Jethro Tull: Classic or Dud?

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Prog's only singles band?

sundar subramanian, Wednesday, 13 March 2002 01:00 (fifteen years ago) Permalink

...well I LOVE 'Living In The Past' - that flute sound really sums up an era for me. Have you heard Cud's version - it's sung against Mission Impossible - works perfectly.

Jez, Wednesday, 13 March 2002 01:00 (fifteen years ago) Permalink

CARMODY TO THREAD!

Marcello Carlin, Wednesday, 13 March 2002 01:00 (fifteen years ago) Permalink

Living In The Past is great, although I have to admit I am still ashamed that I like it. I fear all else.

emil.y, Wednesday, 13 March 2002 01:00 (fifteen years ago) Permalink

Living in the Past is a great, great collection of songs, better than their actual albums I think. Honest oddities like "Inside," bitter little Ian Andersonisms a la "Christmas Song," and intriguing things like "Witch's Promise" and nonsense like "Singing All Day" .. Don't be ashamed with your good taste, e.mily.

Songs from the Wood and Aqualung aren't bad albums, either. But you can skip "A Passion Play," their 60-minute-opus w/fairy-tale- intermission, as well as all of their 80's material. 'Living in the Past' =/= synthesizers.

Dare, Wednesday, 13 March 2002 01:00 (fifteen years ago) Permalink

ouch. emil.y that is.

Dare, Wednesday, 13 March 2002 01:00 (fifteen years ago) Permalink

Insert Heavy Metal/ Metallica Joke here. OK - it's done - forget it.

Tull - one of those bands that everyone secretly likes.... for about 25 minutes at a time, every few years.

Teacher, Locomotive Breath - classics.

Dave225, Wednesday, 13 March 2002 01:00 (fifteen years ago) Permalink

Any time I hear Jethro Tull, I think of Stellan Skarsgård getting [SPOILER!!!] beaned in the head.

Andy K, Wednesday, 13 March 2002 01:00 (fifteen years ago) Permalink

witchiz promiss - shaggd 2 gothchX TO THAT therefore - yayayay

iz crop rotation iz bifta alzo

yuzzah ahhl dddddddmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmd

a-33, Wednesday, 13 March 2002 01:00 (fifteen years ago) Permalink

At the same time or on different occasions?

sundar subramanian, Wednesday, 13 March 2002 01:00 (fifteen years ago) Permalink

'Summerday Sands' Is a super song, and so is "Thick as a Brick": I put that on when I'm painting houses.

A Nairn, Wednesday, 13 March 2002 01:00 (fifteen years ago) Permalink

Yayyyyaqualung...

Sweet Dream video from "Slipstream": CLASSIC!

Joe, Wednesday, 13 March 2002 01:00 (fifteen years ago) Permalink

Have to admit that Tull is a guilty pleasure every once in awhile.

Pump Wellington, Wednesday, 13 March 2002 01:00 (fifteen years ago) Permalink

There's quite a dilemma; yes, Jethro Tull have some brilliant tunes; yes, I have... uh... fond childhood memories connected with them (you may all now feel thoroughly disgusted); but really, that BEARD is a CRIME against HUMANITY and it must be STOPPED.

Elisa, Thursday, 14 March 2002 01:00 (fifteen years ago) Permalink

Has ILM consensus finally been achieved?

sundar subramanian, Thursday, 14 March 2002 01:00 (fifteen years ago) Permalink

There's lots by Jethro Tull that I find boring at best, and Ian Anderson can get pretty affected, but their best stuff is really good. "Wond'ring Aloud" and "Mother Goose" are beautiful songs.

Phil, Thursday, 14 March 2002 01:00 (fifteen years ago) Permalink

The sound of Ian Anderson taking a deep breath in the middle of a flute solo a la Locomotive Breath = CLASSIC,even if only for its hilarity.

Damian, Friday, 15 March 2002 01:00 (fifteen years ago) Permalink

i kind of assume i hate em but to be honest i only know quite a small amount: the JT fan i was at achool with was far and away the weirdest fellow i knew

mark s, Friday, 15 March 2002 01:00 (fifteen years ago) Permalink

I'm listening to "Skating Away on the Thin Ice of a New Day" right now, and I must say, it sounds pretty damn good. I say classic.

o. nate, Friday, 15 March 2002 01:00 (fifteen years ago) Permalink

Jesus, it's like punk NEVER HAPPENED!

Andrew L, Saturday, 16 March 2002 01:00 (fifteen years ago) Permalink

Is it anything like emo?

Prude, Sunday, 17 March 2002 01:00 (fifteen years ago) Permalink

three months pass...
"Tull - one of those bands that everyone secretly likes.... for about 25 minutes at a time, every few years."

I'd say more like every TEN years...just like the Doors!

Matt Riedl (veal), Tuesday, 25 June 2002 00:00 (fifteen years ago) Permalink

one month passes...
I quite like that Aqualung, even though it is uttery absurd. There's some good stuff on there though, you know, the one that goes: dum dum de de de de dum dum; blah du, de blah du, de blah du, de blah du; dum dum de de dum day dum, wah wah waaaa wa wa wa wah wah waaah... etc

Roger Fascist, Wednesday, 31 July 2002 00:00 (fifteen years ago) Permalink

one year passes...
He added: “The moment when the new Palmer identity was revealed to me was when the then, still David, phoned me to say ‘Ian, there’s something I need to get off my increasingly ample chest’.”

Between that and Jackie Enx of Rhino Bucket, it shows that Jayne County was merely the start of something good.

Ned Raggett (Ned), Saturday, 24 January 2004 05:06 (fourteen years ago) Permalink

you mean it wasn't ian that became a she?

you know, my dad and my philly relatives pronounce "ann" and "ian" almost identically.

Eisbär (llamasfur), Saturday, 24 January 2004 05:09 (fourteen years ago) Permalink

I pretty much gave my all for "Stand Up", "Benefit", "Aqualung" and - somewhat - for "Thick As A Brick", but ended up gving away their later releases. You have to keep in mind, though, the context in which this stuff was first heard {in amongst the likes of ...America, Neil Diamond and The Carpenters} wuz just a little bit awesome. Just another old guy talking here... [ me ]
I still revisit.

jim wentworth (wench), Saturday, 24 January 2004 06:28 (fourteen years ago) Permalink

Stand Up and Benefit are both great! Aqualung is pretty solid too. That's about as far as I go.

I love "A New Day Yesterday" and "To Cry You a Song".

Broheems (diamond), Saturday, 24 January 2004 06:35 (fourteen years ago) Permalink

Songs from the Woods is an incredible album.

Joe (Joe), Saturday, 24 January 2004 14:35 (fourteen years ago) Permalink

About as dud as you can get without being The Grateful Dead.

(though "Living In The Past" is a nice tune)

LondonLee (LondonLee), Saturday, 24 January 2004 16:11 (fourteen years ago) Permalink

nine months pass...
Revive!

Naive Teen Idol (Naive Teen Idol), Wednesday, 17 November 2004 05:35 (thirteen years ago) Permalink

These are my initial and rambling thoughts:

I love pretty much everything up to "War Child", plus "Songs from the Wood" and "Heavy Horses"*. I don't think "Stormwatch" is bad. The lyrics on most of "Minstrel in the Gallery" (except for the title song) start to make me cringe. "Broadsword and the Beast" has an unpleasant, bloated-puffy synthesizer sound as well as pretty uninteresting songs. "Crest of a Knave" is hard to imagine as the same band - I can't stand Martin Barre's guitar sound at that time, and the lyrics are brutal. "Rock Island" and "Catfish Rising", as probably everyone will tell you, are just embarassing. I haven't heard anything since, though a friend has told me that "J-Tull.com" (sp?) is not too bad.

*I do think that "Thick as a Brick" is a bit structurally clunky, but when I consider that it was kind of a big piss-take of a concept album, it makes sense that it's that way - it's a pretty funny idea for an album. "A Passion Play" is my favourite: the saxophone and synthesizer parts sound great and the melodies are really deft. I don't know why people got mad about "The Story of the Hare Who Lost His Spectacles". "War Child" continues with similar arrangements and impressive playing (Barriemore Barlow is a superb drummer), though I'd have preferred "Bungle in the Jungle" as a non-LP single.

Pangolino (ricki spaghetti), Wednesday, 17 November 2004 06:19 (thirteen years ago) Permalink

I listened to them back in the day. Like everyone. "Living in the Past" is good but his vocal kind of makes me laugh--he's trying so hard to "swing" and "go Latin" somehow (the flute playing too) and he's just so fucking English and doesn't make it, no way. But the early stuff like on "Benefit" is sort of all right, some nice riffs. "Aqualung" was huge when it came out and a required pretentioso purchase for everyone too dumb to spend their money on JBs albums or something. Because we'd been sold this Jethro Tull shit. There's some movie with Owen? Luke? Wilson and Steve Buscemi about these schlubs who get recruited for a mission to blow up an asteroid and during the interviews Luke? Owen? is asked what really bothers him. "That people think Jethro Tull is just a dude in the band..."


But it's not offensive like ELP (whose best moments were Greg Lake's Paul McCartney/Neil Young knockoff songs w/ cheap synth solos just to remind you who's IN CHARGE HERE). And the later dumb pop hits he had, around the mid-'70s, are quite enjoyable. Normally I don't bring up Lester Bangs but his piece "Jethro Tull in Vietnam" does sum it all up nicely.

eddie hurt (ddduncan), Wednesday, 17 November 2004 15:12 (thirteen years ago) Permalink

Lester Bangs wasn't infallible; Tull is pretty classic. There should be some kind of rule (the Jethro Tull rule?) where if you make at least three great albums you shouldn't have shit albums count against you. Notwithstanding all their crap, the three great Tull albums are

1) Stand Up. One of the great, great psychedelic albums, stuffed with killer riffs and enough otherworldly moods to simulate or enhance being baked. If this album were a one-off by an obscure British folk band (a la Mellow Candle) it would fetch hundreds of $$$$ in collector's circles.
2) Aqualung. There isn't a bad song on it. The flute solo in "My God" is some scary shit. In my experience people who badmouth this are trying to prove another point, like they're cool, or even good music can get overplayed, or something.
3) Thick as a Brick. Some parts drag, but there's no other album like it (I guess besides Passion Play), and most of it's engaging, not an easy thing to pull off over the course of 40+ minutes.

Songs from the Wood, War Child, Benefit, and Minstrel in the Gallery aren't bad, either, and there are timeless singles like "Living in the Past" to get off on.

There's also a ton of shitty albums--Too Old to Rock & Roll. . ., A, Stormwatch, etc. but who cares, really.

martin hilliard, Wednesday, 17 November 2004 16:29 (thirteen years ago) Permalink

yeah, but that Aqualung guy--he smoked too much or what? It's that level of non-specific '70s social commentary crap that gets me about the great band of seed-drillers, you know. If it had been just about another band and the dude plays a flute, then fine. But that other shit, forget it.

and no, Bangs is not infallible. But his central insight into Tull--no rebop--is a good 'un. And I want rebop myself.

eddie hurt (ddduncan), Wednesday, 17 November 2004 21:29 (thirteen years ago) Permalink

I dunno — the church stuff on Aqualung is pretty specific. And good.

Naive Teen Idol (Naive Teen Idol), Wednesday, 17 November 2004 21:59 (thirteen years ago) Permalink

I don't know--I always thought that Aqualung was homeless because he grew up poor (Cross-Eyed Mary being the "Robin Hood of High Gate" who could help a brother out sexually if not financially), and homelessness is a stain on Christian culture, the hypocracies of which are elaborated on side 2 of the album. You're right though the rebop isn't there, but it's not like all good music's got it, either. Aqualung's got the rock, opening up with The Riff, and it never lets up over however many songs. I mean whatever, it all comes down to taste. No harm in not liking Tull; but making them out to be bad guys like Bangs does just doesn't register anymore. At least I don't think so.

xpost

martin hilliard, Wednesday, 17 November 2004 22:01 (thirteen years ago) Permalink

Even today, they're hard to pin down. I think at the bare minimum, even if you can't stand what my friend once described as "Ian Anderson's village idiot routine," you have to credit him with writing several very melodic, even atmopheric, acoustic songs. Chris Dahlen and I were brainstorming what all of them were and came up with:

"Wond'ring Aloud"
"Slipstream" (I think)
"Thick as A Brick" (the intro, but many other parts, too)
"Skating Away On the Thin Ice of a New Day"
"One White Duck/Nothing At All"
"Baker St. Muse"
"Salamander" (again, I think -- it's been awhile)
"Dun Ringill"

My personal tastes tell me they also have a few very good hard rock moments, including "Minstrel In the Gallery", "Pibroch" and much of Aqualung. That and Songs From the Wood has a very cool electro-folk production

Naive Teen Idol (Naive Teen Idol), Wednesday, 17 November 2004 22:47 (thirteen years ago) Permalink

Along the same lines, nobody who hears "Cheap Day Return" with an open mind could not get the shivers. There's some spooky acoustic tip these guys were on early on that's pretty evil and pagan.

martin hilliard, Wednesday, 17 November 2004 23:20 (thirteen years ago) Permalink

two years pass...

Thick as a Brick really is ridiculously good. Sweet tunes, fierce playing, beautifully arranged. The strings near the end are next level.

Noodle Vague, Saturday, 4 August 2007 12:40 (ten years ago) Permalink

"Locomotive Breath" still rocks greatly.

Alex in NYC, Saturday, 4 August 2007 12:51 (ten years ago) Permalink

1) ...If this album were a one-off by an obscure British folk band (a la Mellow Candle) it would fetch hundreds of $$$$ in collector's circles.

Yes yes yes. In the run up to becoming full-on prog, they created some moody and unfussy stuff. Stand Up layers all sorts of acoustic instruments with blues riffing in a way that is intuitive and natural, rather than the hyper-organized feel they soon took on. Really solid songs that would hold up outside of the textures and arrangements.

bendy, Saturday, 4 August 2007 13:31 (ten years ago) Permalink

Their true masterpiece was "A Passion Play". Jethro Tull at their most progressive was also Jethro Tull at their best.

But they did some interesting folk influenced stuff later too.

Geir Hongro, Saturday, 4 August 2007 14:25 (ten years ago) Permalink

To me, Minstrel In The Gallery through Stormwatch = classic. The expansive prog notions recompressed into concise songs without losing the progginess.

The stuff from the first heyday's great, but I don't get the urge to put it on very often.

The string of high-concept records (Thick, Passion, Too Old) I have no time for.

Jon Lewis, Saturday, 4 August 2007 17:22 (ten years ago) Permalink

i own 'aqualung'. i like it and think it's pretty creative and inspired, but i don't listen to it often

Charlie Howard, Sunday, 5 August 2007 06:25 (ten years ago) Permalink

nine months pass...

I went to see them live a few days ago. I only really went along to the gig after a mate said he wanted to go.

I hadn't much listened to them for 30 years, and though I wasn't a big fan I had mates who were very keen indeed and back in the day I did have a soft spot for the quirkier, pop-eyed silliness.

Before the gig I was kinda worried about all that zany 70s catweazle'n'codpiece stuff, since I figured it wouldn't have aged well...

I needn't have worried as there wasn't much of it, indeed there wasn't nearly enough of it. Stripped of the theatrics, left pretty much the music unadorned, though that did reveal some elements which I hadn't noticed before (or didn't know anything about to notice) such as the Mingus influences (though I guess the Roland Kirk stuff was always obvious).

Mainly though they sounded polite 80s rock. Barre's guitar sounded especially cleaned up, Dire Straits and (80s) Supertramp.

So not great then, mostly not even good, but now and then there were flashes about what made them interesting and did confirm there were interesting bits in the War child and earlier albums.

Sandy Blair, Tuesday, 6 May 2008 19:24 (nine years ago) Permalink

Their guitarist kicks ass and besides that they are fucking Jethro Tull. So many songs to love by them.

CaptainLorax, Wednesday, 7 May 2008 06:39 (nine years ago) Permalink

eleven months pass...

Oh god, I had an urge to hear "Skating Away" so I downloaded the Anniversary collection and I'm kind of enjoying it.

Kill me.

Full Metal Slanket (Oilyrags), Friday, 1 May 2009 17:01 (eight years ago) Permalink

They are classic beyond classic.

the girl from spirea x (f. hazel), Friday, 1 May 2009 20:29 (eight years ago) Permalink

people who HATE this band hate fun

kamerad, Friday, 1 May 2009 20:32 (eight years ago) Permalink

I've got a few albums, don't remember much gross stuff apart from "Aqualung" lyrics but I didn't have a problem with them.

Robert Adam Gilmour, Sunday, 15 January 2017 23:13 (one year ago) Permalink

man Minstrel in the Gallery kinda knocking me out today. interesting & good popmatters review here

http://www.popmatters.com/column/195410-reappraising-ian-andersons-minstrel-in-the-gallery/

it's not specific lyrics so much as a condescending hippie all-knowing vibe I get. this could partially be a function of where & when I grew up (California in the 70s). Anderson's always seemed pretentious in a way that both serves the material well sometimes and distracts me from the music's strength sometimes.

though she denies it to the press, (Joan Crawford Loves Chachi), Sunday, 15 January 2017 23:20 (one year ago) Permalink

I'm curious what other songs besides Requiem you put in that category

calstars, Monday, 16 January 2017 00:34 (one year ago) Permalink

I keep meaning to re-investigate these guys. Listened to Aqualung and Thick as a Brick in junior high or high school, I forget now, but never went any further.

Don Van Gorp, midwest regional VP, marketing (誤訳侮辱), Monday, 16 January 2017 00:38 (one year ago) Permalink

I suspect the recent Steven Wilson remasters would do wonders for any sort of relisten. A friend of mine in particular swears by the original band lineup's work -- he compares it (not sonically but in terms of simply overall band dynamic) to Alice Cooper. IE, whatever else happened later on as the lead figure became the sole or primary focus, there was a distinct, unique feeling the original lineup had that gelled and has been lost a bit with time. That said the Cooper comparison isn't entirely exact since Martin Barre was there for decades in the end.

Beyond that my small mutterings upthread stand. They are a band that are good for random/unusual finds throughout their catalog -- deep cuts or just unreleased songs that surfaced later. A favorite of mine would be "Overhang," recorded for The Broadsword and the Beast but only formally released a few years after that. Has a big stirring ending that works very well. And I still think "Farm on the Freeway" is a weird, strange lead-off single for the album that won them their metal Grammy.

Ned Raggett, Monday, 16 January 2017 00:51 (one year ago) Permalink

Wilson's not infallible - I like his King Crimson remasters a lot, but I hate his version of Tales from Topographic Oceans. I suspect I'll start with the albums as they were.

Don Van Gorp, midwest regional VP, marketing (誤訳侮辱), Monday, 16 January 2017 01:14 (one year ago) Permalink

Songs from the Wood remains one of my all time favorite records and I also swear by Living in the Past, Heavy Horses, Minstrel in the Gallery and Aqualung. War Child has some of his best ever songs but doesn't really come together even in the S Wilson remix. The 80s stuff is definitely good for deep cut hunting. The really late stuff like homo erraticus where he has become more of a speak singer was a lot better than I was expecting.

his eye is on despair-o (Jon not Jon), Monday, 16 January 2017 05:06 (one year ago) Permalink

it's tough because he's been the flute/codpiece guy for, um, 50 years but yeah there's definitely a lot of great stuff

mookieproof, Monday, 16 January 2017 05:46 (one year ago) Permalink

I was listening to the Wilson remasters on Spotify last night, they're good - I didn't do any A/B'ing but they felt more like careful staging rather than broad strokes

I'm curious what other songs besides Requiem you put in that category

well, like the title "track" from Thick as a Brick - such a fucking awesome tune, great line about the sperm there bro, haha the straights won't know what to do w/that they'll piss themselves, who cares if it shits all over the tune? 't's not their tune innit like

you know what I mean? and honestly much of Aqualung -- his narrative stance is what I've always thought of as Omniscient Condescending Hippie. as I say, this could be a fx of the time & place I grew up in, I am pretty allergic to O.C.H. A Passion Play is kind of a relief in that it's so self-serious / overtly theatrical that in listening last night its excesses seemed...kind of less pretentious than the persona telling old Aqualung what it's all about, man

though she denies it to the press, (Joan Crawford Loves Chachi), Monday, 16 January 2017 12:41 (one year ago) Permalink

"my words but a whisper, your deafness a SHOUT!" ok man

though she denies it to the press, (Joan Crawford Loves Chachi), Monday, 16 January 2017 12:52 (one year ago) Permalink

Stand Up definitely deserves another look, such a great album, especially if peak Anderson irritates you

frogbs, Monday, 16 January 2017 15:02 (one year ago) Permalink

that has always been a core trait of anderson and Aqualung is probably where it is most on display. IMO Songs from the Wood has almost no OCH content BUT it does have 'Hunting Girl' which is icky shake-the-squares weird sex stuff. But at least it is genuinely fringe, I mean pony play has yet to go mainstream even today.

his eye is on despair-o (Jon not Jon), Monday, 16 January 2017 15:11 (one year ago) Permalink

JCLC otm re passion play, it's so pretentious it's unpretentious.

his eye is on despair-o (Jon not Jon), Monday, 16 January 2017 15:11 (one year ago) Permalink

I think Songs From The Woods is a good album but I don't think anything really lived up to the opening title track.

Robert Adam Gilmour, Monday, 16 January 2017 16:52 (one year ago) Permalink

"The Whistler" is great. First JT song I ever heard (outside of the radio stuff), I ripped a bunch of my buddy's CDs but forgot about them. It came up on shuffle and I was like, "who the hell was that?" (iPod was across the room), pretty stunned to find out who it was

frogbs, Monday, 16 January 2017 16:56 (one year ago) Permalink

Are any of their other albums as folky is that?

Robert Adam Gilmour, Monday, 16 January 2017 16:59 (one year ago) Permalink

Benefit is kind of folky, no? And good!

erry red flag (f. hazel), Monday, 16 January 2017 17:32 (one year ago) Permalink

Heavy Horses is folky in a somewhat similar vein to SftW but not as medieval in its pallette. It's the next album after SotW and forms kind of a trilogy with the not as good Stormwatch as conclusion. The songwriting on HH is really good. 'One Brown Mouse' is one of the cutest things he ever wrote.

There's stuff on Living in the Past with that antique feel also.

Crest of a Knave was a mid-80s self conscious revival of fantasy Tull; it's good but not near SotW's level.

his eye is on despair-o (Jon not Jon), Monday, 16 January 2017 18:03 (one year ago) Permalink

^^^ sorry meant SftW

his eye is on despair-o (Jon not Jon), Monday, 16 January 2017 18:04 (one year ago) Permalink

one month passes...

I think Songs From The Woods is a good album but I don't think anything really lived up to the opening title track.

Velvet Green, Pibroch, Hunting Girl are all really good.

This would be a great Wilson 5.1 remix if he gets around to it.

Naive Teen Idol, Sunday, 5 March 2017 16:37 (ten months ago) Permalink

i tried listening to "heavy horses" this week when i was on a heavy "prog records from 1978" jag and it's just not the same for me (i preferred the granada and nu records from that year). it's simultaneously "the second record in their folk trilogy" and "the record where they stopped faffing around with all that folk stuff", and unfortunately i mainly heard it as the latter. the only time i've really liked tull is when they're trying to out-gentle giant gentle giant; anderson's solo "jack-in-the-green", the clonky tuned percussion on velvet green; hell, i'll rep for the whole of side two.

increasingly bonkers (rushomancy), Sunday, 5 March 2017 16:43 (ten months ago) Permalink

I'll never understand what people hear in A Passion Play... it's always felt like a bit of a snoozer to me. Thick as a Brick does the same thing with more energy and better playing - the overall result, of course, being that it doesn't put me to sleep.

Coolio Iglesias (Turrican), Sunday, 5 March 2017 19:06 (ten months ago) Permalink

man when I listened to it last month it seemed so...like, assured in a way that much of JT isn't. like it almost sounds like they're only making the music because they like it and want to hear what it sounds like once recorded and pressed. Jethro Tull often seems like a band who's writing/playing for an imagined audience -- not "imaginary," but, you know, they sound like they're thinking about how they'll be received a lot of the time. A Passion Play is kinda self-absorbed in all the right ways to me

though the tempest rages, (Joan Crawford Loves Chachi), Sunday, 5 March 2017 19:14 (ten months ago) Permalink

I can only listen to them late at night when I'm mad tired. They sound great at that point

calstars, Sunday, 5 March 2017 19:20 (ten months ago) Permalink

one month passes...

Well here we go, just got a promo mail:

SONGS FROM THE WOOD: THE 40TH ANNIVERSARY EDITION will be available as a limited edition 3-CD/2-DVD set on May 19 for a suggested list price of $49.98.

Highlights from the set include:
Original album remixed in stereo by Steven Wilson on CD.
Unleased tracks and alternate versions on CD.
96/24 LPCM and 5.1 DTS, AC3 Dolby Digital surround mixes of the original album by Steven Wilson on DVD.
Unseen footage from the live concert at the Capital Centre in Landover, Maryland on November 21, 1977.
96/24 LPCM flat transfers of the original stereo masters on DVD.
DTS/DD 4.0 Surround flat transfers of the quadrophonic master on DVD.
An 80-page booklet featuring an extensive history of the project, a film script synopsis, track-by-track annotations by Ian Anderson, plus rare and unseen photographs.

Ned Raggett, Friday, 7 April 2017 18:05 (nine months ago) Permalink

Extra tracks on the first disc:

10. Old Aces Die Hard [previously unreleased]
11. Working John, Working Joe [previously unreleased]
12. Magic Bells (Ring Out, Solstice Bells)
13. Songs From The Wood (Unedited Master)
14. Fire At Midnight (Unedited Master)
[previously unreleased]
15. One Brown Mouse (Early Version)
16. Strip Cartoon
17. The Whistler (US Stereo Single Mix)

And here's the concert audio tracks:

Live in Concert 1977- Disc 1
1. Wond'ring Aloud
2. Skating Away On The Thin Ice Of The New Day
3. Jack-In-The-Green
4. Thick As A Brick
5. Songs From The Wood
6. Instrumental
7. Drum Solo Improvisation
8. To Cry You A Song
9. A New Day Yesterday
10. Flute Solo Improvisation interpolating -
God Rest Ye Gentlemen/Bourée
11. Living In The Past/ A New Day
Yesterday (reprise)

Live in Concert 1977- Disc 2
1. Velvet Green
2. Hunting Girl
3. Too Old To Rock 'n' Roll: Too Young To Die
4. Minstrel In The Gallery
5. Cross-Eyed Mary
6. Aqualung
7. Instrumental Improvisation
8. Wind-Up
9. Back Door Angels / Guitar Improvisation /
Wind Up (reprise)
10. Locomotive Breath
11. Land Of Hope And Glory / Improvisation /
Back Door Angels (reprise)

DVD live tracks:

Live at The Capital Centre, Landover,
Maryland, 21st November 1977:
1. Wond'ring Aloud
2. Skating Away On The Thin Ice Of The New Day
3. Jack-In-The-Green
4. Thick As A Brick
5. Songs From The Wood
6. Instrumental/ Drum Solo Improvisation
7. To Cry You A Song
8. A New Day Yesterday
9. Flute Solo Improvisation interpolating - God Rest Ye Gentlemen/Bouree/A New Day Yesterday
10. Living In The Past /A New Day Yesterday (reprise)
11. Second half of concert - Introduction
12. Velvet Green
13. Hunting Girl
14. Too Old To Rock 'n' Roll: Too Young To Die
15.Minstrel In The Gallery
16. Cross-Eyed Mary
17. Aqualung
18. Instrumental Improvisation
19. Wind-Up
20. Back Door Angels / Guitar Improvisation /Wind Up (reprise)
21. Locomotive Breath
22. Land Of Hope And Glory/ Improvisation / Back Door Angels (reprise)
Beethoven's Ninth (with original audio)
The Whistler (promo footage)(mono)

Ned Raggett, Friday, 7 April 2017 18:07 (nine months ago) Permalink

Source of the video:

The final disc in the package is the video footage taken live at the Capital Centre, Landover, Maryland on November 21 1977 mixed to 16/48 stereo LPCM and 5.1 DTS, AC3 Dolby Digital surround by Jakko Jakszyk. This footage has never been publicly seen before. The concert venue was the home for Washington Wizards basketball team, then known as Washington Bullets - so the video footage comes directly from the film that was played to the big screens in the venue during the show and has since been seen nowhere else.

Ned Raggett, Friday, 7 April 2017 18:09 (nine months ago) Permalink

Holy shit! Not my favourite Tull album by a long way but there's sure to be a couple of people on here that'll lap this up... it seems to be their most popular post-Thick As A Brick LP for some reason.

...so music and chicken have become intertwined (Turrican), Friday, 7 April 2017 18:10 (nine months ago) Permalink

Literally one month back!

This would be a great Wilson 5.1 remix if he gets around to it.

― Naive Teen Idol, Sunday, March 5, 2017

And...there you go.

Ned Raggett, Friday, 7 April 2017 18:11 (nine months ago) Permalink

My favorite Tull album by a long way and the first 'favorite album' I ever had. Might ask for this for my bday.

Looks like the bonus track from the last remaster is MIA here?

iris marduk (Jon not Jon), Friday, 7 April 2017 18:23 (nine months ago) Permalink

nice this is exciting!

blonde redheads have more fun (upper mississippi sh@kedown), Friday, 7 April 2017 18:27 (nine months ago) Permalink

My favourite JT record also, have been eagerly waiting for this and Heavy Horses to come around, stoked for this!

MaresNest, Friday, 7 April 2017 19:09 (nine months ago) Permalink

Anyone been buying all these big deluxe books? Seems a bit too much, would prefer a compilation box set with all these b-sides + unreleased stuff and separate live albums.

Robert Adam Gilmour, Friday, 7 April 2017 20:12 (nine months ago) Permalink

I like 'em, I like size of the boxes and the way they are leavened out to two/three a year which gives you time to enjoy the extras.

What would be nice is, when they're done, a big book of all the liner notes and interviews in reasonable sized type.

MaresNest, Friday, 7 April 2017 20:18 (nine months ago) Permalink

Literally one month back!

It's almost as if I knew something.

I didn't.

Naive Teen Idol, Saturday, 8 April 2017 02:37 (nine months ago) Permalink

six months pass...

"But all this time, Owl had been sitting on the fence scowling!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!"

I'm enjoying Passion Play. Anderson's singing on it is really lovely.

Robert Adam Gilmour, Friday, 3 November 2017 13:49 (two months ago) Permalink

"For the gory satisfaction of telling you how telling you how absolutely awful you really are"

Robert Adam Gilmour, Friday, 3 November 2017 19:15 (two months ago) Permalink

Buggered that a bit but you know the part if you've heard it.

Robert Adam Gilmour, Friday, 3 November 2017 19:16 (two months ago) Permalink

Yes! I really enjoy Passion Play too, what a great run they had.

I'm stuck on Benefit right now which I think has become my go-to, having really enjoyed the excellent re-release of Songs From The Wood, I imagine Heavy Horses must be coming up pretty soon.

MaresNest, Friday, 3 November 2017 19:28 (two months ago) Permalink

I like the concept of A Passion Play, but find the album a bit of a slog... I really wish I enjoyed it as much I do Thick as a Brick or Aqualung

Gholdfish Killah (Turrican), Friday, 3 November 2017 19:37 (two months ago) Permalink

I was initially very disappointed but I'm loving Passion Play right now.

Robert Adam Gilmour, Friday, 17 November 2017 15:41 (two months ago) Permalink

I learned last week that I have underestimated Stormwatch

harbinger of failure (Jon not Jon), Friday, 17 November 2017 16:40 (two months ago) Permalink

I don't think they made a bad record until 'A' really.

MaresNest, Friday, 17 November 2017 16:48 (two months ago) Permalink

'Teacher' is still a fucking tune ...

Gholdfish Killah (Turrican), Friday, 17 November 2017 17:26 (two months ago) Permalink

one of the all-time hooks

harbinger of failure (Jon not Jon), Friday, 17 November 2017 17:27 (two months ago) Permalink

It's as much of a classic for me as 'Living in the Past' or 'Aqualung' is... just a perfect single. Should have been a huge hit.

Gholdfish Killah (Turrican), Friday, 17 November 2017 23:09 (two months ago) Permalink

Teacher was always played on the classic rock radio quite a bit. I seem to recall that it was in some 80s teen movie in the soundtrack as that is where I seem to got to know the tune. Haven't googled it yet...was there a movie with Nick Nolte as a burnt out high school teacher and Ralph Macchio as a student? Maybe I'm just mixing up 48 Hours and Karate Kid in my head. Anyway that's the movie I either invented or remembered having Teacher in the sound track.

earlnash, Saturday, 18 November 2017 08:08 (two months ago) Permalink

Yes but pretty sure that was the 38 Special song...

Naive Teen Idol, Saturday, 18 November 2017 13:36 (two months ago) Permalink

one month passes...

http://thequietus.com/articles/23198-tom-g-warrior-of-celtic-frost-s-baker-s-dozen?page=4
Guess I'll be getting Heavy Horses next.

Keep thinking about the guy in the Vinyl tv series smashing a Tull album, I so wanted to throw him out the window and take the show in a different direction.

Robert Adam Gilmour, Wednesday, 10 January 2018 22:36 (two weeks ago) Permalink

Aww

Feeling a lot of love for tom g warrior right now

What he says about HH is p much me with SftW

Winter. Dickens. Yes. (Jon not Jon), Wednesday, 10 January 2018 23:24 (two weeks ago) Permalink


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