an attempt at a general "What are you currently digging re. classical music" thread

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Okay so this is really just an excuse for me to pontificate on composers I'm enjoying at the moment, as I usually listen to just one exclusively for a week or two to get a good feeling for their style.

I've been listening to this set of orchestral pieces by Hindemith:

http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/4131GR7WV9L._SL500_AA240_.jpg

Lots of fun. Only occasionally does he bog down in "let's see how much I can milk from this single theme" stylistic exercises, but several pieces (Nobilissima Visione, the Op. 50 Konzertmusik) are very near being great. Even when the musical material is slightly less-inspiring his orchestration and unique harmonic language (tonal afaik, but extremely extended) at least make it *sound* interesting.

Daruton, Thursday, 3 December 2009 20:22 (eight years ago) Permalink

Mathis der Maler symphony is great.

Henry Frog (Frogman Henry), Thursday, 3 December 2009 20:35 (eight years ago) Permalink

Nearly everything by Arthur Kreiger.
This is the best currently available collection; a few other pieces are scattered across compilations.
http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/41K5W0FG79L._SS500_.jpg
Meeting Places

This recent collection of pieces by David Rakowski.
http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/51EqHtb8DfL._SS500_.jpg
Winged Contraption

Paul in Santa Cruz, Thursday, 3 December 2009 20:39 (eight years ago) Permalink

I've been digging Ligeti's Chamber Concerto, Mendelssohn's Lieder ohne Worte and Purcell odes.

On the radio I heard Verdi's string quartet, and I thought that was really good.

Henry Frog (Frogman Henry), Thursday, 3 December 2009 20:39 (eight years ago) Permalink

i just keep listening to more and more brahms. like a crazy person or something.

i was gonna start a rolling classical thread. glad someone did it. cheers!

scott seward, Thursday, 3 December 2009 20:46 (eight years ago) Permalink

Paul, the samples on that Rakowski disc sound really interesting. I'd never heard of him until now.

Daruton, Thursday, 3 December 2009 20:49 (eight years ago) Permalink

I have been listening to Winterreise a lot lately.

twice boiled cabbage is death, Thursday, 3 December 2009 21:17 (eight years ago) Permalink

I've been listening to Xenakis a fair bit. Planning on going on a Messaien kick.

sarahel, Thursday, 3 December 2009 21:22 (eight years ago) Permalink

bought a ton of records for the store and ended up with, like, a couple hundred albums that are all classical piano. really been enjoying them. i'll post here when i hear things i really like.

scott seward, Thursday, 3 December 2009 21:40 (eight years ago) Permalink

Kancheli - Abii Ne Viderem
Ligeti - Piano Etudes

zappi, Thursday, 3 December 2009 21:43 (eight years ago) Permalink

Rebecca Clarke / Sonata for viola & piano
Schubert / Piano Quintet in A major (Trout)
Schnittke / Concerto grosso no. 3
Florence Price / Mississippi River Suite
Ellen Taaffe Zwilich / 'Lament' for solo piano
Sylvie Bodorová / Terezín Ghetto Requiem

Salvador Dali Parton (Turangalila), Thursday, 3 December 2009 22:04 (eight years ago) Permalink

+1 on those Ligeti Piano Etudes.

Just spent a month with Sibelius Symphonies and their scores. Unbearable to see how simple his writing really is... so precise.

Tourtière (Ówen P.), Thursday, 3 December 2009 22:10 (eight years ago) Permalink

I'm really happy people are actually responding to this thread btw.

Owen, which is your favorite? I keep vacillating between the 4th and the 6th. Both are arguably his "darkest" pieces. I won't say much about him other than I want The Oceanides played at my funeral.

Daruton, Thursday, 3 December 2009 22:15 (eight years ago) Permalink

I'm not sure this classifies as "classical" in the sense you mean, but in fall -- winter, I listen to Gavin Bryars/Philip Jeck/Alter Ego's version of The Sinking Of The Titanic all the time.

Daniel, Esq., Thursday, 3 December 2009 22:29 (eight years ago) Permalink

I had an adolescent crush on #1 so that will forever be my favourite, but as a study piece I thought 4th was crazily informative.

Talk to me about Rekašius. I heard one thing once and it sounded like clarinetists warming up.

Tourtière (Ówen P.), Thursday, 3 December 2009 22:39 (eight years ago) Permalink

Mm, Villa-Lobos's been capturing my senses lots, lately. Yeah sure, Bachianas Brasileiras, mainly, but also some other chamber music pieces of his...

Ligeti - last night, CD 5 of The Ligeti Project series (Tledec/ Warner): Aventures, Nouvelles Aventures, Artikulation for tape, Eight pieces from "Musica ricercata", etc.

Also the recently-relseased-on-ReR ondes Martenot-piano music album: pieces by Messiaen , Charpentier, Murail.

t**t, Thursday, 3 December 2009 22:42 (eight years ago) Permalink

Sibelius is my favorite composer for orchestra. Of the symphonies 4, 6, and 7 share favorite status about equally, along with Tapiola, the Tempest music, and the so-called 'Lemminkainen Suite'.

When I first listened to the 6th and Tapiola abt 13 years ago there was an intense sens of recognition like 'this is my music. I can live here.'

Scott I am glad you are on a brahms jag. I go on those, usually within the inexhaustible realm of his chamber music. And please do post about your new solo piano trove. That's probably my biggest area of concentration in classical music.

Elric Harris and Dylan Kobold (Jon Lewis), Thursday, 3 December 2009 22:46 (eight years ago) Permalink

xpost you must hear the series of Choros!!! A set of these has been recently been completed on the BIS label. Especially in the longer Choros installments, Villa-Lobos really goes nuts, some of the craziest folk-modernist composing I've ever heard.

Elric Harris and Dylan Kobold (Jon Lewis), Thursday, 3 December 2009 22:48 (eight years ago) Permalink

Re: Rakowski, glad to have introduced his music to someone. He's a Boston-based composer with a great sense of rhythm and sonority. His Piano Etudes (which currently outnumber Ligeti's) are also recommended.

Monophonic Spree (Paul in Santa Cruz), Thursday, 3 December 2009 22:53 (eight years ago) Permalink

brahms killing me most recently: complete trios for piano,violin,cello (isotomin-stern-rose trio. vinyl set.) (i find myself saying: um, did i just play the first side of this record five times in a row? maybe i should try the other side!)

scott seward, Thursday, 3 December 2009 22:58 (eight years ago) Permalink

Digging all the classical samples mentioned in this blog post. Odd things -- e.g., interviews, movie soundtracks -- function as gateways into classical music for me.

Daniel, Esq., Thursday, 3 December 2009 23:02 (eight years ago) Permalink

xpost The trios are soooooo awesome. Have a listen to the Supraphon recordings by the Suk Trio if you come across them.

Elric Harris and Dylan Kobold (Jon Lewis), Thursday, 3 December 2009 23:06 (eight years ago) Permalink

ive realised just how brilliant the brahms symphonies are recently. took me a good long while (except for no 4 which i have loved for years).

Henry Frog (Frogman Henry), Thursday, 3 December 2009 23:09 (eight years ago) Permalink

xpost Alan Gilbert seems cool. I heard him conduct Mahler's 1st in Central Park during the summer and I liked his interpretation a lot. The final movement got rained/lightninged out but you can hardly complain about the 'storm' movement of a symphony summoning a real storm. Will probably get his Stockholm Mahler 9th from emusic soon.

Elric Harris and Dylan Kobold (Jon Lewis), Thursday, 3 December 2009 23:10 (eight years ago) Permalink

I'm still stuck on Brahms 1st whenever I reach for symphonic Brahms. Such a great opening. I hear clear pre-echoes of Mahler in this piece (even though Mahler claimed to have no use whatsoever for Brahms).

Elric Harris and Dylan Kobold (Jon Lewis), Thursday, 3 December 2009 23:12 (eight years ago) Permalink

xpost. re: Villa-Lobos "choros" - yeah thanks for the reminder, Elric/Jon. Must listen to that, certainly. Havn't so far.

t**t, Thursday, 3 December 2009 23:13 (eight years ago) Permalink

okay, in honor of this thread i just threw on some liszt piano stuff. dgg boxed set of annees de pelerinage. never heard it before. (lazar berman on piano.)

with all that piano stuff i bought came a buttload of rachmaninoff. never really listened to the rach that much, but i think i own just about everything he ever wrote now!

scott seward, Thursday, 3 December 2009 23:16 (eight years ago) Permalink

I've said on more than one occasion that the Brahms Piano Trio No. 1 (in its revised version) is my "favorite tonal piece". The best recorded performance in my view is Isaac Stern / Pablo Casals / Dame Myra Hess -- although the slower tempos can take some getting used to.

Monophonic Spree (Paul in Santa Cruz), Thursday, 3 December 2009 23:21 (eight years ago) Permalink

Re: Rakowski, glad to have introduced his music to someone. He's a Boston-based composer with a great sense of rhythm and sonority. His Piano Etudes (which currently outnumber Ligeti's) are also recommended.

― Monophonic Spree (Paul in Santa Cruz), Thursday, December 3, 2009 10:53 PM (25 minutes ago)

I know a 30-second sample isn't exactly representative, but I immediately thought "Boulez" when I heard it. P'raps you can verify/debunk this.

Daruton, Thursday, 3 December 2009 23:22 (eight years ago) Permalink

Allclassical.org

This is the only radio I listen to while driving. I've heard so many great pieces on there.

They ran a fantastic Ravel Daphne & Chloe the other night.

Nate Carson, Thursday, 3 December 2009 23:23 (eight years ago) Permalink

I think the Rakowski <-> Boulez association is a bit misleading. Rakowski has closer ties to American post-serialists like Martino and Imbrie, with a clearer sense of pulse and syncopations that make some contact with jazz (versus the metrical obscurity of some Boulez). You don't find things like Boulez's radically volatile dynamics (variation between loud and soft on a note-by-note basis) or the sometimes pointillistic textures, or the resistance to melody-plus-accompaniment textures. But Rakowski's harmonic sense is as refined as Boulez, and he has a similar knack for effective orchestration.

Monophonic Spree (Paul in Santa Cruz), Thursday, 3 December 2009 23:29 (eight years ago) Permalink

Scott I am a molelike obsessive when it comes to Liszt's ocean-sized piano oeuvre. So so much to discover with him. That Lazar Berman box is a good intro to the Annees De Pelerinage. Berman is especially good in 'Year One'. In Year Two I like Brendel a little more. Follow up Year One with Year Three if you want to hear the stark difference between wide-eyed young philosopher Liszt and weird, bitter yet beatific late Liszt.

There's another not-uncommon Lazar Berman 2LP on Columbia/Melodiya of Liszt's famous 'Transcendental Etudes'-- quite a raging roaring performance if you want to hear the hyper-virtuoso flip side of the Liszt coin.

Elric Harris and Dylan Kobold (Jon Lewis), Thursday, 3 December 2009 23:31 (eight years ago) Permalink

T**t-- start with the longer Choros first (can't remember which numbers in the series exactly) if you wanna hear the wildest stuff.

They're on emusic, FYI.

Elric Harris and Dylan Kobold (Jon Lewis), Thursday, 3 December 2009 23:33 (eight years ago) Permalink

'key! Thanx. :)

t**t, Thursday, 3 December 2009 23:34 (eight years ago) Permalink

Oh-also: Bach pieces arranged by John Lewis, for MJQ, I've enjoyed greatly too. Think that counts as classicak, too. At least partly.

t**t, Thursday, 3 December 2009 23:36 (eight years ago) Permalink

("classickal", was wot i meant)

t**t, Thursday, 3 December 2009 23:37 (eight years ago) Permalink

I think the Rakowski <-> Boulez association is a bit misleading. Rakowski has closer ties to American post-serialists like Martino and Imbrie, with a clearer sense of pulse and syncopations that make some contact with jazz (versus the metrical obscurity of some Boulez). You don't find things like Boulez's radically volatile dynamics (variation between loud and soft on a note-by-note basis) or the sometimes pointillistic textures, or the resistance to melody-plus-accompaniment textures. But Rakowski's harmonic sense is as refined as Boulez, and he has a similar knack for effective orchestration.

― Monophonic Spree (Paul in Santa Cruz), Thursday, December 3, 2009 11:29 PM

Ah okay thanks. I'm actually bent on exploring that generation of US composers (Carter, Babbitt, Martino, Shapey, maybe Wuorinen should be included, et al) at the mo'. One hears this stuff called "academic" and "dry" all the time so I take it as a challenge to prove them wrong.

AFA Boulez goes I tend to like his sensory overload early-mid pieces (that would fit your description) like Structures and le marteau more than his friendlier new stuff like Répons (though "explosante-fixe" might be my absolute favorite Boulez).

Daruton, Thursday, 3 December 2009 23:38 (eight years ago) Permalink

Pangs of regret dept-- There was an all-Kajia Saariaho concert at Columbia's Miller Theater a couple weeks ago in their Composer Portraits series and I couldn't go. So bummed. I think she's my favorite working composer right now (of those I've heard). Any fans of Saariaho up in this piece?

Elric Harris and Dylan Kobold (Jon Lewis), Thursday, 3 December 2009 23:39 (eight years ago) Permalink

xpost explosante-fixe is v v beautiful.

Elric Harris and Dylan Kobold (Jon Lewis), Thursday, 3 December 2009 23:40 (eight years ago) Permalink

Big fan of those same American composer you mention! Mel Powell is especially bright star in the same constellation. (And I sort of lump Wolpe in, too, although he's sort of European?)

And my Boulez picks are pretty much the same as yours -- with a soft spot especially for the first two piano sonatas.

Monophonic Spree (Paul in Santa Cruz), Thursday, 3 December 2009 23:42 (eight years ago) Permalink

My fave Saariaho is Lichtbogen, although I've just now realised I haven't heard a note she's written since 2000. Any recently highlights I should seek out?

Monophonic Spree (Paul in Santa Cruz), Thursday, 3 December 2009 23:44 (eight years ago) Permalink

As seldom as I get the urge to actually throw on any of my Boulez discs, I would go see a performance of any of his big pieces in a hot minnit. Also, I really want to see the guy conduct before he can't any longer...

Elric Harris and Dylan Kobold (Jon Lewis), Thursday, 3 December 2009 23:45 (eight years ago) Permalink

xpost I really like Graal-Theatre, which I THINK is after 2000...

Elric Harris and Dylan Kobold (Jon Lewis), Thursday, 3 December 2009 23:45 (eight years ago) Permalink

Owen, re: Rekašius. Haha I think what you heard might have been "Still not enough" (Saxophone concerto) which mostly fits that description and is of course awesome. Here's an okayish rip of his 7th Symphony, which is one of my favorites, esp. the 3rd movement:

Symphony No. 7, Op. 31 (1987) 'In Memoriam' (perf. by The Lithuanian Philharmonic Orchestra, Juozas Domarkas conducting)

A weirdly translated interview:
http://www.bruceduffie.com/rekasius.html

Here's a very sad article on his death:
http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/entertainment/3168842.stm

Salvador Dali Parton (Turangalila), Thursday, 3 December 2009 23:46 (eight years ago) Permalink

http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/41W5z6LJetL._SL500_AA240_.jpg

M.V., Thursday, 3 December 2009 23:50 (eight years ago) Permalink

Really enjoying Sergio Fiorentino right now.

ogmor, Thursday, 3 December 2009 23:57 (eight years ago) Permalink

Also, I really want to see the guy conduct before he can't any longer...

I really regret that I won't be moving to Chicago in time to see him do The Firebird. I just hope there's a "next time". :\

Daruton, Friday, 4 December 2009 00:21 (eight years ago) Permalink

"There's another not-uncommon Lazar Berman 2LP on Columbia/Melodiya of Liszt's famous 'Transcendental Etudes'"

i have this! haven't played it yet. i'll play it tommorow at the store.

hope nobody minds if i occasionally babble about the sonics/sound of my vinyl. i've got about a thousand classical albums and every once in a while i'll pull something out that has me slack-jawed and drooling. right now that is a columbia 360 sound stereo pressing of bernstein/stern doiing bartok's two rhapsodies for violin and orchestra and berg's violin concerto. not only is the music amazing, but gaaaaaaaaaaaaaa the recording is just staggering. the brightness of stern's violin in tandem with the new york phil...if you ever wonder why people still shell out big bucks for vinyl, well, here ya go. and its not a big bucks album. but its worth its weight in gold.

scott seward, Friday, 4 December 2009 00:56 (eight years ago) Permalink

I'm also a bit sceptical that this is the biggest or most difficult symphony there is.

Robert Adam Gilmour, Sunday, 23 November 2014 19:16 (three years ago) Permalink

guessing that mahlers 8th has been performed by the titular 1000 at some stage?

john wahey (NickB), Sunday, 23 November 2014 19:44 (three years ago) Permalink

Currently digging Beethoven's early string quartets, specifically the six that make up Opus 18.

I know it's the late ones that are supposed to be the real hot potatoes, but they're as yet a bit too impenetrable for a novice like myself.

Sir Lord Baltimora (Myonga Vön Bontee), Sunday, 23 November 2014 20:28 (three years ago) Permalink

all the beethoven SQs are brilliant. esp love the rasumovsky quartets and the "serioso" and "harp" (which seem of a pair to me)

kobaïas fünke (clouds), Sunday, 23 November 2014 21:04 (three years ago) Permalink

Early beethoven quartets and sonatas are amazing, no qualifiers.

a drug by the name of WORLD WITHOUT END (Jon Lewis), Sunday, 23 November 2014 22:19 (three years ago) Permalink

Just watched Ken Russell's ABC Of British Music on youtube, it's all over the place but there were quite a few things that really impressed me.
He lists loads of neglected and forgotten composers and he makes a long list of music critics he hates.

Of the neglected composers, Elizabeth Maconchy stuck out the most.
I was pleased he liked Havergal Brian so much.

He gives a preview of Thomas Dolby playing music for Russell's Gothic, which sounded way better than I remembered.

A real standout was Nigel Kennedy performing part of his collaboration with David Heath. It has mixtures of electronic and rock. I looked for the track on youtube and David Heath has uploaded that whole album, but in a new mix that the record company wasn't interested in reissuing(he was unhappy with his original mix). Great stuff.

But the thing that really bowled me over was a clip of Cornelius Cardew. Wow! If only I can find that piece easily enough. I hope.

Here's a long but incomplete list of the things covered in the documentary.
http://www.screenonline.org.uk/tv/id/1025804/synopsis.html

Robert Adam Gilmour, Saturday, 6 December 2014 20:14 (three years ago) Permalink

Along with his freakout Liszt and Tchaikovsky movies, Russell made biopics of Debussy and Delius, both of whom are all time top 10 composers for me.

I haven't heard Dolby's Gothic score in decades. I remember being disappointed; I was a massive t dolb fan then.

a drug by the name of WORLD WITHOUT END (Jon Lewis), Saturday, 6 December 2014 22:30 (three years ago) Permalink

must remember to rewatch the mahler biopic sometime soon. the devils dvd has some fascinating extras with film of maxwell davies recording the soundtrack.

no lime tangier, Saturday, 6 December 2014 22:43 (three years ago) Permalink

That documentary shows parts of his Delius film.

Robert Adam Gilmour, Saturday, 6 December 2014 22:51 (three years ago) Permalink

Since Sorabji gave the premiere in Glasgow in 1930, there have been just eight further performances of Opus Clavicembalisticum, or OC as it is, apparently, affectionately known. Now there has been a ninth, for Jonathan Powell has spent the past six months getting to grips with this monstrous piece and presented the results at the Purcell Room. The concert lasted five hours, with just one interval. While it would be good to report that it was a worthwhile experience, in which Powell's extraordinary powers of stamina, concentration and technique were properly rewarded, that, sadly, would not be true.

The programme, at least, provided plenty to while away the hours, with tributes to Sorabji from his admirers and a descriptive analysis of OC by the composer Ronald Stevenson, which never used one overheated metaphor when six could be crammed into the same sentence. The cadenzas in OC, you'll be pleased to know, "set off the architectonic counterpoint of the fugues and may be likened to the rose-quartz Aravuli mountains that rise behind the Temple of Ranpur". Such rubbish does Sorabji no favours, but then his empty-headed note- spinning can only be described in hyperbolic terms. Why a fine musician like Powell is bothering with it I cannot imagine.

http://www.theguardian.com/music/2003/sep/18/classicalmusicandopera

نكبة (nakhchivan), Sunday, 7 December 2014 04:22 (three years ago) Permalink

Knut Nystedt has died, 99 years old. :( I think I've sung this with three different choirs:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=C5I4UQV0Ka0

Frederik B, Wednesday, 10 December 2014 00:46 (three years ago) Permalink

Gerald Nedarc
1 week ago

When we look to our history of violence and cold acts against humanity through the ages we must also note some of the godly creations, such as this Pachelbel Cannon in D minor as a buffer zone to allow us to be proud of our human heritage. Follow the ten commandments and listen to music like this and you can rise above the carnage of human greed and depravity.

Chairman Feinstein (nakhchivan), Tuesday, 16 December 2014 22:53 (three years ago) Permalink

HB Beethoven, my buddy at all times. You are even now a living human IMO.

a drug by the name of WORLD WITHOUT END (Jon Lewis), Tuesday, 16 December 2014 23:53 (three years ago) Permalink

this thread, or an earlier incarnation of it, got me into Scriabin a few years back and he became one of my favorites for piano -- but I didn't pay much attention to any of his orchestral music until I got the 1st symphony on a disc where it was paired with a vocal piece by Rachmaninov. I bought that CD for the Rocky but ended up playing it enough to really grow fond of the Scriabin symphony so now I'm digging into his orchestral stuff -- tonight, Symphony No. 3, USSR State TV and Radio Orchestra under Evgeny Svetlanov with Sviatoslav Richter on piano

The Complainte of Ray Tabano, Friday, 19 December 2014 02:51 (three years ago) Permalink

Yeah I've v much neglected Scriabin orchestral in favor of piano stuff too. I shouldn't do that because I generally chime pretty strongly with late-romantic mystical gigantism-- e.g. I just started getting into Respighi who is shamelessly over the top and totally fucking rules.

a drug by the name of WORLD WITHOUT END (Jon Lewis), Friday, 19 December 2014 16:20 (three years ago) Permalink

The Poem of Ecstasy is a great piece, but i don't know too much outside of that

Ottbot jr (NickB), Friday, 19 December 2014 16:33 (three years ago) Permalink

the final movement of scriabin's 2nd symphony is hilariously overwrought -- sounds like the anthem for some fascist regime.

poem of ecstasy is all-time, so is prometheus

a nice little gem is the "reverie" for orch. (only ~5 mins long)

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=C6Izcel5-z4

(曇り) (clouds), Friday, 19 December 2014 17:35 (three years ago) Permalink

what do you all think of this piano sonata?

http://expirebox.com/download/363688c72277613ac55281c4e013eb7b.html

Chairman Feinstein (nakhchivan), Sunday, 21 December 2014 07:13 (three years ago) Permalink

schubert - complete piano trios (beaux arts, grumiaux trios) [philips]

d. 898 is astounding

(曇り) (clouds), Wednesday, 31 December 2014 00:18 (three years ago) Permalink

D929 for me. Amazes me every time.

Speaking of piano trios, right now argerich and co. are blowing me away in the serge rach trio elegiaque. Never heard this piece before. Not sure what it's like in a non-mind-blowing performance. Yow.

a drug by the name of WORLD WITHOUT END (Jon Lewis), Wednesday, 31 December 2014 01:19 (three years ago) Permalink

i think i may finally get into rachmaninoff in the new year. same with tchaikovsky and rimsky-korsakov and borodin. in my neotenic modernist crusader phase i instantly shunned anything that appeared merely virtuosic (and basically all romantic/late-romantic composers who weren't german or austrian).

(曇り) (clouds), Wednesday, 31 December 2014 01:40 (three years ago) Permalink

Dude I am so into warhorses now. I can't tell you how happy the motherfucking Polovtsian Dances make me.

a drug by the name of WORLD WITHOUT END (Jon Lewis), Wednesday, 31 December 2014 02:00 (three years ago) Permalink

WKCR Bachfest innit. One day left.

Call the Cops, Wednesday, 31 December 2014 08:56 (three years ago) Permalink

It's making me very happy that the DJ is referring to each piece only by its BWV number.

EveningStar (Sund4r), Wednesday, 31 December 2014 14:20 (three years ago) Permalink

i remember those before i remember key sigs

(曇り) (clouds), Wednesday, 31 December 2014 14:29 (three years ago) Permalink

Me too

a drug by the name of WORLD WITHOUT END (Jon Lewis), Wednesday, 31 December 2014 17:47 (three years ago) Permalink

I don't remember key sigs for ANYTHING tbh. Except the b minor mass and liszt sonata lol

a drug by the name of WORLD WITHOUT END (Jon Lewis), Wednesday, 31 December 2014 17:48 (three years ago) Permalink

Was totally sincere that it made me happy btw

EveningStar (Sund4r), Wednesday, 31 December 2014 18:16 (three years ago) Permalink

I heard one of them fess up that they were just very uncomfortable pronouncing German words.

Teri Noel Towe's segments were a joy.

Call the Cops, Wednesday, 31 December 2014 18:45 (three years ago) Permalink

That got me to pull out this album again: https://itunes.apple.com/us/album/bach-complete-lute-works/id695290508

I love this recording. Matlik's playing is really crisp and precise. I think the fugue from BWV 998 is one of my favourite pieces to listen to.

EveningStar (Sund4r), Thursday, 1 January 2015 21:37 (three years ago) Permalink

Although I've never listened much to the National, I picked this up recently because I saw the CD second-hand for a good price and am really interested in compositions that include electric guitar: http://pitchfork.com/reviews/albums/19141-jonny-greenwood-bryce-dessner-st-carolyn-by-the-sea-suite-from-there-will-be-blood/

I've been pleasantly surprised by how strong it is. I didn't know about the depth of Dessner's compositional experience and training tbh but he has serious compositional chops. (The Greenwood piece is good but I knew it already. Good performance/recording, though.)

EveningStar (Sund4r), Thursday, 1 January 2015 21:49 (three years ago) Permalink

Sund4r what do you think about g crumb's pcs written for david starobin?

a drug by the name of WORLD WITHOUT END (Jon Lewis), Thursday, 1 January 2015 22:30 (three years ago) Permalink

I loved "Quest" when I saw it in Toronto. I should look for a good recording. I don't think I'm familiar with "Mundus Canis" or "Ghosts of Alhambra" but I'll find them. Was Songs, Drones, and Refrains of Death is obv classic.

EveningStar (Sund4r), Friday, 2 January 2015 18:59 (three years ago) Permalink

- "Was"

EveningStar (Sund4r), Friday, 2 January 2015 19:06 (three years ago) Permalink

There's still just the one recording of Quest afaik. Haven't heard Alhambra yet myself.

a drug by the name of WORLD WITHOUT END (Jon Lewis), Friday, 2 January 2015 19:50 (three years ago) Permalink

one month passes...

just bought a cheap ticket to see the following:

Barbara Hannigan soprano, conductor / Britten Sinfonia

Mozart Overture to La clemenza di Tito
Stravinsky Souvenirs de mon enfance
Stravinsky Pastorale
Haydn Symphony No.49, ‘La Passione’
Stravinsky Act One, Scene Three from The Rake’s Progress
Mozart Overture to Idomeneo
Mozart Bella mia fiamma, addio K528
Stravinsky Pulcinella Suite

we reward the hake (NickB), Friday, 27 February 2015 21:29 (three years ago) Permalink

and if you haven't seen hannigan do her singing & conducting thing before:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=k1YPNEXQu3E

we reward the hake (NickB), Friday, 27 February 2015 21:30 (three years ago) Permalink

this is more awesome yet tbh, but not anything like what i'll be seeing:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sFFpzip-SZk

we reward the hake (NickB), Friday, 27 February 2015 21:36 (three years ago) Permalink

Saw Feldman's For John Cage performed a cpl of wks ago with a sandwiched of Webern either side (massive meat on that sandwich then).

This I am immensely looking fwd to: http://www.city.ac.uk/events/2015/march/against-the-day-a-concert-for-simon-howard-1960-2013

Good op to finally see how Beat Furrer very 'slight' sounding music works out: https://www.cafeoto.co.uk/events/kammer-klang-beasts-and-beauties-georgia-rogers-be/

xyzzzz__, Friday, 27 February 2015 21:39 (three years ago) Permalink

one month passes...

digging some

http://cps-static.rovicorp.com/3/JPG_400/MI0001/073/MI0001073246.jpg?partner=allrovi.com

also:
Dietrich Buxtehude - Orgelwerke vol. 1 (Harald Vogel)
Simons Preston's J.S. Bach The Organ Works
Leonhardt's Das Wohltemperierte Klavier (all harpsichord - also watched Chronik der Anna Magdalena Bach on nakh's recommendation)
Pickett's Monteverdi - L'Orfeo

Mordy, Thursday, 9 April 2015 00:40 (three years ago) Permalink

Felt a sudden (and largely unprecedented) need to listen to Wagner this afternoon and have been working through Die Walküre (Marek Janowski, Jeannine Altmeyer, Siegfried Jerusalem & Staatskapelle Dresden) since then (4m into Act 3 now).

EveningStar (Sund4r), Thursday, 9 April 2015 00:48 (three years ago) Permalink

I get pulled into listening to the lions share of die walkure frequently because I need to hear that fucking storm prelude.

Also the scene with brunnhilde and siegmund where he abjures Valhalla <3

demonic mnevice (Jon Lewis), Thursday, 9 April 2015 12:51 (three years ago) Permalink

two months pass...

Anyone into Julio d'Escrivàn? I started checking out his music because I was working through one of his music tech textbooks. This is pretty cool imo, a movement from a concerto for USB video game controller, laptop, and orchestra.

EveningStar (Sund4r), Wednesday, 10 June 2015 17:34 (three years ago) Permalink

four months pass...

This is a superlative Ravel/Rachmaninov recording, it wasn't what I was looking for but it is awesome.
http://www.cdbiblio.com/eingang/cdimages/img_ravel/ravel0008.jpg

xelab, Saturday, 10 October 2015 21:16 (two years ago) Permalink

That recording of the slow movement of the Ravel is heaven in a bottle.

banned on ixlor (Jon not Jon), Sunday, 11 October 2015 14:13 (two years ago) Permalink

Attended the Lahti Sibelius Festival last month. All the symphonies and more besides. Great experience. Jon Anderson was in the audience too!

Call the Cops, Tuesday, 13 October 2015 20:54 (two years ago) Permalink

Aarrrrrgghhhh the jealousy
Also I am so stoked that Jon Anderson is a sibelian

banned on ixlor (Jon not Jon), Tuesday, 13 October 2015 22:08 (two years ago) Permalink

Apparently he cried through most of the performances. It was a fantastic series of concerts - really wish you had been there Jon!

Call the Cops, Saturday, 17 October 2015 07:26 (two years ago) Permalink

two years pass...

Ettore De Carolis - Ciociaria - A Land Of Ancient Silences (one of my finds of the year. and why i will always love the musical heritage society. they put out so much stuff that NOBODY would have put out in the states. Italian folk stuff. children chanting. hurdy-gurdy. guitar. harmonium. mandolin. lutes. trombones. evocations of ancestral rituals. this record has it all.)

^^ This record scott wrote about five years ago is B L O W I N G MY M I N D

ian, Friday, 9 March 2018 22:21 (six months ago) Permalink

I'm taking note.

Robert Adam Gilmour, Saturday, 10 March 2018 18:45 (six months ago) Permalink


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