ten years ago) Permalink

how does stringing together a series of major chords constitute a "harmonic masterpiece"?

The key is in the genius combination of major and minor chords. Paul McCartney did that better than most, while in more recent years Neil Finn has been the master of it.

Does no one else think that Michelle is a twee joke record?

That word should not be used in a negative context. "Rock" music needs to be considerably more twee. Twee music is good music.

Geir Hongro, Monday, 9 April 2007 13:17 (ten years ago) Permalink

the sparseness/spareness of pob = "wall of sound"? ah yes, who could forget the echoey choirs and string section on "working class hero," the hordes of percussionists on "i found out," and the massive brass section on "well well well"?

All done in virtually mono, in such a way that you can hardly make out the instruments from each other.

Geir Hongro, Monday, 9 April 2007 13:18 (ten years ago) Permalink

does no one else think that Michelle is a twee joke record?

I never thought so, but it's funny to picture Paul McCartney doing a Pooh Sticks or "Pop Songs Your New Boyfriend's Too Stupid To Know About," isn't it?

there's some pretty great film from some of the Let It Be outtakes of Yoko fronting the Beatles, and they're playing "Why" (or something very close). Ringo's playing like a maniac and Paul's making 100% feedback, huddled over his amp and moving his bass around slowly about a foot away from it. George has left the room.

Wanting to see this: seconded. On a related note, I finally heard George's Electronic Sounds recently. It's basically 45 minutes of George (and, depending on who's telling the story, Bernie Krause) randomly hitting keys. I don't usually use the phrase "anyone could have done this" as an insult, but it applies here.

mike a, Monday, 9 April 2007 14:27 (ten years ago) Permalink

I don't understand this sick idea that "Plastic Ono Band" is too atonal, I'd rather say the opposite.

To create truly original music you have to start with the following

- Abandon all sense of melody
- Abandon all sense of harmony
- Abandon all sense of a rhythmic pulse
- Make sure your music has no appeal to anyone but yourself. Once somebody else likes you you have lost.

Not until you have made sure to follow these instructions, you will succeed in having created truly great music.

Camenend Bob Dole, Monday, 9 April 2007 14:40 (ten years ago) Permalink

Bizarro-Geir checks in!

J, Monday, 9 April 2007 14:42 (ten years ago) Permalink

This is the Fake Geir at work is it not?

Tom D., Monday, 9 April 2007 14:44 (ten years ago) Permalink

John Lennon, McCartney and The Beatles are all awfully overrated btw. they did nothing that hasn't been done before by classical composers. Everything they did was abanondonded by Arnold Schönberg 60 years before.

Camenend Bob Dole, Monday, 9 April 2007 14:54 (ten years ago) Permalink

Don't get "Geir" started on Schoenberg, for gawdsake

Tom D., Monday, 9 April 2007 14:55 (ten years ago) Permalink

Oh, I have discussed with this Geir guy before, back in ama in the 90s. I have no interest in discussing more with him, or with any of the other losers behind ILM.

Camenend Bob Dole, Monday, 9 April 2007 14:57 (ten years ago) Permalink

Hmmm.. Is this Gondola Bob or what?

Geir Hongro, Monday, 9 April 2007 15:08 (ten years ago) Permalink

I finally heard George's Electronic Sounds recently. It's basically 45 minutes of George (and, depending on who's telling the story, Bernie Krause) randomly hitting keys. I don't usually use the phrase "anyone could have done this" as an insult, but it applies here.

supposedly harrison had absolutely nothing to do with this record, and in fact was as knee-jerk anti-avant-garde as mccartney is always accused of being. he was the one who kept "carnival of light" off anthology 2.

um...all this despite his participation in "revolution 9."

Lawrence the Looter, Monday, 9 April 2007 16:01 (ten years ago) Permalink

(FWIW, my post was a comic book reference to Camenend Bob Dole, not to Geir or "Geir")

J, Monday, 9 April 2007 16:12 (ten years ago) Permalink

they did nothing that hasn't been done before by classical composers. Everything they did was abanondonded by Arnold Schönberg 60 years before.


he's right, you know. check out early schoenberg -- the drummer speeds up slightly going into the fills, then pulls back, adding this incredible level of excitement and tension (best heard on schoenberg's version of the shirelles' "boys"). sometimes, when stuck for a hook, schoenberg would have a harmonica doubling the guitar line. schoenberg's tape collage work is all the more remarkable for it predating the invention of magnetic recording tape. which is why he soon abandoned it.

Lawrence the Looter, Monday, 9 April 2007 16:21 (ten years ago) Permalink

Twee music is good music.

i'm imagining elmer fudd grooving to music made by trees...

Lawrence the Looter, Monday, 9 April 2007 16:23 (ten years ago) Permalink

Does no one else think that Michelle is a twee joke record?

IT IS BASICALLY MY LEAST FAVORITE SONG EVER??? I ACTUALLY BIT THE INSIDE OF MY MOUTH IN ANGER AT IT BEING REFERENCED MULTIPLE X ON THIS THREAD. WOW!

also please do not tell me that is gondola bob then i will really stop reading ilm.

the schef (adam schefter ha ha), Monday, 9 April 2007 16:26 (ten years ago) Permalink

but seriously "honey pie" is actually the single most offensive paul mccartney song tho.

ghost rider, Monday, 9 April 2007 16:30 (ten years ago) Permalink

Wow, a lot of people here really suck.

billstevejim, Monday, 9 April 2007 16:37 (ten years ago) Permalink

css

ghost rider, Monday, 9 April 2007 16:39 (ten years ago) Permalink

I love "Honey Pie"!

J, Monday, 9 April 2007 17:07 (ten years ago) Permalink

It's fucking great. Beautiful. I'm going to go listen to it.

Tim Ellison, Monday, 9 April 2007 17:52 (ten years ago) Permalink

also please do not tell me that is gondola bob then i will really stop reading ilm.

On second thought, I doubt Gondola Bob would parody himself. He is way too pompous and narcissistic to be able to do that.

Geir Hongro, Monday, 9 April 2007 19:59 (ten years ago) Permalink

uh

ghost rider, Monday, 9 April 2007 20:03 (ten years ago) Permalink

I pick Yoko's.

Krautrock!

-- Shakey Mo

otm

-- Lawrence the Looter



Yep!

Myonga Vön Bontee, Monday, 9 April 2007 20:58 (ten years ago) Permalink

...not that I'm any kinda authority on the stuff, (superfluous) umlaut or not.

Myonga Vön Bontee, Monday, 9 April 2007 21:00 (ten years ago) Permalink

TS: Yoko Ono vs. Damo Suzuki

Shakey Mo Collier, Monday, 9 April 2007 21:08 (ten years ago) Permalink

Damo

Tim Ellison, Monday, 9 April 2007 21:11 (ten years ago) Permalink

I'm undecided myself ... I may have to give it to Yoko since Damo never composed any moving piano ballads (that I know of)

Shakey Mo Collier, Monday, 9 April 2007 21:14 (ten years ago) Permalink

two years pass...

COOKIE!!

Adam Bruneau, Sunday, 17 May 2009 13:27 (eight years ago) Permalink

People who whine about this being all serious and self-indulgent conveniently forget that in the middle of a purty nice song like "Hold On" John growls "COOKIE!!!!" out of nowhere, for absolutely no reason.

^ Z S on the internet here (Z S), Sunday, 17 May 2009 14:03 (eight years ago) Permalink

In all the things I've read about "POB" I've never read a mention of 'cookie' and it doesn't exist in the liner notes. I was half entertaining the idea that I had been imagining it this whole time!

Adam Bruneau, Sunday, 17 May 2009 14:40 (eight years ago) Permalink

High point of John's career--definitely in terms of guitar work; one of Ono's two best. And definitely the funkiest Ringo or Klaus Voorman ever got. Ono was nearing a Faust-like state.

Soundslike, Sunday, 17 May 2009 14:45 (eight years ago) Permalink

I really, really, really hope there are some bootlegs of the Klaus/Ringo/John rhythm section blasting from Valhalla somewhere.

This is why I like Ringo so much. He can act like a doofus, be the 'lucky guy that got picked randomly' to go down in history, and take all that criticism in stride. And then you hear this Yoko Ono POB stuff and think 'holy shit!!'

Ringo's so unpretentious. The day after they recorded 'Why' he was making a silly peace sign. I bet it never registered how badass it was, he just thinks "Oh well, that was a fun little jam with me friends!"

Adam Bruneau, Sunday, 17 May 2009 14:54 (eight years ago) Permalink

"Harmonic masterpieces" -- this thread is just chock full of classic Geir.

My view is Yoko/POB for reasons already cited.

Naive Teen Idol, Sunday, 17 May 2009 15:01 (eight years ago) Permalink

Geir shocked by Beatles liking music by black people.

leavethecapital, Sunday, 17 May 2009 15:37 (eight years ago) Permalink

The Beatles are my favorite band, but Yoko is my favorite Beatle.

Nate Carson, Sunday, 17 May 2009 18:42 (eight years ago) Permalink

i've never heard the rest of the album, but I know and love "why." is it worth my time to track down the rest?

Billy Pilgrim, Sunday, 17 May 2009 23:25 (eight years ago) Permalink

Yes! Get the whole album if you love "Why". Also get "Fly"

Adam Bruneau, Monday, 18 May 2009 01:09 (eight years ago) Permalink

The Beatles' Hamburg roots brought them no fame. For a reason. It wasn't until they started composing their own tunes that The Beatles became the greatest and most important thing ever to happen to music. And Paul McCartney was the most important musical brain in the group, proving a touch of true musical sophistication to the otherwise way too raw and simple R&B roots.
― Geir Hongro, Sunday, April 8, 2007 7:15 PM (2 years ago) Bookmark Suggest Ban Permalink

Definition of "Curate's egg" here. Parts are very true, and parts are total bol. Without Hamburg, there'd be no 1st album, which brought them fame. "I saw her standing there" was made perfect by Hamburg (where they played it 10 times a week, at least)

The raw and simple R&B brought them fame. Yes, if they had stuck to that, they'd have fizzled out. But they developed musically. Oh no! They developed! Oh, it's OK, musical development was only banned in 1974...

Mark G, Monday, 18 May 2009 06:57 (eight years ago) Permalink

oh, and these albums need re-releasing as a double or twin-pack.

Mark G, Monday, 18 May 2009 06:58 (eight years ago) Permalink

four months pass...

The new Plastic Ono Band record, Between My Head And The Sky, is fantastic

to cloves fork comfurt (Curt1s Stephens), Thursday, 1 October 2009 22:08 (seven years ago) Permalink

plenty of Fly-esque tracks of "OHWHAHAHAHHAHAA" over heavy psych beats

to cloves fork comfurt (Curt1s Stephens), Thursday, 1 October 2009 22:10 (seven years ago) Permalink

another thread ruined by Geir

the taint of Macca is strong (Shakey Mo Collier), Thursday, 1 October 2009 22:12 (seven years ago) Permalink

This is crazy sounding:

http://www.sfmoma.org/exhibitions/395

WARS OF ARMAGEDDON (Karaoke Version) (Sparkle Motion), Thursday, 1 October 2009 22:14 (seven years ago) Permalink

new Plastic Ono Band IS pretty good! new Sean Lennon is uhhhh.
http://static.rateyourmusic.com/album_images/4079a19b95ca98b945924ba60584f7f8/2480031.jpg

tylerw, Thursday, 1 October 2009 22:18 (seven years ago) Permalink

actually terrible album covers of 2009

WARS OF ARMAGEDDON (Karaoke Version) (Sparkle Motion), Thursday, 1 October 2009 22:18 (seven years ago) Permalink

like, seriously

tylerw, Thursday, 1 October 2009 22:19 (seven years ago) Permalink

Together, we are stronger than Geir.

xpost or are we?

Mark G, Thursday, 1 October 2009 22:20 (seven years ago) Permalink

NSFW everybody

the taint of Macca is strong (Shakey Mo Collier), Thursday, 1 October 2009 22:21 (seven years ago) Permalink

As I just discovered

WARS OF ARMAGEDDON (Karaoke Version) (Sparkle Motion), Thursday, 1 October 2009 22:21 (seven years ago) Permalink

shit, sorry about that, doggs. didn't realize it was totally nsfw.

tylerw, Thursday, 1 October 2009 22:22 (seven years ago) Permalink

three months pass...

http://img.ymlp108.com/GuerrillaGroup_1_image_3.jpg

dmr, Monday, 11 January 2010 21:40 (seven years ago) Permalink

is that hope sandoval lying on sean lennon?

piscesx, Monday, 11 January 2010 22:27 (seven years ago) Permalink

She's hotter than Yoko and he's way more burnt than John.

Nate Carson, Tuesday, 12 January 2010 02:30 (seven years ago) Permalink

Had to research because "DAMN".

For the Fall issue of Purple magazine, Sean Lennon appears in a recreation of his parents’ famous 1981 Rolling Stone cover, their last photo together by financially troubled photographer Annie Leibovitz. The new snap by Terry Richardson features Sean in his mother’s place while nude model Kemp Muhl fills in for his dead father."

Nate Carson, Tuesday, 12 January 2010 02:31 (seven years ago) Permalink

Launched in 1969 with the single "Give Peace A Chance", PLASTIC ONO BAND is known for its avant-garde music, film, art, and activism. Revived in 2009, YOKO ONO PLASTIC ONO BAND includes Yoko Ono, Cornelius, Yuka Honda, Haruomi Hosono and Sean Lennon. On February 16, the group performs a very special concert, featuring songs from their new album Between My Head And The Sky , welcoming many special guests, including some original band members.

There are some eye-opening special guests.

http://imaginepeace.com/news/archives/9356

Thus Sang Freud, Tuesday, 12 January 2010 17:04 (seven years ago) Permalink

three years pass...

It occurred to me hearing "Give Peace a Chance" full through on the radio tonight that this tune has to be one of the most raggedy pop hits of all time. It's pretty much just one long chorus with a big group of singers and John Lennon scatting every so many measures. What the heck is making that drum beat sound? It might be more than just a microphone in a room. Maybe it was staged to sound that raw, I don't know, but it seems hard to believe that the song was that big a hit. The tune made it to #14 in the US charts and #2 in the UK.

earlnash, Saturday, 30 November 2013 04:27 (three years ago) Permalink

one year passes...

It's a tough choice because they're both excellent, yet very different records. Yoko Ono/Plastic Ono Band is hugely underrated, IMO. Post-punk before there was post-punk. It actually makes John Lennon/Plastic Ono Band look relatively conservative, and hits the spot in the same way for me as Public Image Ltd. or Can or The Fall do.

You’re being too simplistic and you’re insulting my poor heart (Turrican), Friday, 30 January 2015 20:16 (two years ago) Permalink

that and Fly are very krautrock-y. although I've never really understood why/how that came about, did Yoko visit Cologne with Klaus and Ringo at some point in 1970 or something

Οὖτις, Friday, 30 January 2015 20:30 (two years ago) Permalink

I'm fascinated by Lennon's guitar playing on this record, actually, particularly the searing guitar on 'Why?'... I love it when the screaming kicks in on 'AOS' too. Lennon's album is more lyrical and song-based, but I find Yoko's album far more expressive and cathartic.

You’re being too simplistic and you’re insulting my poor heart (Turrican), Friday, 30 January 2015 20:42 (two years ago) Permalink

Still have never listened to all of the John album. I love the Yoko album deeply. Even (most of) the bonus tracks on the reissue are great.

Indiana Jones and the Sphincter of the Sphinx (Old Lunch), Friday, 30 January 2015 20:42 (two years ago) Permalink

Beatles haircut came from German avant gardeners. Klaus did dada-pop collage for "Revolver". Beatles always had some proto-krautrock in them. Remember that long droney take of Revolution that leaked a few years ago?

Also there is that long-rumored 20+ minute version of "Helter Skelter" that I suspect has some cool stuff going on.....

©Oz Quiz© (Adam Bruneau), Friday, 30 January 2015 20:45 (two years ago) Permalink

Also the lovely "Remember Love" (released while the Beatles were still together). Twee lofi indie pop w/o the insufferably, just pure uncut beauty.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=a-wSiMplfJQ

©Oz Quiz© (Adam Bruneau), Friday, 30 January 2015 20:48 (two years ago) Permalink

Beatles always had some proto-krautrock in them.

otm. "Tomorrow Never Knows" is seriously proto-krautrock.

Montgomery Burns' Jazz (Tarfumes The Escape Goat), Friday, 30 January 2015 20:48 (two years ago) Permalink

Isn't there supposed to be a 25 minute jam version of "It's All Too Much" that the released track was edited from?

Don A Henley And Get Over It (C. Grisso/McCain), Friday, 30 January 2015 20:57 (two years ago) Permalink

yeah yeah I'm aware of the Beatles' history with musique concrete and epic jams there's just something about those two Yoko records that slots in so perfectly with early krautrock - the locked-in groove, the abstraction, the tape effects - I just wonder if there was some more direct connection

Οὖτις, Friday, 30 January 2015 21:24 (two years ago) Permalink

They all went to art school and know about those techniques?

©Oz Quiz© (Adam Bruneau), Friday, 30 January 2015 21:26 (two years ago) Permalink

Yoko surely about those techniques, but Lennon didn't know that tapes could be played backwards, never mind what they sounded like backwards (to say nothing of loops), until 1966. His mantra was "'avant-garde' is French for bullshit" until he met Yoko.

Lennon's art school education was far different/more conservative than the later (and, significantly, London) art school experience of, say, Pete Townshend, who was immersed in an overtly avant-garde curriculum (and, as it turns out, witnessed a Yoko performance, in collaboration with Gustav Metzger, at least a year or two before Lennon met her).

Montgomery Burns' Jazz (Tarfumes The Escape Goat), Friday, 30 January 2015 23:15 (two years ago) Permalink

you guys aren't really answering my question

Οὖτις, Friday, 30 January 2015 23:21 (two years ago) Permalink

although the implication seems to be that it was just osmosis - CAN and John/Yoko were on similar trajectories and arrived at the same point largely independent of each other

Οὖτις, Friday, 30 January 2015 23:22 (two years ago) Permalink

two years pass...

https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/51aLY99QTeL.jpg

i got the new vinyl Plastic Ono Band reissue. sounds great! i really love this record. it is still quite mindblowing. love the noise jams. love the drone rock. hey on some of these songs there are more Beatles playing than on actual Beatles songs. Ringo + John + i count bassist Klaus Voorman who may as well be an honorary Beatle from the OG days (and doing the cover art for Revolver). the Beatles with a German art school bass player and a Japanese conceptual artist lead singer. its the Beatles as Can.

"Why?" is such an powerhouse opener. i really love the direction it takes on side two. "Touch Me" and "Paper Shoes" going through different moods. the bit with the train going by. the part where the tree falls and it cuts right into a primal muck bass-drums groove by Ringo and Klaus. so great. i really appreciate the flow of this record, especially all the little found sounds. there is a part where the music stops and we just hear birds in a little forest for a while, a potent and soothing antidote. lot of love and care in this album.

the re-issue is really nice and comes with an art booklet and a foldout poster for the Feb 1968 Ornette Coleman performance that opens side 2. the label on the record is a grapefruit done in the style of the classic apple label. fucking awesome.

AdamVania (Adam Bruneau), Saturday, 15 July 2017 13:32 (one week ago) Permalink


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