“Fear is making the record companies less arrogant. They’re more open to ideas. So, what’s important now is to find music that’s timeless.”

Message Bookmarked
Bookmark Removed

so says rick rubin here.

new timeless answers, please.

tricky, Sunday, 2 September 2007 14:50 (eleven years ago) Permalink

this article is dripping with d-baggery. rearranging the deck chairs on the titanic, etc. or having someone check the feng shui of a burning building.

but have fun with your mystical hippie guru, sony, and good luck.

GOTT PUNCH II HAWKWINDZ, Sunday, 2 September 2007 15:10 (eleven years ago) Permalink

"we don't have titles" LAWLZ

GOTT PUNCH II HAWKWINDZ, Sunday, 2 September 2007 15:11 (eleven years ago) Permalink

making timeless music:

http://youtube.com/watch?v=3gUwG7CtqYY

latebloomer, Sunday, 2 September 2007 15:16 (eleven years ago) Permalink

Compare it, though, with the bright ideas of the other head of Columbia Records:

Barnett has other ideas, which he is discussing with Rubin. For instance, asking Columbia artists to give the record company up to 50 percent of their touring, merchandising and online revenue.

Eazy, Sunday, 2 September 2007 15:18 (eleven years ago) Permalink

but have fun with your mystical hippie guru, sony,

I'm guessing Rubin has been dismissed as white guy, guru, hippie all of his adult life, daily. From this article, he's the best chance they've got.

Eazy, Sunday, 2 September 2007 15:20 (eleven years ago) Permalink

Ravishing Rick Rubin Rules!

President Evil, Sunday, 2 September 2007 15:29 (eleven years ago) Permalink

This is kinda like a Sept. 22, 2005 Rolling Stone Mag giant feature article on Rubin that I read. Interesting but noone ever seems to ask him any tough questions.

curmudgeon, Sunday, 2 September 2007 15:31 (eleven years ago) Permalink

This thread (and the thread on the Gossip,a recent Rubin signee)have been planted by Rubin's employees...

At Rubin's suggestion, he has also set up a "word of mouth" department, which will probably employ some members of the Big Red focus group along with dozens of other 20-somethings. The "word of mouth" department will function as a publicity-promotional arm of the company, spreading commissioned buzz through chat rooms across the planet and through old-fashioned human interaction. "They tell all their friends about a band," Barnett explained. "Their job is to create interest."

curmudgeon, Sunday, 2 September 2007 15:34 (eleven years ago) Permalink

"I grew up in the independent music business, and you still really need the muscle of the majors."

Yeaaaah sure.

Alex in SF, Sunday, 2 September 2007 15:38 (eleven years ago) Permalink

i thought that for an article of its length a surprising amount was left unsaid which is probably smart. there may be some d-baggery (the street team stuff in particular), but i think there are some big grains of truth there: the stuff about art and fandom. i would hate to see technology destroy the mythmaking in music, but at the same time technology-based business models are just more of the same really, just sped up. it's like technology only exacerbates the disconnect b/w art and commerce that was already there. so it's true (and glaringly obvious) that art is what should be focused on.

tricky, Sunday, 2 September 2007 15:44 (eleven years ago) Permalink

anyone see him in the dixie chicks' film shut up and sing? it looked like he never actually entered the studio or was present during the recording. they played some stuff for him at his house, and he gave them such indispensible nuggets of wisdom as "the chorus sounds nice" and "nice change there."

Lawrence the Looter, Sunday, 2 September 2007 17:08 (eleven years ago) Permalink

Dear NYT. The Gossip have been around for about a decade.

Jimmy The Mod Awaits The Return Of His Beloved, Sunday, 2 September 2007 17:18 (eleven years ago) Permalink

A self-declared part-time artist coach with no skills. Ain't life grand.

blunt, Sunday, 2 September 2007 17:36 (eleven years ago) Permalink

But let him tell ya about his role in transforming hiphop:

Through his passion for the Beatles, he became fascinated by the seductive, addictive power of songs. From the first hip-hop records he produced for L L Cool J and the Beastie Boys, he insisted on classic song structure. "Before Def Jam, hip-hop records were typically really long, and they rarely had a hook," he continued. "Those songs didn't deliver in the way the Beatles did. By making our rap records sound more like pop songs, we changed the form. And we sold a lot of records."

I think back in those days he was actually more hands-on. I've read other features on him that talked about how he obsessed over drum sounds and LL's flow.

curmudgeon, Sunday, 2 September 2007 18:59 (eleven years ago) Permalink

Let's hope he can recapture a little of the magic he brought to Mel C's first solo album

Dom Passantino, Sunday, 2 September 2007 19:01 (eleven years ago) Permalink

this article is an advertisement for columbia records, nothing more

it's called "pr"

Tracer Hand, Sunday, 2 September 2007 19:20 (eleven years ago) Permalink

best thing about the teaser on the times web site is it says "rick rubin takes chances - but can he save columbia records?"

does anyone have any evidence of rick rubin "taking chances" at any point in the last decade?

Tracer Hand, Sunday, 2 September 2007 19:23 (eleven years ago) Permalink

PaloAlto

Eazy, Sunday, 2 September 2007 19:28 (eleven years ago) Permalink

Although Hirschberg is famous for turning celebrity profiles into celebrity vivisections (as in the memorable "The Fall of Jamie Tarses, As Scheduled" in the New York Times magazine a few months ago) her portrait of Seinfeld was basically a Valentine -- atypical for Hirschberg, but typical for a Vanity Fair cover.

http://64.233.169.104/search?q=cache:uQwewd75NXMJ:www.salon.com/media/1998/04/24media.html+LYNN+HIRSCHBERG&hl=en&ct=clnk&cd=1&gl=us

No vivisection here. A NY Times editor should have had her toughen it up a bit.

curmudgeon, Sunday, 2 September 2007 19:32 (eleven years ago) Permalink

IIRC, she is an editor.

C0L1N B..., Sunday, 2 September 2007 19:59 (eleven years ago) Permalink

Oh, it looks like she's just an editor at large, which can mean almost anything right?

C0L1N B..., Sunday, 2 September 2007 20:03 (eleven years ago) Permalink

this reads like a parody

latebloomer, Sunday, 2 September 2007 20:20 (eleven years ago) Permalink

There wasn't exactly what I'd call a huge amount of classic song structure in Hose, and the fact that Flipper have been written out of this story is a little bit sad.

dlp9001, Sunday, 2 September 2007 20:44 (eleven years ago) Permalink

"I grew up in the independent music business, and you still really need the muscle of the majors."

Yeaaaah sure.

it depends on how you wanna make your money - independencts offer a potentially much bigger cut of whatever totals you manage to produce, but big labels still have deep enough pockets to cut large advances, which can free artists to tour more & establish themselves - getting free from the day job can be very trying for independent artists of any genre. This is the main attraction of the major label system and has been since, what, forever?

J0hn D., Monday, 3 September 2007 00:36 (eleven years ago) Permalink

when i think of rick rubin i hardly think "independent music business". that moldy dorm story was a looooooooooooooooooong-ass time ago. he's a millionare record mogul and has been for ever. and been in league with satan for just as long.

scott seward, Monday, 3 September 2007 00:52 (eleven years ago) Permalink

having said that, i have nothing against him. his hits were good and his misses suitably forgettable.

scott seward, Monday, 3 September 2007 00:56 (eleven years ago) Permalink

Anecdotally, I'm hearing more and more musicians (both people I know and people I don't) talking about being perfectly happy with the idea of music requiring a day job. Neither indies nor majors offer you much chance of a long term self-supporting career, especially now, but as pointed out above, a major can at least give you a shot at it with an advance big enough to let you quit your day job and tour heavily. But I feel like more musicians now are deciding that isn't worth it and never completely leaving the day job world.

Hurting 2, Monday, 3 September 2007 03:05 (eleven years ago) Permalink

Hurting, I'm very much getting the same vibe.

Joseph McCombs, Monday, 3 September 2007 04:50 (eleven years ago) Permalink

Writers have in the main lived this way since the dawn of the proverbial, so it kind of makes sense. I mean the day job can be in a complimentary industry anyway - selling instruments, working at labels/record stores, producing, etc.

Trayce, Monday, 3 September 2007 05:16 (eleven years ago) Permalink

am I reading y'all wrong or are you saying that you know musicians who'd just as soon punch a clock as make a decent living making music? not contesting you but musicians constitute the greater part of people I know (not that I'm a big social butterfly admittedly) and I don't know one who wouldn't strongly prefer to be making rent off of music

J0hn D., Monday, 3 September 2007 05:19 (eleven years ago) Permalink

u guys r gay

Catsupppppppppppppp dude 茄蕃, Monday, 3 September 2007 05:29 (eleven years ago) Permalink

J0hn: oh hell not on my part (dunno about Hurting) - obviously no creative person wants to have to do things that pull them away from that.

Trayce, Monday, 3 September 2007 06:29 (eleven years ago) Permalink

cut large advances, which can free artists from day jobs, only to have them indebted & endlessly recouping said advances in the face of dwindling returns?

I also hear about more musicians wanting to keep the day job lately, it's something that I noticed when netlabels started popping up. Music's another thing to do. Feels healthy that way, too.

blunt, Monday, 3 September 2007 08:14 (eleven years ago) Permalink

Well, especially considering how *unhealthy* the state of the industry as a career choice seems to be, especially now.

Trayce, Monday, 3 September 2007 08:55 (eleven years ago) Permalink

Frankly I'm just surprised that Columbia or any record label or even Rubin himself thinks ANYONE is going to be able to save the record industry. I don't even understand why the nearest small, local chain of CD stores has imjected so much money into their business, either. Sure, it's a free country, but I sure as hell wouldn't put a penny into "saving the music business" if I were these people. Either come up with a new business model, or forget it.

Bimble, Monday, 3 September 2007 09:03 (eleven years ago) Permalink

Rubin's idea of a cheap and maybe satellite-based catalog replacing the iPod and radio is not so crazy an idea.

Eazy, Monday, 3 September 2007 14:27 (eleven years ago) Permalink

Sure, it's called the "celestial jukebox", everybody and their mother is waiting for/talking about it. But if he needs to take credit for that too he should be among those actually making it happen.

blunt, Monday, 3 September 2007 14:33 (eleven years ago) Permalink

Well, he's offering something better than his co-head at Columbia is offering:

Barnett has other ideas, which he is discussing with Rubin. For instance, asking Columbia artists to give the record company up to 50 percent of their touring, merchandising and online revenue.

Eazy, Monday, 3 September 2007 14:43 (eleven years ago) Permalink

getting free from the day job can be very trying for independent artists of any genre. This is the main attraction of the major label system and has been since, what, forever?

4:15am - wake up for labor day shift so I can have 2nd half of day free to finish trax

Dominique, Monday, 3 September 2007 14:46 (eleven years ago) Permalink

And according to some of those guys you will love getting up for that shift! Yea, I can't imagine anyone wanting to be in debt based on advances to a major label, but otherwise it would have to be a pretty exciting dayjob to choose to keep it (if you knew you could make a living from the major label deal).

curmudgeon, Tuesday, 4 September 2007 00:03 (eleven years ago) Permalink

Barnett has other ideas, which he is discussing with Rubin. For instance, asking Columbia artists to give the record company up to 50 percent of their touring, merchandising and online revenue.

"Yeah guys, if you could just see your way clear to giving us half of your touring profits as, y'know, a favour."

Matt #2, Tuesday, 4 September 2007 00:08 (eleven years ago) Permalink

Does keeping a foot in the real world help producing art that isn't disconnected from its' audience? I'm in favor of artists having all the time & resources needed to excel at what they do tho -if I wasn't convinced that it produces bad art I'd advocate public grants & state sponsorships for all!

blunt, Tuesday, 4 September 2007 00:11 (eleven years ago) Permalink

maybe we should ask karen finley.

tricky, Tuesday, 4 September 2007 00:19 (eleven years ago) Permalink

"if you knew you could make a living from the major label deal"

This is a bare fraction of the people on major label deals as far as I can tell.

Alex in SF, Tuesday, 4 September 2007 01:14 (eleven years ago) Permalink

am I reading y'all wrong or are you saying that you know musicians who'd just as soon punch a clock as make a decent living making music?

No, but I think there are a lot of musicians that have read the Passman book and know what kind of living, if any, they can make on a major label, and they know that the major labels seem kind of out of touch in their marketing and promotion and production of most things outside of hip-hop and teen pop, and that there's no artist development these days.

And on the other hand they see how few resources an indie can offer them, and how unlikely it is for them to become self-supporting with massively increased competition (internets, etc.) and decreased CD sales, and they'd still rather do it the indie way and at least have creative control.

I'm sure most of these artists would jump at the chance to quit their jobs if a successful career seemed within their reaches, of course.

Hurting 2, Tuesday, 4 September 2007 01:28 (eleven years ago) Permalink

Maybe it's a generational thing too - less willingness to struggle with poverty on the part of the children of boomers.

Hurting 2, Tuesday, 4 September 2007 01:30 (eleven years ago) Permalink

Bukowski said something about never trusting a writer who hadn't worked an eight-hour-a-day job. I think it's reasonable to say the same about any type of artist.

unperson, Tuesday, 4 September 2007 01:42 (eleven years ago) Permalink

I totally agree.

moley, Tuesday, 4 September 2007 02:32 (eleven years ago) Permalink

So an artist has to have suffered (via an 8 hour work day) (or imbibe like Bukowski) to create true art! I am not sure I buy that. I judge Rick Rubin's production work based on what it sounds like to me, not based on whether he ever worked a dayjob. Whether or not I "trust" him, to use Unperson's description of the Bukowski phrase, does not matter.
Please do not turn this into an 'authenticity' rockism discussion.

curmudgeon, Tuesday, 4 September 2007 03:12 (eleven years ago) Permalink

(Ha, probably better not to sidetrack into MFA-talk, but I just meant Iowa's aesthetic is really crisp, precise, and conventional. Also, hardly anyone writes bloated, pretentious, postmodern novels anymore, in part because boys don't like to read.)

nabisco, Wednesday, 5 September 2007 18:37 (eleven years ago) Permalink

oh yeah. I'm not saying I don't believe record companies would be all over this, I'm saying you (the artist) would have to be pretty dumb to get on board with it. That is unless most of the financial/ manpower investment is assumed by your label.

xxxpost

will, Wednesday, 5 September 2007 18:38 (eleven years ago) Permalink

Yeah, I think you might see some labels take on more of those roles in exchange for revenue sharing. If a label can get some other hand out of your pocket in exchange for digging its own in a little deeper, artists might agree to it. But knowing the majors they'll probably find a way to make sure the artist comes out worse off in the end.

Hurting 2, Wednesday, 5 September 2007 18:40 (eleven years ago) Permalink

hardly anyone writes bloated, pretentious, postmodern novels anymore,

David Foster Wallace to thread

Shakey Mo Collier, Wednesday, 5 September 2007 18:43 (eleven years ago) Permalink

His last novel came out more than ten years ago.

Hurting 2, Wednesday, 5 September 2007 18:44 (eleven years ago) Permalink

I didn't read it then either

Shakey Mo Collier, Wednesday, 5 September 2007 18:45 (eleven years ago) Permalink

Is it wrong to enjoy seeing the slow collapse of the major labels? It's like watching the Hindenburg go down.

Matt #2, Wednesday, 5 September 2007 18:48 (eleven years ago) Permalink

You enjoyed watching the Hindenburg go down?

Hurting 2, Wednesday, 5 September 2007 18:49 (eleven years ago) Permalink

it's more fun than watching the slow collapse of the bloated, pretentious, postmodern novel

fritz, Wednesday, 5 September 2007 18:50 (eleven years ago) Permalink

hahaha

Shakey Mo Collier, Wednesday, 5 September 2007 18:51 (eleven years ago) Permalink

i just hope the music columbia releases now is as good as that article makes it out to be...

titchyschneiderMk2, Friday, 7 September 2007 14:42 (eleven years ago) Permalink

I think someone got a jump on Rick's word-of-mouth department with that whole Marie Digby fiasco going down right now.

pgwp, Friday, 7 September 2007 17:22 (eleven years ago) Permalink

the hindenburg went down pretty quickly actually

latebloomer, Friday, 7 September 2007 17:31 (eleven years ago) Permalink

that's odd, it looked like it was barely moving in all those photographs.

Alex in Baltimore, Friday, 7 September 2007 17:32 (eleven years ago) Permalink

oh the humanity

hstencil, Friday, 7 September 2007 17:50 (eleven years ago) Permalink

Marie Digby...? what's the deal?

Shakey Mo Collier, Friday, 7 September 2007 17:59 (eleven years ago) Permalink

I guess that's really the most insulting thing about the article--the assumption that major labels are worth saving, that we should be upset if Rick can't keep Columbia from going under. Personally, I could give a fuck. Seems like the real winner is large indies who are agile enough to roll with filesharing and for whom 50,000 sold is a success.

call all destroyer, Friday, 7 September 2007 19:03 (eleven years ago) Permalink

While I don't think *the majors* as they currently exist are all that worth saving, I do think there's something to be said for capital. Maybe labels the size of Matador and Sub Pop have enough money these days that you don't really need something bigger. But fact is it's pretty hard to make a great album without an advance.

Our label (a small but established and reputable indie) is paying for four days of studio time for us to do a full-length. That's including mixing. The only way we can possibly get it done is to do all the main tracking live in 2 days or so, a day of overdubs and a day of mixing. And that means practicing the hell out of the songs, which we can only do two or three times a week with our rental space schedule. And it's stressful as hell and no matter how much practice we get there's no guarantee we'll get good takes.

Which I don't mean as a complaint - four days is better than nothing. Hell, there are probably Stax sessions that were done as quickly. But if you name 20 of your favorite albums, at least 19 of them took more than four days to make, unless you deliberately pick ultra-lo-fi stuff or pre-studio-wizardry records. The majors are the ones who can put up the money, and they used to make great records as a result.

Hurting 2, Friday, 7 September 2007 19:22 (eleven years ago) Permalink

Seems like the real winner is large indies who are agile enough to roll with filesharing and for whom 50,000 sold is a success.

Most indies will never have a 50,000-seller, and I'm not sure what "agile enough to roll with filesharing" means -- agile enough to not mind losing money?

Hurting 2, Friday, 7 September 2007 19:23 (eleven years ago) Permalink

I think Black Sabbath's first three records were done in 10 days, total. And they still sound awesome.

Bill Magill, Friday, 7 September 2007 19:29 (eleven years ago) Permalink

Again, not saying you can't make a good record in three or four days. But there are a lot of great records that couldn't have been made in three or four days.

Hurting 2, Friday, 7 September 2007 19:30 (eleven years ago) Permalink

Marie Digby...? what's the deal?

Here.

Ms. Digby's simple, homemade music videos of her performing popular songs have been viewed more than 2.3 million times on YouTube. Her acoustic-guitar rendition of the R&B hit "Umbrella" has been featured on MTV's program "The Hills" and is played regularly on radio stations in Los Angeles, Sacramento and Portland, Ore. Capping the frenzy, a press release last week from Walt Disney Co.'s Hollywood Records label declared: "Breakthrough YouTube Phenomenon Marié Digby Signs With Hollywood Records."

What the release failed to mention is that Hollywood Records signed Ms. Digby in 2005, 18 months before she became a YouTube phenomenon. Hollywood Records helped devise her Internet strategy, consulted with her on the type of songs she chose to post, and distributed a high-quality studio recording of "Umbrella" to iTunes and radio stations.

pgwp, Friday, 7 September 2007 21:09 (eleven years ago) Permalink

that is very interesting

Shakey Mo Collier, Friday, 7 September 2007 21:21 (eleven years ago) Permalink

I think Black Sabbath's first three records were done in 10 days, total.

if the first three black sabbath albums were released today everyone would say they sound like shit and that they need more dynamic range compression or something

Shakey Mo Collier, Friday, 7 September 2007 21:22 (eleven years ago) Permalink

"Marie Digby...? what's the deal?"

She was sonned in internet beef.

I eat cannibals, Friday, 7 September 2007 22:37 (eleven years ago) Permalink

Most indies will never have a 50,000-seller, and I'm not sure what "agile enough to roll with filesharing" means -- agile enough to not mind losing money?

You mentioned two large indies yourself--Sub Pop and Matador. I know Matador has had 50k sellers, I bet Sub Pop has too. Hell, so has Touch and Go, although it took them a while.

As for filesharing, indies may have a better chance at devising things to download that people will actually buy--the New Pornographers "Executive Edition" is at least an interesting idea.

call all destroyer, Friday, 7 September 2007 23:13 (eleven years ago) Permalink

By the way, watch the video in that Marie Digby link to hear a WSJ reporter say "acoustical guitar." Tesla fan??

call all destroyer, Friday, 7 September 2007 23:19 (eleven years ago) Permalink

Sub Pop has a multi-million seller.

Mark Rich@rdson, Friday, 7 September 2007 23:28 (eleven years ago) Permalink

(Bleach)

Mark Rich@rdson, Friday, 7 September 2007 23:28 (eleven years ago) Permalink

And what are the totals on the Shins records at this point? Gotta be up there.

Bob Standard, Friday, 7 September 2007 23:30 (eleven years ago) Permalink

Re: Independent record labels, people on here seem to be forgetting that independent labels aren't some sort of sentient entity. They require employees. I have a friend who works at a pretty big independent metal label, and he's making peanuts. As much as he loves his job and the music, he just isn't making enough to support himself considering his education. As bloated as major labels may be, they can (or could) afford to pay their employees well, and provide the necessary apparatus to get the music to the people in the first place. So yeah, 50,000 records sold is great for an independent label, but those labels still need people to run them.

Jeff Treppel, Friday, 7 September 2007 23:33 (eleven years ago) Permalink

"As bloated as major labels may be, they can (or could) afford to pay their employees well, and provide the necessary apparatus to get the music to the people in the first place."

Until they all get laid off because 90% of lost album sales seem to be coming from majors, not from indies.

pgwp, Friday, 7 September 2007 23:42 (eleven years ago) Permalink

If the majors really do die off like fat, stinking shit dinosaurs, then won't that give a long slow boost to big indies? Won't we end up with a playing field crowded with labels bigger than todays big indies, but smaller than the majors? If so, there'll be more money to go around, though less than at the Columbia top floors circa 1980-whatever.

Bob Standard, Friday, 7 September 2007 23:44 (eleven years ago) Permalink

Shit, totally forgot about Bleach. The Shins, well, they're kind of forgettable.

Isn't a big part of employing people at indies the fact that they'll work for pretty cheap because they feel strongly about what they're doing? If a label I liked called me and offered me a job at half what I make now (which isn't a ton) I would take it in a second.

call all destroyer, Friday, 7 September 2007 23:58 (eleven years ago) Permalink

x post

Well, the layoff factor is why I put in the "could."

And yes, the reason a lot of them do it is because they're passionate about it, but it isn't a great long-term career, not if you want to live very far above the poverty level. I think once you get married and have a family, it isn't nearly enough to support that, which is why a lot of the independent label employees I've met are single (or least unmarried) males.

Jeff Treppel, Saturday, 8 September 2007 00:03 (eleven years ago) Permalink

Yeah that's true, but it's not like there's any shortage of young males who are passionate about music. I'm not suggesting that you don't need talent to run an indie, but most indies are guided into their fruitful years by one or two people with vision and a lot of chipper young help.

call all destroyer, Saturday, 8 September 2007 00:15 (eleven years ago) Permalink

"We will employ passionate young men who quit when they turn 30 and are sick of not having health insurance, to be replaced with newer, greener passionate young men" -- this business model has not worked so well outside of retail work

I dunno: people's notions of how the music industry might be radically reconfigured tend to put a lot of emphasis on fresh, creative music, but I honestly don't know how well those notions would serve would serve the many, many people who rely on having solid, conventional, corporate-product music in the world. (And when I say "I don't know," I seriously mean that I don't know: there's plenty of evidence to suggest that people are happy to get their traditional pop music from near-amateurs and kids with great voices straight out of high-school musical-theater productions. I just wonder who the discontents of a decentralized system with passionate gatekeepers might be -- what, if anything, would suddenly go unserved.)

nabisco, Saturday, 8 September 2007 00:36 (eleven years ago) Permalink

Nickelback.

Jeff Treppel, Saturday, 8 September 2007 00:39 (eleven years ago) Permalink

diplo remix

elan, Saturday, 8 September 2007 00:54 (eleven years ago) Permalink

Bob Standard may be right - the Matadors and Sub-Pops might become the new old majors, and perhaps their boost in profile might make up for the loss in CD sales. Plus they don't have a stock price to drive up, so maybe they can be a little more flexible with profitability. But make no mistake that they are being hit and will continue to be hit by file-sharing too. You think people aren't getting The Shins and Joanna Newsom from torrent sites?

Hurting 2, Saturday, 8 September 2007 16:46 (eleven years ago) Permalink

Every time I see the first sentence of the thread title, I think of:

http://moviesmedia.ign.com/movies/image/article/753/753021/tarkin_1167867382.jpg

Alfred, Lord Sotosyn, Saturday, 8 September 2007 17:22 (eleven years ago) Permalink

I just wonder who the discontents of a decentralized system with passionate gatekeepers might be -- what, if anything, would suddenly go unserved.

that's why i brought up the (done to death) subscription idea upthread.

clearly the majors make shitty gatekeepers, but gatekeeping's a bit separate from fandom, too, and i think it's more than an rss app sponsored by targeted ads though that's obviously the first step.

tricky, Saturday, 8 September 2007 19:00 (eleven years ago) Permalink

i have to wonder what bill hicks would have to say about it.

tricky, Saturday, 8 September 2007 19:07 (eleven years ago) Permalink

Alfred COMPLETELY OTM. I've been reading it in my head with that voice every time.

Ned Raggett, Saturday, 8 September 2007 19:18 (eleven years ago) Permalink

Grand Moff Rubin

max, Saturday, 8 September 2007 19:30 (eleven years ago) Permalink

Drag City is gone from emusic.

http://www.emusic.com/messageboard/viewTopic.html?topicId=12450

One poster says he e-mailed the label and received a reply that emusic "pays peanuts."

That may not bode well for the subscription model.

Hurting 2, Sunday, 9 September 2007 19:37 (eleven years ago) Permalink

I dunno, I wouldn't really call the Shins "fresh and creative" music. It seems like more and more the large indies are shepherding decent, but ultimately boring acts into the mainstream over a period of time. Large indies are informing a reasonable amount of mainstream taste these days. Obviously, this model doesn't account for the people who just need some Nickelback or decent teen pop, but can't you see some kind of new label entering the arena to fill this void?

call all destroyer, Sunday, 9 September 2007 22:21 (eleven years ago) Permalink

Whether you think The Shins are "fresh and creative" is totally irrelevant - I'm talking about bands that are the bread and butter of their labels. If those bands make less money, the labels make less money, and they have less money to put out less accessible acts. If anything, a little boutique label that only focuses on "fresh, creative" music is the worst off of anyone - labels like that can't afford to take a 10% hit to their bottom line because a few people are getting their stuff for free.

Hurting 2, Sunday, 9 September 2007 23:02 (eleven years ago) Permalink

i do like rubins 'if you make art people will respond' idea but the idea that we still need mega-mass marketed mainstream music needs a rethink IMO. and theres plenty of artists making 'art' on the fringes, some of whom ARE on majors, and i dont see any of that stuff shifting major units (obv, TVOTR were never going to sell much anyway but hey...) like rubin thinks they will...

titchyschneiderMk2, Monday, 10 September 2007 17:43 (eleven years ago) Permalink

If anything, a little boutique label that only focuses on "fresh, creative" music is the worst off of anyone - labels like that can't afford to take a 10% hit to their bottom line because a few people are getting their stuff for free.

I'm not sure if that is entirely accurate, considering how the boutique labels traditionally emphasize packaging, artwork, and limited editions. Check out eBay: OOP releases by boutique labels command relatively big bucks even though much of the music can be found for free online.

QuantumNoise, Monday, 10 September 2007 17:58 (eleven years ago) Permalink


You must be logged in to post. Please either login here, or if you are not registered, you may register here.