palm wine guitar music (from west africa)

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i've fallen in love with the few examples of this type of music i can find.

i have a few questions:

(1) anyone know much about this stuff or have some LPs in this genre?

(2) anyone have anything by Ebenezer Calendar & His Maringar Band, who apparently recorded many great 78s which have yet to be reissued

(3) what about s.e. rogie (aside from the album he cut for real world)?

(4) anyone want to share???

(5) has anyone had a glass of palm wine? it sounds delicious.

Amateur(ist) (Amateur(ist)), Friday, 14 July 2006 21:52 (sixteen years ago) link

i don't know anything about this kind of music! tell me about it! or point me somewhere!

s1ocki (slutsky), Friday, 14 July 2006 22:01 (sixteen years ago) link

check it out: http://waxidermy.com/2006/04/21/s-e-rogie-palm-wine-guitar-music/

Amateur(ist) (Amateur(ist)), Friday, 14 July 2006 22:18 (sixteen years ago) link

I learned a bit about palm wine music in an African studies class in my college days - my understanding is that it's the main pre-cursor of Juju, and some of what's called "early juju" is alternately called palm wine. Tunde King was considered to be the greatest artist in this style.

The comp "Juju Roots" is pretty good, and I think there are a few other comps and stuff available.

Abbadavid Berman (Hurting), Friday, 14 July 2006 22:24 (sixteen years ago) link

sounds like calypso

MUCHO MACHO (jaxon), Friday, 14 July 2006 22:58 (sixteen years ago) link

Wow, these songs are great! Tell us if you find anything else, amateurist.

C0L1N B... (C0L1N B...), Saturday, 15 July 2006 00:00 (sixteen years ago) link

it has a strong calypso influence, and it sounds a ways from jujuto me.

Amateur(ist) (Amateur(ist)), Saturday, 15 July 2006 00:02 (sixteen years ago) link

hey if anyone finds this lp let me know ok?: http://www.calypsoworld.org/world/sl.htm

Amateur(ist) (Amateur(ist)), Saturday, 15 July 2006 00:02 (sixteen years ago) link

There's a good CD called I've Found My Love: Guitar Bands of Ghana. Palm wine recordings from the '60s, I think. Might be hard to find.

Tim Ellison (Tim Ellison), Saturday, 15 July 2006 00:17 (sixteen years ago) link

it's selling on amazon for $50, yikes.

Amateur(ist) (Amateur(ist)), Saturday, 15 July 2006 01:58 (sixteen years ago) link

sounds like calypso? interest = piqued.

s1ocki (slutsky), Saturday, 15 July 2006 02:11 (sixteen years ago) link

hey amateurist don't mean to derail, but do you have that roosevelt in trinidad comp?

s1ocki (slutsky), Saturday, 15 July 2006 02:14 (sixteen years ago) link

i do, i do.

Amateur(ist) (Amateur(ist)), Saturday, 15 July 2006 03:27 (sixteen years ago) link

how is it?

s1ocki (slutsky), Saturday, 15 July 2006 03:30 (sixteen years ago) link

two months pass...
http://ec1.images-amazon.com/images/P/B00009YX98.01._SS500_SCLZZZZZZZ_V1131146879_.jpg

I just picked this up through eMusic. Not much info out there except that the cover says it was recorded in the Bokoor studios, which is where that great Electric Highlife comp was also recorded. Really beautiful stuff.

A-ron Hubbard (Hurting), Saturday, 23 September 2006 03:02 (sixteen years ago) link

oo thanks for the emusic tip. i'll grab it. the only thing i have is the s.e. rogie disc amateurist mentioned at top, which is great.

gypsy mothra (gypsy mothra), Saturday, 23 September 2006 03:58 (sixteen years ago) link

i haved an old s.e. rogie comp of his early sixties stuff, called palm wine music i think.. he does twist songs and at least one cowboy song. it's incredible

Fritz Wollner (Fritz), Saturday, 23 September 2006 04:18 (sixteen years ago) link

this is the one
http://afropop.org/img/wa/palm_wine_guitar_music.jpg

Fritz Wollner (Fritz), Saturday, 23 September 2006 04:20 (sixteen years ago) link

oh amateurist linked to it already, i'm an idiot.

Fritz Wollner (Fritz), Saturday, 23 September 2006 04:21 (sixteen years ago) link

that collection on emusic is sweet, i'm listening to it now. i have no idea what palm wine tastes like, but this really makes me want some.

gypsy mothra (gypsy mothra), Saturday, 23 September 2006 04:30 (sixteen years ago) link

i have a book somewhere and am quite a fan. tomorrow:!

also, the hi-life music of west africa is a direct descendent as well. hi-life music=teh shit

trees (treesessplode), Saturday, 23 September 2006 05:50 (sixteen years ago) link

do you think palm wine is imported?

Amateur(ist) (Amateur(ist)), Saturday, 23 September 2006 07:50 (sixteen years ago) link

i imagine it is maybe not as good as the music makes it sound.

s1ocki (slutsky), Saturday, 23 September 2006 13:34 (sixteen years ago) link

:(

apparently it also has an EXTREMELY brief shelf life so cannot be imported anywhere that takes over a day or two to reach.

which makes me happy in a roundabout way, because this circumstance preserves the locality of this drink--means it can't be consumed in supermarkets the world over.

yet.

Amateur(ist) (Amateur(ist)), Saturday, 23 September 2006 18:35 (sixteen years ago) link

to reach CONSUMERS i should have written

Amateur(ist) (Amateur(ist)), Saturday, 23 September 2006 18:36 (sixteen years ago) link

two years pass...

everybody should get that "marvellous boy" comp on honest jon's.

i have a lot more of this music, if slocki wants to get in touch i can send him some.

amateurist, Tuesday, 19 May 2009 11:03 (thirteen years ago) link

Yes, Marvellous Boy is good! It's funny that they subtitled it "Calypso From West Africa" when imho "Palm Wine Guitar From West Africa" is both more accurate and probably more appealing to your average consumer? Did you ever pick up the Juju Roots comp on Rounder? It does have a bit of palm wine guitar on it.

ian, Tuesday, 19 May 2009 14:06 (thirteen years ago) link

some of those records were originally labeled as "calypsos" so it's not too much of a stretch (though they don't resemble trinidadian calypso very closely).

those honest jon's comps (the ones from the emi archives) are a bit odd. "marvellous boy" and the west african comp, at least, have cover photos of very "un-western" looking african folks that date to well before the period when the music was recorded, and seem to promise something more, for the lack of a better word, "tribal." the whole curatorial approach seeks to play up the strangeness of the music, and that's fine, but i think they overdo it sometimes. i mean those highlife bands were as western as anything in africa at the time, insofar as they had whole horn sections, string bass, dudes in nice suits, etc. so why put a bunch of dudes in tribal attire with native drums on the cover?

amateurist, Tuesday, 19 May 2009 16:22 (thirteen years ago) link

consider me... in touch! should i webmail you?

s1ocki, Tuesday, 19 May 2009 16:23 (thirteen years ago) link

hmm, actually contact me on facebook if you please.

amateurist, Tuesday, 19 May 2009 16:36 (thirteen years ago) link

three months pass...

Couldn't believe there wasn't a dedicated S.E. Rogie thread but fair enough.

If you have never heard the "Palm Wine Guitar Music" comp then your life is tragically incomplete. The playing, the production, the voice, the songs. Jesus.

"Do Me Justice" is the best record ever made no lie.

fun is for people who can't cope with life (Noodle Vague), Thursday, 17 September 2009 14:16 (thirteen years ago) link

I'm going to check that out - do you have anything to say about "Dead Men Don't Smoke Marijuana", his album on Realworld?

I am using your worlds, Thursday, 17 September 2009 14:38 (thirteen years ago) link

It's an ok realworld-type record but the sixties stuff is incredible.

Brio, Thursday, 17 September 2009 14:44 (thirteen years ago) link

Some of the production magic is lost on "Dead Men" - the 60s records have an almost Motown-ish "recorded at the end of a tunnel" sound that adds greatly to their charm, it adds unbelievable warmth to the guitar sound - makes it sound like you're at a family party. But most of everything else great about Rogie is still there on the 90s album, and the sound certainly isn't bad, just less special. The playing is still beautiful and fluid plus you get Danny Thompson I think who definitely adds something. It's a great record and the fact that it's lesser (to me) than the godlike qualities of the 60s work isn't really a criticism.

fun is for people who can't cope with life (Noodle Vague), Thursday, 17 September 2009 14:48 (thirteen years ago) link

Just went and got "Palm Wine Guitar Music" off Amazon so will report back later.

I am using your worlds, Thursday, 17 September 2009 14:52 (thirteen years ago) link

Enjoy it! "Advice To Schoolgirls" is my jam.

Brio, Thursday, 17 September 2009 14:54 (thirteen years ago) link

"Advice to Schoolgirls" makes me laugh a lot and then o_O a little.

fun is for people who can't cope with life (Noodle Vague), Thursday, 17 September 2009 14:55 (thirteen years ago) link

I know, it's fucked up but real pretty. Reminds me a little bit of some of the more gentle Joseph Spence/Bahamian folk stuff.

Brio, Thursday, 17 September 2009 15:11 (thirteen years ago) link

He released a late-1980s LP on Worker's Playtime which is excellent, almost as good as the '60s stuff. I also have a copy of his self-published songbook from the mid 1970s. Lyrics for his songs, but also those of folks like Jim Reeves. Lots of ads for Freetown (Sierra Leone) businesses, photo and prose tributes to Sierra Leone politicians and other powerful figures. And an introduction sort of written by Val Wilmer, who gets a full-page picture, the caption to which reads "Beautiful English woman" (or something to that effect).

amateurist, Thursday, 17 September 2009 16:34 (thirteen years ago) link

Oh and by complete chance I walked into a 2nd-rate record store in Chicago a few months ago and found a copy of a self-released LP, AFRICAN LADY, by Rogie released in the 1970s. It has some cut-rate "soul" touches and is the least of his albums (of the ones I've heard) but I still enjoy it.

amateurist, Thursday, 17 September 2009 16:35 (thirteen years ago) link

AFRICAN LADY was released when he was living in California, by the way.

amateurist, Thursday, 17 September 2009 16:35 (thirteen years ago) link

Just to be contrary, I will add that I got drunk with a lady from West Africa once and the mere thought of palm wine makes me queasy.

l'homme moderne: il forniquait et lisait des journaux (Michael White), Thursday, 17 September 2009 16:45 (thirteen years ago) link

Oprah admits she's not big on short stories, but her latest pick is a stunning collection by a Nigerian priest that reflects Africa through the eyes of its children. "I was born under a palm-wine tree in Ikot Ekpene Diocese in Nigeria," writes Akpan. "I was inspired to write by the people who sit around my village church to share palm wine after Sunday Mass, by the Bible, and by the humor and endurance of the poor."

Oprah's new book choice is Uwem Akpan's "Say You're One Of Them"

curmudgeon, Tuesday, 22 September 2009 14:08 (thirteen years ago) link

Ah yes, I meant to post again on here. Got the "Palm Wine Guitar Music" album and have been playing it loads. Lovely ambience to it and puts a smile on my face. Thanks for recommending it, NV and others.

I am using your worlds, Tuesday, 22 September 2009 14:11 (thirteen years ago) link

He released a late-1980s LP on Worker's Playtime which is excellent, almost as good as the '60s stuff. I also have a copy of his self-published songbook from the mid 1970s. Lyrics for his songs, but also those of folks like Jim Reeves. Lots of ads for Freetown (Sierra Leone) businesses, photo and prose tributes to Sierra Leone politicians and other powerful figures. And an introduction sort of written by Val Wilmer, who gets a full-page picture, the caption to which reads "Beautiful English woman" (or something to that effect).

― amateurist, Thursday, September 17, 2009 12:34 PM (5 days ago) Bookmark Suggest Ban Permalink

really thought that said val kilmer

fountain bleaut (s1ocki), Tuesday, 22 September 2009 14:15 (thirteen years ago) link

two weeks pass...

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Val_Wilmer

-- sort of a hero of mine.

amateurist, Wednesday, 7 October 2009 23:24 (thirteen years ago) link

one year passes...

that Worker's Playtime album - The Palm Wine Sounds of S.E. Rogie is brilliant btw. The sound is so sharp the guitar just pings out of the mix. Hannah just asked me "why is this so funky?"

cockroach shakespeare (Noodle Vague), Monday, 11 April 2011 17:44 (eleven years ago) link

two years pass...

Windsor just reminded me of this thread which reminded me of this track

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tC0jhKwuxFU

which is a FRIDAY NIGHT JAM boys and girls

life went on, sadly (Noodle Vague), Friday, 12 April 2013 22:44 (nine years ago) link

i've been listening to so much palm wine lately

Mordy, Friday, 12 April 2013 23:04 (nine years ago) link

here's my palm-wine playlist: http://open.spotify.com/user/mordys/playlist/4v23GlH3nTfURT2mFpKt3s

we took a long walk on the bala heritage trail last weekend and i played it off a speaker in d's stroller - it's pretty much the perfect warm spring day walk music

Mordy, Friday, 12 April 2013 23:05 (nine years ago) link

lots of nice stuff on this thread

curmudgeon, Wednesday, 17 April 2013 13:56 (nine years ago) link

John Peel used to play the shit out of that SE Rogie album. Never owned it but feel like I know it so well. Need to check out some of these other folks for sure.

dschinghis kraan (NickB), Wednesday, 17 April 2013 14:05 (nine years ago) link

love this stuff so much

sean gramophone, Wednesday, 17 April 2013 15:04 (nine years ago) link

i can't get enough of it

Mordy, Wednesday, 17 April 2013 15:25 (nine years ago) link

thx for the spotify mix mordy

honest to god spotify has really made ILM so much more amazing to me now, so cool w.stuff like this or any of the rolling threads

ums (upper mississippi sh@kedown), Friday, 19 April 2013 15:47 (nine years ago) link

i'm completely infatuated w/ "the tree and the monkey" from the marvellous boy compilation and i wish i knew who was singing on it bc i would love to hear her sing more

Mordy, Saturday, 20 April 2013 00:10 (nine years ago) link

i asked honest jon's and they aren't sure but think maybe Juliana Okine - she's got one google scholar reference on a totes out of print book called "flagbearers of ghana" and a slight reference in this article: http://www.ghanaweb.com/GhanaHomePage/people/pop-up.php?ID=144

Mordy, Saturday, 20 April 2013 15:56 (nine years ago) link

do any ilxors know where i could find copies of either the 'all for you' or 'day by day' e.t. mensah comps for purchase or otherwise?

Mordy, Saturday, 20 April 2013 16:06 (nine years ago) link

ha nm, apparently amazon has them for sale

Mordy, Saturday, 20 April 2013 16:08 (nine years ago) link

one month passes...

Music appears to have played some role in the construction of social networks among African workers in Lagos. As one elderly guitarist in Lagos described it:

It is from all this sort of music that people got the idea of developing one tune to another. You know, when you hear a record and it's nice, it's likely you'll begin to sing it alone, in the bed or in the bathroom. That is how this thing happens, you know. If you have a G. V. record, and I'm living very near you, I'll be expecting you to play that record in the morning, and I can because of that become your friend. I'll be visiting you, "Mo like record-e" [I like your record], and we'll drink beer and palmwine.

Mordy , Friday, 31 May 2013 23:41 (nine years ago) link

Some of the stuff on your mix really suprised me at how country influenced it sounded

unfinest DN (upper mississippi sh@kedown), Saturday, 1 June 2013 00:28 (nine years ago) link

Gramophone discs imported by European firms such as the United Africa Company, Witt and Busch, and the Compagnie Francaise d'Afrique Occidental expanded the repertories of Lagosian guitarists. American country music star Jimmie Rodgers was very popular during the 1920s and 1930s.

Mordy , Saturday, 1 June 2013 00:31 (nine years ago) link

Yeah my best friend from high school roomed w a guy from nigeria one year in college and he said his family really liked jim reeves and that real saccharine countrypolitan stuff

unfinest DN (upper mississippi sh@kedown), Saturday, 1 June 2013 00:35 (nine years ago) link

how great is that song "she caught me red hot" btw? that whole collection is a++

Mordy , Saturday, 1 June 2013 03:05 (nine years ago) link

Been getting heavy into this stuff lately, and African music from '30-'75 in general, but as someone new to a lot of this, can someone help me distinguish between palm wine, high life and juju? Are these genre names just temporal distinctions with increasing immersion of other styles, ie bop > hard bop > fusion, or does it have to do with region of origin, or what? What I've gleaned is that palm wine came first, and is the more country-calypso sounding stuff, and then highlife took those rhythms and electrified (figuratively and literally) the sounds, adding Afro beat, rock and roll, etc. I see Hurting's definition of Juju upthread, but i still have no idea what Juju actually sounds like as opposed to highlife. From the bit of reading I've done, it seems to have come after highlife. Is that corect?

Jimmywine Dyspeptic, Wednesday, 5 June 2013 13:38 (nine years ago) link

Juju music, a local variant of the urban west african palm wine guitar tradition, emerged as a defined genre in the Nigerian colonial capital of Lagos around 1932… The initial popularizer of juju was a Lagosian guitarist named Tunde King. He incorporated elements of syncretic Christian hymnody, asiko drumming, and ijinlee Yoruba poetic rhetoric into the labile palmwine framework. Although musicians in Lagos were already performing similar styles, "T.K." was the first juju practitioner to develop a following among the colonial black elite, and the first to be commercially recorded. His contemporaries thus generally regard him as the man who "brought juju music out." Early juju style remained remarkably stable from 1932 through the Second World War. As veteran juju musician Ojoge Daniel expresses it, the style's trajectory may be broadly characterized as an initial burst of innovation followed by a long period of "small-small shifts" in performance practice.

Mordy , Wednesday, 5 June 2013 13:45 (nine years ago) link

That, like the other quotes above, are from Christopher Alan Waterman's Juju: A Social History and Ethnography of an African Popular Music.

Mordy , Wednesday, 5 June 2013 13:47 (nine years ago) link

Been getting heavy into this stuff lately, and African music from '30-'75 in general, but as someone new to a lot of this, can someone help me distinguish between palm wine, high life and juju? Are these genre names just temporal distinctions with increasing immersion of other styles, ie bop > hard bop > fusion, or does it have to do with region of origin, or what? What I've gleaned is that palm wine came first, and is the more country-calypso sounding stuff, and then highlife took those rhythms and electrified (figuratively and literally) the sounds, adding Afro beat, rock and roll, etc. I see Hurting's definition of Juju upthread, but i still have no idea what Juju actually sounds like as opposed to highlife. From the bit of reading I've done, it seems to have come after highlife. Is that corect?

― Jimmywine Dyspeptic, Wednesday, June 5, 2013 9:38 AM Bookmark Flag Post Permalink

I could be wrong about this, but I believe Palm Wine music is usually acoustic, whereas JuJu is electrified and bears some influence of rock, R&B and funk. JuJu is specifically associated with Nigeria, whereas Highlife is associated with Ghana and other countries, although there is Nigerian music that gets referred to as highlife, and I would say JuJu generally favors more laid back tempos whereas Highlife is a more uptempo dance music, but that's also not an across the board distinction. I get the impression that a lot of the afropop/afrorock compilations that have come out in the last decade blur distinctions or pay no attention to them. Another thing about highlife is that I think you hear horns and jazz influence more often, whereas JuJu seems much more focused on guitar and percussion interplay.

i don't even have an internet (Hurting 2), Wednesday, 5 June 2013 14:03 (nine years ago) link

All of these styles bear the imprint of rumba's popularity in Africa during the WWII era.

i don't even have an internet (Hurting 2), Wednesday, 5 June 2013 14:04 (nine years ago) link

oh another distinguishing thing that occurs to me is that in JuJu you often hear a heavy presence of pitch-alterable "talking drums" because of the Yoruba influence. I don't think you hear that so much in highlife.

i don't even have an internet (Hurting 2), Wednesday, 5 June 2013 14:08 (nine years ago) link

For example, if you listen to Sunny Ade or Ebeneezer Obey, two of the biggest juju artists:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=G7vZ5yzYboA
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YANSNL6bp7Y
you hear what I'm talking about -- languid tempos, spaciousness, talking drum, lots of interplay between percussion and guitar, still a noticeable rumba influence, but almost more of a spiritual than a dance music feel

Whereas highlife music:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3xyTYDNdTz8

horns, more uptempo, more dancy, tighter, rumba influence is more obvious, etc.

But both juju and highlife have gone through many stylistic changes and permutations over the years so it's hard to simplify. I mean what's the difference between funk, rock, R&B and blues? There's funky rock, and rocky blues, and funky R&B, and bluesy funk, etc., but you still probably have a sense that in a general sense there are some loose parameters.
a

i don't even have an internet (Hurting 2), Wednesday, 5 June 2013 14:15 (nine years ago) link

Extremely helpful, thanks everyone (especially Hurting - those Youtube clips were something of a revelation. I always see King Sunny's albums cheap but never pick 'em up). And I agree with this -

I get the impression that a lot of the afropop/afrorock compilations that have come out in the last decade blur distinctions or pay no attention to them.

- which makes parsing this stuff even more difficult.

Jimmywine Dyspeptic, Wednesday, 5 June 2013 19:14 (nine years ago) link

Yeah I find it to be an annoying drawback to stuff like the Soundway comps -- great music, but not much respect for the music. They present it like it's all part of some Old Weird Africa.

i don't even have an internet (Hurting 2), Wednesday, 5 June 2013 19:19 (nine years ago) link

my impression is that these genres terms are somewhat unstable in the original context too

Mordy , Wednesday, 5 June 2013 19:19 (nine years ago) link

no moreso than other genre terms I don't think

i don't even have an internet (Hurting 2), Wednesday, 5 June 2013 19:22 (nine years ago) link

I find myself wishing the songs on those Nigeria Special and Ghana Special comps had less vocals. To my Western ears, a lot of the chanty call-and-response stuff starts to sound tediously similar. How are the Nigeria 70 comps?

Jimmywine Dyspeptic, Wednesday, 5 June 2013 20:04 (nine years ago) link

I like the Nigeria 70 comps better than the Soundway comps

i don't even have an internet (Hurting 2), Wednesday, 5 June 2013 20:06 (nine years ago) link

not for a particular reason, I just think those guys choose better tracks

i don't even have an internet (Hurting 2), Wednesday, 5 June 2013 20:08 (nine years ago) link

Yeah I find it to be an annoying drawback to stuff like the Soundway comps -- great music, but not much respect for the music. They present it like it's all part of some Old Weird Africa.

― i don't even have an internet (Hurting 2), Wednesday, June 5, 2013 2:19 PM (57 minutes ago) Bookmark Flag Post Permalink

90% of that stuff is post-1960s and palm wine stuff has it roots much earlier and indeed s.e. rogie probably would have been considered to have an "old-fashioned" repertoire when he was recording in the 60s and 70s

flesh, the devil, and a wolf (wolf) (amateurist), Wednesday, 5 June 2013 20:17 (nine years ago) link

oh I know, I didn't mean Old Weird Africa in time period, I more mean that it all becomes this single, vague, exoticized place with a BIZARRO version of rock and funk.

i don't even have an internet (Hurting 2), Wednesday, 5 June 2013 20:20 (nine years ago) link

i'm not sure you can levy that accusation what with all the detailed liner notes and stuff

flesh, the devil, and a wolf (wolf) (amateurist), Wednesday, 5 June 2013 20:21 (nine years ago) link

but it does strike me that all the interest in post-rock african music hasn't really excited that much interest in earlier genres.... or so it seems....

flesh, the devil, and a wolf (wolf) (amateurist), Wednesday, 5 June 2013 20:22 (nine years ago) link

i think a lot of the older stuff isn't as available as the 70s music. Waterman mentions a bunch of recordings that he says he couldn't locate --

The earliest recordings known to me of Yoruba songs with guitar accompaniment were made in England in the late 1920s by the Zonophone Company. The Catalogue of Zonophone West African Records by Native Artists, published in Hayes, Middlesex in 1929, includes a number of songs in Yoruba with guitar and tambourine accompaniment, performed by Domingo Justus. None of my older informants mentioned Justus, and I haev no been able to locate any of these discs for analysis. The first recordigns of palmwine music with guitar accompaniment made in Lagos, performed by Irewolede Denge and Dickson Oludaiye, were part of the Odeon series previously mentioned. The masters of these recordings were likely kept in Germany and lost during the Second World War, and I have not managed to find any of the discs.

I'd love to hear some more palmwine recordings than the few that have been reissued. Maybe there's an archive we could get access to somewhere? Actually, I was hunting around for these discs recently: http://www.afrodisc.com/parlophone_po_500_599.79.html but I can't figure out who has them.

Mordy , Wednesday, 5 June 2013 20:39 (nine years ago) link

here's a motherload of west african music in various genres, albeit only some that might be categorized as "palm-wine guitar music": http://sounds.bl.uk/World-and-traditional-music/Decca-West-African-recordings

i actually managed to download the 100s of tracks in this collection and converted them to MP3s. i could try to share but it's like 10 GB.

flesh, the devil, and a wolf (wolf) (amateurist), Wednesday, 5 June 2013 20:49 (nine years ago) link

oh man that;s beautiful thank you thank you

sleepish resistance (Noodle Vague), Wednesday, 5 June 2013 20:50 (nine years ago) link

I always see King Sunny's albums cheap but never pick 'em up

Oh man, most anything pre 1985 or so from Sunny is awesome

A True White Kid that can Jump (Granny Dainger), Wednesday, 5 June 2013 20:53 (nine years ago) link

i think the british library's "sounds" site is kind of underutilized in general, maybe because everything is streaming as opposed to easily downloadable, and it's not as user-friendly as it could be. but it's an amazing resource.

i mean check out http://sounds.bl.uk/World-and-traditional-music/Ethnographic-wax-cylinders

flesh, the devil, and a wolf (wolf) (amateurist), Wednesday, 5 June 2013 20:53 (nine years ago) link

i'm sure i've been to the sounds site before and then forgot it existed

sleepish resistance (Noodle Vague), Wednesday, 5 June 2013 20:54 (nine years ago) link

(listen to that one!)

flesh, the devil, and a wolf (wolf) (amateurist), Wednesday, 5 June 2013 20:56 (nine years ago) link

So much stuff! Hard to keep track of it all. Anyway, just bought that Waterman book, which will likely only increase my list of things to check out. Thanks, gang.

Jimmywine Dyspeptic, Wednesday, 5 June 2013 20:59 (nine years ago) link

yeah I read that Waterman book in college, which is a long time ago now and I don't remember much of it. but liked it at the time.

i don't even have an internet (Hurting 2), Wednesday, 5 June 2013 21:05 (nine years ago) link

i thought that jollof rice song sounded familiar so i searched it on spotify/my local library -- it turns out i didn't have a copy of it, but searching it brought up this album which is apparently really new and has a jollof rice track on it?! http://www.mvulamandondo.com/album/ambush/

Mordy , Wednesday, 5 June 2013 22:18 (nine years ago) link

like really new = a few days old i think

Mordy , Wednesday, 5 June 2013 22:20 (nine years ago) link

one month passes...

this is the same tracklisting as the Palm Wine Guitar Music comp but i'm hoping the vol 1 means we can expect a vol 2

http://www.amazon.com/Sounds-Rogie-Limited-Edition-Vinyl/dp/B00CIOG4BA

Mordy , Tuesday, 23 July 2013 02:27 (nine years ago) link

Just came looking for a thread on SE Rogie after finding The Sounds of SE Rogie on LP this weekend. Initial thoughts were Rogie = African Hank Williams but it's a very simplistic analogy. Enjoying this with the windows open and a warm breeze flowing through the house.

brotherlovesdub, Tuesday, 23 July 2013 03:54 (nine years ago) link

three years pass...

somehow missed this came out last year

Mordy, Sunday, 15 January 2017 23:00 (five years ago) link

five years pass...

You know what's a good album ? Seven Degrees North (2000) by King Sunny Adé.

I tried (bottled) palm wine two weeks ago. It was light, sweetish, slightly tart, not bad but not something I'd trade a beer for.

Nabozo, Thursday, 17 November 2022 09:26 (two weeks ago) link


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