John Lennon Solo Albums Poll

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John Lennon solo albums poll

Poll Results

OptionVotes
1970 John Lennon/Plastic Ono Band 33
1971 Imagine 7
1980 Double Fantasy 5
1969 Unfinished Music No.2: Life with the Lions 2
1968 Unfinished Music No.1: Two Virgins 1
1984 Milk and Honey 1
1973 Mind Games 0
1974 Walls and Bridges 0
1975 Rock 'n' Roll 0
1969 Wedding Album 0
1972 Some Time in New York City 0


village idiot (dog latin), Monday, 7 June 2010 11:44 (seven years ago) Permalink

voted Life with the Lions, prob Lennon's heaviest gtr rec

Ward Fowler, Monday, 7 June 2010 12:02 (seven years ago) Permalink

I would like to be the sole vote for Rock 'n' Roll, which I do like an awful lot, but Imagine is better, and really the only Lennon solo album I play with any regularity.

MumblestheRevelator, Monday, 7 June 2010 12:05 (seven years ago) Permalink

i have only heard POB, Imagine, maybe Rock'n'Roll a long time ago, Double Fantasy and Milk & Honey. Plus a few compilations, so I'm familiar with No9 Dream and Mind Games which are great songs. Not heard the Beatles-era experimental albums. I can imagine they have a lot of heroin-aided shrieking all over them but are they really any good at all?

I remember not minding Milk & Honey (at least the Lennon songs - never could stand Yoko), particularly the sweet "Grow Old With Me".

Voting POB btw.

village idiot (dog latin), Monday, 7 June 2010 12:13 (seven years ago) Permalink

Re: Some Time in New York City, Mind Games, Walls and Bridges. You're not missing much

Wenlock & Mandelson (Tom D.), Monday, 7 June 2010 12:15 (seven years ago) Permalink

I think Mind Games is half an excellent album, with a half dozen good to great songs spread out amongst a half dozen fair to poor songs. Walls & Bridges and Sometime in New York City are largely bores, though with a couple good songs each.

MumblestheRevelator, Monday, 7 June 2010 12:24 (seven years ago) Permalink

half an excellent album, with a half dozen good to great songs spread out amongst a half dozen fair to poor songs.

Every album I've heard by him tbh.

village idiot (dog latin), Monday, 7 June 2010 12:29 (seven years ago) Permalink

Plastic Ono Band over Imagine. I prefer Milk and Honey over DF, tbh.

Filmmaker, Author, Radio Host Stephen Baldwin (Alfred, Lord Sotosyn), Monday, 7 June 2010 12:55 (seven years ago) Permalink

Voted Plastic Ono Band.

I just wish he hadn't adopted the "ilxor" moniker (ilxor), Monday, 7 June 2010 14:05 (seven years ago) Permalink

Unstarted music would have been preferable in those 1st two album's cases

PaulTMA, Monday, 7 June 2010 14:21 (seven years ago) Permalink

You missed out Live Peace in Toronto.

Mark G, Monday, 7 June 2010 15:20 (seven years ago) Permalink

Live albums don't count obv.

anagram, Monday, 7 June 2010 15:23 (seven years ago) Permalink

JL/POB. THis still ranks as one of the most intense sonic exorcisms you're likely to run across. Its also a prime example of stripped-down rock punch. Gnarly & intense meets soft, melodic & intense, with a touch of mostly crazy thrown in for good measure.

ImprovSpirit, Monday, 7 June 2010 15:35 (seven years ago) Permalink

xpost Lifew/ Lions is half live.

Mark G, Monday, 7 June 2010 15:38 (seven years ago) Permalink

only 2 contenders really, Plastic Ono Band for its artistic qualities and Imagine for the tunes. Everything else too patchy for my vote.

Dr X O'Skeleton, Monday, 7 June 2010 17:06 (seven years ago) Permalink

yeah there's some really great stuff scattered here & there, but POB & Imagine are the only two i could call solid

used to bull's-eye Zach Wamps in my T-16 back home (will), Monday, 7 June 2010 17:59 (seven years ago) Permalink

Agreed re. POB & Imagine. 'Some Time in NYC' would prolly make third place for me.

The 'Unfinished Music' & 'Wedding Album' things are an excellent preview of what Nurse With Wound would be up to a few years later & had more to do with Yoko's aesthetic than John's. STinNYC would merge the two much more gooder. However, Lennon seems to have been coming from "I am so totally NOT going to do anything like THAT!" (meaning tunes that are remotely 'pop' or resemble the Beatles in ANY way) whereas NWW was all "Damn! I really want to do THIS!" You can sorta tell the difference.

The smug cynicism of 'Mind Games' never did anything for me. 'Walls & Bridges' just mostly blew. Nilsson's 'Pussycats' is just as worthy a listen as most of Lennon's solo output & I mean that in a basically good way. The last couple of discs saw John veering off into well-worn Billy Joel semi-profound MOR goo and away from his earlier bristling art attacks that had me longing for his return. I filed 'Double Fantasy' away after 1 or 2 spins, drank way too much Rebel Yell, blasted 'POB' & pondered the WTF question...

ImprovSpirit, Monday, 7 June 2010 19:02 (seven years ago) Permalink

are the first two/three those noise/loops records he made? i always thought pob was the first post-beatles record of actual music

teflon donk (samosa gibreel), Monday, 7 June 2010 19:05 (seven years ago) Permalink

Musically, Some Time in New York City is actually not bad if you can ignore him drinking the lefty Kool Aid lyrically. Please tell me his "Right on, sister!" is meant at least a little sarcastically.

Hideous Lump, Tuesday, 8 June 2010 01:12 (seven years ago) Permalink

Yoko Ono supervised remixes of the more popular solo albums - anyone have any thoughts on these? WHY? etc.

PaulTMA, Tuesday, 8 June 2010 11:46 (seven years ago) Permalink

uh, why not?

(runs way)

Mark G, Tuesday, 8 June 2010 11:51 (seven years ago) Permalink

i think the remixes are improvements. i know some people disagree but they did a really good job, just adding some separation in places to spector's wall of mud. it did take some of the 'whoomp' feeling out of some of it I suppose but I still like them. the earlier cds sounded terrible and original vinyl is hard to find anyway.

POB is my boring choice, will Walls and Bridges or Imagine next. W&B is really overlooked and underrated.

akm, Tuesday, 8 June 2010 14:13 (seven years ago) Permalink

First two Plastic Ono Band records totally rule. "Fly" owns most of John's catalog.

Adam Bruneau, Tuesday, 8 June 2010 14:17 (seven years ago) Permalink

Although spotty in a few places, 'Imagine' narrowly over POB for me.

I heard DF for the first time on Dec 7 '80. So sad.

Lee626, Wednesday, 9 June 2010 06:49 (seven years ago) Permalink

Automatic thread bump. This poll is closing tomorrow.

System, Sunday, 13 June 2010 23:01 (seven years ago) Permalink

easy one.

chromecassettes, Monday, 14 June 2010 01:11 (seven years ago) Permalink

Lennon is generally overrated as a solo artist, but "Double Fantasy" was great. Would have been even better without the Yoko tracks though.

Tied Up In Geir (Geir Hongro), Monday, 14 June 2010 07:10 (seven years ago) Permalink

Oh, and I am not saying "Imagine" is a bad album. Just a pity the rest of the album doesn't hold up with "Imagine", "Jealous Guy", "Oh My Love" and "How?"

Tied Up In Geir (Geir Hongro), Monday, 14 June 2010 07:12 (seven years ago) Permalink

I'd have thought "Mind Games" and "Walls/Bridges" would be up yr alley, geir.

Mark G, Monday, 14 June 2010 08:11 (seven years ago) Permalink

Nah, "Tight A$" and "Meat City" too . . . well, you know.

I guess for copraphiles this is gonna be awesome (Pancakes Hackman), Monday, 14 June 2010 13:07 (seven years ago) Permalink

Automatic thread bump. This poll's results are now in.

System, Monday, 14 June 2010 23:01 (seven years ago) Permalink

Wow.

ilxor has truly been got at and become an ILXor (ilxor), Tuesday, 15 June 2010 04:32 (seven years ago) Permalink

o_O

The order is what I was expecting, but the landslide? Only two points' difference between Imagine and Double Fantasy? I didn't even think PBO was that well known let alone popular.

village idiot (dog latin), Tuesday, 15 June 2010 09:00 (seven years ago) Permalink

I didn't expect Mind Games or Walls & Bridges to both get shut out. Neither are particular faves of mine, but I could have sworn that I have heard love for both on ILM in the past.

The whine that winks back at you (KMS), Tuesday, 15 June 2010 14:47 (seven years ago) Permalink

Lennon is generally overrated as a solo artist, but "Double Fantasy" was great. Would have been even better without the Yoko tracks though

Oh, and I am not saying "Imagine" is a bad album. Just a pity the rest of the album doesn't hold up with "Imagine", "Jealous Guy", "Oh My Love" and "How?"

Geir lives in Bizarro world - down is up, black is white, etx

If you can believe your eyes and ears (outdoor_miner), Tuesday, 15 June 2010 15:52 (seven years ago) Permalink

i find it quite reassuring myself.

"enduring lack of street cred" (Ioannis), Tuesday, 15 June 2010 16:32 (seven years ago) Permalink

three months pass...

http://www.google.co.uk/logos/2010/lennon10-res.gif

Mark G, Friday, 8 October 2010 11:19 (seven years ago) Permalink

two weeks pass...

I think I disagree with pretty much every single conclusion Wolk draws in today's Pfork review, with the exception of his dismissal of Sometime in NY

the first Asian legislator in our Nevada State Assembly (Shakey Mo Collier), Friday, 22 October 2010 17:16 (seven years ago) Permalink

Mind Games deserves alot more love than it gets.

Telephoneface (Adam Bruneau), Friday, 22 October 2010 17:51 (seven years ago) Permalink

I mean

Mind Games, on the other hand, isn't particularly off-putting-- it's just creatively exhausted and timid. The title track has a nice tune; the session dudes who play on the album are entirely competent; "Aisumasen (I'm Sorry)" is a sweet sentiment. But there is not a single risky or urgent moment on the entire thing.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Zx0ZqyqO8Wg
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4l1ILO2DZwA
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FJSMvVyRVZ0

Yeah, perhaps if you take away those above songs and the title track.

Telephoneface (Adam Bruneau), Friday, 22 October 2010 17:58 (seven years ago) Permalink

Yoko's songs on Doubel Fantasy are better than John's. FACT

the first Asian legislator in our Nevada State Assembly (Shakey Mo Collier), Friday, 22 October 2010 18:02 (seven years ago) Permalink

About to listen to "Life With the Lions" for the first time.

Telephoneface (Adam Bruneau), Friday, 22 October 2010 18:05 (seven years ago) Permalink

John can really play some feedback!

Telephoneface (Adam Bruneau), Friday, 22 October 2010 18:06 (seven years ago) Permalink

I imagine there are some 1967 jams where John is doing this while George plays sitar and Paul and Ringo play maracas & congas.

Telephoneface (Adam Bruneau), Friday, 22 October 2010 18:07 (seven years ago) Permalink

never heard Life with the Lions. neighbor had a vinyl copy of it that he wanted to sell for $150 though. lol

the first Asian legislator in our Nevada State Assembly (Shakey Mo Collier), Friday, 22 October 2010 18:08 (seven years ago) Permalink

Rawer than Metal Machine Music, tbh.

Telephoneface (Adam Bruneau), Friday, 22 October 2010 18:10 (seven years ago) Permalink

I like the insouciance of Wolk's review! It's like he wrote his own Walls and Bridges.

raging hetero lifechill (Alfred, Lord Sotosyn), Friday, 22 October 2010 18:13 (seven years ago) Permalink

insouciant? seems like a lot of received wisdom to me - Imagine is overplayed hippie drivel, POB is good except when you think about it in terms of whiny rich guy, etc

the first Asian legislator in our Nevada State Assembly (Shakey Mo Collier), Friday, 22 October 2010 18:21 (seven years ago) Permalink

i think it's really hard to write a review of john lennon, or any of the beatles (and *especially* the beatles themselves). some parts of this review (particularly the mind games overview) seemed dismissive to me, but then again, short of writing another book, pretty much anything you say is going to dismiss some aspect of the guy. The notion of yet another compilation of his music does make me tired just thinking about it--- despite the fact that it did make me listen to a bunch of solo lennon today, and like pretty much everything I played. interesting guy!

Dominique, Friday, 22 October 2010 18:25 (seven years ago) Permalink

Wow, now it's total freejazz territory. Sounds almost like Coltrane w Yoko screaming over it.

Telephoneface (Adam Bruneau), Friday, 22 October 2010 18:30 (seven years ago) Permalink

I'll keep 'Nobody Told Me', 'Woman' and 'Watching the Wheels' and maybe 'I'm Losing You', but that's about it.

Gholdfish Killah (Turrican), Friday, 17 November 2017 15:08 (three days ago) Permalink

agree

calstars, Friday, 17 November 2017 17:05 (three days ago) Permalink

But my assessment - like some upthread - is biased due to hearing them when I was a kid

calstars, Friday, 17 November 2017 17:06 (three days ago) Permalink

"Watching the Wheels" is probably the best of the bunch.

back to Sometime in NYC, this one in particular struck me as a pretty decent Spector-pop gem. Yoko does 60s girl-group!
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Fe4jyGk3qIY

Οὖτις, Friday, 17 November 2017 17:19 (three days ago) Permalink

like there's actually a decent hook there

Οὖτις, Friday, 17 November 2017 17:20 (three days ago) Permalink

and feminist-call to arms-as-girl-group-ditty is p clever imo

Οὖτις, Friday, 17 November 2017 17:20 (three days ago) Permalink

There's some not bad tunes on that album, as long as you don't listen to the lyrics.

Gholdfish Killah (Turrican), Friday, 17 November 2017 17:25 (three days ago) Permalink

Watching the Wheels acoustic demo is his last masterpiece

flappy bird, Friday, 17 November 2017 17:42 (three days ago) Permalink

"Whatever Gets You Through the Night" is a depressing experience to listen to: fagged-out, a submission to the sounds of the times

Is submission the right term, though? Lennon was quite enthusiastic about the era's hip discofied grooves in contemporary interviews. (I believe he did want a chart topper badly at the time, true.)

Scape: Goat-fired like a dog! (Myonga Vön Bontee), Friday, 17 November 2017 19:37 (three days ago) Permalink

and it worked! his only #1 single. (which is sort of crazy)

Οὖτις, Friday, 17 November 2017 19:39 (three days ago) Permalink

his first #1 ("Starting Over" hit #1).

morning wood truancy (Alfred, Lord Sotosyn), Friday, 17 November 2017 19:43 (three days ago) Permalink

In the 1980 BBC interview he's quite touched that Elton helped him get his first #1 and John helped Bowie get his.

morning wood truancy (Alfred, Lord Sotosyn), Friday, 17 November 2017 19:44 (three days ago) Permalink

that was after he died, right?

Οὖτις, Friday, 17 November 2017 19:46 (three days ago) Permalink

"Starting Over" hitting #1, that is

Οὖτις, Friday, 17 November 2017 19:46 (three days ago) Permalink

right

morning wood truancy (Alfred, Lord Sotosyn), Friday, 17 November 2017 19:46 (three days ago) Permalink

Both Lennon and McCartney kept their eyes on the charts to check out the competition from the beginning, really... they were still doing this in the mid '70s, but Lennon was obviously paying more attention to US trends as a consequence of living there, where McCartney was paying attention more to the UK chart - he carried on doing this until at least Flowers in the Dirt, and never stopped working with contemporary producers.

Gholdfish Killah (Turrican), Friday, 17 November 2017 19:51 (three days ago) Permalink

Lennon was a fan of "Coming Up."

morning wood truancy (Alfred, Lord Sotosyn), Friday, 17 November 2017 19:52 (three days ago) Permalink

Can't remember where I read this but apparently "Coming Up" and the music video are what inspired Lennon to start writing songs again

flappy bird, Friday, 17 November 2017 19:59 (three days ago) Permalink

He was writing songs throughout his "house husband" period, though!

Gholdfish Killah (Turrican), Friday, 17 November 2017 20:03 (three days ago) Permalink

was he? i thought he was pretty dormant creatively, busy "baking bread"... wasn't all of Double Fantasy/Milk & Honey written in 1980?

flappy bird, Friday, 17 November 2017 20:04 (three days ago) Permalink

'Free as a Bird' was written in 1977, for one.

Gholdfish Killah (Turrican), Friday, 17 November 2017 20:05 (three days ago) Permalink

I mean, if anyone thinks a songwriter with instruments lying around the house can just switch off their creative impulses for five years, then y'know, that's just naive.

Gholdfish Killah (Turrican), Friday, 17 November 2017 20:09 (three days ago) Permalink

you're just talking metaphysical nonsense

brimstead, Friday, 17 November 2017 20:15 (three days ago) Permalink

https://i.imgur.com/y4YErKh.jpg

Karl Malone, Friday, 17 November 2017 20:17 (three days ago) Permalink

I understand what you mean and agree in a way but it is totally possible for a songwriter to go through a long period in which, for whatever reason, nothing gets done.
I mean, not comparing, but I have always made songs but at some times (personal issues, work, family, whatever), you can really spend years without making songs although there are instruments and all available.

AlXTC from Paris, Friday, 17 November 2017 20:19 (three days ago) Permalink

Free as a Bird is not on Double Fantasy or Milk & Honey.

yeah obviously he probably noodled around but he was busy "breaking bread." i'm pretty sure he wrote most of if not all of DF & MH in 1980

flappy bird, Friday, 17 November 2017 20:20 (three days ago) Permalink

No, but 'Free as a Bird' was still written in 1977, as was 'Now and Then', not to mention numerous other demos from 1975-1979 that have been heavily bootlegged and are out there if you can be arsed to seek them out.

Gholdfish Killah (Turrican), Friday, 17 November 2017 21:06 (three days ago) Permalink

But even though proof of Lennon writing songs during his "house husband" days exists, you're quite welcome to believe the mythology of him baking bread for five fucking years.

Gholdfish Killah (Turrican), Friday, 17 November 2017 21:08 (three days ago) Permalink

lol you realize that's a euphemism right? he was blasted on smack for many of those years. besides, the question was when he was inspired to make a new record, and it was the "Coming Up" video, and none of those bootlegged songs (to my knowledge) made it onto Double Fantasy or Milk & Honey.

flappy bird, Friday, 17 November 2017 21:53 (three days ago) Permalink

idgi what's the basis for assuming he was "blasted on smack" while raising Sean

Οὖτις, Friday, 17 November 2017 21:55 (three days ago) Permalink

There was no "question", you out-and-out stated "apparently "Coming Up" and the music video are what inspired Lennon to start writing songs again", and I pointed out, correctly, that he'd never stopped writing songs. You're now changing this (because you're wrong) to "making a new record" which is something completely different.

Gholdfish Killah (Turrican), Friday, 17 November 2017 22:01 (three days ago) Permalink

(x-post, obviously)

Gholdfish Killah (Turrican), Friday, 17 November 2017 22:03 (three days ago) Permalink

The fact that the likes of 'Free as a Bird', 'Now and Then' and 'Real Life' didn't make it onto Double Fantasy or Milk and Honey is neither here nor there. They still got written.

Gholdfish Killah (Turrican), Friday, 17 November 2017 22:06 (three days ago) Permalink

it's fairly well documented, Jann Wenner says as much in his new bio, there's Robert Rosen's Nowhere Man (sourced from Lennon's diaries). even the Philip Norman bio has allusions to it. obviously the truth lies somewhere between the baking bread myth and the nightmare that Albert Goldman concocted. anyway the question is when did he write the songs on DF & MH - I don't know of any songs on those records written before 1980.

flappy bird, Friday, 17 November 2017 22:07 (three days ago) Permalink

& should've been clear initially: it inspired him to start writing songs for a new record, with the intention of releasing it, not puttering about writing a song every six months or something

flappy bird, Friday, 17 November 2017 22:10 (three days ago) Permalink

I can't imagine raising a baby while smacked out but I guess ppl do

Οὖτις, Friday, 17 November 2017 22:11 (three days ago) Permalink

Kurt & Courtney

also they obv had help, nannies, etc.

flappy bird, Friday, 17 November 2017 22:11 (three days ago) Permalink

and what a bang-up job they did

Οὖτις, Friday, 17 November 2017 22:12 (three days ago) Permalink

How can you be sure that he wasn't intending on doing something with those songs when he wrote them? How can you be sure they weren't in contention? How do you even know how frequently Lennon was writing songs between 1975-1979? The answer to questions of course are: you can't be sure and you don't know.

We can only go off the evidence that exists, which is that he was still writing songs during his "house husband" days.

Gholdfish Killah (Turrican), Friday, 17 November 2017 22:15 (three days ago) Permalink

Now, Lennon might very well have heard 'Coming Up' and thought "hmm, I'd better get back in there and make a record", but that's something different. We know he hadn't made a record for years.

Gholdfish Killah (Turrican), Friday, 17 November 2017 22:19 (three days ago) Permalink

He'd let his record contract lapse- and signed a new one with Geffen for Double Fantasy, which was seen very much as comeback record:

PLAYBOY: "The word is out: John Lennon and Yoko Ono are back in the studio, recording again for the first time since 1975, when they vanished from public view. Let's start with you, John. What have you been doing?"
LENNON: "I've been baking bread and looking after the baby."

Luna Schlosser, Friday, 17 November 2017 22:43 (three days ago) Permalink

"baking bread" "looking after the baby"

https://i.imgur.com/TMLjbG8.gif

Terry Micawber (Tom D.), Friday, 17 November 2017 22:50 (three days ago) Permalink

Yes, he'd let his record contract lapse and so what? He was John Lennon! I don't think he would have had a problem getting another record deal when he felt the need to look for one, and I'm pretty sure he knew it.

Gholdfish Killah (Turrican), Friday, 17 November 2017 22:56 (three days ago) Permalink

Even Stiff Records tried to sign Lennon.

Gholdfish Killah (Turrican), Friday, 17 November 2017 22:57 (three days ago) Permalink

Ha, right, they sent him a message saying, "$1000! And that's our final offer!" Lennon briefly (thought probably jokingly) entertained taking them up on it.

Montgomery Burns' Jazz (Tarfumes The Escape Goat), Saturday, 18 November 2017 00:05 (two days ago) Permalink

The timeframe probably doesn't line up, but imagine Lennon making the deal and then recording w/Rockpile* and/or The Attractions!

*Which reminds me of an anecdote from a recent Nick Lowe interview I read wherein he describes a scene from when Brinsley Schwarz opened for Wings. The Brinsleys were having an aftershow party and where singing Beatles songs when Paul shows. They were reluctant to continue because they were under the impression he was really trying to shake off "the Beatles thing", but he joined in, and Lowe noted that afterwards more and more Beatles songs started popping up in Wings sets.

to fly across the city and find Aerosmith's car (C. Grisso/McCain), Saturday, 18 November 2017 01:11 (two days ago) Permalink

Hard to reconcile his casual appreciation of “coming up” with “How do you sleep nightssssssss?”

calstars, Saturday, 18 November 2017 12:14 (two days ago) Permalink

Only a person who loved Paul could have written "How Do You Sleep?"

morning wood truancy (Alfred, Lord Sotosyn), Saturday, 18 November 2017 12:25 (two days ago) Permalink

'How Do You Sleep?' and 'Coming Up' were released 9 years apart. That's more time than The Beatles' recording career from 'Love Me Do' to Abbey Road.

Gholdfish Killah (Turrican), Saturday, 18 November 2017 12:33 (two days ago) Permalink

For what it's worth, here's the Fred Seaman account of John's reaction to hearing 'Coming Up':

We were driving past a vast shopping mall, near Walt Whitman's birthplace, when a familiar voice boomed over the four speakers.

"Fuck a pig!" John shouted. "It's Paul!".

Indeed it was Paul McCartney's new hit single, "Coming Up', a catchy tune built around a repetitive staccato riff. John frowned, turned up the volume, and began to nod to the beat.

"Not bad," he said at the end of the song, sounded surprised and even somewhat disappointed. When the announcer mentioned that Paul played all the instruments himself, John mumbled something to the effect that it made perfect sense as Paul had always wanted to be a one-man band. John turned down the volume and fell silent for a while. Then he asked me to get him a copy of Paul's new album and set up a stereo system in his bedroom.....

The next day at breakfast, John hummed the melody of Paul's new single, which he said he could not get out of his head." It's driving me crackers!" he exclaimed cheerfully. He said the album was uneven, but he acknowledged that it was an unusually adventurous effort by Paul, and far superior to his previous release 'Back to the Egg' which John had dismissed as "garbage'. He gave Paul credit for trying his hand at something new.

Luna Schlosser, Sunday, 19 November 2017 12:20 (yesterday) Permalink


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