Why Vinyl Can't Survive

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A DJ perspective on the death of vinyl posted at Resident Advisor.

Good Dog (Good Dog), Thursday, 17 August 2006 07:39 (thirteen years ago) link

My take:

1) Downloads are killing off CD sales, slowly.
2) Vinyl sales are on the up.

Fill in the 1,000 word article around those two points yourself, I have things to do...

mark grout (mark grout), Thursday, 17 August 2006 07:46 (thirteen years ago) link

It's already survived

A Viking of Some Note (Andrew Thames), Thursday, 17 August 2006 08:32 (thirteen years ago) link

Such a partisan stance, the true idiocy in this debate is people siding with either format vehemently in a large "I am more technologically advanced than you" pissing contest.

At the moment I buy alot of vinyl, some mp3s, and I download others, the cheaper way! When I play it's a combination of these 3, this is the case for lots of people I know.

Some use all mp3s yes, but not all, it's generally not a big deal, it makes NO DIFFERENCE.

There are quite a few fallacys in the article tho.

1. That buying MP3s is cheaper: it's quite expensive considering you get no physical product.

2. That the MP3 stores have the same stock as vinyl ones: plenty of times I can't find the track I want on beatport.

3. That John in Nova Scotia being able to buy a tune on MP3 actually has anything to do with the death of vinyl, dance music starts with Hans in Berlin and Fred in London, and filters down to these other places, John in Nova Scotia never could buy vinyl so how does this affect the sales?

4. Isn't the biggest threat to vinyl diminishing supplies of the materials used to create it?

I mean I can definitely see that vinyl is so much heavier and stuff, but as long as it keeps getting produced it will keep selling. Why do I feel the writer of the article is a US house purist or something and his friends think "CDs have no soul", so relatively he feels he is a modern day Eno.

Ronan (Ronan), Thursday, 17 August 2006 09:28 (thirteen years ago) link

just look around – iPods have people listening to music again

hahahahahahahahahahaha .... yes, music was on the verge of being phased out of popular culture before the iPod came along.

And next week they're writing about why vinyl *will* survive ...

NoTimeBeforeTime (Barry Bruner), Thursday, 17 August 2006 10:10 (thirteen years ago) link

basing arguments on "because i said so!" is always a good tactic.

Every album released since has been creatively constrained to that same 75 minutes.

and thank god.

GOD PUNCH TO HAWKWIND (yournullfame), Thursday, 17 August 2006 10:16 (thirteen years ago) link

Ronan OTM on it not being an either/or proposition.

But speaking as someone who just lost 10,000 songs due to a hard disc failure, from now on if I really like a track, I'm going to spring for the vinyl. In the long run, vinyl will trump digital. If you want to make sure you still own that song when you're 90, best get it on record and store in a nice cool place.

And in the very long run, the musicians are out of luck. People in the year 4000 will be analyzing 20th century culture from pots and sculptures not info on circuit boards.

Good Dog (Good Dog), Thursday, 17 August 2006 10:28 (thirteen years ago) link

er, doubt that actually.

and if you want to listen to the track on the move it's still hassle to record and encode it from vinyl (i'm about to do a LOT of this over the next few weeks).

Konal Doddz (blueski), Thursday, 17 August 2006 10:35 (thirteen years ago) link

USB turntables, bro.

GOD PUNCH TO HAWKWIND (yournullfame), Thursday, 17 August 2006 10:52 (thirteen years ago) link

I think they're a waste of money really. It's pretty straightforward hooking up record player to PC via line-in after all. It's more the time issue.

Konal Doddz (blueski), Thursday, 17 August 2006 10:54 (thirteen years ago) link

ihttp://www.synthtopia.com/news/05_10/images/iMic.jpg

Get an iMic. They are cheap and good.

mark grout (mark grout), Thursday, 17 August 2006 11:04 (thirteen years ago) link

bah.

They look like this:

http://www.macfriends.com/productImages/adapters/13892.jpg

mark grout (mark grout), Thursday, 17 August 2006 11:05 (thirteen years ago) link

what does iMic do??

wogan lenin (dog latin), Thursday, 17 August 2006 11:09 (thirteen years ago) link

..and from the world's "top 100" djs (DJ MAG) list,
dj numbers 2 and 5 say:

02 - Tiesto - "I've moved totally to CDs this year - vinyl is dead"
05 - Ferry Corsten - ...."I've pretty much switched to CDs"
--------

what you can do with mp3s and cds on the newst pioneers and suchlike makes the traditional vinyl deck look like a museum piece.

pisces (piscesx), Thursday, 17 August 2006 11:16 (thirteen years ago) link

wow, two guys! vinyl is doomed!!!

they're just moving to CDs because they're the next "dead format."

GOD PUNCH TO HAWKWIND (yournullfame), Thursday, 17 August 2006 11:42 (thirteen years ago) link

no. the DJ MAG lists about 40 guys from the 100 bigging up the new formats, but i thought it pertinent to point out what 2 of those considered to be 'top 5' thought. and i still do in fact.

pisces (piscesx), Thursday, 17 August 2006 11:53 (thirteen years ago) link

much like dying computer/console platforms, the technology is developed to make best use of formats like CDs for live mixing and fx just as the need for a physical storage medium for the music beyond hard drives becomes un-necessary itself. it does seem silly to be proudly claiming to have moved to just CDs NOW. did the likes of Tiesto and Corsten have to re-obtain all their vinyl stuff on CD? did they get someone to convert it all for them? why not just go straight to laptop and uncompressed data?

Konal Doddz (blueski), Thursday, 17 August 2006 11:56 (thirteen years ago) link

The year 4000 question is an interesting one.

If we assume that our current global culture will be dead and buried with nothing left, not even a folk memory, what will people make of the material culture we have left behind and will they be able to extract the immaterial data on it?

A player piano roll, a cylinder, a vinyl record, a piece of magnetic tape or a CD, combined with evidence of what was originally used to play them, wouldn't present too much of a challenge, but say you found a mp3 CD. It's quite a leap to go from the laser-read pits to the data to the digital-analogue converter and so on and actually work out what on earth it was meant to be.

It reminds me of a Bruce Sterling novel, where all the criminals keep their data on long obsolete technology instead of encrypting it.

(Off the point, I know, but interesting, I reckon. Fwiw, I doubt there will be anything commercially available that will play an mp3 in 10 years time and that a lot of people will be re-buying an awful lot of music in some sort of loss-less format)

Anyway, the point of vinyl for us non-DJs is that we like the big pictures!

Jamie T Smith (Jamie T Smith), Thursday, 17 August 2006 11:57 (thirteen years ago) link

All of this knowledge will be archived, Jamie. It's not like comparing now to 2000 years ago.

Isn't the biggest threat to vinyl diminishing supplies of the materials used to create it?

A few months ago a friend of mine told me that the company that actually makes one of the key chemicals or materials used in vinyl was planning to close all its factories because they'd ceased to be profitable. And no one else was making this stuff, ergo no more vinyl.

At the time, I dismissed this as bollocks and I'm still sure it is. Am I wrong?

Matt DC (Matt DC), Thursday, 17 August 2006 12:00 (thirteen years ago) link

Steve - I too have struggled to encode my vinyl (after having to come to ILM to learn how!) just because it takes ages (How did we ever have the patience to make compilation tapes in REAL TIME?), so now just figure it's quicker to download it if I want it on mp3, which presumably is also not illegal, since I've paid for it once already.

Jamie T Smith (Jamie T Smith), Thursday, 17 August 2006 12:01 (thirteen years ago) link

Matt - but WHAT FORMAT will it be archived on, eh?

Jamie T Smith (Jamie T Smith), Thursday, 17 August 2006 12:01 (thirteen years ago) link

It's still hard to find some things I have on vinyl. I should be more patient with slsk perhaps. But then half the time it's worse quality than a direct vinyl->mp3 transfer could be. And I want higher than 192.

ILM will be the new Rosetta Stone.

Konal Doddz (blueski), Thursday, 17 August 2006 12:03 (thirteen years ago) link

(How did we ever have the patience to make compilation tapes in REAL TIME?)

there is a fine answer to this. not now.

who gives a fuck if music lasts 2,000 years or not!!!??? not people 2,000 years hence, that's for sure.

Bashment Jakes (Enrique), Thursday, 17 August 2006 12:05 (thirteen years ago) link

My mate works for the sound archive of the British Library and these kind of questions are very real to them.

It's a big debate as to whether to 'go digital'. Apart from retrievability, COST is obviously the issue. How long would it take them to turn everything they've got into a .wav or whatever?

(Anyway, I am derailing the thread. Lets talk about Ferry Corsten some more.)

Jamie T Smith (Jamie T Smith), Thursday, 17 August 2006 12:06 (thirteen years ago) link

who gives a fuck if music lasts 2,000 years or not!!!???

Hahaha - the ultimate rockist criteria

Jamie T Smith (Jamie T Smith), Thursday, 17 August 2006 12:07 (thirteen years ago) link

My mate works for the sound archive of the British Library and these kind of questions are very real to them.

the BL barely lets you look at stuff more than 200 years old without a gloves and a mask, let alone 2,000 year old music.

as a user, i can think of about a million other things they could concentrate on over this.

but i guess to keep all the wonderful undergrads they've started letting in interested, mp3s will be their main shit from now on.

Bashment Jakes (Enrique), Thursday, 17 August 2006 12:13 (thirteen years ago) link

"At the time, I dismissed this as bollocks and I'm still sure it is. Am I wrong?"

Not at all. Remember that vinyl's not just for records. It's also for siding, car seats, clothes... All sorts of stuff.
It has become more expensive to dispose of polyvinyl chloride since people are finally wise to the fact that it causes wicked cancers.

js (honestengine), Thursday, 17 August 2006 12:28 (thirteen years ago) link

Following up Ronan's points:

From the perspective of a DJ working in a smaller dance market, MP3's are cheaper on a month-to-month basis once you get over the initial investment in computer gear and Serato or whatever. At $1-$2 per MP3 versus $7-$14 for a 12", I get a lot more music out of my budget every month if I download.

The online stores still don't have an adequately broad selection, but this is changing *quickly*. There are at least a dozen DJ-oriented MP3 stores operating now, and I'm starting to regularly experience the phenomenon where I'll search for something in MP3 format unsuccessfully, buy it on vinyl, and then see it pop up on Beatport or Kompakt-MP3 a week or two later.

Now if someone would just convince Perlon to get with the program.

jeffery (jeffery), Thursday, 17 August 2006 13:32 (thirteen years ago) link

If McLuhan were still alive, he’d love the vinyl/digital debate

I find this statement HIGHLY dubious!

A-ron Hubbard (Hurting), Thursday, 17 August 2006 13:37 (thirteen years ago) link

we are all aware that non-DJs buy vinyl, too?

GOD PUNCH TO HAWKWIND (yournullfame), Thursday, 17 August 2006 13:37 (thirteen years ago) link

i luv when hipstahs get sikk of digging thru da crates, cuz then i can buy all the rekkerds they get rid of.

scott seward (scott seward), Thursday, 17 August 2006 13:42 (thirteen years ago) link

i feel the same way about books AND rekkerds. there are already way too many for me to read/hear. they don't need to make any more.

scott seward (scott seward), Thursday, 17 August 2006 13:43 (thirteen years ago) link

You shameless man, Scott. They could have sold it all to buy coke.

Ned Raggett (Ned), Thursday, 17 August 2006 13:44 (thirteen years ago) link

(You are however correct about how all this production must stop. Everything must now only be updated blogs.)

Ned Raggett (Ned), Thursday, 17 August 2006 13:44 (thirteen years ago) link

i just started reading henry james. i haven't even gotten to balzac yet. i mean, do i really need jonathonsaffronwhatshisface to keep cranking them out? as long as alice munro keeps at it, i'm good to go. no need for more than a forest or two to be decimated for modern lit.

scott seward (scott seward), Thursday, 17 August 2006 13:58 (thirteen years ago) link

vinyl may be out but pleather is back baby

Sir Dr. Rev. PappaWheelie Jr. II of The Third Kind (PappaWheelie 2), Thursday, 17 August 2006 13:59 (thirteen years ago) link

But but but we need more Ann Coulter books.

Pappa, you are the smoothest dude of the 1985 timewarp.

Ned Raggett (Ned), Thursday, 17 August 2006 14:00 (thirteen years ago) link

what takes longer to disintegrate in the earth, CDs or rekkerds? i imagine they both take about a thousand years to turn to dust.

scott seward (scott seward), Thursday, 17 August 2006 14:01 (thirteen years ago) link

not that i'm one of those environmentalpatient moonbats or something! as long as the grand canyon is empty, i'll continue to buy rekkerds.

scott seward (scott seward), Thursday, 17 August 2006 14:01 (thirteen years ago) link

on an average day we sell between $1-2k worth of vinyl.
jus sayin.

the eunuchs, Cassim and Mustafa, who guarded Abdur Ali's harem (orion), Thursday, 17 August 2006 14:01 (thirteen years ago) link

(we don't sell mp3s.)

the eunuchs, Cassim and Mustafa, who guarded Abdur Ali's harem (orion), Thursday, 17 August 2006 14:02 (thirteen years ago) link

reading Geeta's blog makes me wish i bought more vinyl.

Konal Doddz (blueski), Thursday, 17 August 2006 14:02 (thirteen years ago) link

Well, they're both partially made of oil. That stuff seems to last forever!

But Ian, what happens when Robert Pollard finally runs out of spending money?

Ned Raggett (Ned), Thursday, 17 August 2006 14:02 (thirteen years ago) link

Yeah, that McLuhan thing seemed to be an example of some logical fallacy.

Ruud Haarvest (Ken L), Thursday, 17 August 2006 14:02 (thirteen years ago) link

that's, like, three records a day, right? at NYC prices. for top-notch lonerfolkpsych rarities on the wall.


x-post to ian who is making brooklyn sink into the mud with the weight of his fleetwood mac demo bootlegs.

scott seward (scott seward), Thursday, 17 August 2006 14:03 (thirteen years ago) link

dude, i took a tusk break for like two weeks and it was weird.

the eunuchs, Cassim and Mustafa, who guarded Abdur Ali's harem (orion), Thursday, 17 August 2006 14:05 (thirteen years ago) link

i can't imagine every doing something because tiesto did it too

a name means a lot just by itself (lfam), Thursday, 17 August 2006 17:26 (thirteen years ago) link

er, ever doing

a name means a lot just by itself (lfam), Thursday, 17 August 2006 17:26 (thirteen years ago) link

To some extent doesn't the obsessive completist nature of music collectors come into play for many individuals who choose to collect vinyl? Compares these scenarios:

Person #1: "Yay, I just downloaded the entire Trapez catalogue. All that hard work was totally worth it!"

Person #2: "Yay, I just found that elusive Perlon 12” I've been looking for. Now I have every release. All that hard work was totally worth it!"

I dunno about anybody else, but the *feeling* I get from looking at a crate of records in the corner of my bedroom knowing full well the time and money spent searching for some of them is quite a bit more satisfying than looking at my hard drive full of mp3s, awesome though they may be.

Trace Henry (Trace), Thursday, 17 August 2006 18:12 (thirteen years ago) link

Trace OTM.

Hoosteen (Hoosteen), Thursday, 17 August 2006 18:44 (thirteen years ago) link

yes

Li'l Brexit (Tracer Hand), Wednesday, 11 September 2019 14:04 (one week ago) link

i need the objects as tactile/visual aides to help me think about the music, remember things, and organize my thoughts & listening.

Ditto. Every time I've moved or otherwise had to pack/unpack my CDs and records, the process of going through each individual object has reminded me a) that I had this one record I'd forgotten about, and b) "I should listen to ____ more! I'd forgotten I had so many of their records!" Then I make a stack of things I need to listen to/re-familiarize myself with.

There is no equivalent to this rediscovery with streaming.

Montgomery Burns' Jazz (Tarfumes The Escape Goat), Wednesday, 11 September 2019 14:19 (one week ago) link

I was a little flabbergasted recently when one of our local Targets which had been (to my chagrin) slowly winnowing down their physical media section to an insignificant nub suddenly had an entire aisle devoted to vinyl, and mostly older albums at that. Like I can't pick up a Blu-ray that was released any earlier than the past 90 days but if I wanna throw Doggystyle on the turntable I'm set.

Time to Make a Pizza Pact! (Old Lunch), Wednesday, 11 September 2019 14:20 (one week ago) link

lol, yeah the selection can be pretty inscrutable. My local Barnes and Noble had multiple copies of Ron Wood's I've Got My Own Album To Do one of the last times I flipped through their rack.

☮ (peace, man), Wednesday, 11 September 2019 14:25 (one week ago) link

taking hints from ILM obviously

Captain ACAB (Neil S), Wednesday, 11 September 2019 14:31 (one week ago) link

LOL

“Hakuna Matata,” a nihilist philosophy (One Eye Open), Wednesday, 11 September 2019 14:53 (one week ago) link

I'm sure I mentioned this on some other vinyl thread - I saw a reissue of the original cast recording of Hello Dolly and I cannot imagine the target demographic

https://www.barnesandnoble.com/w/hello-dolly-ocr/32465957

...like, silent gen grandfolks already have this on LP somewhere, but they all love their CDs and Bose wave radios. Who would want this that is completely unaware that it's always available at the Goodwill? Are there really younger Broadway-heads that are seeking out the hipster cred of vinyl and the impulse buy at B&N? I'd imagine the original pressing sounds great. Near mint on discogs for #1.98 plus shipping.

bendy, Wednesday, 11 September 2019 15:12 (one week ago) link

There is no equivalent to this rediscovery with streaming.

I have a giant physical music collection but this statement is kinda spurious

the girl from spirea x (f. hazel), Wednesday, 11 September 2019 15:15 (one week ago) link

Well, for me there's no equivalent. I mean, I don't go through menus and lists on streaming services and think "Oh, I forgot I had that/bought that!" because I don't "have" it, nor did I buy it.

Montgomery Burns' Jazz (Tarfumes The Escape Goat), Wednesday, 11 September 2019 15:21 (one week ago) link

One equivalent would be me coming across an old mp3 folder on my hard drive that I hadn't opened since like 2007, especially if it had mixes I made for people, another one is paging back through your Facebook history/Livejournal entries/whatever blog and seeing what you were listening to at various points in time. The process is intrinsically human and exists independently of anything tangible or intangible that it attaches to (IMHO).

the girl from spirea x (f. hazel), Wednesday, 11 September 2019 15:32 (one week ago) link


I'm sure I mentioned this on some other vinyl thread - I saw a reissue of the original cast recording of Hello Dolly and I cannot imagine the target demographic

https://www.barnesandnoble.com/w/hello-dolly-ocr/32465957

...like, silent gen grandfolks already have this on LP somewhere, but they all love their CDs and Bose wave radios. Who would want this that is completely unaware that it's always available at the Goodwill? Are there really younger Broadway-heads that are seeking out the hipster cred of vinyl and the impulse buy at B&N? I'd imagine the original pressing sounds great. Near mint on discogs for #1.98 plus shipping.

― bendy, Wednesday, September 11, 2019 3:12 PM (twenty-six minutes ago) bookmarkflaglink

Maybe young adult Wall-E fans?

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EIfD2g9QOTo

☮ (peace, man), Wednesday, 11 September 2019 15:41 (one week ago) link

I’ve noticed an odd trend: it seems if you know someone who loves music the most adequate and accesible gift is a vinyl record of a band they like. It doesn’t even matter if they actually own a turntable.

People love gifting other people physical formats, I know I’ve gifted way too many books in an era where people don’t really read (they’re photography books for the most part though, people seem to like to leave those as decor in coffee tables in their living room) - and honestly is there a better format for music to give as a gift? They might use a yearly spotify, apple music, tidal, etc... more but you’d probably look cheap if you gave that one.... cassettes, cds are awful gifts unless you know the person collects them. But with vinyl it doesn’t even seem to matter, the fetish works as well as those fancy illustration/photography books, you can frame them and have them in your media room or something.

✖✖✖ (Moka), Wednesday, 11 September 2019 15:47 (one week ago) link

xxp Even with Spotify (and, I have to imagine, the others), I like to look back over saved albums sorted by newest save first... it works, there's memories (see also: folders of old playlists). And I still buy music as well. There's room for all this, if you've got the room.

maffew12, Wednesday, 11 September 2019 15:58 (one week ago) link

I sometimes gift vinyls from my collection if the person seems very enthusiastic about a certain album in there... I think I’ve gifted 11 so far. recently I was hosting a party in my house and some dude was very curious about my collection and my audio system, he’s married to one of my friends so I know for a fact they don’t own a turntable. He got so excited to see I had some Rolling Stones records, specifically Exile on Main St., I don’t actually play that one much because it’s a 70’s print and while the sleeve looks great the actual record is not in a good condition, but I bought it for like 2 dollars so it’s fine for what it is. Anyways, I told him he could keep it and he was ecstatic. As if I has given him like the rarest record in the world.

So yeah, some people seem to think of these things as some sort of treasures. It’s ridiculous to me, but then again I collect vinyl so I’m guilty as well

✖✖✖ (Moka), Wednesday, 11 September 2019 16:02 (one week ago) link

Moka i've thought a lot about this, about how people used to be able to GIVE each other music and that gift was meaningful because it said something about the giver's identity, about how they perceived the giftee's identity, where they overlapped, about their relationship. And it was something that could be kept. People send playlists to each other... feels like it's not the same to me, that it's disposable, easy to forget, not easy to love and treasure, but maybe I'm just an old git

Li'l Brexit (Tracer Hand), Wednesday, 11 September 2019 16:05 (one week ago) link

aw that's cute. as is "I think... 11"

maffew12, Wednesday, 11 September 2019 16:06 (one week ago) link

I had that experience giving a Rappers Delight single

maffew12, Wednesday, 11 September 2019 16:06 (one week ago) link

Moka brings in an angle I wasn't aware of - the pure gift, like a singing fish novelty or something.

Vinyl does give me this bizarre archival security that, should the climate apocalypse destroy the electrical grid, one will still be able to spin LPs with modified Victrola-like turntable-and-megaphone contraption, perhaps hooked up to a bicycle, Gilligan's Island style.

bendy, Wednesday, 11 September 2019 16:08 (one week ago) link

I haven't had to barter none since I learned to turn the crank at exactly 33.3rpm

maffew12, Wednesday, 11 September 2019 16:11 (one week ago) link

yeah theres definitely digital equivalents of the physical organizing/forgetting/discovering experience, but at this point I cant train my mind to function the same way in a digital realm, its like trying to learn to read backwards or something.

“Hakuna Matata,” a nihilist philosophy (One Eye Open), Wednesday, 11 September 2019 16:25 (one week ago) link

Yeah, that's it. I'm honestly not that much of a detail-oriented person so significant gifts are usually a headache for me but most people definitely appreciate a 'personalized' gift rather than a convenient one. I used to give gifts that friends would actually use in their homes and I noticed that they were missing like say: good quality kitchen knives, blenders, air dryers - things like that - and I was often given the weirdest looks. I started giving more customized gifts and people appreciate more if you remember their interests or as TH puts it - a meaningful gift of how you perceive their identity and your relationship - it's usually cheaper too! The thing is, not all of my friends/family seem to have explicit interests. The good thing is, most of my acquaintances like drinking on weekends so giving them a mid-range bottle of whiskey or tequila seems to do the job just fine too!

While I'm here deviating the conversation from vinyl allow me to keep exposing private tidbits of my life when it comes to gifts. I hate giving gifts to one of my brothers, he's very posh and lives somewhat minimal - he doesn't buy any sort of decor or collects anything, he hates having things around without purpose - so the only thing he cares about is watching Soccer and designer clothes, but clothes are a headache to choose as a gift, specially if I'm buying something like freaking $300 dollar Burberry shirt and it doesn't fit well or he doesn't really like it.

✖✖✖ (Moka), Wednesday, 11 September 2019 16:38 (one week ago) link

Love that story, Moka.

ban golf (jed_), Wednesday, 11 September 2019 16:39 (one week ago) link

I kind of regret giving my friend my copy of Tusk for their birthday like 15 years ago... finding nice copies for 1-5 bucks was no big deal back then

brimstead, Wednesday, 11 September 2019 17:40 (one week ago) link

I felt really bad this past Christmas when all my parents got me was a nice button down as well as some fancy mall kiosk chocolates that came in novelty shapes like wrist watches and pens etc. Sure, that's cute but it's a gift you get for a family member you never see or a co-worker or something. The fact that they didn't really invest much energy into thinking about me and what I like or am into... it felt bad and was hard to navigate cause I didn't want to seem entitled.

So anyway, personalized gifts are indeed really meaningful, and vinyl is very gift-able. The story above about the ecstatic Rolling Stones guy- I mean his attitude towards vinyl as this sacred object is one that most people completely unengaged with vinyl have. So even if they can't/won't/would rarely play it, they're going to be really charmed if the artist is one they have some emotional connection to. It's also why people would bring in used vinyl to sell to a record store and expect to make hundreds or thousands of dollars.

Evan, Wednesday, 11 September 2019 18:51 (one week ago) link

Beautiful story Moka, but what I'd really like to know now: did you gifting him Exile lead to him being a turntable? :)

Le Bateau Ivre, Thursday, 12 September 2019 12:09 (one week ago) link

I've heard some copies of Exile are cursed like that.

the girl from spirea x (f. hazel), Thursday, 12 September 2019 13:02 (one week ago) link

Hahaha now that you mention it I haven’t seen him ever since, I should call my friend to see if everything is ok

✖✖✖ (Moka), Thursday, 12 September 2019 18:45 (one week ago) link

4000 albums boxed up--this is why.

http://phildellio.tripod.com/albums.JPG

clemenza, Friday, 13 September 2019 15:52 (one week ago) link

Are you moving?

Trotsky Icepick! Loved bits of them.

Gerald McBoing-Boing, Friday, 13 September 2019 17:49 (one week ago) link

ahh man, love those classic sugarhill sleeves!

Totally different head. Totally. (Austin), Friday, 13 September 2019 19:02 (one week ago) link

(xpost) I am. The album paradox: 1) they're much easier to pack than books, but 2) are much harder to find boxes for. I swear that most liquor companies make sure their boxes are either an inch too short in either width or height--it's a big conspiracy.

clemenza, Friday, 13 September 2019 19:24 (one week ago) link

2) are much harder to find boxes for. I swear that most liquor companies make sure their boxes are either an inch too short in either width or height--it's a big conspiracy.

U-Haul's "small moving box" has always been my go-to box for moving records. There's a Discogs discussion thread that gets into other options, but the U-Haul ones have been great.

Elvis Telecom, Sunday, 15 September 2019 18:26 (five days ago) link

agree with elvis. u-haul’s small box are what i’ve used. i recently moved cross country and those boxes did the trick

sknybrg, Sunday, 15 September 2019 19:50 (five days ago) link

i think the vinyl market continues to prop up that specific box and also the Ikea Kallax shelf.

omar little, Sunday, 15 September 2019 19:53 (five days ago) link

Thanks--all the albums are packed now, though. I'm on to DVDs, which are a breeze; they fit most liquor store boxes perfectly.

clemenza, Sunday, 15 September 2019 21:31 (five days ago) link

I'll be looking for new shelving when I get there; that Kallax shelf looks nice and not too pricey. How many albums would one hold?

clemenza, Sunday, 15 September 2019 21:33 (five days ago) link

Each cube of the Ikea shelves holds around 45 records.

If you get the really big one (5x5), you might consider reinforcing the back with something for structural support. I stack 2x4 units and reinforce them so they have a proper back which cuts down on dust.

Cow_Art, Sunday, 15 September 2019 21:52 (five days ago) link

So that's 350 per shelf (the one I'm looking at for $99 has 8 cubicles), meaning I'd need 12--$1,200 for 4000 albums. I have no idea how that would compare to, say, hiring someone to build shelving.

clemenza, Sunday, 15 September 2019 22:13 (five days ago) link

gonna have to disagree with that calculation, though i did question myself for a second. i did a recount and mine (the Expedit, but it has the same shelf size) holds 75-80 per cube, depending on the thickness of the LPs. Got a couple of the 2x4 ones. I have a bunch of overflow but that's all for discogs and eBay anyway.

I do also recommend reinforcing the back. I had considered particle board, measured out to the exact side of the back (approx 31x59) but i went for a few pieces of strong wood 4 inches wide, cut to proper length, and nailed them across the back side, which allowed for access to the outlets.

omar little, Sunday, 15 September 2019 23:03 (five days ago) link

If you're right, and they each hold 600 records, then I'd only need 7--I'd definitely go that route.

clemenza, Sunday, 15 September 2019 23:46 (five days ago) link

you will need enough room to flip them surely

Li'l Brexit (Tracer Hand), Monday, 16 September 2019 00:15 (four days ago) link

Yes--and extra room for whatever I buy in the next decade or two (which won't be much...I buy maybe 50 albums a year now). So eight, maybe nine.

clemenza, Monday, 16 September 2019 00:39 (four days ago) link

Totally depends on thickness of records. 80 seems tight though!

I love the feeling when I get a new shelving unit and all the records that had gotten a little too snug suddenly expand and have space to breathe. The only direction I have left to expand is up at this point. Eventually I'll have two columns side by side, each stacked with three 2x4 cube units yielding a 6x8 behemoth. Slightly worried about the foundation of the house.

Cow_Art, Monday, 16 September 2019 02:25 (four days ago) link

I've seen the 5x5 buckle and collapse under the weight of records, total disaster

Blues Guitar Solo Heatmap (Free Download) (upper mississippi sh@kedown), Monday, 16 September 2019 03:18 (four days ago) link

I moved over 3000 records today, I hurt all over. But the end result is good, I've sold a bunch and now have room for the ones that were all in boxes. The collection almost fits on the three large shelves with only three boxes of overflow. Now I need to find a bookshelf for all the books I took off of the unit that now has albums (again).

sleeve, Monday, 16 September 2019 04:21 (four days ago) link

I've seen the 5x5 buckle and collapse under the weight of records,

I've seen things you people wouldn't believe

Li'l Brexit (Tracer Hand), Monday, 16 September 2019 07:52 (four days ago) link

Another question--there's probably a better thread, but I'll use this one.

I'm going to have to put all these boxes (photo above) into storage for a couple of months. The guy handling my house sale doesn't want them in there while showing the house. I'm trying to find something close to where I'm moving and temperature-controlled--no luck yet on the latter. What is the acceptable temperature range for storing records? I don't expect any really hot days for the next couple of months; wondering more about the lower end.

clemenza, Monday, 16 September 2019 13:04 (four days ago) link

I knew a guy who had a second floor apartment with a massive collection and when the property management incidentally saw it one day they made him move to a ground floor unit... he had around 8,000 albums on a big floor-to-ceiling custom-built shelf IIRC. So I guess there are worse things than just the shelf collapsing!

the girl from spirea x (f. hazel), Monday, 16 September 2019 13:22 (four days ago) link

xp I've heard that vinyl can get brittle at subzero temps, but I think cold shouldn't really be an issue as long as they stay above freezing.

“Hakuna Matata,” a nihilist philosophy (One Eye Open), Monday, 16 September 2019 13:57 (four days ago) link

I've got about 800 in a hanging case bolted to the wall. before putting it in we took the sheet rock down and added a thick sheet of plywood to the studs, then put the sheetrock on that. it's very solid and helpfully cantilevered due to the placement of the (very thick) bolts.

Li'l Brexit (Tracer Hand), Monday, 16 September 2019 14:11 (four days ago) link


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