Paul Simon

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We don't seem to have a general Paul Simon thread on ILM; we have threads on Hearts and Bones, and on Graceland, and polls polls polls but how about a general thread of Simon talk in addition.

I'm listening through his oeuvre today, and just listened to Live Rhymin', from 1974. I wanted to remark on the version of "America" that ends the album. Someone in the audience yells something like "say a few words!" Simon replies "Say a few words? Well, let's hope that we're...let's hope that we continue to live." He then plays a slow, quiet, and sad "America"; it's missing half its life, resigned, but resignation was in the air in 1974. It's a remarkable performance.

Most important performer of our generation: (Euler), Saturday, 6 March 2010 19:06 (eight years ago) Permalink

I grew up with Negotiations and Love Songs on cassette

I think he's classic as a songwriter
when his prose doesn't get too purple & ponderous

lukevalentine, Saturday, 6 March 2010 19:24 (eight years ago) Permalink

a lot of his recordings sound dated because of the production though

lukevalentine, Saturday, 6 March 2010 19:26 (eight years ago) Permalink

I'm with you on his lyrics; I listened through the whole Simon & Garfunkel oeuvre earlier today, and I cringe at some of his lyrics, especially on PSR&T. But from Bookends on I think he came to understand his own voice better. In short: he was wise to avoid trying to write like Dylan, because most songwriters end up sounding silly when they do that (cf. early Springsteen).

Most important performer of our generation: (Euler), Saturday, 6 March 2010 19:28 (eight years ago) Permalink

dunno how dated his records sound, or if they're dated it's not to their detriment -- I mean, sure, something like "Still Crazy" is pretty quintessentially 70s, but in the same way that say, Steely Dan is quintessentially 70s. Production on the whole is pretty sparkling and gorgeous to these ears.

tylerw, Saturday, 6 March 2010 20:09 (eight years ago) Permalink

btw Paul Simon was my first genuine rock concert. The 1990 (or 1989?) "Born At The Right Time" tour. I was 11 ... It was excellent.

tylerw, Saturday, 6 March 2010 20:11 (eight years ago) Permalink

halfway through One-Trick Pony now (my first listen to it!) and the production on all the records through 1980 sound fine. My brother, though, refuses to give Graceland a chance on account of its "dated" production, by which he means gated drums, mostly. While I think he's nuts for dismissing Graceland, I do see how gated drums sound of their time.

Most important performer of our generation: (Euler), Saturday, 6 March 2010 20:12 (eight years ago) Permalink

I really must buy me some Paul Simon. I own none of his records, but I know them reasonably well from my parents' record collection when I was younger. I mean this 5-disc Simon and Garfunkel set costs next to nothing.

Duke, Saturday, 6 March 2010 20:17 (eight years ago) Permalink

The 1990 (or 1989?) "Born At The Right Time" tour. I was 11 ... It was excellent.

One of my first shows. I've told the story in one of the other Simon threads: it's still the only concert during which the performer played a Big Hit Single ('You Can Call Me Al'), then said, "Woo! That was great! Let's do it again!" and proceeded to play it again.

Inculcate a spirit of serfdom in children (Alfred, Lord Sotosyn), Saturday, 6 March 2010 21:39 (eight years ago) Permalink

Is the song "The Dangling Conversation" meant to be ironic at all ?

lukevalentine, Saturday, 6 March 2010 21:48 (eight years ago) Permalink

I suspect not. His pre-Bookends lyrics leaned way into the "depressed teenager in a turtleneck" territory.

Hideous Lump, Saturday, 6 March 2010 22:00 (eight years ago) Permalink

One of my first shows. I've told the story in one of the other Simon threads: it's still the only concert during which the performer played a Big Hit Single ('You Can Call Me Al'), then said, "Woo! That was great! Let's do it again!" and proceeded to play it again.

Man, that kinda bums me out. I saw Simon on the Graceland tour - I think that puts it around 87 or 88. I was twelve - it was my second concert (1st was Jimmy Buffett). Anyway, he did the exact same thing when I saw him. The crowd went so nuts after he played "You Can Call Me Al" that he (I thought) spontaneously said "We can do it again!", to which the crowd went nuts again. Makes me a little sad to know that was a rehearsed thing on his part.

On the other hand, there's something kind of wonderful about him being so premeditated about his set list. "...okay, and then at this point we play 'You Can Call Me Al' two times in a row..."

scott pgwp (pgwp), Saturday, 6 March 2010 22:17 (eight years ago) Permalink

I mentioned it on the Unplugged thread, but the extra tracks on the 2005 (2004?) reissues are worth buying as individual songs. Hearts and Bones has a terrific acoustic-guitar-and-voice demo for "Train in the Distance."

I'm a stan, and bought Surprise for a few bucks at a Half Price Books -- so disappointing. Maybe there are better demos for those songs that will be released later.

can it compete with the wagon wheel (Eazy), Saturday, 6 March 2010 22:18 (eight years ago) Permalink

I think it's much too twee & teen angsty, then

xxp

lukevalentine, Saturday, 6 March 2010 22:20 (eight years ago) Permalink

& I am wearing a turtleneck fwiw !

lukevalentine, Saturday, 6 March 2010 22:20 (eight years ago) Permalink

"Surprise" sucked imo, Eno's ambient shit added nothing to half baked song sketches

lukevalentine, Saturday, 6 March 2010 22:22 (eight years ago) Permalink

Another case for Paul Simon with just voice and guitar:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Dd8ePfu7_pg

can it compete with the wagon wheel (Eazy), Saturday, 6 March 2010 22:27 (eight years ago) Permalink

i think i've discussed this elsewhere, but his 1st "real" solo album (the one from 1972) is one of the great albums of its period.

and although i like much of the rest of his work (w/ and w/o garfunkel) it sort of towers above everything else.

by another name (amateurist), Saturday, 6 March 2010 22:35 (eight years ago) Permalink

his crappy lyrics pretty much go away after he broke w/ garfunkel. or at least the stratospherically crappy ones, anyway.

by another name (amateurist), Saturday, 6 March 2010 22:37 (eight years ago) Permalink

personally speaking, simon comes across like a bit of a dick, I think

lukevalentine, Sunday, 7 March 2010 01:12 (eight years ago) Permalink

If "dick" means "self-aware," sure. I can't accuse him of gratuitous cruelty to his lovers.

Inculcate a spirit of serfdom in children (Alfred, Lord Sotosyn), Sunday, 7 March 2010 01:16 (eight years ago) Permalink

his 1st "real" solo album (the one from 1972) is one of the great albums of its period

I've been listening to this a lot recently. "Duncan" is a killer song.

President Keyes, Sunday, 7 March 2010 02:08 (eight years ago) Permalink

Interesting to contrast "Duncan" with its demo version. "My wife and me took a home by the sea..."

Love this album. Sometimes I think Paul Simon's stuff from the S/T through "Graceland" (or sometimes if I'm feeling generous "Saints") is the best stuff ever. Once about every 5 years or so I go on a bender with it.

Then I get to feeling like an overstuffed couch and have to listen to some Misfits.

Hardcore Homecare (staggerlee), Sunday, 7 March 2010 02:40 (eight years ago) Permalink

x-post Yep, Simon played the song twice at every stop. But who would complain, really? I last time I saw Joe Strummer, toward the end of the night, after he had already played "London Calling" and "White Man ...," he asked the crowd which of them they wanted to hear again. People voted "London Calling," and he played it again. Man of the people, that Strummer.

Funny this thread kicked in now, since I just took out my S&G albums to give them a listen for the first time. Them and Simon's solo albums are interesting to me, since scanning the back I know two or three songs per disc like the back of my hand, but few of the others - yet I know the song titles! Like "Dangling Conversation." I have no idea what that song sounds like, but I at least recognize the name. Weird.

Josh in Chicago, Sunday, 7 March 2010 02:46 (eight years ago) Permalink

I listened to One-Trick Pony last night for the first time, as I mentioned, and it was kind of a snoozer (granted, it was the 12th S&G/Simon record I played yesterday, haha). Any suggestions on what I should listen for next time?

Most important performer of our generation: (Euler), Sunday, 7 March 2010 06:37 (eight years ago) Permalink

Interesting to contrast "Duncan" with its demo version.

yeah, he tells a completely different story! weird, huh?

the s/t lp has some great singles and s&g-style BIG songs like duncan, mother&child reunion, me&julio, but i think the highlights are armistice day, peace like a river, and papa hobo. armistice day might be my favorite simon song, period.

by another name (amateurist), Sunday, 7 March 2010 07:36 (eight years ago) Permalink

my favorite Simon track just might be "Diamonds On the Soles of Her Shoes" from some deluxe version of Graceland, I think. It's totally stripped down, the only things on the track are Simon's vocals, Ladysmith Black Mambazo & bass

lukevalentine, Sunday, 7 March 2010 13:18 (eight years ago) Permalink

I meant to say "Diamonds On the Soles of Her Goes (Unreleased Version)"

lukevalentine, Sunday, 7 March 2010 13:18 (eight years ago) Permalink

Any suggestions on what I should listen for next time?

well "late in the evening" is so much better than the rest of the record that it doesn't need pointing out. but i like the title track too, and "long, long day." don't actually remember a lot else off the top of my head. i've never seen the movie, sort of curious about it.

hellzapoppa (tipsy mothra), Sunday, 7 March 2010 14:13 (eight years ago) Permalink

I think She's The One is kinda underrated ... Maybe closest in tone/style to Hearts and Bones. Not Simon at his catchiest, maybe, but some good tunes/lyrics.

tylerw, Sunday, 7 March 2010 16:20 (eight years ago) Permalink

eight months pass...

hmm, didn't he just do a bunch of reissues? http://artsbeat.blogs.nytimes.com/2010/11/12/here-comes-rhymin-simon-on-a-different-label/?src=twt&twt=artsbeat

tylerw, Friday, 12 November 2010 23:08 (seven years ago) Permalink

The current reissues sound amazing. I doubt there's much they could do to improve them, nor is there probably much in the vaults of note that didn't make the current batch.

This is like the Stones reissuing/remastering on a different label every few years.

EZ Snappin, Friday, 12 November 2010 23:30 (seven years ago) Permalink

i should get those reissues probably. all of my 70s-80s simon is on vinyl. bonus trax are good?

tylerw, Friday, 12 November 2010 23:32 (seven years ago) Permalink

most of the bonus material I could take or leave, with the glaring exception of the alternate version of "Gone At Last" with the Jessy Dixon Singers from Still Crazy.

the Whiney G. Weingarten Memorial 77 Clique (Shakey Mo Collier), Friday, 12 November 2010 23:37 (seven years ago) Permalink

They run from really good to never going to play that again. But the sound on all the albums is pristine. He had the best of the best backing bands and they sound like the best - warm, clean 70s studio sound. I only have the three 70s records (I never warmed to the 80s work outside of a track here and there), but I understand the remasters are equally great if you care for the material.

xpost

EZ Snappin, Friday, 12 November 2010 23:40 (seven years ago) Permalink

I love the "Duncan" and "Take me to the Mardi Gras" demos.

EZ Snappin, Friday, 12 November 2010 23:41 (seven years ago) Permalink

This is like the Stones reissuing/remastering on a different label every few years

dunno what this means. abkco series came out 20+ years after the original cd releases. the reamaining ones came out about a year ago. it's not like Elvis Costello who's had about 4 This Years Models since 1987

xxxxpost

KC & the sunshine banned (outdoor_miner), Saturday, 13 November 2010 00:02 (seven years ago) Permalink

^^^Bowie is the other one who does this

the Whiney G. Weingarten Memorial 77 Clique (Shakey Mo Collier), Saturday, 13 November 2010 00:08 (seven years ago) Permalink

and Zappa - all three of those guys got the "Rykodisc treatment", too, coincidentally

KC & the sunshine banned (outdoor_miner), Saturday, 13 November 2010 00:09 (seven years ago) Permalink

Stones issued Sticky Fingers on cd in 90, 94 & 09. Costello issued This Year's Model in 86, 93, 02 & 07. One more time - what a huge difference! Point is, these artists that control their catalog have huge incentive to switch labels and reissue stuff whenever they can.

Hell, I've bought the Soft Boys' Underwater Moonlight four times on cd. I'm an enabler.

EZ Snappin, Saturday, 13 November 2010 00:25 (seven years ago) Permalink

i was actually thinking of the Stones' early ones, which only came out once before they were done perfectly in 2001 or whatever it was. had to take exception 'cuz there's a night and day difference between the two issues.
sorry for derailing on Paul Simon's watch

KC & the sunshine banned (outdoor_miner), Saturday, 13 November 2010 00:32 (seven years ago) Permalink

I wasn't clear to start - those abkco remaster are great. The Stones don't own those though so can't milk 'em.

EZ Snappin, Saturday, 13 November 2010 00:38 (seven years ago) Permalink

A really talented guy who since the mid 80s has done the mistake of letting other people control a bit too much of his sound and songwriting style. "Hearts And Bones" is fantastic, and seems to be his peak. "Surprise" was an aptly titled Eno collaboration though, just need to relax the rhythm section even a good bit and find back to his good, old pre-"Graceland" style.

You're Twistin' My Melody Man! (Geir Hongro), Saturday, 13 November 2010 10:24 (seven years ago) Permalink

four months pass...

New album streaming on NPR. Sounds pretty good, glad to hear him dabbling in Afropop again, the rhythms overall are stronger than anything he's done in a long time (and I think rhythm is really key to his best songwriting).

something of an astrological coup (tipsy mothra), Monday, 4 April 2011 14:47 (seven years ago) Permalink

He's touring the US and doing mid-sized halls and some club gigs (930 club and others).

curmudgeon, Monday, 4 April 2011 14:51 (seven years ago) Permalink

this sounds good!

tylerw, Monday, 4 April 2011 16:26 (seven years ago) Permalink

"dazzling blue" kinda dazzling!

tylerw, Monday, 4 April 2011 16:35 (seven years ago) Permalink

Haven't kept up with his new output since Rhythm of the Saints (other than hearing the ghastly Capeman). This is nice, in a pleasantly unassuming sort of way. Nothing jumped out me after one listen but it was solid throughout.

scott pgwp (pgwp), Monday, 4 April 2011 16:41 (seven years ago) Permalink

you're the one is worth hearing.... surprise has its moments, but some of those moments are not so hot.

tylerw, Monday, 4 April 2011 16:51 (seven years ago) Permalink

Man, there are definitely some dud tracks and cheese on Still Crazy/One-Trick Pony/H&B, but the good stuff is so good. This probably reads like challops but I actually think OTP is one of his strongest records, if you just lop off the forced "Ace in the Hole" and maybe the title track. More consistent than H&B (though the top-drawer stuff there is really essential Simon) and just more memorable, lyrically and melodically, than most of Still Crazy. (I will admit that side two of that one is super forgettable - can't hum most of the songs, looking at the titles, and why on earth he left "Slip Slidin' Away" off of that I cannot fathom.)

Tried halfheartedly to like Capeman, never could.

Harvey Manfrenjensenden (Doctor Casino), Wednesday, 6 July 2016 16:43 (two years ago) Permalink

i saw Capeman for free... he needed a dramturg or somethin'

helpless before THRILLARY (Dr Morbius), Wednesday, 6 July 2016 16:48 (two years ago) Permalink

four months pass...

i listened to the new album on a plane last week, on shitty plane headphones. Had some decent stuff.

hard to get past the lyrics of Still Crazy - it has a self-pitying, self-justifying tone

p sure he was going for a Dostoevskian thing here

Supercreditor (Dr Morbius), Monday, 5 December 2016 19:12 (one year ago) Permalink

http://www.nytimes.com/2016/11/30/books/review/rock-lives-this-seasons-pop-music-biographies-and-memoirs.html?_r=0

Alan Light reviews a bio done on Paul Simon, without any cooperation from Simon

HOMEWARD BOUND: The Life of Paul Simon (Holt, $32), Peter Ames Carlin’s biography of Paul Simon, presents the portrait of an artist with a much greater compulsion to keep his eyes on the prize. Carlin — who has chronicled the lives of Brian Wilson, Paul McCartney and Bruce Springsteen — received no cooperation from Simon; the closest he got to the singer was getting glared at from the stage of a 2013 lecture at Emory University. But the thoroughly researched and solidly told “Homeward Bound” reveals many sides of a complicated, ambitious, insecure figure.

The most newsworthy element of this story is Simon’s ruthlessness. Carlin explains that at the heart of the fraught, almost comically competitive relationship between Simon and his on-again-off-again partner/rival, Art Garfunkel, is a solo deal that a teenage Simon secretly made with a record company during the duo’s early, brief moment of pop success under the name Tom and Jerry. It’s a pattern that seems to play out repeatedly in his career as described by those who have known Simon — according to one of the legendary Muscle Shoals session musicians, he promises them royalties on 1973’s “There Goes Rhymin’ Simon” album, but they never see the money; he borrows a tape of South African music from a musician acquaintance, then, she says, blows her off and turns her idea to use the irresistible rhythms into the basis for the “Graceland” album — only to record two songs for the project that Los Lobos and Rockin’ Dopsie and the Twisters say were largely created by them without giving them songwriting credit or revenue.

But Carlin isn’t out to do a hatchet job; his love for Simon’s towering accomplishments as a songwriter is clear. He’s especially insightful examining the colossal Broadway flop of “The Capeman” and the “Rhythm of the Saints” album, inevitably overshadowed as the follow-up to the “Graceland” juggernaut. Unfortunately, “Homeward Bound” breezes over Simon’s fascinating latter-day work, sprinting through the last 20 years (a new family with the singer Edie Brickell, and new music that stands up to the best of his catalog) in about 20 pages.

curmudgeon, Monday, 5 December 2016 21:07 (one year ago) Permalink

Um, who cares about lending someone an inspirational tape, really, as long as the South African musicians he recorded with got paid (?).

sam jax sax jam (Jordan), Monday, 5 December 2016 21:21 (one year ago) Permalink

as long as the South African musicians he recorded with got paid (?).

That is the question. Did not realize earlier musicians had also grumbled about him not paying :

according to one of the legendary Muscle Shoals session musicians, he promises them royalties on 1973’s “There Goes Rhymin’ Simon” album, but they never see the money

When I saw him on tour this summer, he didn't ever introduce the band (but I assume they got paid).

curmudgeon, Tuesday, 6 December 2016 15:21 (one year ago) Permalink

Maybe they got paid in exposure, a la nu-economy interns.

Josh in Chicago, Tuesday, 6 December 2016 15:44 (one year ago) Permalink

Carlin did a pretty good biog of Springsteen (albeit with Bruce's co-operation). I trust him to do a decent job here.

heaven parker (anagram), Tuesday, 6 December 2016 15:59 (one year ago) Permalink

Would read if only for, but of course not only for, The Capeman material.

I Walk the Ondioline (James Redd and the Blecchs), Tuesday, 6 December 2016 16:09 (one year ago) Permalink

I have no problem believing Simon is something of a cagey asshole professionally and personally. great songwriter though.

Οὖτις, Tuesday, 6 December 2016 16:26 (one year ago) Permalink

i guess simon probably won't write an autobio? i can see it being kinda feisty.

tylerw, Tuesday, 6 December 2016 16:56 (one year ago) Permalink

I saw Paul Simon on the Graceland tour - it was one of the first concerts I ever saw. I have strong memories of his bass player from that show. When I saw him again a couple years ago, that bass player was still in the group. For what it's worth. Assuming the guy gets paid.

sctttnnnt (pgwp), Wednesday, 7 December 2016 02:49 (one year ago) Permalink

I love this guy's work, but have no doubt at all that his autobiography would be insufferable self-serving crap.

walk back to the halftime long, billy lynn, billy lynn (Doctor Casino), Wednesday, 7 December 2016 03:05 (one year ago) Permalink

I'm under the impression that the core of Simon's backing band these days have been with him for quite a while, including a few South African musicians dating back to Graceland and Vincent Nguini (whose Cameroonian) who's played with him since early '90s as main guitar dude.

If Simon can't be honest enough about going bald to not try to hide it for 40 years, I doubt he would hold his own feet over the flame in a memoir.

in twelve parts (lamonti), Wednesday, 7 December 2016 07:57 (one year ago) Permalink

Put it this way, I love Simon & Garfunkel as much as anyone and I spin The Rhythm of the Saints frequently, but I've never read or watched an interview with the guy where I haven't felt like dozing off.

Working night & day, I tried to stay awake... (Turrican), Friday, 9 December 2016 22:47 (one year ago) Permalink

maybe garfunkel should just make a documentary about him and simon a la Herzog's My Best Fiend

tylerw, Friday, 9 December 2016 22:50 (one year ago) Permalink

I've just had to throw on The Rhythm of the Saints briefly just to listen to 'The Coast', which is probably my answer to the question "what is your favourite song from Paul Simon's solo career?"

Working night & day, I tried to stay awake... (Turrican), Friday, 9 December 2016 22:52 (one year ago) Permalink

ba ba ba Ba Ba Ba PROUST!

Okay, I'm leaving this LP on for lil while.

Working night & day, I tried to stay awake... (Turrican), Friday, 9 December 2016 22:56 (one year ago) Permalink

He was a mean individual

I Walk the Ondioline (James Redd and the Blecchs), Saturday, 10 December 2016 02:14 (one year ago) Permalink

^^ would watch

also yeah "The Coast" is amazing. Turrican, I think you and me were the only people to vote for it on the Simon ballot poll, maybe. But mannnn that main guitar figure is just so compelling and lovely.

walk back to the halftime long, billy lynn, billy lynn (Doctor Casino), Saturday, 10 December 2016 02:55 (one year ago) Permalink

"The Coast," "The Cool, Cool River," "Can't Run But," "Further to Fly" -- these are best-ever compositions.

The burrito of ennui (Alfred, Lord Sotosyn), Saturday, 10 December 2016 02:56 (one year ago) Permalink

yeah Rhythm.. is amazing and Graceland isn't even all that great really.

piscesx, Saturday, 10 December 2016 03:13 (one year ago) Permalink

The demo of "The Coast" is worth a listen just for the alternate first verse alone.

who even are those other cats (Eazy), Saturday, 10 December 2016 05:23 (one year ago) Permalink

"The Coast" and the title track are among the most r e l a x e d pieces of music ever.

Hideous Lump, Saturday, 10 December 2016 05:58 (one year ago) Permalink

Cool Cool River is soooo good!

And is in 9/8 for bonus points.

in twelve parts (lamonti), Saturday, 10 December 2016 07:16 (one year ago) Permalink

'Spirit Voices', 'Born At The Right Time' and 'The Obvious Child' are all amazing too, IMO. I don't know if it's better than Graceland but I certainly listen to it more!

Working night & day, I tried to stay awake... (Turrican), Saturday, 10 December 2016 18:52 (one year ago) Permalink

two months pass...

huh I had never really dug into the whole arc of S&G's career/output. Weird how much of it was in fits and starts - a hastily recorded debut album that disappears, Paul goes to England and records a solo album (and produces Jackson C. Frank), Garfunkel goes off to act in Catch 22, their big breakthrough single is orchestrated and released without their input, Paul has writer's block for most of 1967, etc. It's almost like they were never really a functional unit apart from maybe 1969.

Οὖτις, Tuesday, 21 February 2017 21:12 (one year ago) Permalink

Yeah, that's very true! One of the main reasons for their on-and-off activity post-Sounds of Silence is that Simon took a long time to come up with a batch of material. He was really picky when it came to songwriting.

Working night & day, I tried to stay awake... (Turrican), Wednesday, 22 February 2017 22:56 (one year ago) Permalink

six months pass...

damn STS

Uhura Mazda (lukas), Friday, 25 August 2017 00:14 (one year ago) Permalink

good songs

niels, Friday, 25 August 2017 06:58 (one year ago) Permalink

nine months pass...

Just realized I missed him in Chicago last night on his farewell tour.

Great setlist:

America
50 Ways to Leave Your Lover
The Boy in the Bubble
Dazzling Blue
That Was Your Mother
Rewrite
Mother and Child Reunion
Me and Julio Down by the Schoolyard
Rene and Georgette Magritte With Their Dog After the War
Can't Run But
Wristband
Spirit Voices
The Obvious Child
Questions for the Angels
The Cool, Cool River
Diamonds on the Soles of Her Shoes
You Can Call Me Al
Graceland
Still Crazy After All These Years
Late in the Evening
Homeward Bound
Kodachrome
The Boxer
American Tune
The Sound of Silence

... (Eazy), Thursday, 7 June 2018 22:00 (four months ago) Permalink

The Cool, Cool River

yeeessssssss

morning wood truancy (Alfred, Lord Sotosyn), Thursday, 7 June 2018 22:16 (four months ago) Permalink

damn that setlist is fire

call all destroyer, Friday, 8 June 2018 00:37 (four months ago) Permalink

i just impulsively spent a small fortune to catch this tour so uh thanks i guess!

call all destroyer, Friday, 8 June 2018 03:17 (four months ago) Permalink

two weeks pass...

this show was a lot of fun btw though i think the think that will stick with me was a sort of chamber music version of rene & georgette magritte; he sang it faithfully and intimately and it was just totally gorgeous.

call all destroyer, Tuesday, 26 June 2018 03:20 (three months ago) Permalink

yeah i’m hoping he works more with ymusic (and gabriel kahane, who did some of the arranging) in the future

maura, Tuesday, 26 June 2018 03:21 (three months ago) Permalink

yeah definitely. (also thought your globe review aptly captured the vibe of the show.)

call all destroyer, Tuesday, 26 June 2018 03:25 (three months ago) Permalink

thank you : )

maura, Tuesday, 26 June 2018 03:29 (three months ago) Permalink

two months pass...

Sounds good:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Wu2f5LHnVKk

Pesto Mindset (Eazy), Friday, 7 September 2018 16:04 (one month ago) Permalink

is someone gonna stream his final show on 9/22?

alpine static, Friday, 7 September 2018 17:49 (one month ago) Permalink

Oh, I've been waiting to hear this since I saw the show. Rene and Georgette Magritte With Their Dog After The War is really good.

Frederik B, Friday, 7 September 2018 17:57 (one month ago) Permalink

Can't Run But is a nice version as well. Pretty great live.

Frederik B, Friday, 7 September 2018 18:05 (one month ago) Permalink

Man, all old Jewish men really end up looking like the same person.

I dig the New Orleans-ized 'Pigs, Sheep and Wolves'.

change display name (Jordan), Friday, 7 September 2018 18:15 (one month ago) Permalink

These new versions, especially Can't Run But, are horrible. The way he phrases the lyrics in that song on the new version is so bad. His enunciation of the T in 'but' drives me crazy. I had high hopes, but this sucks.

brotherlovesdub, Friday, 7 September 2018 18:55 (one month ago) Permalink

Going to see him tomorrow, my first solo experience with him since the '91 tour behind The Rhythm of the Saints.

The Silky Veils of Alfred (Alfred, Lord Sotosyn), Friday, 7 September 2018 18:57 (one month ago) Permalink

I can't imagine a new version of 'Can't Run But' being anywhere near as good as the original. One of my favourites on Saints..., that.

Le Baton Rose (Turrican), Friday, 7 September 2018 19:39 (one month ago) Permalink

Strongly disagree with brotherlovesdub here. Just having heard the new album for the first time, I'm really loving it already. No matter how good the original versions already were, these new takes exist in their own right and all have something to offer.
The original 'Can't Run But' is a big fave of mine as well, and I agree nothing could top that song with its outstanding rhythm section. But this variation is so different, I'd think that the two versions could exist on the same album without it being repetitive and with neither take being redundant.

'How The Heart Approaches What It Yearns' might be an early favourite with its gorgeous Wynton Marsalis trumpet work.

Valentijn, Wednesday, 12 September 2018 20:35 (one month ago) Permalink

two weeks pass...

wow, that's a cuíca drum on Me and Julio...

Always thought it was Paul doing funky monkey sounds!

the more you know...

niels, Tuesday, 2 October 2018 08:51 (three weeks ago) Permalink

Lol

Harper Valley CTA-102 (James Redd and the Blecchs), Tuesday, 2 October 2018 10:06 (three weeks ago) Permalink


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