Rory Gallagher - classic or dud

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There is a "None More Rockist" air to this Irish bluesman, and the one album of his I've listened to is a bit short of songs that are any good. Furthermore, his voice is a bit thin. And there is a general sense that people who like Rory Gallagher are essentially people with a narrow, warped, and failed take on what makes music good or bad.

Still, Rory Gallagher remains an iconic figure, at least in my country, and the extent to which his fans worship him suggests there might be something going on there.

Do you have an informed opinion on this legendary figure?

DV (dirtyvicar), Saturday, 23 July 2005 19:14 (twelve years ago) Permalink

And there is a general sense that people who like
Rory Gallagher are essentially people with a narrow, warped, and failed take on what makes music good or bad.

Do you have an informed opinion...

Not for a stock troll lede like that.

George Smith, Saturday, 23 July 2005 19:27 (twelve years ago) Permalink

All I can say is I wish I knew more about this guy. I've now managed to confuse him with another Rory artist entirely and I'm glad I didn't post the paragraph I was going to because I would have been talking about the wrong guy. This wouldn't have been so bad except that I also confused that other Rory with yet another artist in the past. I can't keep my Rory's straight. I'm hopeless.

Hydrochloric Shaved Weirds (Bimble...), Saturday, 23 July 2005 19:34 (twelve years ago) Permalink

And there is a general sense that people who like Rory Gallagher are essentially people with a narrow, warped, and failed take on what makes music good or bad.

I don't know if this is true or not. I think perhaps not. I do have a strong feeling that he is popular among guitarists mainly, and that his appeal among guitarists is that:

1/he was a very good, actually outstandingly good, inventive electric lead guitarist

2/his fender stratocaster w/all the paint scoured off by his acidic sweat (true!1) is kind of, uh, an iconic, er, THING.

3/He did have this kind of exploratory/inventive approach to blues electric guitar playing, a bit, I think? Like he'd use the Coral electric sitar and other such unusual instruments which is perhaps a bigger deal than it sounds, given the time-period in which he worked.

4/ also he isn't very well known, I think he deserves/d to be a lot better known than he is.

As well as this one gets the impression that he was somewhat eccentric, but likeably so, and that he was also very humble and likeable. Maybe this shouldn't matter, but it kind of does I think.

My old boss years ago was and is a big big fan of gallagher, and taste. Perhaps I was a bit over-exposed to Gallagher when I worked for my old boss. I dunno, I might pick something of his up next week.

Pashmina (Pashmina), Saturday, 23 July 2005 19:36 (twelve years ago) Permalink

How would you rate taste against the groundhogs, george smith? both sixties/seventies heavy/electric power trios, heavily blues based? The Groundhogs at their best ("groundhogs live at leeds", "Split") were an amazingly good, powerful band, really about as powerful as that kind of music, played by that kind of lineup is likely to get, what about taste? It's so long since I last heard them!

Pashmina (Pashmina), Saturday, 23 July 2005 19:41 (twelve years ago) Permalink

I particularly like the Taste album with "Born on the Wrong Side of Time" and "Blister On the Moon." Gallagher could write catchy stuff, the live Taste material that's been published is closer to the typical heavy white boy blues trios that were popular at the time, although Gallagher tended to be more energetic than his peers.

Gallagher must have been the opening act for almost every mid-level hard rock gig I saw in Pennsy in the Seventies, or almost. He toured relentlessly. "Laundromat" was a good taut guitar number, one of his calling cards. His best album in the US was probably "Against the Grain," which had "Bought and Sold," another catchy tune in the Taste vein, as well as the ravers he was known for ("Souped Up Ford.)

Rory vs. The Groundhogs. The Groundhogs were heavier, fuzzier and noisier. TS really put the "eccentric man" into it. Gallagher favored much faster arrangements, was more into straight boogie.

George Smith, Saturday, 23 July 2005 19:49 (twelve years ago) Permalink

And there is a general sense that people who like Rory Gallagher are essentially people with a narrow, warped, and failed take on what makes music good or bad.

OK, this is maybe a bit extreme. What I mean really is that liking Rory Gallagher is strongly associated with hardline rockism, at least among my in-laws.

DV (dirtyvicar), Saturday, 23 July 2005 19:51 (twelve years ago) Permalink

Yeah, he sucked because he was a hardline rockist. Unfortunately, he's no longer here to make a clarification on that. I remember when I was buying my old vinyl copy of "Irish Tour:" Hmmmm, rockist, should I get this or save my money for Cactus and Bull Angus?

George Smith, Saturday, 23 July 2005 19:56 (twelve years ago) Permalink

You seem to be implying that any criticism of dead musicians is unacceptable.

DV (dirtyvicar), Saturday, 23 July 2005 20:03 (twelve years ago) Permalink

it would be quite funny if the named artists always showed up on classic or dud threads to state their case.

DV (dirtyvicar), Saturday, 23 July 2005 20:03 (twelve years ago) Permalink

I don't know if Rory would understand what rockist means. Then we would have to clarify it for him and.....things would get ugly.

Masked Gazza, Saturday, 23 July 2005 20:10 (twelve years ago) Permalink

You seem to be implying that any criticism of dead musicians is unacceptable.

If were true I would be dead myself many times over.

I don't know if Rory would understand what rockist means. Then we would have to clarify it for him and.....things would get ugly.

Voila!

George Smith, Saturday, 23 July 2005 20:12 (twelve years ago) Permalink

My in-laws would understand "rockist" as "liking good music".

DV (dirtyvicar), Saturday, 23 July 2005 20:30 (twelve years ago) Permalink

> liking Rory Gallagher is strongly associated with hardline rockism

You appear to be implying that he is somehow the progenitor of your in-laws' small-mindedness - that listening to his work somehow limited their ability to appreciate other forms of music.
Gallagher's medium of choice was blues-rock, and it was a genre he rarely strayed from, but he was a consummate musician, a man who lived for music, and I doubt he ever urged his audience to foreswear everything else. Guys like him usually understand that it's all good.

Palomino (Palomino), Saturday, 23 July 2005 22:00 (twelve years ago) Permalink

Definitely a subject for future research. As I say below, I'm shocked how much I like that new best-of twofer, which I'm sure George could explain is probably far from his best stuff. But some of it even reminds me of Thin Lizzy! Anyway, I don't remember ever trying to listen to the guy before. My loss, obviously...

http://www.villagevoice.com/music/0530,eddy,66199,22.html

xhuxk, Saturday, 23 July 2005 22:47 (twelve years ago) Permalink

Yeah, I was disappointed in the selection on that. It's not bad, however, it's only fair, and it's very listenable because much of what Rory Gallagher did was of high quality.

No "Laundromat," first off. That was Gallagher's early signature tune. "Tattoo'd Lady" was second and that one, happily, is on the omnibus.

"Calling Card" was picked from the album of that title. The pick should have been that -and- "Secret Agent."

"Out on the Western Plain" comes from "Against the Grain," which I thought was his finest. But skipped are the entirely over the top "Souped Up Ford" and greasy rocking, "Bought and Sold," which was always a sweet crowd-pleaser.

"Shadow Play" is all right. I would bet Mark Knopfler got a lot from it. Gallagher had a way with country rags, and I don't see much of that on the omnibus.

One plus, "Born on the Wrong Side of Times" from Taste, which was one his best hooks.

Rory Gallagher got the complete remaster and deluxe reissue treatment a few years ago. I'd recommend finding some of them and picking the stuff you find that looks the best to you from that. It's hard to get a bad record in the bunch. He spanned styles. First boogie and blues, in the middle a couple nods toward refined FM before it fossilized, later in his career he got heavy to take advantage of some interest from the NWOBHM. Most of the louder stuff is good, too. Gallagher never overplayed things or pandered.

George Smith, Sunday, 24 July 2005 00:21 (twelve years ago) Permalink

George OTM. For what it's worth, my favorites are the self-titled album (good late-night music) and 'Top Priority,' which scorches.

Rickey Wright (Rrrickey), Sunday, 24 July 2005 00:43 (twelve years ago) Permalink

The Irish Tour live album is a really good.

Earl Nash (earlnash), Sunday, 24 July 2005 10:45 (twelve years ago) Permalink

Yeah, start with the live stuff. He put out at least three live records -- Live In Europe, Irish Tour, and Stage Struck. Live In Europe was my intro to him, and is probably my favorite. Irish Tour might be the most representative.

As time went on, his music got heavier, and maybe a little less hooky. His best tunes are on the earlier studio albums (self-titled, Deuce, Blueprint, Tattoo), but the studio versions can come off as a little dry. In addition to "Laudromat," search "Hands Off."

For a blues rocker, his lead playing is surprisingly free of blues mannerisms. And his voice can grow on you.

Sang Freud (jeff_s), Sunday, 24 July 2005 11:05 (twelve years ago) Permalink

weirdly I listened to a Rory Gallagher compilation just last week, first time I've heard him since the 70s. been playing Cactus, too.

for some reason I always confused Rory G w/Roy Buchanan, dunno why.

m coleman (lovebug starski), Sunday, 24 July 2005 11:09 (twelve years ago) Permalink

Busted out my Rory Gallagher collection today and spent hours listening to it. Supports my contempt for the proposition that started this thread re the "rockism" [say it in a sissy voice] hobbyhorse.

Rory wouldn't have known what rockist meant and if he were around to have it explained to him, he would have dismissed the teller as a moron. But the teller wouldn't have known it because Gallagher appeared to have been, faultlessly, a gentleman.

I, ekkp, keep coming back to the new anthology and, as usual, I'm mixed up as to why what was included, was included. Prob'ly because the anthologist wasn't there, or was there later. No matter, it's hard to hurt yourself seriously sampling from the Gallagher catalog.

What I didn't mention was "Cradle Rock"!!!! Another sig tune of his.
Again, so much to recommend. The remaster series, organized by Rory's brother, Donal, who was his manager, spit out a BBC session double disk. The first disc alone is worth twice the price of admission. Builds from "Calling Card" to OTT boogie rock madness, different from many else of the time in the electric piano of Lou Martin and the velocity with which Gallagher -riffed-, not shredded. "I Take What I Want," from "Against the Grain," and "Cruise on Out" or on fire, as is most of the material from "Calling Card" that's played in the set.

"Lost At Sea" should have been included on the anthology. It's a subtle bolero which a magnificent climax and sounded great on radio. Never played much, but it's one of the reasons I bought the album.

Don't know if the anthology mentions this but Gallagher was tortured by the collapse of Taste and wrote a good number of songs as a result of his anger at that. Often, they were really great songs. According to his brother, he was also indifferent or opposed to the spawning of singles off his records.

If you read some of the histories of the Brit rock bluesmen, many of them were the first of the independents, before the word indie was coined. Gallagher was a true independent. He did his albums, he toured, it was all self-contained. The recordings were issued by majors with seemingly absolutely no control over what he chose to do, the music the better for it.

Another feature of Gallagher's catalog: Much of his high energy stuff was/is way too jacked up for a standard classic rock audience. So while Clapton, for instance, got a lot of mileage with material that made it to FM that indicates he was either asleep or on 'ludes while doing it, Gallagher was, by comparison, ferocious, or not particularly interested in the applying the meaning of the adjective -mellow- to his stuff.

George Smith, Monday, 25 July 2005 04:39 (twelve years ago) Permalink

"for some reason I always confused Rory G w/Roy Buchanan, dunno why."

Both on Polydor for a while? Both start with R?

Rickey Wright (Rrrickey), Monday, 25 July 2005 06:17 (twelve years ago) Permalink

George is right; the two records I mentioned above, and the massive stylistic differences, are eight years apart or so.

Rickey Wright (Rrrickey), Monday, 25 July 2005 06:19 (twelve years ago) Permalink

Also, "riffed not shredded" captures dude perfectly.

Rickey Wright (Rrrickey), Monday, 25 July 2005 06:19 (twelve years ago) Permalink

[Heads to loft for eight Rory Gallagher records.]

Rickey Wright (Rrrickey), Monday, 25 July 2005 06:19 (twelve years ago) Permalink

Odd bit of trivia: The most serious bit of rock journalism done by Peter Laughner (Lester Bangs buddy, guitarist Rocket from the Tombs) was done for CREEM on Rory Gallagher. CREEM actually went to the trouble of shipping Laughner out to accompany Gallagher on an airplane flight on one of his American tours!

I felt Laughner's few pieces of rock journalism for CREEM were duffer crap. I was doing some reporting writing for a newspaper at the time and was younger than him. But his long feature on Rory Gallagher was way more than halfway decent. He resisted the urge to be Lester Bangsian -- which Gallagher would have in no way deserved and simply brushed off -- and turned in a feature piece which was honest to the man and his art. Might have been the best longish article I ever saw published on Rory Gallagher in the US while he was alive and in his prime. And there weren't many of these.

Supports my suspicion that dudes in Rocket from the Tombs dug hard Brit white boy blooz -- at least the guitarists. And understood you could be reactionary employing variations on the style. Gallagher would have been a good teacher.

George Smith, Monday, 25 July 2005 08:00 (twelve years ago) Permalink

I was just gonna mention that CREEM piece! As best as I can recall (too lazy to look for that magazine without 15-foot arms) Laughner came off kinda defensive, earnestly trying to explain just why Gallagher stood out, compared to Winter/Trower/etc. Like he was embarrassed to embrace anyone as un-punk (or, maybe un-"punk") as Rory Gallagher. It was 1976, after all.

(Still haven't heard him m'self - I downloaded "Laundromat" back in '03, right before my computer died, and so never got to hear it.)

Myonga Von Bontee (Myonga Von Bontee), Monday, 25 July 2005 08:38 (twelve years ago) Permalink

I'd take Rory Gallagher over so many of the guitar heroes from that period. He's aged better than most of 'em, early Johnny Winter excepted.

He wrote great hooks (check out "Philby" off of Top Priority), and his live albums were blistering.

Such a tasteful lead guitarist too. Great tone. Damn, I wish I had all those LPs still.

Brooker Buckingham (Brooker B), Monday, 25 July 2005 15:46 (twelve years ago) Permalink

http://www.handsomeproductions.com/creemwork.htm

Here is a link that has the Peter Laughner article on Rory Gallagher.

Earl Nash (earlnash), Monday, 25 July 2005 18:19 (twelve years ago) Permalink

It's funny, when I posed the question I expected only responses from knee-jerk anti-rockists... hence the entryist way the question was posed, and the plea for informed opinions. It's nice to see that popery has not completely overtaken ILM. Don't stop the rock!

Anyway, a guy at work with broad musical tastes recommended "Live in Europe" as the place to start with Rory Gallagher... what do you reckon?

DV (dirtyvicar), Monday, 25 July 2005 19:08 (twelve years ago) Permalink

It has a good blend of high energy and acoustic on it. If the price is good, you've nothing to lose.

George Smith, Monday, 25 July 2005 19:26 (twelve years ago) Permalink

Classic, but maybe not in England.

SoHoLa (SoHoLa), Tuesday, 26 July 2005 03:22 (twelve years ago) Permalink

Laughner came off kinda defensive, earnestly trying to explain just why Gallagher stood out, compared to Winter/Trower/etc. Like he was embarrassed to embrace anyone as un-punk (or, maybe un-"punk") as Rory Gallagher. It was 1976, after all.

There's something to that. Thanks to Earl Nash's digging up the URL, I went back and looked at it. As a music journalist, Laughner was a cliche. Happily, that's not what we know him most for or where his good creative work was handed in. Bangs imitation on Lou Reed records and Television. The Rory Gallagher assignment broke him out of that mold. Perhaps Gallagher made him nervous because he was totally unlike Lou Reed and Television. Rory Gallagher wasn't dangerous, avante garde or cutting edge, but he was legitimately dangerous -- in all the good ways -- on guitar.

Rory Gallagher was also a total guy thing. I can't remember any young women liking his music when I played. And I can't recall any numbers of note in attendance at his shows. And it wasn't that the guy was macho, or his lyrics were poor, quite the opposite.
It just must have been the fearsome noise of the guitar and the velocity of the band. Pianner player Lou Martin always sounded like he was on speed.

I'd love to see sales stats in the US for 71-78 or so. I'm betting, usually well well less than 70,000/per but still turning a profit because his records were efficiently and cheaply produced. That was a a very good way to make hard rock records distributed by majors, a talent and tradition long lost. Your record would be in stores, one copy, maybe and it would get name recognition, and you would be an adequate draw on the undercard of major tours. Everyone would go away happy and ready to make the next record. It's called a career, something very few within the genre are allowed to have anymore.

Hah. I've been listening to Rory Gallagher this year -- now -- a lot more than I'll have clocked Johnny Winter for 2005. And I just played "Second Winter" & "Johnny Winter And" a month ago.


George Smith, Tuesday, 26 July 2005 17:43 (twelve years ago) Permalink

True. Gallagher is more listenable by a mile. But he never made and album as good as Johnny Winter's Columbia debut.
Winter's catalog was mega spotty from there on, though.

Brooker Buckingham (Brooker B), Tuesday, 26 July 2005 20:23 (twelve years ago) Permalink

I can't remember any young women liking his music when I played.

do you mean when you played his music to them... or when you played in Rory Gallagher's band????

DV (dirtyvicar), Tuesday, 26 July 2005 20:25 (twelve years ago) Permalink

Ha-ha! When I played his records for them. "Cradle Rock" was good for getting the "Do we have to listen to this?" query.

George Smith, Tuesday, 26 July 2005 20:45 (twelve years ago) Permalink

This Rory fan site is quite worth investigating:

http://shadowplay.hostingisfree.com/

Sang Freud (jeff_s), Saturday, 30 July 2005 13:54 (twelve years ago) Permalink

five years pass...

Revive in honor of St. Patrick's day, which is a perfect day to play this guy. I love Rory Gallagher.

Also, a shout out to George Smith and his classic dismantling of the clueless "dirty vicar" nearly six years ago

Thraft of Cleveland (Bill Magill), Thursday, 17 March 2011 17:58 (six years ago) Permalink

always wanted to buy a rory gallagher album, never have

always get him confused with roy buchanan

what do it take to be a legend like noz is? (upper mississippi sh@kedown), Thursday, 17 March 2011 18:29 (six years ago) Permalink

He's pretty consistently great. Im not familiar with Buchanan, so i cant really compare the two.

Thraft of Cleveland (Bill Magill), Thursday, 17 March 2011 18:37 (six years ago) Permalink

http://gratefulbreed.blogspot.com/2011/03/rory-gallagher-live-in-sausalito-ca-10.html
smoking show from 1975.

tylerw, Thursday, 17 March 2011 18:42 (six years ago) Permalink

i will have to check something out, assuming like something early 70s vintage be best? see his stuff at used record shops quite a bit....

i hope this isn't a disappointment like when i finally got bridge of sighs by robin trower

what do it take to be a legend like noz is? (upper mississippi sh@kedown), Thursday, 17 March 2011 18:42 (six years ago) Permalink

this is what you want
http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/51FSqsEtbmL._SS500_.jpg

tylerw, Thursday, 17 March 2011 18:45 (six years ago) Permalink

that's a dude who looks like he wails IMO

what do it take to be a legend like noz is? (upper mississippi sh@kedown), Thursday, 17 March 2011 18:48 (six years ago) Permalink

wrt roy buchanan i've never heard this but one of my fav album covers ever:

http://www.woundedbird.com/buchanan/9138.jpg

'ello mate!

what do it take to be a legend like noz is? (upper mississippi sh@kedown), Thursday, 17 March 2011 18:49 (six years ago) Permalink

just 'avin a pint with me guitar ...

tylerw, Thursday, 17 March 2011 18:51 (six years ago) Permalink

The Taste records are pretty cool, too. "blister on the Moon" is a great psych single.

Trip Maker, Thursday, 17 March 2011 19:17 (six years ago) Permalink

that's a dude who looks like he wails IMO

^ Oh, he does. Irish Tour absolutely kills.Get that one, no doubt.

Thraft of Cleveland (Bill Magill), Thursday, 17 March 2011 19:26 (six years ago) Permalink

lol at all the rockist fites going on when this thread began. kinda glad that whole argument has died down around these parts?

tylerw, Thursday, 17 March 2011 19:29 (six years ago) Permalink

absolutely. I never understood that particular battle.

Thraft of Cleveland (Bill Magill), Thursday, 17 March 2011 19:32 (six years ago) Permalink

i get not wanting rock music to be the standard by which every other music is judged, but after that ... so what?

tylerw, Thursday, 17 March 2011 19:38 (six years ago) Permalink

kinda glad that whole argument has died down around these parts?

Pretty much. Boy, I'd forgotten about this thread. Well, I'll be listening to my RG collection tonight, I think.

Gorge, Thursday, 17 March 2011 19:50 (six years ago) Permalink

yeah, that song opens Irish Tour. Gallagher gets introduced, does a little tuning and then nukes the place. One of the best openings to an album ever.

Thraft of Cleveland (Bill Magill), Thursday, 17 March 2011 21:01 (six years ago) Permalink

two months pass...

just downloaded irish tour

this is the definition of going ham on guitar. everything wow! hard shit, slow shit, acoustic shit, dude is a fucking master.

i'm a fucking walking pair of Docs (upper mississippi sh@kedown), Tuesday, 17 May 2011 21:14 (six years ago) Permalink

robin trower eat a dick

i'm a fucking walking pair of Docs (upper mississippi sh@kedown), Tuesday, 17 May 2011 21:14 (six years ago) Permalink

Eagle Records is reissuing his whole catalog; they started with Irish Tour '74 and just last week I got a package that included the s/t debut, Deuce, Live in Europe and Blueprint, plus a new 2CD set called Notes from San Francisco - a previously unreleased studio session from '77 paired with a disc of liveage from '79. I'd never heard the guy until I was flown to Ireland to follow The Answer around for Relix magazine in 2009 - I bought a 2CD The Essential... on that trip and became a casual fan. Now that I've got this much of his stuff, I intend to do some real wallowing.

that's not funny. (unperson), Tuesday, 17 May 2011 21:25 (six years ago) Permalink

That's pretty awesome, psyched he's getting reissued.

(nb: I like Trower too)

Thraft of Cleveland (Bill Magill), Tuesday, 17 May 2011 21:30 (six years ago) Permalink

yeah, dude pretty much goes IN at all times

tylerw, Tuesday, 17 May 2011 21:32 (six years ago) Permalink

I think Rory Gallagher's song writing gets a bit undersung in the wake of his instrumental prowess. I really particularly like his Duece LP.

earlnash, Tuesday, 17 May 2011 22:36 (six years ago) Permalink

two years pass...

robin trower eat a dick

― i'm a fucking walking pair of Docs (upper mississippi sh@kedown), Tuesday, May 17, 2011 4:14 PM (2 years ago) Bookmark Flag Post Permalink

lol

usic for 18 magicians (upper mississippi sh@kedown), Thursday, 15 August 2013 17:58 (four years ago) Permalink

the rory documentary "Ghost Blues" is on Netflix instant! pretty interesting! i didn't know how important he was to the sense of Irish rock identity w/kids like The Edge and Bob Geldof etc

usic for 18 magicians (upper mississippi sh@kedown), Thursday, 15 August 2013 17:58 (four years ago) Permalink

johnny marr is in it really briefly and he just talks about how once he say Rory change a string WHILE STILL PLAYING A SONG which marr says "there should be a monument to that somewhere" haha

usic for 18 magicians (upper mississippi sh@kedown), Thursday, 15 August 2013 17:59 (four years ago) Permalink

van, phil lynott and rory are like the holy trinity of irish rock

Old Boy In Network (Michael B), Thursday, 15 August 2013 18:32 (four years ago) Permalink

i didn't know how important he was to the sense of Irish rock identity w/kids like The Edge and Bob Geldof etc

^you wouldnt know by listening to their shit music that either of these clowns were influenced by someone like Gallagher. For kicks i may go back to back on Irish Tour and Rattle and Hum and hear how pathetic the latter fares.

One Way Ticket on the 1277 Express (Bill Magill), Thursday, 15 August 2013 19:08 (four years ago) Permalink

the influence wouldnt have been claimed as directly musical

"fear of putting out" in one's early thirties (darraghmac), Thursday, 15 August 2013 19:14 (four years ago) Permalink

yeah i mean The Edge was only 15 i think he said when he saw rory w/his older brother and friends

the sense i got was that there just weren't that many bands that really ID'd as "Irish" that were big on the UK/world stage, so the kids there really identified and rooted for them, as michael b. said Van, Them, Thin Lizzy, Skid Row, Rory etc

also in the documentary Rory and his ppl put on some big outdoor Irish rock fest that i guess was a big deal, and he also would tour Northern Ireland when other ppl wouldn't

usic for 18 magicians (upper mississippi sh@kedown), Thursday, 15 August 2013 19:32 (four years ago) Permalink

though i never do understand how people don't get that you can be influenced by ppl musically w/o sounding like them :/

usic for 18 magicians (upper mississippi sh@kedown), Thursday, 15 August 2013 19:34 (four years ago) Permalink

I heard this for the first time a few days ago on the radio. lovely song.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=25x0OFIEhfA

Old Boy In Network (Michael B), Friday, 16 August 2013 01:33 (four years ago) Permalink

one year passes...

I've been getting into this dude lately. His appearances on Don Kirshner's shows are pretty great, especially watch the keyboardist and bassist...

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MqtX8dGHhEs

^^^ NOT METAL (GOTT PUNCH II HAWKWINDZ), Friday, 10 April 2015 07:42 (two years ago) Permalink

one year passes...

irish tour right now...his soloing on "Million Miles Away" just stunning

I said some things about Robin Trower on this thread I regret.

Also the exchange in 2011 upthread about the Roy Buchanan album cover "Loading Zone" between me & tyler was a precursor to the "I've Got My Own Album to Do" thread lol

blonde redheads have more fun (upper mississippi sh@kedown), Tuesday, 14 March 2017 14:33 (eight months ago) Permalink

lol rereading this thread i was thinking the exact same thing about that buchanan cover.

new noise, Tuesday, 14 March 2017 15:05 (eight months ago) Permalink


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