Wilco - Yankee Hotel Foxtrot

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my pick for the best album of 2002...i've felt this way since i first heard it last october. jeff tweedy has never been better...it's simply an amazing album. everyone should mark april 23 down on their calendar as the day they'll go out and buy one of the truly great albums that's been released in the last five years.

wondering boy poet, Friday, 22 March 2002 01:00 (fifteen years ago) Permalink

It's kind of dull, isn't it? The songs aren't that good, and the production affects an illusion of progression that just isn't there. But then, I've never liked Wilco. But I seriously can't understand what everyone is raving about.

Melissa W, Friday, 22 March 2002 01:00 (fifteen years ago) Permalink

everyone should mark april 23 down on their calendar as the day they'll go out and buy one of the truly great albums that's been released in the last five years

I was wondering when the new Pulp album would be released in America, thanks!

Ned Raggett, Friday, 22 March 2002 01:00 (fifteen years ago) Permalink

The Wilco record is beautiful. Don't forget that the Chelsea Walls soundtrack, composed by Jeff Tweedy, also comes out that day.

Right now my favorite records of the year involve a tie between Wilco & Trail of Dead at the top with the 90 Day Men album behind them.

Yancey, Friday, 22 March 2002 01:00 (fifteen years ago) Permalink

Surely, Ned, you imported 'We Love Life' or have come upon it in some fashion (that last part doesn't sound right at all, my apologies). In any respect, count me as one of the disappointed... with both the new Pulp and the new Wilco. I'm in agreement with Melissa, though I do thoroughly enjoy 'Summerteeth' and the sparring match that is the Mermaid Avenue experiment. I've only heard "Yankee... " online, and I must say that I don't understand why they've stripped everything down. Tweedy seems more under the weather here than on Anodyne (I think that's how you spell that). Just my opinion... but maybe it'll grow on me, though I'm understanding why the multi-instrumentalist guy left, since they apparently weren't using his services anymore.

Tim DiGravina, Friday, 22 March 2002 01:00 (fifteen years ago) Permalink

is that pulp album ever going to come out in the US?

g, Friday, 22 March 2002 01:00 (fifteen years ago) Permalink

"I've only heard "Yankee... " online, and I must say that I don't understand why they've stripped everything down. Tweedy seems more under the weather here than on Anodyne (I think that's how you spell that). Just my opinion... but maybe it'll grow on me, though I'm understanding why the multi-instrumentalist guy left, since they apparently weren't using his services anymore."

I'm not sure how you see things as being stripped down. Just because they didn't use the same grandiose approach used on Summerteeth? That was the first time Wilco had ever done anything like that, so I don't see the "new" sound as that surprising. I just wonder how much of the new sound is due to Jim O'Rourke (can't wait to hear the album he and Tweedy did together).

As far as Jay Bennett leaving, Jeff definitely seems to struggle with sharing the spotlight, maybe he's just afraid of having to deal with another Uncle Tupelo-esque power struggle. After "A.M." he booted Max Johnston from the band, reportedly because all of the reviews praised Jonston's multi-instrumental prowess.

I have to confess that Tweedy is my musical hero. I love him. Love his songwriting (with the exception of songs like "Can't Stand It," "Monday" and "Outta Mind Outta Site"). I think Yankee Hotel Foxtrot is the best thing he has ever done. Pay attention to "Radio Cure," it's his finest song yet. All of this is from my ultimate fan- boy opinion, however.

Yancey, Friday, 22 March 2002 01:00 (fifteen years ago) Permalink

What I heard last fall sounded like a Jim O'Rourke chin stroking project with Jeff Tweedy tagging along. I don't always believe an artier approach automatically makes a band amazing.

Curt, Friday, 22 March 2002 01:00 (fifteen years ago) Permalink

Yes, YHF is a great album. One of my favorites of the year - last year or this - take your pick. I love that opening line, "I am an American aquarium drinker." Every song has something to recommend it (except maybe "Reservations", which is the only one I have yet to get into), but the album really hits its stride on the middle stretch, from "Jesus, etc." through "I'm the Man Who Loves You". I hadn't heard much Wilco before this, so I can't compare it with their other work - though on the strength of YHF, I will be paying renewed interest to their back catalog.

o. nate, Friday, 22 March 2002 01:00 (fifteen years ago) Permalink

Wilco = problematic for me. I loved loved loved AM because of it's perfect pop influence to country (or vice versa). Being There would have been a great single album, but too much filler/wandering to make a compelling double. Summerteeth was just too slick, and not much of the material grabbed me. Listened to the new one online and it just seemed dull, though admittedly that's not the best way to hear it, and I'll get it anyhow out of loyalty. Really, the O'Rourke album with the Wilco guys on it is grate...much better than Yankee Hotel Foxtrot seems.

Making the whole thing even more problematic is that I just picked up the Uncle Tupelo compilation yesterday, and it reminds me of just why I have so much respect for Tweedy and Farrar: they were brilliant at taking something that was stripped down and making it seem lush, either through emotion or just plain ol' honesty. Farrar hasn't done much better since the break, starting with one amazing release and then winding down into more generic territory since.

Sean Carruthers, Friday, 22 March 2002 01:00 (fifteen years ago) Permalink

Really, the O'Rourke album with the Wilco guys on it is grate...

Pardon my ignorance - which album is this? I couldn't find anything fitting this description in allmusic.com.

o. nate, Friday, 22 March 2002 01:00 (fifteen years ago) Permalink

Surely, Ned, you imported 'We Love Life' or have come upon it in some fashion (that last part doesn't sound right at all, my apologies).

Sick. And yes, I have both albums around on mp3 format, huzzah.

Here's where I admit Uncle Tupelo et al is a cult I could never really figure out, care about or stand. Nice enough intentions and all, I guess, but anyway.

Ned Raggett, Friday, 22 March 2002 01:00 (fifteen years ago) Permalink

'Insignificance' by O'Rourke features Tweedy on gtr/harmonica on a few tracks. Drummer Glen Kotche is now a member of Wilco, but he also plays on quite a lot of O'Rourke's albs.

Andrew L, Friday, 22 March 2002 01:00 (fifteen years ago) Permalink

Pardon my ignorance - which album is this? I couldn't find anything fitting this description in allmusic.com.
Check it here. allmusic.com doesn't mention it, but IIRC Tweedy plays all over this one, and I'm positive one of the other Wilco guys does too. (Which one it is escapes me for the moment, Coomer maybe? I can try looking it up when I get home if no one else can confirm first.)

Sean Carruthers, Friday, 22 March 2002 01:00 (fifteen years ago) Permalink

"Insignificance" is okay, but no way would I rate it higher than YHF. O'Rourke's vocals pretty much ruin it for me. The guy couldn't sing his way out of a paper bag, and the lyrics don't go anywhere either. That would be forgivable if the music were interesting, but that too seems almost willfully bland.

o. nate, Friday, 22 March 2002 01:00 (fifteen years ago) Permalink

See, I found YHF bland when I heard it, but again I'll qualify that with an "it's probably not the same over the net". I'll get back to you in a month or so on this, but I do love the big ol' rifforama on Insignificance.

Sean Carruthers, Friday, 22 March 2002 01:00 (fifteen years ago) Permalink

For me, the weakest link on "Insignificance" is the lyrics. Take "Memory Lane" for instance. There is a long and distinguished tradition of spiteful kiss-off songs in pop music history, stretching from Dylan's "Positively 4th Street" to Jay-Z's "Take Over", so you would think that O'Rourke had a fruitful subject to mine, but unfortunately, he digs deep and comes up with... not much. Here's a representative O'Rourke barb: "It's quite a gamble to speak out of place/ Those things'll kill ya/ And so could your face." You really have to resist the urge to say, "Ooooh burn." The reason those classic kiss-off songs are classics is because they make you laugh, almost against your will, at the object of ridicule, but O'Rourke fails to give you any sense of what he doesn't like about this person or why you should even care. Witty he is not.

o. nate, Friday, 22 March 2002 01:00 (fifteen years ago) Permalink

Okay, I admit it. I'm from the Ned Raggett school of "Lyrics? What lyrics?"

Sean Carruthers, Friday, 22 March 2002 01:00 (fifteen years ago) Permalink

I think YHF is very pretty too, cheapmuffin man. What's creepy is American Flag and Jesus, etc.--so sad and yet prescient in one of those it's a coincidence but so strange ways. Although I wouldn't necessarily recommend the soundtrack thing from the advance, nor the side project with Glenn and Jeff and some other guys from Dirty Three. That's pretty much a piss-off project, yuuuuuuck.

Mickey Black Eyes, Friday, 22 March 2002 01:00 (fifteen years ago) Permalink

Okay, I admit it. I'm from the Ned Raggett school of "Lyrics? What lyrics?"

Dear, sweet wonderful man. You are part of the cult. I should proclaim myself the new Darby Crash or something. "Follow what I do or say. Get yourself a Raggett Burn."

Ned Raggett, Friday, 22 March 2002 01:00 (fifteen years ago) Permalink

Ever since I Got Right With Ned(tm) I have lived in a world of wonderfulness!

Sean Carruthers, Friday, 22 March 2002 01:00 (fifteen years ago) Permalink

Yes, this is indeed a wonderful album. The production is freaking ace, especially on 'Ashes', 'I Am Trying To Break Your Heart' and 'Pot Kettle Black'. If it has a weak link, it's 'Heavy Metal Drummer'.

Simon H., Friday, 22 March 2002 01:00 (fifteen years ago) Permalink

"Heavy Metal Drummer" is the best thing I've ever heard by them. The rest seems entirely eh to me, 'slow-burning' 'moody' rock songs with 'intelligent' lyrics etc etc. That's all very well but. It will get fountains of praise because i) in that style it's a good album and that style is a style that critics love, ii) critics love even more the opportunity to show that they have better taste than record execs - fountainous reviews were guaranteed for YHF whatever it sounded like from the moment its original release was nixed. (I do not discount myself from this by the way - why do you think I patiently downloaded the thing?).

Tom, Friday, 22 March 2002 01:00 (fifteen years ago) Permalink

one month passes...
Got it. Whoever it was at Warner who claimed there were no singles on this thing was obviously huffing gas, because track 2 would make an amazing single, as would a couple other songs, as long as the expectations were reasonably low (ie. modest modern rock hit as opposed to Density's Child-style BLOCKBUSTAH). Listening to it again over headphones today, as opposed to a really crappy net stream made quite a bit of difference...it's definitely something that's going to grow on me a lot, even if there's that one whacked-out guitar solo midway through that sounds like it was played by someone who wandered into the studio off the street.

Sean Carruthers, Wednesday, 24 April 2002 00:00 (fifteen years ago) Permalink

I love track 5 but it seems to me like only 7, Heavy Metal Drummer, could really break onto modern rock etc. radio (though I'm told we've got a station here playing something - probably that). The sound just seems too delicate.

Josh, Wednesday, 24 April 2002 00:00 (fifteen years ago) Permalink

Im liking it. Though Im noticing an odd simularity between "I Am Trying To Break Your Heart" and The Tragically Hip's "Lake Fever" mostly due to the singing.
Wilco fucking depress me somedays in that something this good gets virtually ignored and Kylee is pumped to the masses. [nothing particular about the wee one but shes the first one to come to mind]. Well maybe not her but Garth Brooks or that stammering church boy. But hey I also wish I was in the universe where MBV where bigger then Rod.

Mr Noodles, Saturday, 27 April 2002 00:00 (fifteen years ago) Permalink

Sean, you're message made me laugh out loud (the thing about the guitar solo). You know what's really scary - I think it's Tweedy!! He said in an interview that in one song, he did his first real guitar solo.. And he was totally proud about it. Well, I can't remember the song, but when I went back and listened to it at the time, I cringed!! It was totally out of flow with the album and sounded like some high school kid.

But make no mistake, I LOVE the album. And it makes all the difference in the world to listen to it for real, not streaming off the net. I have made that mistake so many times and almost refused to by albums that ended up being great. Next time I want to "sample" an album I'll go to a record store that lets me listen.

Those of you still in doubt, just try to find a friend who has YHF and borrow it. Don't listen to it on the little PC speaker, or even "big" computer speakers. Gotta crank it in the car!

Cheers

Scott P., Saturday, 4 May 2002 00:00 (fifteen years ago) Permalink

My family is renting a Minivan for me to cart my crap back from university, in light of the recent best friends ride threads I think I shall blar Wilco at obscene levels as I pass through Moncton and other centers of civilization.

Mr Noodles, Saturday, 4 May 2002 00:00 (fifteen years ago) Permalink

But you might be hauled from your vehicle and beaten. Not sure by who, though.

Ned Raggett, Saturday, 4 May 2002 00:00 (fifteen years ago) Permalink

If the solo he's talking about is the one in the middle of "I'm the Man Who Loves You" he really has to practice harder. My first reaction when I heard it was "I couldn't played that...and I suck." Also, has anyone else noticed the eerie similarity between the guitar line on "Pot Kettle Black" and "Inbetween Days" by the Cure?

Sean Carruthers, Monday, 6 May 2002 00:00 (fifteen years ago) Permalink

haha this LP is advertised in the current issue of the NEW YORK REVIEW OF BOOKS!! the barnes and noble throwdown!!

mark s, Monday, 6 May 2002 00:00 (fifteen years ago) Permalink

You're right, it is "I'm the Man Who Loves You," which remains the only song that I really can't get into. Fair enough, one bad apple doesn't spoil the whole bunch in this case - I am still thrilled with YHF and am amazed that it is as good as it is.

I was disappointed to see it fall this week to #34 on Billboard after a kickass start at #13. I imagine a lot of the fast start was from pre-orders, etc. It was kind of a fairy tale anyway, the idea that this album could come rip up the charts when even some of my good friends, smart people with good musical taste, still haven't even heard of Wilco (what is up??). Another big problem is lack of radio play. So far, I think "Heavy Metal Drummer" is the one getting played on a few stations. The coolest station here in Austin (besides NPR) claims to be playing it, but I haven't heard it on there yet. I keep enduring hours of Steve Earle and Lucinda Williams, even some Counting Crows just to see if Wilco will come on. Okay, I personally like all those artists, don't get mad! But all I want to hear right now is something new, and I want other people to hear it as well.

I'm a little surprised "Drummer.." was picked as the single (was it picked? Or are stations just picking it up?).. I think it's pleasant, but kinda sing-songy and a little lightweight - in my opinion. That's just because the rest of the album is so good. But it is certainly catchy.. we shall see.

Cheers, Scott

Scott P., Thursday, 9 May 2002 00:00 (fifteen years ago) Permalink

er the first single (correct me if i'm wrong) is 'war on war' which i thought was pretty decent but not as singleworthy as 'heavy metal drummer' or even 'kamera'. i've never liked wilco, but i gave this album a listen and i think for the most part it's fantastic. my favorite song, i think, is the first one on the album - wow. somehow a lot of it eerily sounds like what pavement might have done if they'd spent several years living in the woods.

geeta, Thursday, 9 May 2002 00:00 (fifteen years ago) Permalink

sometimes i wonder if this record dropping business was a conspiracy and to build hype for the yhf

ernest, Thursday, 9 May 2002 00:00 (fifteen years ago) Permalink

heh. read the village voice review of the album.

geeta, Thursday, 9 May 2002 00:00 (fifteen years ago) Permalink

"If you listen to a lot of hip-hop (or house music or basement bhangra or any other genre not dominated by white people), it probably won't be the most extraordinary album you'll hear all month." Help me out here: what's the equivalent opposite of "rockist"?

Greil Marcus hates it even more. Fah.

Nate Patrin, Thursday, 9 May 2002 00:00 (fifteen years ago) Permalink

there is no equivalent opposite of rockist!! that's the strange thing!!

mark s, Thursday, 9 May 2002 00:00 (fifteen years ago) Permalink

On your adive Ned, I decided that Celtic rock will be best, Pogues and His Lusicous Uncles ode to Sackville, "One More Year" will be best suited to my flee to civilization.

Mr Noodles, Thursday, 9 May 2002 00:00 (fifteen years ago) Permalink

I am pleased you have considered my wisdom.

Ned Raggett, Thursday, 9 May 2002 00:00 (fifteen years ago) Permalink

I don't know whether it's rockist or racist or anti-rockist or anti- racist or what to say that but the thing is he's right - I listen to all of those things and YHF isn't the most extraordinary album I've heard this month!

Tom, Friday, 10 May 2002 00:00 (fifteen years ago) Permalink

Out of interest, what's the most extraordinary album you've heard this month, Tom?

Mitch Lastnamewithheld, Friday, 10 May 2002 00:00 (fifteen years ago) Permalink

YHF isn't the most extraordinary album I've heard this month
Which album is the most extraordinary album this month you have heard up to now then, Tom? The month is only ten days old! I ordered YHF and should get it tomorrow. My expectations are high and I'll tell you about it then.

alex in mainhattan, Friday, 10 May 2002 00:00 (fifteen years ago) Permalink

Tom, so what is your favourite of the first ten days of May? And did you find out the email or any other contact info of the guy who is supposed to do the "102 beats that" exchange review of Howe's Confluence? Guess I have to send him a CD-ROM. I wrote you an email a while ago.
Some ideas after three listens on YHF and some bullshit on Greil Marcus bullshit review of the album in my blog.

alex in mainhattan, Saturday, 11 May 2002 00:00 (fifteen years ago) Permalink

it's the answer album to big star's third.

doomie, Saturday, 11 May 2002 00:00 (fifteen years ago) Permalink

Don't know when it came out - I hadn't seen it around before - but Greensleeves Sampler Vol 23 is the most extraordinary new thing I've heard since last month. I heard YHF when it started kicking around the 'net though - so in the month I first heard it So Solid's Fuck It and the Lambchop album were both hands-down more extraordinary.

Tom, Monday, 13 May 2002 00:00 (fifteen years ago) Permalink

Oh well it's not a contest anyway.. I love YHF but I've heard more extraordinary music before. I think I'm just so shocked that this kind of sound came from Wilco, so soon. It's like the progression is startling, and from a band that is so good, yet so unknown in many circles.

At any rate, I read that Village Voice review. What really made me frustrated with it is the fact that the critic couldn't seem to figure out what message he was trying to get across. By the end of the review, I knew he thought that YHF: 1. Is too hyped 2. Is a great album 3. Is an okay album 4. Tweedy is a shuffling, somewhat soulless suburban white boy 5. But he is a good songwriter 6. But he's still white 7. People need to listen to music not performed by white people 8. But YHF is a good album sometimes 9. But we really shouldn't like it too much.

If there was a #10, it would be "confusion". The critic seems to be entirely in conflict. He wants to recommend the album, but is upset at all the raves it is getting, so he can't outright recommend it, but he can't say with a straight face that it's bad.

By the end of it I really regretted having mired myself in such rubbish. This guy needs to just go back to reviewing the album, not society, other critics, circumstances, and fans lack of appreciation for his other, more worldly music. Uggh.

Other stuff, I for one just got Amnesiac and so far I'm kind of intrigued. Even though I have NEVER liked Radiohead, for some reason. No, not even OK Computer, really. But maybe I'll give it all another try. Anyone heard Pinback? Kind of mellow, nice vocals. A nice change of pace.

Scott P., Monday, 13 May 2002 00:00 (fifteen years ago) Permalink

he can't say with a straight face that it's bad

Neither can I -- but neither can I say it's all that, because it isn't.

Ned Raggett, Monday, 13 May 2002 00:00 (fifteen years ago) Permalink

it's the answer album to big star's third.

Oh, so it's an overrated dog's breakfast of inconsistencies?

Brian "who loves #1 RECORD and RADIO CITY but thinks THIRD/SISTER LOVERS is the , Monday, 13 May 2002 00:00 (fifteen years ago) Permalink

By the end of the review, I knew he thought that YHF: 1. Is too hyped 2. Is a great album 3. Is an okay album 4. Tweedy is a shuffling, somewhat soulless suburban white boy 5. But he is a good songwriter 6. But he's still white 7. People need to listen to music not performed by white people 8. But YHF is a good album sometimes 9. But we really shouldn't like it too much.

This (very neat) summary is why I liked the bits I liked of the review - it sums up the critic's conflictedness very well. I wish his editor had printed the above instead of the full monty.

I left the review thinking the critic was probably a bit of an arsehole and scared of his own indie past/present (i.e. identifying with him) but thinking that he'd got the it's-good-but-limited point over quite well.

Tom, Monday, 13 May 2002 00:00 (fifteen years ago) Permalink

It IS all that, Ned. IS IS IS IS IS! (cry)

Nate Patrin, Monday, 13 May 2002 00:00 (fifteen years ago) Permalink

Just don't treat it as either the end, or the beginning, of pop music.

This rule should apply to pretty much ever record ever.

I just wish he hadn't adopted the "ilxor" moniker (ilxor), Thursday, 3 June 2010 17:36 (seven years ago) Permalink

in general, yes, but as ilx's resident Wilco stan i can say will full confidence that Yankee Hotel Foxtrot truly is the beginning and end of pop music

ksh, Thursday, 3 June 2010 17:40 (seven years ago) Permalink

ksh, how do you rate Radio Cure and what is the best song from this album in your estimation?

Otherwise you're kinda being comp-lit in his racism. (kkvgz), Thursday, 3 June 2010 17:42 (seven years ago) Permalink

But didn't they have a song called Pop is Dead?

― Otherwise you're kinda being comp-lit in his racism. (kkvgz)

Wilco's big hit was "Exit Music (For A Documentary Film)" iirc

ksh, Thursday, 3 June 2010 17:43 (seven years ago) Permalink

"Radio Cure" is solid for sure -- it's like a later career "Dash 7" -- but the best song on the record is, probably, a three-way tie between "Ashes of American Flags," "Poor Places," and "Reservations"

ksh, Thursday, 3 June 2010 17:44 (seven years ago) Permalink

Wilco's best record is a ghost is born, though, so fuck all this noise

ksh, Thursday, 3 June 2010 17:44 (seven years ago) Permalink

live version of "Ashes of American Flags" from Kicking Television, ending in a not-on-the-studio-record Nels Cline guitar solo is also quite excellent

ksh, Thursday, 3 June 2010 17:46 (seven years ago) Permalink

best track on this album is either IATTBYH or Poor Places

best Wilco song is Handshake Drugs

science

some men enjoy the feeling of being owned (acoleuthic), Friday, 4 June 2010 02:18 (seven years ago) Permalink

best Wilco song is Handshake Drugs

LJ, you are a good dude, but this is COMPLETELY FUCKIN WRONG

ksh, Friday, 4 June 2010 02:27 (seven years ago) Permalink

also Less Than You Think is awesome

I may be expressing them to rile, but I actually hold these opinions

some men enjoy the feeling of being owned (acoleuthic), Friday, 4 June 2010 02:27 (seven years ago) Permalink

LTYT -> The Late Greats is some sequencing genius

some men enjoy the feeling of being owned (acoleuthic), Friday, 4 June 2010 02:28 (seven years ago) Permalink

Radio Cure is best Wilco song

licorice oratorio (baaderonixx), Friday, 4 June 2010 08:22 (seven years ago) Permalink

xpost

"Less Than You Think Is" awesome, and the fact that it goes straight into "The Late Greats" to end the record is great

ksh, Friday, 4 June 2010 13:07 (seven years ago) Permalink

the best Wilco song, though, is "At Least That's What You Said"

ksh, Friday, 4 June 2010 13:08 (seven years ago) Permalink

Ha ha ha! Good humour abounds because the sun's out and it's a Friday... but really everyone knows Summerteeth is the album right?

Duran (Doran), Friday, 4 June 2010 13:37 (seven years ago) Permalink

awesome record, definitely their third best though, even if it is the first in their three album run of essential records

ksh, Friday, 4 June 2010 13:43 (seven years ago) Permalink

Still haven't heard Summerteeth

some men enjoy the feeling of being owned (acoleuthic), Friday, 4 June 2010 13:50 (seven years ago) Permalink

the best Wilco song, though, is "At Least That's What You Said"

^^^^^^^^

I just wish he hadn't adopted the "ilxor" moniker (ilxor), Friday, 4 June 2010 13:51 (seven years ago) Permalink

Here's the ksh guide to Wilco's discography:

Essential: Summerteeth, Yankee Hotel Foxtrot, A ghost is born
Excellent: Kicking Television
Patchy: Being There
Slight, but good: AM
Eh, not awful but whatever -- some good tunes, at least: Wilco (the album)
Are you fuckin kiddin me dogg?: Sky Blue Sky

ksh, Friday, 4 June 2010 13:54 (seven years ago) Permalink

Actually, I'd roundly agree with this^

Duran (Doran), Friday, 4 June 2010 13:54 (seven years ago) Permalink

Being as I agree with four of those placements entirely and haven't heard any of the others, I may have to hear Summerteeth

Opening track of Sky Blue Sky is quite good, IIRC - shame about the rest (Wilco (the album) extends this to the first FOUR tracks before sputtering into mediocrity)

some men enjoy the feeling of being owned (acoleuthic), Friday, 4 June 2010 13:57 (seven years ago) Permalink

Can I please see the ksh guide to Sleigh Bells' discography?

I just wish he hadn't adopted the "ilxor" moniker (ilxor), Friday, 4 June 2010 14:00 (seven years ago) Permalink

LJ, get thee Summerteeth. their most poppy record, but still really weird

ksh, Friday, 4 June 2010 14:00 (seven years ago) Permalink

ilxor dogg, it'd just be "dope debut" O_O

ksh, Friday, 4 June 2010 14:00 (seven years ago) Permalink

I quite like Sky Blue Sky, but most of the time, I skip the mid-tempo plod of the intro/verses and just fast-forward to the guitar solos.

Veðrafjǫrðr heimamaður (ecuador_with_a_c), Friday, 4 June 2010 14:36 (seven years ago) Permalink

So you listen to, like, five minutes of the record?

ksh, Friday, 4 June 2010 14:43 (seven years ago) Permalink

the song 'impossible germany' on repeat morelike

some men enjoy the feeling of being owned (acoleuthic), Friday, 4 June 2010 14:48 (seven years ago) Permalink

That and the closing track are the only good songs on that record iirc.

ksh, Friday, 4 June 2010 14:53 (seven years ago) Permalink

two years pass...

Good piece. I think this album has aged well, actually. I've always been impressed with its relative austerity, especially following the denser "Summerteeth." There's a lot of space on this disc, which helps casts its moving parts in stark relief. The tour behind it, before the album had officially been released but after it leaked, was a remarkable thing. The date I saw in Anaheim was particularly memorable. Totally respectful crowd, Tweedy tearing himself apart, people crying (!), a novel sense of community at singing along to songs everyone had heard but no one had released yet. I've never seen many shows quite like that, and given that rehab was not too far off in Tweedy's future, he probably couldn't handle too many more like that, either.

Josh in Chicago, Sunday, 12 May 2013 23:42 (four years ago) Permalink

i agree with you re. the austerity of this album. i think it really is a masterpiece, whatever people think of wilco's indie sincerity/corniness. the fact of the cover and that it was first streamed in September 2001 always leant it a kind of gothic aura to me that has been enhanced with repeated listens. it is a lonely album.

Treeship, Monday, 13 May 2013 00:16 (four years ago) Permalink

in their top three albums, with a ghost is born and summerteeth

markers, Monday, 13 May 2013 02:16 (four years ago) Permalink

i'd take it over summerteeth probably

markers, Monday, 13 May 2013 02:16 (four years ago) Permalink

coincidentally I sold my copy about two weeks ago

A deeper shade of lol (Alfred, Lord Sotosyn), Monday, 13 May 2013 02:19 (four years ago) Permalink

i think summerteeth > YHF > a ghost is born, but they are all good. i don't feel strongly about wilco's other efforts, really.

Treeship, Monday, 13 May 2013 02:19 (four years ago) Permalink

Being There may remain my fave, but there's a confluence of reasons why YHF is special/notable.

Josh in Chicago, Monday, 13 May 2013 02:28 (four years ago) Permalink

check out some of the demos too if you have time

markers, Monday, 13 May 2013 02:34 (four years ago) Permalink

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FdZLroTtYDo

markers, Monday, 13 May 2013 02:35 (four years ago) Permalink

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fb6ZwRcyxjc

markers, Monday, 13 May 2013 02:35 (four years ago) Permalink

cool, thanks, i'll listen to them when mad men's over

Treeship, Monday, 13 May 2013 02:36 (four years ago) Permalink

there's a bunch more shit out there but that's what i found in two seconds on youtube

markers, Monday, 13 May 2013 02:36 (four years ago) Permalink

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5MSYgSSS-Lg

markers, Monday, 13 May 2013 02:38 (four years ago) Permalink

there are two different sets of demos for yankee hotel foxtrot floating around on the internet, one called something like "engineer's demos" or whatever. (do a quick google search for "yankee hotel foxtrot demos", and you'll find some shit.) the songs in the first two videos i posted above are, i think, probably from those volumes. the third song might be too, but it was also released by the band at some point.

this might be worth checking out: http://captainsdead.com/yankee-hotel-foxtrot-demos.html

markers, Monday, 13 May 2013 02:44 (four years ago) Permalink

For those who aren't from here, the building on the cover, btw, is Marina City, aka Corncob Towers, or Bike Handle Towers, which is just a condo building (designed by Bertrand Goldberg) overlooking the river downtown, right by the House of Blues and a bunch of touristy restaurants.

Josh in Chicago, Monday, 13 May 2013 14:16 (four years ago) Permalink

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OWtZ_C0DS1s

Josh in Chicago, Monday, 13 May 2013 14:16 (four years ago) Permalink

The towers are famous in architecture circles.

Jesus, etc might be my favorite song of all time.

Van Horn Street, Monday, 13 May 2013 14:25 (four years ago) Permalink

I heard it in the supermarket last week.

Josh in Chicago, Monday, 13 May 2013 14:29 (four years ago) Permalink

probably just on half of these songs are spectacular. have never quite unconditionally tapped into the merits of the final two tracks, and that's probably why i'd fall short of calling the album a masterpiece. it does hold a very dear place in my heart though. despite its devastating subject matter and those really unsettling metaphors that enliven everyday struggle with a kind of poetic gravitas, it's interestingly a less harrowing listen track by track than either Summerteeth or A Ghost is Born. but if i'm looking for a quick, abridged fix of YHF's virtues, i'll cut straight to "Kamera" or maybe "Pot Kettle Black" these days. sadly burnt out on some of the rest.

charlie h, Monday, 13 May 2013 15:00 (four years ago) Permalink

i really like this record -- summerteeth > YHF > a ghost is born is probably right, but a pretty great run of records however you rank em. i saw wilco several times on this tour and yeah, it was kind of a special thing, in that the band hadn't quite figured out how to play the YHF stuff onstage but they were reaching for greatness in an inspired way. there was a vulnerability there that the lineup these days (as powerful as they are) doesn't have.

tylerw, Monday, 13 May 2013 16:20 (four years ago) Permalink

four years pass...

I'm not a dad, but felt like one tonight while playing this record.

rap is dad (it's a boy!), Saturday, 11 November 2017 03:27 (one week ago) Permalink


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