Chord Progressions S&D

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Which songs/song-moments have chord progressions that move you? Which have ones that make you cringe? Perhaps a certain bridge makes you choke up every time, or maybe no progression and a simple looped C minor done right really hits the spot. Are there some progressions that can be considered clichéd and must die? etc. etc. etc.

Honda, Tuesday, 11 June 2002 00:00 (eighteen years ago) link

g to a to c as used in a Velvet Underground trk on their debut. Gold sounds by Pavement is built solidy around this progression. Tired overused and pretty much every rock band who uses it thinks they have discovered it. Diminished minor chords, the grunge chord. Harmonics are over used as well.

monstatruk, Tuesday, 11 June 2002 00:00 (eighteen years ago) link

Really, almost any chord progression that you can't see coming a mile away is good. I usually hate songs that seem to have written themselves.

dleone, Tuesday, 11 June 2002 00:00 (eighteen years ago) link

The most shit chord progression in world history is the end of the gtr solo in Suede's "Animal Nitrate", where a really cool modulation happens, and then...THE LAST CHORUS JUST GOES BACK TO THE SAME FUCKING CHORD AS THE EARLIER ONES! Completely destroying the whole point of fucking with the tone center in the solo in the first place! Didn't anyone NOTICE how lame and stupid that sounded? Even worse for being a titanically boneheaded missed opportunity.

Progressions I like a lot - "Dogs" (Floyd), "Road Rage" (Catatonia), and yeah those open chords in the middle of "Space Oddity" do it for me still

dave q, Tuesday, 11 June 2002 00:00 (eighteen years ago) link

gold soundz is a-b-d! hehe

sam, Tuesday, 11 June 2002 00:00 (eighteen years ago) link

Yeah except "Gold Soundz" is all slack-open-tuned so those are all oddly suspended.

For some reason I could listen to cmaj7 - fmaj7 endlessly, just dropping back and forth.

nabisco%%, Tuesday, 11 June 2002 00:00 (eighteen years ago) link

The choruses (chori?) for the following: John Lennon's "Jealous Guy", Christina Aguilera's "What a Girl Wants", Velvet Underground's "Candy Says". Also, Veruca Salt's "New York Mining Disaster 1994" and the Bee Gees' "How Deep Is Your Love" and XTC's "Dear God". I'd tell you what the chords are, but I dunno 'em.

Daver, Tuesday, 11 June 2002 00:00 (eighteen years ago) link

Every choral piece by Herbert Howells has amazing chord progessions. Ditto a large number of Cure songs.

Dan Perry, Tuesday, 11 June 2002 00:00 (eighteen years ago) link

Actually, I AM a big fan of the B-G switcheroo (cf. Slint's "Good Morning Captain"). Any chords involving more than one letter, though, and I'm all feet.

Daver, Tuesday, 11 June 2002 00:00 (eighteen years ago) link

For some reason I could listen to cmaj7 - fmaj7 endlessly, just dropping back and forth.

...and cmaj7 - bflat maj7 back & forth. People always say that strummed major 7ths sound summery.

Jez, Tuesday, 11 June 2002 00:00 (eighteen years ago) link

The whole last minute of Bowie's "Rock N Roll Suicide" is very well put together; the last stab of the strings gets me every time.

misterhungry, Tuesday, 11 June 2002 00:00 (eighteen years ago) link

Just a side question: does anyone see chords as particular shapes or colors? Major-major7th chrods (like Cmaj7) always strike as very round and soft, and of a light shade, such as a pastel. Contrarily, major-minor7th chords (like C7) strike me as angular and harder, and a brighter color, such as red.

For the record, I generally don't hold too many biases with chords, and use them as I see fit (which basically means, I play what sounds good to me, or in rare cases, use them for particular effects) -- but I will say that I don't generally like major-major 7th chords. To me, they seem *too* passive. Debussy used them, and for that, I must grant them credence, for he somehow made them sound credible, but he also did wonders with flatted 7ths, and using 9ths, and making chords that sounded heavenly (and just a bit erotic).

Furthermore (on possibly a more technical note), if you listen to a note and follow its series of overtones, it seems to be outlining a major chord with 5th, 3rd, flatted 7th, and eventually 9th. At a point, it becomes very hard to hear (and in fact does go on to hit every other interval). Synthesizers often have patches which emphasize these overtones, and striking a note to listen to them is quite lovely. I have always wonderded if my attraction to major- minor7th chords and 9ths had something to do with this series of overtones.

dleone, Tuesday, 11 June 2002 00:00 (eighteen years ago) link

Debussy used them...

I think Debussy (someone correct me if I'm wrong)invented the maj 7th & was told be the musical powers that this was forbidden as it was, in fact, a dischord...it's odd how the ear has evolved.

Jez, Tuesday, 11 June 2002 00:00 (eighteen years ago) link

I-IV-V 'til I die, man...

Colin Meeder, Tuesday, 11 June 2002 00:00 (eighteen years ago) link

I think Debussy (someone correct me if I'm wrong)invented the maj 7th & was told be the musical powers that this was forbidden as it was, in fact, a dischord...it's odd how the ear has evolved.

Hmm, I think Satie was using them in similar ways as Debussy, though, Debussy's methods of revelling in certain chords (especially without regard to their supposed "function" in the scheme of the work) were certainly the greatest support their distinctive sound could have asked for. You will find major chords with major sevenths quite far back (e.g., Bach and earlier), but generally only used as suspension elements (i.e., momentary tension to resolve soon after, rather than legit tonality).

dleone, Tuesday, 11 June 2002 00:00 (eighteen years ago) link

I was in a band once whose entire show was playing C and E in a "psychedelic style"

Tracer Hand, Tuesday, 11 June 2002 00:00 (eighteen years ago) link

Brian Wilson's progressions on "Pet Sounds" are completely fucked, in a good way.

Nick A., Tuesday, 11 June 2002 00:00 (eighteen years ago) link

Brian Wilson/Beach Boys' "This Whole World" is a very creative chord progression.

http://gygax.pitas.com, Tuesday, 11 June 2002 00:00 (eighteen years ago) link

There's this Elvis Costello song off of Trust, it's called 'Pretty Words' and the chords in the chorus put me in PAIN everytime I hear it. He sings 'pretty words don't mean much anymore', the chords go G F Bm(!!!) it is in like three keys at the same time, and the F to Bm is the most painful progression I have ever heard.

tyler, Wednesday, 12 June 2002 00:00 (eighteen years ago) link

if you like F to Bm (or enjoy the pain it seems to cause you) 'no more workhorse blues' from palace's second album has F-Bm-Emaj. it works rill well.

gilgamesh, Thursday, 13 June 2002 00:00 (eighteen years ago) link

five years pass...

Offhand, both Joni Mitchell and perhaps the unlikely choice of Fantastic Something have some chord progression stuff going on that never fails to do it for me.

Also, offhand, Durutti Column, Steely Dan, MBV, Lilys, Todd Rundgren...

dell, Wednesday, 6 February 2008 01:07 (twelve years ago) link

Also, Prefab Sprout's first few records. I don't think that any of the aforementioned could be placed in the same class as the best of Brian Wilson compositions where you're gonna be moved to tears, but rather it's a , wow, this is so surprising but sounds so right-- how did these people come up with this stuff?

dell, Wednesday, 6 February 2008 01:17 (twelve years ago) link

Also, "The Rain Song" by Leed Zeplin has some great stuff going on...but this is gonna end up being never-ending posts by me. Everyone obviously picks up on different things when they listen to songs initially, or even with repeated listens, and for me, I tend to pick up on chord changes on first listens for whatever reasons.

dell, Wednesday, 6 February 2008 01:36 (twelve years ago) link

S: I-IV-vi-iii-IV-I-ii-V-I

The Reverend, Wednesday, 6 February 2008 06:38 (twelve years ago) link

That's almost Pachabell's Canon or that Green Day song

Hurting 2, Wednesday, 6 February 2008 06:39 (twelve years ago) link

I think Debussy (someone correct me if I'm wrong)invented the maj 7th & was told be the musical powers that this was forbidden as it was, in fact, a dischord...it's odd how the ear has evolved.

waht

Hurting 2, Wednesday, 6 February 2008 06:45 (twelve years ago) link

It's "I Want You Back"

The Reverend, Wednesday, 6 February 2008 06:47 (twelve years ago) link

nice

Hurting 2, Wednesday, 6 February 2008 06:50 (twelve years ago) link

lol @ maj 7th quote

Curt1s Stephens, Wednesday, 6 February 2008 06:59 (twelve years ago) link

The "Louie Louie" sequence - never gets old.

And it can even spice up a song that is fairly lame (like when it turns up for eight seconds in the middle of "Snoopy Vs. The Red Baron" by the Royal Guardsmen).

Rev. Hoodoo, Wednesday, 6 February 2008 07:06 (twelve years ago) link

People who ape the Louie Louie progression often miss that the third chord is minor.

Hurting 2, Wednesday, 6 February 2008 07:10 (twelve years ago) link

yeah that kinda surprised me when i realized that. made perfect sense, and explained the gap between it and so many other 3-chord riffs. it gives the song a sort of tragic undertow.

tipsy mothra, Wednesday, 6 February 2008 08:01 (twelve years ago) link

i like chord modulations in their place, but sometimes i wish theyd just leave the damn song as it was...

example: dave dudley's "truck drivin' son-of-a-gun"...i wish they hadnt started modulating on the second verse, 'cause i wasnt tired of the original key yet! sometimes i dont need somebody "upping the ante" with a chord modulation. in the case of "truck drivin s.o.g.", it wasnt broke in the 1st place, so no need fixin it. im marinating on this fine melody and youre gonna switch up on me? hey!

but despite that unneeded change, i dig the song in general

Rev. Hoodoo, Wednesday, 6 February 2008 08:06 (twelve years ago) link

People who ape the Louie Louie progression often miss that the third chord is minor.

In "Snoopy," the Royal Guardsmen played that third chord in major and it WORKS.

It might not be an accurate "Louie Louie," but it's not a bad "Hang On, Sloopy."

Rev. Hoodoo, Wednesday, 6 February 2008 08:10 (twelve years ago) link

i love I-vi-IV-V so much i started a thread about it once. it lends itself to melodrama. it's sort of the roy lichtenstein progression.

xpost:
well sure I-IV-V always works. but what makes louie stand out is partly its deviation. (and partly jack ely of course.)

tipsy mothra, Wednesday, 6 February 2008 08:18 (twelve years ago) link

(i do realize that "love it so much i started a thread about it" is sorta damning with faint praise.)

tipsy mothra, Wednesday, 6 February 2008 08:20 (twelve years ago) link

Pop cliche = I-V-vi-iii-IV-I-IV-V

startak, Wednesday, 6 February 2008 10:01 (twelve years ago) link

It's "I Want You Back"
I think Nick Lowe used it too, in "Nutted By Reality."
(xpost)

the maj 7th & was told be the musical powers that this was forbidden
I remember reading that Jim Stewart, the power that were at Stax Records, forbade this chord from his recordings as being "too jazzy" or something, but I think they managed to sneak some in anyway.

James Redd and the Blecchs, Wednesday, 6 February 2008 14:47 (twelve years ago) link

I love any pretty New Orleans-like changes, commonly invoked in songs like "Sunnyside of the Street," "Georgia," and countless Randy Newman tunes:

C-E7-Am-C7-F-Fdim7-C, etc., etc.

Jazzbo, Wednesday, 6 February 2008 14:57 (twelve years ago) link

G00gling brought me back to this somewhat related thread

James Redd and the Blecchs, Wednesday, 6 February 2008 15:04 (twelve years ago) link

You know who's got some crazy chords- John Barry! Check out "Goldfinger" for example.

James Redd and the Blecchs, Wednesday, 6 February 2008 15:34 (twelve years ago) link

Although if he was a student of Bill Russo, I guess that explains something.

James Redd and the Blecchs, Wednesday, 6 February 2008 15:44 (twelve years ago) link

I love sixties-ish chord progressions with neato tricky chromaticism. I've been into the Something chord progression of late:

C Cmaj7 C7 F D7 G Am Am(maj7) Am7 D7
C: I Imaj7 V/IV IV V/V vi V/V

Yesterday is also one of my faves:

F Em7 A7 Dm Bb C F Dm7 G7 Bb F
F: I ii/vi V/vi vi IV V I vi7 V/V IV I

And The Zombies have some brilliant ones, like Rose for Emily:

Verse: G D G#dim7 A G#dim7 A Bm7 E7 A
I'm inclined to analyze the song in D: IV I vii/V V vii/V V ii/V V/V V

Then the chorus goes: Bb F C#dim7 D C#dim7 D A7 D D7
Which would be: bVI bIII vii7 I vii7 I V7 I V/IV

St3ve Go1db3rg, Wednesday, 6 February 2008 17:29 (twelve years ago) link

One time somebody called the tune "Yesterday" which I had never learned and I was dying, even with fakebook in front of me.

I've been into the Something chord progression of late
I think they were doing a lot of that bit with descending sevenths into sixths basslines around The White Album too.

"truck drivin' son-of-a-gun"...i wish they hadnt started modulating on the second verse, 'cause i wasnt tired of the original key yet!
Are you aware, Rev, that some people call this the "truck driver's key change"?

James Redd and the Blecchs, Wednesday, 6 February 2008 17:36 (twelve years ago) link

with descending sevenths into sixths basslines
Maybe your phrase is better, "neato tricky chromaticism."

James Redd and the Blecchs, Wednesday, 6 February 2008 17:40 (twelve years ago) link

Yeah, well that whole thing is kind of a cliche, and The Beatles used it in various ways quite frequently, but I like the way it works in Something; there's a kind of nice balance between functional harmony and chromaticism. Same with Yesterday really -- contrast the functionality of the F Em7 A7 Dm with the non-standard resolution and chromatic line of the Dm7 G7 Bb F.

St3ve Go1db3rg, Wednesday, 6 February 2008 17:55 (twelve years ago) link

Something was the first song I learned on guitar. Quite easy to play but sounded quite complicated. Thank you "neato tricky chromaticism".

jim, Wednesday, 6 February 2008 17:59 (twelve years ago) link

Are you aware, Rev, that some people call this the "truck driver's key change"?

-- James Redd and the Blecchs, Wednesday, 6 February 2008 17:36 (39 minutes ago) Link

ha, I almost pointed out that this wasn't me

The Reverend, Wednesday, 6 February 2008 18:21 (twelve years ago) link

S: I'm all about the descending chord progressions. Put a D-to-C chord progression in your song, and I'm bound to like it.

D: E-A-Bb. Seriously, just retire it already.

mike a, Wednesday, 6 February 2008 18:25 (twelve years ago) link

Scott Miller uses this one in "Where You Going Northern":
C#m B F# A

And the chorus to "24" is one for the ages:
A Em G
A Em G
C G C F G F G

mike a, Wednesday, 6 February 2008 18:30 (twelve years ago) link

A new ILX, a new compendium of our intreped hero TuomasSteve staring into the vast seas of mystery
Fake Steve

James Redd and the Blecchs, Wednesday, 6 February 2008 21:14 (twelve years ago) link

um, I can't think of any songs that use that progression either

Hurting 2, Wednesday, 6 February 2008 23:47 (twelve years ago) link

Fake Hurting.

James Redd and the Blecchs, Thursday, 7 February 2008 02:58 (twelve years ago) link

Oh, I see. I thought he meant B minor.

James Redd and the Blecchs, Thursday, 7 February 2008 02:59 (twelve years ago) link

I guess if it was really Bb like he wrote, that'd be pretty crazy.

James Redd and the Blecchs, Thursday, 7 February 2008 03:16 (twelve years ago) link

not that crazy. loop it on your chosen instrument for a few minutes, try humming along with it, and before you know it you'll have written three or four faux grunge songs.

fact checking cuz, Thursday, 7 February 2008 03:23 (twelve years ago) link

play it super-slow and you have a Black Sabbath song

Hurting 2, Thursday, 7 February 2008 03:25 (twelve years ago) link

Oh yeah, "Maria" from West Side Story, no?
(xpost)

James Redd and the Blecchs, Thursday, 7 February 2008 03:26 (twelve years ago) link

j/k

James Redd and the Blecchs, Thursday, 7 February 2008 03:26 (twelve years ago) link

S: G#-Gm-G#-Gm-F-Bb-Db-B

(and feel free to call that Db a C# or whatever. i've never been good at figuring out when to notate flats vs. sharps)

fact checking cuz, Thursday, 7 February 2008 03:39 (twelve years ago) link

waht song is taht

Hurting 2, Thursday, 7 February 2008 03:43 (twelve years ago) link

chorus of gary puckett & the union gap's "young girl"

fact checking cuz, Thursday, 7 February 2008 04:13 (twelve years ago) link

actually, in spite of what I said above, I've been really liking the Cmaj/Cmaj7/C7/F progression in "I Can't Go For That" - but I think that's because it's kind of surprising coming out of the Cmin and also its sweetness has an irony in the context of the song.

Hurting 2, Thursday, 7 February 2008 05:41 (twelve years ago) link

six months pass...

Jeff Buckley doesn't seem to get much love round these parts, but he has a bunch of amazing sequences:

The ascending Em -> B7 -> G6-> A6 bridge bit of Grace

The astounding chorus to Lover, You Should Have Come Over ("so I'll wait for you...") where he goes all the way up the fretboard from D and then back again at twice the speed

The back-and-forth between the two verse bits of So Real

ecuador_with_a_c, Tuesday, 2 September 2008 02:20 (twelve years ago) link

These songs are all about you
And I'm tellin' everyone I'm doin' fine without you
I hurt you but I helped you
You may think I've a lot of nerve
But I deserve some credit
Or at least an edit
Take out the part that breaks my heart
And makes me sound uncaring
If you eliminate the swearing
Then I could show my mother
That you can go from one chord to another

G will turn to D
You'll turn to me
And you'll say
You have done me wrong
I wrote these songs about it

She's aware it's all been done before
It's another song in this key
Yeah but this one's about me
That all the validity she needs
Her criticism's brutal
But I don't really mind
Yeah, she's put it out on vinyl
But it's pretty hard to find, but you'll hear

G will turn to D
You'll turn to me
And you'll say
You have done me wrong
I wrote these songs about it

I wish I'd never taught her how to play
I knew she'd get me I should have known
Now her hands are on the fretboard
In an unfamiliar way
And it's tellin' me
She's aware it's all been done before
It's another song in this key
Yeah but this one's about me
I may not wanna hear the words to

G when put with D
But if you take what you're shown
Learn on your own
Then everything you do
Belongs to you
But know that you are on your own

On your own

PappaWheelie V, Tuesday, 2 September 2008 02:40 (twelve years ago) link

the man with the child in his eyes

Surmounter, Tuesday, 2 September 2008 02:50 (twelve years ago) link

^ Surmounter

I remember a mate and I trying to work out the chords to the above- I take it you mean the Kate B song- we gave up after a fairly unproductive 5 hours and proceeded to annihilate it with a Black Flag style version we had done in three minutes

Madonna's 'Oh Father ' always reminded me of this song in its chord progression. Probably knowhere near.

Any progression with a 6/9,add9 , major 13th, sus chords slay me. Fuck majors and minors

Fer Ark, Tuesday, 2 September 2008 20:18 (twelve years ago) link

personally, my favorite progression is Dm Bb F / Bb Am F

res, Tuesday, 2 September 2008 20:36 (twelve years ago) link

Any progression with a 6/9
So you must like Brazilian music.

James Redd and the Blecchs, Tuesday, 2 September 2008 20:41 (twelve years ago) link

I'm amazed I haven't posted to this thread already. One thing I like, even though it's super-common, is I --> vi, especially when there's something melodic going on that stays the same as the root changes.

jaymc, Tuesday, 2 September 2008 21:31 (twelve years ago) link

i can see what you mean about O Father, something about a major chord

Surmounter, Tuesday, 2 September 2008 22:46 (twelve years ago) link

three years pass...

Destroy:
-I-V-vi-IV was mentioned in the pop songs borrowing from classical music thread. In the key of C major this would be C-G-Am-F.
-similarly, the related minor-chord progression (and excuse me if this is not written according to music theory conventions) i-bVI-bIII-bVII (which is vi-IV-I-V rewritten with the vi as the tonic). In the key of A minor this would be Am-F-C-G.

both are classic formulas for lazy songwriting from the 90s onward.

Sexess - Sexual Success Or; Successful Sex (crüt), Saturday, 17 March 2012 04:08 (eight years ago) link

Yeah, you don't have to use the flat symbols on that one in A minor. Using an accidental for a chord symbol is only if the chord is built on a tone that's not in the scale. (And, of course, all those pitches are a part of the A minor scale.)

timellison, Saturday, 17 March 2012 04:21 (eight years ago) link

that's what I was thinking.

Sexess - Sexual Success Or; Successful Sex (crüt), Saturday, 17 March 2012 04:32 (eight years ago) link

I love the chord progressions in this song:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ka3l1KKZkmw

Hongroe (Geir Hongro), Saturday, 17 March 2012 10:47 (eight years ago) link

I'm a sucker for the minor-major flip that was distinctive in early Lennon. New Order used it nicely just before the chorus in True Faith, where it's like the sun coming out

Dr X O'Skeleton, Saturday, 17 March 2012 16:20 (eight years ago) link

word, "Long Time" by the Roots is largely just a switch back and forth from the minor to the major of the same chord and it sounds damn nice.

lately i've been quite impressed by the semi-complex progression in the building jam at the end of "Stitches" by the Morning Benders.

Rufus Wainwright's "Going to a Town" also has a pretty great, showtune-y sort of progression.

caulk the wagon and float it, Saturday, 17 March 2012 16:26 (eight years ago) link

One of my all-time favorite piano house chord progressions.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lewbH3jjLBA

Eric H., Saturday, 17 March 2012 16:30 (eight years ago) link

so simple yet so effective

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TSXUZEcvgBw

zappi, Saturday, 17 March 2012 17:33 (eight years ago) link

Two of my fave chord progressions which I have written about:

The Zombies, A Rose for Emily

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=elbJ4hy5C7A

My analysis, part 2

David Bowie, Life On Mars

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=v--IqqusnNQ

My analysis, part 2

St3ve Go1db3rg, Saturday, 17 March 2012 20:05 (eight years ago) link

four years pass...

I've always loved "The Stars of Track and Field"--deceptively strange with the major VI chord and the minor v7. Keeps the key ambiguous.

Hey Bulldog does a similar trick in the same key (B), with the minor v7, especially since it resolves into the bVII in the second part of the verse (bVII, v, IV).

Any one have any favorite progressions from the past decade or so? Most of these examples are older.

poolboy skew (voodoo chili), Wednesday, 20 July 2016 20:46 (four years ago) link

I learned a lot of my favorite chord progression tricks that I still like to use today from one song, an instrumental from the Superfly soundtrack that I learned to play in high school:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GAZ9zBLLuOc

socka flocka-jones (man alive), Wednesday, 20 July 2016 20:54 (four years ago) link

I'm a big fan of the quick 2nd inversion c-triad -> g triad -> 1st inversion d triad. Also love the e minor into the g-triad over a. It's basically gospel stuff.

socka flocka-jones (man alive), Wednesday, 20 July 2016 20:57 (four years ago) link

two years pass...

the chord progression on the chorus of Vampire Weekend's "Sympathy" has a fun use of tritones: Bm6/G# C#7 Am6/F# B7

Jeff the grown man (voodoo chili), Thursday, 30 May 2019 14:08 (one year ago) link

should say, the melody uses tritone intervals over those chords

Jeff the grown man (voodoo chili), Thursday, 30 May 2019 14:08 (one year ago) link

Maybe someone more knowledgeable than I can answer this one. There's a modulation that shows up in a bunch of deep soul songs that always moves me. It's here at :37 when Mavis hits the lyric "...will to try." What exactly are they doing?

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LmWkKYcFhuo

While My Guitar Gently Wheedly-Wheedly-Wheedly-Weeps (Dan Peterson), Thursday, 30 May 2019 14:56 (one year ago) link

hope I'm not out of my depth here but it sounds like on that particular chord they're raising the third to make a major chord rather than the minor chord that it's supposed to be within that key

Josefa, Thursday, 30 May 2019 18:25 (one year ago) link

I think Josefa is right. To me that sounds like a major III chord, which would normally be minor. Typically this would be followed by a vi or IV chord, but in this case it sounds like it is followed by the V chord and then goes back to I after that.

big gym sw0les (crüt), Thursday, 30 May 2019 18:53 (one year ago) link

a typical example that I always think of of a major III chord being used in a song is the second chord in "Georgia On My Mind"

big gym sw0les (crüt), Thursday, 30 May 2019 18:55 (one year ago) link

Yep. And Otis Redding uses a major III chord in "I've Been Loving You Too Long" also (he wrote "Good to Me").

Josefa, Thursday, 30 May 2019 19:26 (one year ago) link

I was looking at a chord chart for that one online. So it's in the key of A, goes between the A and E a bit, and then goes to a C#. So that would be the major III?

It seems like it's providing a preface or buildup to the D (IV) right? (I know just enough about this stuff to be dangerous...)

While My Guitar Gently Wheedly-Wheedly-Wheedly-Weeps (Dan Peterson), Thursday, 30 May 2019 19:37 (one year ago) link

i think in this case it leads into the V, but i'd need a piano to be certain

Jeff the grown man (voodoo chili), Thursday, 30 May 2019 19:44 (one year ago) link

I to Major III is a common move in the gospel playbook, lots of hymns start with this basic movement (also seen in georgia on my mind): I - III - vi - IV

Jeff the grown man (voodoo chili), Thursday, 30 May 2019 19:45 (one year ago) link

Goes to the IV in this version, but lord knows the internet is often wrong:

https://www.e-chords.com/chords/otis-redding/i-ve-been-loving-you-too-long

xp

While My Guitar Gently Wheedly-Wheedly-Wheedly-Weeps (Dan Peterson), Thursday, 30 May 2019 19:47 (one year ago) link

oh i was still thinking about that mavis staples song

Jeff the grown man (voodoo chili), Thursday, 30 May 2019 19:48 (one year ago) link

I'm pretty much a "cowboy chords" musician, so I,IV, and V, with the occasional II, are about the extent of my playbook. Everything else is kind of an aha! moment.

While My Guitar Gently Wheedly-Wheedly-Wheedly-Weeps (Dan Peterson), Thursday, 30 May 2019 19:52 (one year ago) link

There's a modulation that shows up in a bunch of deep soul songs that always moves me. It's here at :37 when Mavis hits the lyric "...will to try."

I actually think this IS a modulation and not just a borrowed chord. The song is in E (not A) and the chord is G#. VC says, "it leads into the V," but I don't think it does. The V chord that follows is the start of the next verse. I don't think the G# has a function at all and I believe the song is actually in the key of G# there momentarily.

That's not the case with "Georgia on My Mind," where the chord is clearly a secondary dominant, or "I've Been Loving You Too Long" where it's...a passing chord on the way to III?

timellison, Friday, 31 May 2019 00:56 (one year ago) link

A passing chord on the way to IV - I meant to say in that last part

timellison, Friday, 31 May 2019 00:57 (one year ago) link

one year passes...

george's "beware of darkness" is a weird and beautiful one, isn't it?

ptah el dude (voodoo chili), Friday, 11 September 2020 21:42 (one week ago) link

Yes. I put it on now and followed it along and it's uncanny.

Eyeball Kicks, Sunday, 13 September 2020 00:38 (one week ago) link


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