Revelation - Official ILX Pet Shop Boys tracks poll results

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https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=onM4cR7-DqM&feature=player_profilepage

Over the next few nights I'll be unveiling the results for the Pet Shop Boys tracks poll.

There were 32 voters, who voted for 136 tracks. Tonight I'll do 50-31, 30-16 tomorrow and finally the top 15 on Wednesday.

Hopefully, you'll find it as enjoyable to read as I did compiling it and relistening to their work. There's several gems I was blissfully unaware of so if nothing else it was worth doing it for that reason. There's a few surprises (to me anyway) and as you'll see some of the results are a bit nip and tuck.

The multi-talented F.R. David (Billy Dods), Monday, 4 July 2011 19:35 (seven years ago) Permalink

going to miss this tonight because of US independence day festivities but have fun!

skip, Monday, 4 July 2011 19:39 (seven years ago) Permalink

We don't even start with them...

50. I'm Not Scared (Eight Wonder). (1988, Collaboration. 69 Points, 4 votes, 0 number ones

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FN3eEzLSlKY

Spotify: http://open.spotify.com/track/6ffj9gcxAThomdhLW6HiNd

Random Internet Fact. #1 in Italy.

The multi-talented F.R. David (Billy Dods), Monday, 4 July 2011 19:46 (seven years ago) Permalink

49. Do I Have To? (1987, B-Side, 76 points, 4 votes, 0 number ones)

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=arYohGJkyQI
Spotify: http://open.spotify.com/track/1Wu8EqeV0JfLl3hcezx9bh
RIF:Inspired by Chris Lowe's frequent complaining when on a promo tour in Japan.

The multi-talented F.R. David (Billy Dods), Monday, 4 July 2011 19:52 (seven years ago) Permalink

I forgot to mention at the start, if there are any ties they will be decided as follows; by number of number one votes, number of voters, which track gets the highest placing in individuals ballot, alphabetically.

The multi-talented F.R. David (Billy Dods), Monday, 4 July 2011 19:55 (seven years ago) Permalink

Love that this thread has it's own PSB name. A good one too! The boys would approve.

daavid, Monday, 4 July 2011 19:56 (seven years ago) Permalink

48. To Face The Truth. (1990, Behaviour, 77 points, 3 votes, 0 number ones)
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZbdtlP0gt7w
Spotify: http://open.spotify.com/track/78GoyurUrxm4X2kG6pnp5T

The multi-talented F.R. David (Billy Dods), Monday, 4 July 2011 20:02 (seven years ago) Permalink

47. Liberation. (1993, Very, 81 points, 4 votes, 0 number ones)

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vtlM1F8guPc
Spotify:http://open.spotify.com/track/2DnvlQI1kYMTBaxJpfAMz8

The multi-talented F.R. David (Billy Dods), Monday, 4 July 2011 20:07 (seven years ago) Permalink

46. A Red Letter Day (1996, Bilingual, 83 points, 4 votes, 0 number ones)

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=A-2TaT8dPns

Spotify: http://open.spotify.com/track/3XQTpx2DHsBE3xuXZCFJdW

RIF: Single debuted at #9 in the UK, but fell to #42 the following week, at the time the largest drop in chart history.

The multi-talented F.R. David (Billy Dods), Monday, 4 July 2011 20:15 (seven years ago) Permalink

probably beaten every week since

Ismael Klata, Monday, 4 July 2011 20:19 (seven years ago) Permalink

LOL at their clothes in that To Face The Truth screenshot.

Liberation made my "short"list of ~70 but that's the only one so far.

skip, Monday, 4 July 2011 20:21 (seven years ago) Permalink

I'm feeling very sheepish, incidentally - I couldn't sing a note of these so far.

Ismael Klata, Monday, 4 July 2011 20:21 (seven years ago) Permalink

You'll definitely be able to sing this one..

45. Where The Streets Have No Name (I Can't Take My Eyes Off Of You). (1991, standalone, 87 points, 4 votes, 0 number ones)

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Jt2j79pca7c

Spotify: http://open.spotify.com/track/2TNRmSMJzsweYzWXHi28r2

RIF: Following the release of the single, U2 issued a statement saying "What have we done to deserve this?"

The multi-talented F.R. David (Billy Dods), Monday, 4 July 2011 20:22 (seven years ago) Permalink

I completely forgot to vote for Where The Streets Have No Name, one of the greatest cover versions of all time.

All good songs so far, I'm wondering if this maybe the first poll I like every song that places.

Kitchen Person, Monday, 4 July 2011 20:31 (seven years ago) Permalink

44. Love etc. (2009, Yes, 94 points, 5 votes, 0 number ones)

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=InBiaRBUjUs

Spotify: http://open.spotify.com/track/58aYg1HRp6muVAWaSPLLKD

The multi-talented F.R. David (Billy Dods), Monday, 4 July 2011 20:33 (seven years ago) Permalink

Bono has ended a simmering feud with the Pet Shop Boys over their cover version of one of U2's best-loved songs.

He was appalled after they turned the 1987 hit "Where the Streets Have No Name" into an instant camp classic by adding their own vocals and a pumping disco beat.

The Irish rockers issued a statement soon after the Pet Shop Boys version was released, declaring: "What have we done to deserve this?" But speaking about the spat for the first time this week, singer Neil Tennant insisted he had managed at long last to patch things up with Bono.

Peace was declared after a bizarre encounter at Elton John's mansion in the south of France, which ended with Bono and the English pop duo jumping into the swimming pool from a first floor balcony.

Asked about claims that Bono and Edge had been gunning for him, Tennant told music magazine Q: "I'd read things in the press.

"Anyway, we met Bono at Elton's and he was a bit funny at the beginning but he was really friendly. It all ended with a competition. He kept saying, 'It's rock versus pop.' At the end of the meal he jumped into Elton's swimming pool from the terrace and to his evident surprise I jumped in as well. So he said, 'OK. Rock one -- Pop one.' It ended as a draw -- quite rightly so."

The Edge of Gloryhole (Alfred, Lord Sotosyn), Monday, 4 July 2011 20:33 (seven years ago) Permalink

43. Some Speculation. (1993, B-Side, 4 votes, 0 number one votes)

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tBmAw9eoRJU

Spotify: http://open.spotify.com/track/3SiFFfmFac2OEM51SEKQbt

The multi-talented F.R. David (Billy Dods), Monday, 4 July 2011 20:39 (seven years ago) Permalink

I was really underwhelmed with Love etc. when it came out but it grew on me so much and I love it now. It was the exact opposite of what happened with I'm With Stupid which I can't even listen to now.

Kitchen Person, Monday, 4 July 2011 20:39 (seven years ago) Permalink

Yeah, agree with that. 'Yes' has really grown on me as an album.

oppet, Monday, 4 July 2011 20:42 (seven years ago) Permalink

42. It Must Be Obvious. (1990, B-Side, 98 points, 5 votes, 0 number one votes)

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cO9tJlvC9ro

Spotify: http://open.spotify.com/track/5zlTMICphPXPL9n7k585KV

The multi-talented F.R. David (Billy Dods), Monday, 4 July 2011 20:43 (seven years ago) Permalink

Oh, only saw this thread now due to Gubke mentioning it in the nomination thread!

Frogbs Day Afternoon (Le Bateau Ivre), Monday, 4 July 2011 20:49 (seven years ago) Permalink

41. It Couldn't Happen Here. (1987, Actually, 105 points, 0 number ones)

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dq72QbwOhoU

Spotify: http://open.spotify.com/track/2QqPaaNdbpgNMot5WKw9y5

RIF:The title is borrowed from Sinclair Lewis's 1935 novel 'It Can't Happen Here'.

The multi-talented F.R. David (Billy Dods), Monday, 4 July 2011 20:49 (seven years ago) Permalink

Love etc. is a solid track. The only thing I don't like is the melody in the first verse which follows the synth motif and totally doesn't work. Strange, considering how Neil Tennant described Xenomania as somewhat obsessed with finding the best melody for a song.

daavid, Monday, 4 July 2011 20:50 (seven years ago) Permalink

First of my picks to appear!

oppet, Monday, 4 July 2011 20:52 (seven years ago) Permalink

and here's your second:

40. Miserabilism. (1992, B-side, 106 points, 6 votes, 0 number ones)

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fPBmzTvKsmw&feature=related

Spotify: http://open.spotify.com/track/20GBfHqwta4csdKTDVjZ9F

RIF: The song is sung from the viewpoint of cheeky chappy Morrissey.

The multi-talented F.R. David (Billy Dods), Monday, 4 July 2011 20:57 (seven years ago) Permalink

Thought this one might be higher. I thought it would be the highest B-side to place.

Kitchen Person, Monday, 4 July 2011 20:58 (seven years ago) Permalink

39. Losing My Mind (Liza Minelli). (1989, Collaboration, 109 points, 0 number one votes)

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZtR_eyyrn9g Scroll to 8:45 to avoid Wogan.

Spotify: http://open.spotify.com/track/2loMPlz3JWjFGF6fPoiSoo

RIF: Minelli's biggest chart hit in the UK, #6 in August 1989.

The multi-talented F.R. David (Billy Dods), Monday, 4 July 2011 21:11 (seven years ago) Permalink

I've a big fan of "Some Speculation" - that galumphing Patrick Cowley bassline that comes in alongside the brisk percussion (esp. around the three minute mark), married to the dreamlike menace of the synths and Neil's vocal ... they've written some fantastic songs about gossip, but unlike the bitchiness of others this captures an ambient dread. "What's your game? What's his name?"

etc, Monday, 4 July 2011 21:18 (seven years ago) Permalink

Love etc.: Enjoyed it greatly at the time and if anything it has grown on me. The space around those soft bass thumps is massive - it's like they found a whole new layer of sound to play with, using the same old tinkly stuff at the top to the super low bass. Miserabilism has a similar sonic palette but everything feels crammed into the midrange by comparison. The "Yes" bonus disc version of this is also solid.

Some Speculation: also voted for this, not exactly the biggest dancefloor banger in the world but I love the main riff, and the lyrics are about as biting as they come.

Miserabilism: I was expecting this to be in my top 10 but it ended up not even making the ballot. Not sure what's missing - maybe the verse is a bit weak, and the backing track too one-note. Can't take anything away from the chorus though.

skip, Monday, 4 July 2011 21:24 (seven years ago) Permalink

The full length commentary they recorded for Yes was really funny and interesting too. Definitely made me enjoy the album more.

oppet, Monday, 4 July 2011 21:32 (seven years ago) Permalink

38. My October Symphony. (1990, Behaviour, 116 points, 5 votes, 0 number ones)

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=r-c7A500Po0

Spotify: http://open.spotify.com/track/23jXBMOpIlhh3yH4ySSBPC

The multi-talented F.R. David (Billy Dods), Monday, 4 July 2011 21:32 (seven years ago) Permalink

Where can I find that? Didn't know it existed. (xpost)

daavid, Monday, 4 July 2011 21:33 (seven years ago) Permalink

So far, two Behaviour tracks I wasn't expecting to appear. I wonder if the "obvious" ones will show up too.

daavid, Monday, 4 July 2011 21:34 (seven years ago) Permalink

commentary on spotify here: http://open.spotify.com/track/7w9AsZpoehCjItgDZwJ7TG

oppet, Monday, 4 July 2011 21:36 (seven years ago) Permalink

My ballot was full of obviousness (only one thing I've voted for has shown up so far).

I really love the lower regions of these polls—especially for bands with which I'm not already a know-it-all—because I get a really good setting to check out songs I've only ever heard a couple times or not at all and appreciately them differently.

Alpaca Lips (Johnny Fever), Monday, 4 July 2011 21:37 (seven years ago) Permalink

37. It's Alright. (1988, Introspective, 118 points, 0 number ones)

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9r0pISqCDRw

Spotify: http://open.spotify.com/track/5qhZObqAsOcnKWvknSPSfA

The multi-talented F.R. David (Billy Dods), Monday, 4 July 2011 21:39 (seven years ago) Permalink

Thanks opplet.

daavid, Monday, 4 July 2011 21:39 (seven years ago) Permalink

Don't know if I've ever sat down and listened to this track closely. Very similar to a lot of the Release stuff that people love to slag on... [xpost to My October Symphony]

skip, Monday, 4 July 2011 21:39 (seven years ago) Permalink

xxp
Should be 118 points, 4 votes, 0 number ones.

The multi-talented F.R. David (Billy Dods), Monday, 4 July 2011 21:40 (seven years ago) Permalink

Was it news to anyone else that It's Alright is a cover?

skip, Monday, 4 July 2011 21:40 (seven years ago) Permalink

Nope! I read the Discography liner notes when I got the tape in '93.

Most of these B-sides were on my ballot.

"Love Etc" and "Minimal" are the best of this their autumnal period.

The Edge of Gloryhole (Alfred, Lord Sotosyn), Monday, 4 July 2011 21:41 (seven years ago) Permalink

Should have voted for It Couldn't Happen Here. Wonderful song.

Strictly vote-splitting (DL), Monday, 4 July 2011 21:44 (seven years ago) Permalink

Didn't vote for this, but pleasantly surprised how high it is.

36. The Truck Driver and his Mate. (1996, B-Side, 120 points, 6 votes, 0 number ones)

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sHI7OHqKzW8

Spotify: http://open.spotify.com/track/2LHGm35sLk2yfQ6HdLjCKg

RIF: This is based on the slogan for 'Yorkie' chocolate bar, "Big enough for the truck driver and his mate."

The multi-talented F.R. David (Billy Dods), Monday, 4 July 2011 21:45 (seven years ago) Permalink

^^^ one of mine. Love the guitar riff (played by Tennant).

The Edge of Gloryhole (Alfred, Lord Sotosyn), Monday, 4 July 2011 21:48 (seven years ago) Permalink

great guitar line in this one. My #16.

skip, Monday, 4 July 2011 21:48 (seven years ago) Permalink

35. One More Chance. (1984/1987, Actually, 123 points, 5 votes, 0 number ones.)

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=g-6gZExiOno

and the original Bobby O mix

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-vfszNwfGRE

Spotify: http://open.spotify.com/track/28h0GZFHrgVZ0WWiOHSZCU

The multi-talented F.R. David (Billy Dods), Monday, 4 July 2011 21:52 (seven years ago) Permalink

Truck Driver was my number 3, really happy to see it has other fans.

Kitchen Person, Monday, 4 July 2011 21:52 (seven years ago) Permalink

Truck Driver is an extremely complex song - goes from minor to major multiple times and has some seriously screwy chord progressions and seeming key changes. Somehow everything ties together but it has B-side written all over it. It kind of reminds me of "Cold Sweat" by James Brown, which is probably ridiculous but there you go.

skip, Monday, 4 July 2011 21:53 (seven years ago) Permalink

34. Your Funny Uncle. (1988, B-side, 124 points, 6 votes, 0 number ones)

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Pn_uWqlbdOM

Spotify: http://open.spotify.com/track/05ohJ9ImZinFRQt4ZBpSWm

RIF: The song is inspired by the funeral of Neil Tennant's friend Chris Dowell whose death also inspired their song 'Being Boring'.

The multi-talented F.R. David (Billy Dods), Monday, 4 July 2011 22:02 (seven years ago) Permalink

the highest b-side on my ballot. kind of expected it to be higher, tbh.

Gukbe, Monday, 4 July 2011 22:03 (seven years ago) Permalink

Billy: I voted for "Nothing Has Been Proved" too. Almost voted for it twice--I love the Strings of Love version even more than Dusty's, but I wasn't sure if Tenant/Lowe had anything to do with it beyond writing the song, so I skipped it. I was surprised it didn't make the Top 50 too.

clemenza, Thursday, 7 July 2011 09:37 (seven years ago) Permalink

xp I bought every single on seven and twelve from Please through Behaviour so every song on that first disc of Alternative means something to me, to the point where I can't really be objective about them. I remember trying to transcribe and decipher the lyrics to Don Juan. With Very they stopped doing vinyl singles so I drifted away from the B-sides. Even though many of the later ones are utterly fantastic, I discovered them en masse on Alternative so I didn't devote as much time to them.

Strictly vote-splitting (DL), Thursday, 7 July 2011 09:40 (seven years ago) Permalink

In case anyone hasn't heard this:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zErjqOlHWqU&feature=related

There's a longer and better version on the 12-inch. Being right from the Black Box moment, I have to wonder if the gorgeous woman in the video is even doing the singing.

clemenza, Thursday, 7 July 2011 09:47 (seven years ago) Permalink

Billy: I voted for "Nothing Has Been Proved" too.

Yes, you did, my mistake. Don't worry, it was counted.

The multi-talented F.R. David (Billy Dods), Thursday, 7 July 2011 10:03 (seven years ago) Permalink

Loses a little something of the Profumo story, that version

Strictly vote-splitting (DL), Thursday, 7 July 2011 10:08 (seven years ago) Permalink

Alfred, I had no idea it was you that wrote that Stylus write-up of "Young Offender". It's one of my favourite PSB write-ups.

aww thanks!

The Edge of Gloryhole (Alfred, Lord Sotosyn), Thursday, 7 July 2011 11:06 (seven years ago) Permalink

Yeah, that was a great piece. I am curious about something, though. I grew up listening to the Pet Shop Boys without ever thinking of them as gay. Not as straight, either - for some reason, sexuality never came into my appreciation of them (or at least I was too unsophisticated to recognize it). But when "Very" came out, I was suddenly very aware of the band's sexuality, as well as the album's place in the AIDS/post-AIDS era. It was like a little light bulb that went off that cast all their previous material in a different, more illuminating light. Sort of the same thing with the Magnetic Fields' "Holiday," which I believe came out the same year.

Anyway, for those of you back in the '80s who understand what being gay was (or were gay yourselves), how did that affect your appreciation of the Pet Shop Boys? Did they seem more daring? Subversive? Like a well-kept secret that went deeper than strictly great pop? Or as strictly great pop, with the layers of politics and sexuality only revealing themselves later?

Josh in Chicago, Thursday, 7 July 2011 12:00 (seven years ago) Permalink

When I bought Behaviour in early '91, there was already a lot of snickering from friends about their sexuality; it wasn't lost on anyone that "Getting Away With It" was a duet between two men. As a sixteen-year-old closeted teenager, I didn't know the language of homosexuality yet, but I sensed the oddness of the point of view in "The End of the World" (its detachment) and "Being Boring" (subject and object blur).

The Edge of Gloryhole (Alfred, Lord Sotosyn), Thursday, 7 July 2011 13:13 (seven years ago) Permalink

Anyway, for those of you back in the '80s who understand what being gay was (or were gay yourselves), how did that affect your appreciation of the Pet Shop Boys? Did they seem more daring? Subversive? Like a well-kept secret that went deeper than strictly great pop? Or as strictly great pop, with the layers of politics and sexuality only revealing themselves later?

as a pre-pubescent, I felt cheated when I clocked that NT's lyrics were dancing around gender so pointedly. be bold! why hide! I thought. your songs are so wonderful, they must be universally respected and beloved - to engage gendered pronouns would rip scales from eyes, and show the ludicrousity of homophobically languaged abuse to thousands, I thought.

later, I couldn't remember the one "she" or "her" that had tipped me towards briefly reading their songs in a heteronormative context, and became aware of how little dancing there actually was, if you didn't approach the songs in a standard pop context, and that bullies were irrational and fuckwits anyway.

undeɹrated ærosm?th b∞tlegs I have pwned (sic), Thursday, 7 July 2011 14:35 (seven years ago) Permalink

by the time Tennant did the ...Advocate? interview in ...1993? it seemed ludicrous to me that anyone could possibly need or want clarification about 'their' sexuality. I became aware that it wasn't, though.

undeɹrated ærosm?th b∞tlegs I have pwned (sic), Thursday, 7 July 2011 14:38 (seven years ago) Permalink

['their' as in the entity Pet Shop Boys, that makes the music of the Pet Shop Boys; expressed such to acknowledge Mr Lowe's disinterest in identifying sexually under anyone else's terms.]

undeɹrated ærosm?th b∞tlegs I have pwned (sic), Thursday, 7 July 2011 14:40 (seven years ago) Permalink

TBH, as a straight fan, I never thought about their sexual orientation or whether it even mattered to how I listened to the songs until they released "Go West", which I didn't like to the point of actively avoiding everything associated with Very (which was really, really easy to do in the US) and incorrectly assuming for a while that they lost a good chunk of their cleverness when they officially outed themselves, that the allusions and restrictions they imposed upon themselves were the extra parameter that elevated them from pedestrian to essential.

A year later, a friend played me Disco 2 and I realized I was being a douchebag.

DJP, Thursday, 7 July 2011 14:46 (seven years ago) Permalink

Chris Lowe has never made any statements, by the way.

The Edge of Gloryhole (Alfred, Lord Sotosyn), Thursday, 7 July 2011 14:49 (seven years ago) Permalink

Somewhere in a shoe box in the basement, I've got an interview I did with Tennant and Lowe in '88. It was slated for the next issue of the magazine I worked for at the time, which promptly went bankrupt before it ever went to print. I've been telling myself the past few years to sit down and transcribe it and post it on my site, but I'm just too lazy. (It would also be major work to find it; the shoe box is filled with cassettes.) Anyway, I did, circumspectly, bring up the dreaded question, and got an icy stare and evasive answer from Tennant. Big surprise: he handled 97% of the talking during the interview. I've always felt pretty stupid for doing so. As I wrote on my site when I recounted the story a few years ago, it was like asking Stevie Wonder if it was true he was blind.

clemenza, Thursday, 7 July 2011 14:52 (seven years ago) Permalink

I distinctly remember when I became aware of their homosexuality: it was in a 1990 review of Behaviour in a local music magazine, which casually described Tennant's new lyrics as those of "a more mature gay man, having come to terms with x and y, in an era of z" or some such thing. It was mentioned in passing in a matter-of-fact fashion, such that I remember thinking I must have been inattentive to have not picked up on this previously. Not sure it felt like anything more than a piece of interesting trivia, as their sexuality was not something I had pondered up to that point either.

I was still relatively young and it may have had more resonance if I was gay myself. I suspect it changed my perceptions of them only insofar as certain lines in "Rent" or "It's A Sin" or "Being Boring" might suddenly have been open to different intepretations. Actually, it may have seemed kind of apt more broadly, as the one other fan I knew, my slightly older neighbour whose PSB 12"s I borrowed, was widely understood to be gay himself.

Nag! Nag! Nag!, Thursday, 7 July 2011 14:54 (seven years ago) Permalink

Anyway, I did, circumspectly, bring up the dreaded question, and got an icy stare and evasive answer from Tennant.

I've learned that their policy with most journalists before '93 was to admit Tennant's sexuality off the record.

The Edge of Gloryhole (Alfred, Lord Sotosyn), Thursday, 7 July 2011 14:58 (seven years ago) Permalink

as someone who only discovered the group through Bilingual and Nightlife as an out gay teenager, their evasiveness seems silly and anachronistic. Only a gay man would write and perform the songs they did in the way they did; it takes what feels like an almost willful ignorance to separate their music from their sexuality. Of course times were different back then.

skip, Thursday, 7 July 2011 15:29 (seven years ago) Permalink

As a straight kid living with a gay dad (who only did his business outside the house), PSB were about as oblique and transparent as everything else around me. I bought Please when I was 15-16 and loved it; my Dad, mostly a folk and new-age guy, came home one day with the Opportunities 12".

Lazy Lay (Eazy), Thursday, 7 July 2011 15:42 (seven years ago) Permalink

xpost It takes what feels like an almost willful ignorance now, but yeah, times are different. If they weren't, they likely would never have had much chart success in the US, I bet. I mean, even Boy George's sexuality was more often than not totally elided back then.

Josh in Chicago, Thursday, 7 July 2011 15:48 (seven years ago) Permalink

John Gill's "Queer Noises" has a section on the Pet Shop Boys - I remember thinking at the time that it was well-written and thoughtful but that was a few years ago. IIRC he takes a pretty negative view about their semi-non-closeted status.

skip, Thursday, 7 July 2011 16:17 (seven years ago) Permalink

^^^ YES. That was the journalist I was trying to remember. He was very offended.

The Edge of Gloryhole (Alfred, Lord Sotosyn), Thursday, 7 July 2011 16:27 (seven years ago) Permalink

It didn't change my own perception but what I really, really hated after "Very" and Tennant's coming out was that the general public/media perception (at least in North America) immediately went to "lol the gay duo who makes gay music for gay people" and that was pretty much that. So sometimes I wish Tennant hadn't come out, but then it would've probably not make much difference.

daavid, Thursday, 7 July 2011 16:52 (seven years ago) Permalink

In America their profile is "lol the gay duo who did 'West End Girls.'"

The Edge of Gloryhole (Alfred, Lord Sotosyn), Thursday, 7 July 2011 16:54 (seven years ago) Permalink

I recall a friend recounting telling me, "It must be obvious? well it wasn't to me."

Gukbe, Thursday, 7 July 2011 16:54 (seven years ago) Permalink

Well I kind of see why it wasn't obvious to everyone. I mean in the eighties everyone looked (and acted) gayer than the PSB.

daavid, Thursday, 7 July 2011 16:59 (seven years ago) Permalink

That was part of the joke too: they were less, er, flamboyant than their peers.

The Edge of Gloryhole (Alfred, Lord Sotosyn), Thursday, 7 July 2011 17:02 (seven years ago) Permalink

So pre'93, were their shows not 75% gay men like they are now? I don't think I saw them live until the Nightlife tour.

Josh in Chicago, Thursday, 7 July 2011 18:54 (seven years ago) Permalink

That percentage is wrong in Germany and the UK.

Gukbe, Thursday, 7 July 2011 19:07 (seven years ago) Permalink

Yeah, not true at all of any PSBs shows I've been to.

Strictly vote-splitting (DL), Thursday, 7 July 2011 19:56 (seven years ago) Permalink

Since Miami is one of their US strongholds, the percentage of straights attending their shows is MUCH higher.

The Edge of Gloryhole (Alfred, Lord Sotosyn), Thursday, 7 July 2011 19:59 (seven years ago) Permalink

Hadn't heard their own version of this, really into it tonight.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6Dj3ymyCl3s&NR=1&feature=fvwp

Lazy Lay (Eazy), Friday, 8 July 2011 05:36 (seven years ago) Permalink

TBH, as a straight fan, I never thought about their sexual orientation or whether it even mattered to how I listened to the songs until they released "Go West", which I didn't like to the point of actively avoiding everything associated with Very (which was really, really easy to do in the US)

Except in gay clubs.

As a straight kid living with a gay dad (who only did his business outside the house)

Define "business."

Kevin John Bozelka, Sunday, 10 July 2011 15:50 (seven years ago) Permalink

A friend posted this old Drudge headline this morning--he can't remember the context. I think you might call this Soto bait:

http://rockcritics.files.wordpress.com/2011/07/drudge-boring1.jpg

clemenza, Friday, 22 July 2011 17:59 (seven years ago) Permalink

how can you expect to be taken seriously?

The Edge of Gloryhole (Alfred, Lord Sotosyn), Friday, 22 July 2011 20:10 (seven years ago) Permalink

i don't think they were *so* evasive about it, i was at school in 88/89 when there was a (Channel 4?) tv special made by Jon Savage that at one point had the boys sitting together, with one saying clearly that they first heard disco 'in all the gay clubs'. also there's plenty of lines to read between in the '... Vs America' book.

piscesx, Friday, 22 July 2011 20:37 (seven years ago) Permalink

yeah but they're British, and most Americans assume they're all gay.

The Edge of Gloryhole (Alfred, Lord Sotosyn), Friday, 22 July 2011 20:38 (seven years ago) Permalink

three weeks pass...

"Heart" was the album's FOURTH single (and it hit #1, to their and everyone's surprise).

The lowest-selling ever No 1 or something at the time, I seem to recall from my Record Mirror reading days.

Alba, Wednesday, 17 August 2011 22:02 (six years ago) Permalink

Enjoyed today's Introspective article by Tom

http://www.guardian.co.uk/music/musicblog/2011/aug/17/introspective-pet-shop-boys

oppet, Wednesday, 17 August 2011 22:35 (six years ago) Permalink

Sadly Tom didn't vote in the poll, I don't know if he even lurks around here. Would've been interesting to see his choices.

The multi-talented F.R. David (Billy Dods), Thursday, 18 August 2011 08:35 (six years ago) Permalink

Just finished Pet Shop Boys: A Life in Pop. Would I ever have loved to be at that Potemkin presentation in Trafalgar Square--any British people who were there? It reminded me a bit of seeing Daniel Lanois preview Neil Young's album at Nuit Blanche last year, with video screens all around Nathan Phillips Square, but of course there was no Neil at that. Loved the West End Girls too--much better than the West End Girls who were from Vancouver 20 years ago. Anyway, good film. Didn't even mind having to listen to so much of someone from the Killers--seemed like a knowledgeable fan.

clemenza, Saturday, 27 August 2011 04:23 (six years ago) Permalink

Yeah, I was at that Potemkin show, am sure some other people here were too. It was good - I have a vague memory of some rain, but perhaps I'm imagining that? It was the first time I saw Potemkin, too, which helped.

toby, Saturday, 27 August 2011 11:10 (six years ago) Permalink

The rain was real--somebody in the documentary said that people were politely putting away their umbrellas so other people behind them would be able to see okay.

clemenza, Saturday, 27 August 2011 15:24 (six years ago) Permalink

I was there as well. There was a lot of rain, but as I recall the rain stopped just before the performance, and umbrellas were duly lowered. Great event, but I remember the film more than I remember the music, to be honest.

mike t-diva, Tuesday, 30 August 2011 09:44 (six years ago) Permalink

two weeks pass...

http://open.spotify.com/user/djperry1973/playlist/7LyurbFLzd9cnbyqaBdYKs

countdown from 50 - 1, five tracks missing because I couldn't find them (stupid Spotofiy, missing Behaviour) plus 2 versions of "I Want A Dog" (the superior original version and the boring Introspective version)

sick yr finger up his butt (DJP), Friday, 16 September 2011 20:45 (six years ago) Permalink

two months pass...

Format, a new B-Sides collection coming in February.

encarta it (Gukbe), Friday, 18 November 2011 20:25 (six years ago) Permalink

four months pass...

aww, RIP. A big reason why Catalogue is my favourite coffee table book.

stay in school if you want to kiw (Gukbe), Thursday, 22 March 2012 20:37 (six years ago) Permalink

RIP. Those sleeves and videos are burned into my brain.

And I have been called "The Appetite" (DL), Thursday, 22 March 2012 23:20 (six years ago) Permalink

five years pass...

There was some chatter about the Helena Springs version of A New Life on the poll threads; whether or not it was ever released and such.
Here it is! As with the cover of Do I Have To? by Inga, i think i might actually prefer it to theirs

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=njjdHfeereM

piscesx, Monday, 12 February 2018 12:51 (six months ago) Permalink

I collated the chatter &c on one of the b-sides threads but great to be reminded of this - I should really rip it in case it vanishes.

etc, Wednesday, 14 February 2018 08:23 (six months ago) Permalink


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