is the ciara album worth getting?

Message Bookmarked
Bookmark Removed
what say you

s1ocki (slutsky), Monday, 16 May 2005 04:21 (fourteen years ago) link

and by "getting" i mean "grokking"

s1ocki (slutsky), Monday, 16 May 2005 04:24 (fourteen years ago) link

yes, regardless of what you mean.

Forksclovetofu (Forksclovetofu), Monday, 16 May 2005 04:26 (fourteen years ago) link

what's it called?

s1ocki (slutsky), Monday, 16 May 2005 04:27 (fourteen years ago) link

I really like the singles but I really can't think of an album released by an artist I enjoy that I am less interested in hearing.

The Ghost of Dan Perry (Dan Perry), Monday, 16 May 2005 04:33 (fourteen years ago) link

It has at least three good songs (the singles!) plus a second version of "Goodies" that I have not yet heard. If it's cheap, proceed.

mike h. (mike h.), Monday, 16 May 2005 04:34 (fourteen years ago) link

i dl-ed it off limewire and am really glad i did

[that bastard] jaxon (jaxon), Monday, 16 May 2005 05:28 (fourteen years ago) link

This was one of my favourite albums of last year. You'll never be in the mood to hear the bangers and the ballads/slow jams at the same time, but they're all amazing. Has 'Hotline' been released as a single yet? It's maybe the best thing Ciara's done.

The Lex (The Lex), Monday, 16 May 2005 11:24 (fourteen years ago) link

Haven't heard the album yet. Is it like all other similar R&B albums, i.e. two or three knockout tracks followed by twelve coma-inducing "ballads"?

Marcello Carlin (nostudium), Monday, 16 May 2005 11:26 (fourteen years ago) link

There are five knock-out tracks and the rest are ballads or slow jams. I really like most of the latter but your tolerance of them is probably entirely dependent on your tolerance of r&b ballads in general. There's a very disturbing stalker mantra called 'Pick Up The Phone', and the R Kelly duet 'Next To You' is gorgeous.

The Lex (The Lex), Monday, 16 May 2005 11:43 (fourteen years ago) link

Hmmm. I'll see if I can blag a copy.

Marcello Carlin (nostudium), Monday, 16 May 2005 12:23 (fourteen years ago) link

i notice that even the people who like it don't know what it's called.

s1ocki (slutsky), Monday, 16 May 2005 12:25 (fourteen years ago) link

the album? it's called Goodies.

The Lex (The Lex), Monday, 16 May 2005 12:28 (fourteen years ago) link

Oh no oh no someone's hassling RnB ballads!

A Viking of Some Note (Andrew Thames), Monday, 16 May 2005 12:52 (fourteen years ago) link

Can't be done with them. Why do all R&B albums follow this format, such that by the end I have to send for Ronan Keating to sing me out of a coma? We're not all pimps!

Marcello Carlin (nostudium), Monday, 16 May 2005 12:53 (fourteen years ago) link

Brooke Valentine bucks this trend.

Hari A$hur$t (Toaster), Monday, 16 May 2005 12:55 (fourteen years ago) link

What's the ballad ratio on the BV record? I keep meaning to get it but its tacky cover keeps putting me off.

Marcello Carlin (nostudium), Monday, 16 May 2005 12:56 (fourteen years ago) link

No I agree wholeheartedly, but I got pretty hassled for putting this idea forth a few nights/weeks (maybe) ago tho

A Viking of Some Note (Andrew Thames), Monday, 16 May 2005 12:59 (fourteen years ago) link

I don't think that "tho" ended up being v necessary

A Viking of Some Note (Andrew Thames), Monday, 16 May 2005 13:00 (fourteen years ago) link

On the Brooke V record there are 3 ballads and 12 non-ballads. Of the two ballads, 'Dying Of A Broken Heart' is Aaliyah-on-Broadway and 'Cover Girl' has amazing Hammond organ action. It's probably my second favourite album this year after Vitalic...

I think Marcello would like it.

The Lex (The Lex), Monday, 16 May 2005 13:01 (fourteen years ago) link

it's good but somehow i wish all the songs were as good as the singles, than i would LOVE it, now i like it

rizzx (rizzx), Monday, 16 May 2005 13:12 (fourteen years ago) link

I second "hotline". Surefire hit and bound to be a followup single after they try to release her "r+b diva" track. "Oh" is a bit better but not much.

Forksclovetofu (Forksclovetofu), Monday, 16 May 2005 13:46 (fourteen years ago) link

The high end in 'Hotline' is my favourite sound this year.

The Lex (The Lex), Monday, 16 May 2005 13:51 (fourteen years ago) link

the thing with Ciara is that even though there are a few "ballads", it's not like they're much slower than the singles. the whole album is slow so they just feel like part of the flow.

[that bastard] jaxon (jaxon), Monday, 16 May 2005 17:18 (fourteen years ago) link

so... everyone who responded to this thread, i just want you to say "yea" or "nay" now

s1ocki (slutsky), Monday, 16 May 2005 17:20 (fourteen years ago) link

"Haven't heard the album yet. Is it like all other similar R&B albums, i.e. two or three knockout tracks followed by twelve coma-inducing "ballads"? "

that is such a rock/pop POV of R&B. why do all rock and popists hate R&B ballads? ill grant you that a lot of R&B slowies ARE a bit soporific, sleepy, watery, spineless, insipid, motionless, wet, identical and all the rest of that, but i for one, happen to like some nice and slow R&B action. it makes me feel gooey inside. just cos the rest of the ciara album isnt chock full of goodies and 1-2 step doesnt mean its not good. that just means you only like poppier, dancier R&B, and are cold and heartless and rockist and popist and dont really like what real R&B fans like about R&B - the ballads. so there!

blahbarian, Monday, 16 May 2005 17:22 (fourteen years ago) link

'Dying Of A Broken Heart' by Brooke V really hit me today. GREAT song.

Hari A$hur$t (Toaster), Monday, 16 May 2005 17:23 (fourteen years ago) link

so... everyone who responded to this thread, i just want you to say "yea" or "nay" now

BUY THE ALBUM, DUDE.

i mean,

YEA.

(Lex OTM, his thoughts are mine exactly)

MindInRewind (Barry Bruner), Monday, 16 May 2005 17:25 (fourteen years ago) link

http://www.cadenceweapon.com/audio/Ciara_-_Oh_(Cadence_Weapon_Smart_Bomb_Remix).mp3

Rollie Pemberton (Rollie Pemberton), Monday, 16 May 2005 17:50 (fourteen years ago) link

copy and paste that, i guess

Rollie Pemberton (Rollie Pemberton), Monday, 16 May 2005 17:50 (fourteen years ago) link

Just download the singles and the afformentioned "Hotline."

The Brainwasher (Twilight), Monday, 16 May 2005 17:53 (fourteen years ago) link

yea or nay, people. yea or nay.

s1ocki (slutsky), Monday, 16 May 2005 18:05 (fourteen years ago) link

the only r&b albums with too many ballads, really, are Beyonce's solo and the last Destinys. (And some of the ballads were good, at least on Beyonce's.) Otherwise, this is a vicious stereotype.

And yes, buy Goodies. It's not all quite as inventive as a singles, but its a solid album.

just saying, Monday, 16 May 2005 18:15 (fourteen years ago) link

why do all rock and popists hate R&B ballads?

This is such a great question.

The Ghost of Dan Perry (Dan Perry), Monday, 16 May 2005 20:51 (fourteen years ago) link

ill grant you that a lot of R&B slowies ARE a bit soporific, sleepy, watery, spineless, insipid, motionless, wet, identical and all the rest of that

I sense conflicted feelings.

Yanc3y had a great post somewhere about R&B ballads and how they are valued (or rather not valued) in much discourse.

Ned Raggett (Ned), Monday, 16 May 2005 20:55 (fourteen years ago) link

(That said I'm not going to pretend to be above it all. The Beyonce album was not my friend.)

Ned Raggett (Ned), Monday, 16 May 2005 20:56 (fourteen years ago) link

yea or nay, people. yea or nay.

YEA.

why do all rock and popists hate R&B ballads?

Public perception of r&b singer is based on her singles/videos wherein she is pouting, preening sex diva dancer goddess who leaves little room for argument; most people don't like it when women try to escape pigeonholes, esp. when the pigeonholes are as amazing as Ciara on 'Goodies' or Christina Milian on 'Dip It Low', and they justify this by pointing towards the r&b singer's own compliance in her über-branding. So of course when they get the album and hit the ballads they're all like "oh ugh no, she's trying to be something she's not". Rockists don't like it because they see her overtly emotional side as 'fake' and 'dishonest'; popists don't like it because they see her trying to pander to rockist criticisms by making 'honest' and 'emotional' songs. All of them need to get over themselves and start actually listening to the songs.

Also a side-effect is that many r&b albums are rarely good as albums - when I listen to Goodies I listen to either the ballads or the bangers, because you're not going to be in the mood for both at the same time. But this is why we have that thing called the skip button.

None of this applies to Beyoncé because she's really, really bad at ballads.

The Lex (The Lex), Tuesday, 17 May 2005 12:57 (fourteen years ago) link

"Dangerously In Love 2" seriously gives me nightmares.

Al (sitcom), Tuesday, 17 May 2005 13:01 (fourteen years ago) link

I don't look at it from any "popist" or "rockist" perspective. I look at it from the point of view that R&B ballads bore me shitless. And if R&B albums are rarely good as albums, then why expect people to shell out their hard-earned money for them? The point is that R&B people have got this stupid idea in their head of maturity, i.e. making soundtracks for yuppie pimps' beds. I didn't subscribe to pop music to be forcefed the milk of magnesia that is aesthetic "maturity." Bang bang bang all the fucking way at 9000 bpm, otherwise you don't get my fucking money. End of story.

Marcello Carlin (nostudium), Tuesday, 17 May 2005 13:02 (fourteen years ago) link

And if R&B albums are rarely good as albums, then why expect people to shell out their hard-earned money for them?

because there are generally two great mini-albums on one CD!

I don't think many r&b ballads are signifiers of 'maturity' at all, if anything the majority of them seem to emphasise innocence and naivety - situations where the singer doesn't have all the answers and freely admits this. Most of them seem to stem from confusion more than anything else.

The Lex (The Lex), Tuesday, 17 May 2005 13:07 (fourteen years ago) link

Oh bullshit, they're only singing what their producers and writing committees tell them to sing. It doesn't come from them. It's all built on the format of let's have a quick bop, then it's back to mine for a long, slow shag. Stringing seven or eight soporific "ballads" together doesn't make Beyonce Sigur Ros.

Marcello Carlin (nostudium), Tuesday, 17 May 2005 13:10 (fourteen years ago) link

R&B ballads are great when done WELL, which most are not these days. (damn you teddy riley, for shifting the focus onto BANG POW uptempo joints.) (note: i wuv u teddy.)

strng hlkngtn, Tuesday, 17 May 2005 13:17 (fourteen years ago) link

that brooke valentine album sux like a hoover btw

strng hlkngtn, Tuesday, 17 May 2005 13:18 (fourteen years ago) link

Oh good, that encourages me to give it a listen.

D'Angelo's two albums (when's the third coming, you workshy fop?) are a prime example of how this sort of thing can work in the extended format if done (im)properly. But otherwise...it's faux-sophisticated MoR for used car salesmen in Sydenham. Light the candle, open the fridge door, etc.

Marcello Carlin (nostudium), Tuesday, 17 May 2005 13:19 (fourteen years ago) link

Well, they're also singing what their producers and writing committees tell them to sing when they sing the club hits too (insofar as this is true at all, which varies from singer to singer) (and insofar as it matters, I don't look for my r&b divas to be auteurs). But you can't listen to ballads like Christina Milian's 'Oh Daddy' or 'Miss You Like Crazy', Aaliyah's 'I Refuse' or 'I Care 4 U', Brooke Valentine's 'Dying Of A Broken Heart', Jamelia's 'Thank You' or 'Life', or any given Teedra Moses ballad, and then claim that the singer doesn't inhabit the song. And most of them are completely inappropriate for shagging!

xposts

The Lex (The Lex), Tuesday, 17 May 2005 13:21 (fourteen years ago) link

Agree about the Aaliyah ones, don't know about the BV ones yet but Christina Milian and Jamelia are just boring, however heartfelt they may be.

Marcello Carlin (nostudium), Tuesday, 17 May 2005 13:24 (fourteen years ago) link

I'm not sure if ballad hatred is a cleanly rockist issue. There's a lotta stuff involved both social and sonic.

At root people who dislike R&B ballads specifically (as opposed to R&B generally) often seem to be reacting against the dominance of a certain post-Babyface sound - the use of certain chords, a certain quality to the piano tingles and starry background effects... it is a quality of familiarity perhaps - this replication of specific musical and sonic effects being like a signpost for "what remains the same" (the "truth" of love) in spite of the rapidly shifting cultural, sonic and linguistic ground of the uptempo single (where sounds, phrases and story constructs tend to come and go according to the dictates of fashion). And "what remains the same" appears to persevere unchanged regardless of year or singer, such that paradoxically the personal love song appears much more interchangable across albums and artists than the supposedly utilitarian club banger. As with failed-indie, what grates for the listener is not merely the perceived genericism but the perceived genericism in the face of an emphasis on personal feeling.

This vantage point tends to lead to two positions: people who dismiss R&B ballads unconditionally, or people who theorise their love of individual ballads according to the extent to which they deviate from the above. For a long time I was in the second camp: an R&B ballad was great insofar as it distinguished itself from the post-Babyface mulch. Such a category of avant-ballad tends to start with unarguable sonic peculiarity ("One In A Million" is archtypal here) and slowly or rapidly accrue other criteria by which to mark out the deserving few: particularly vivid or perceptive lyrics maybe, or an unusual or idiosyncratic vocal performance, or a naggingly bittersweet refrain - not to mention a more expansive or subtle ear for sonic differentiation.

But once you start to listen to ballads in this mode it is difficult not to start hearing so many great ones, or such a variety, that this entire approach begins to appear suspect. One can't see the forest of the rule for the trees of the exceptions. And yet the rule persists. I suspect it remains my underlying critical formulation when listening to R&B ballads, even though I now generally enjoy ballads so much that the Teedra Moses album could be my favourite R&B album in years. But what I'm looking for now is quite a small element of differentiation (perhaps the element of differentiation which can be found and is worth noting in all genres) - maybe even just a piece of post-Babyface mulch done really really well.

It would probably not now result in a change to the amount of ballads I liked or the intensity of my enjoyment, but I'd like to rebuild my approach to ballads so that it centered around a positive rather than negative definition (what should ballads do rather than what should they avoid). I like the way that Spizzazzz tend to flip this entire construct around and talk about R&B artists "keeping it real" with ballads and slow jams. I think it's really useful to think of ballads in this way, as a deliberate assertion of fidelity to something (what? I dunno, ask facelift or rob them co) rather than conservative pandering or album filling.

Tim Finney (Tim Finney), Tuesday, 17 May 2005 13:41 (fourteen years ago) link

"Oh bullshit, they're only singing what their producers and writing committees t
tell them to sing"

well, thats just rockism at its absolute finest. who cares who tells them to sing it or not? most of the stax and motown catalogue was made in virtually the exact same way.

"R&B people have got this stupid idea in their head of maturity, i.e. making soundtracks for yuppie pimps' beds. "

yeah, more typical white middle class rockism. go to an estate and tell some fof the kids and adults listening to and enjoying R&B ballads that theyre yuppie pimps.

"I don't look at it from any "popist" or "rockist" perspective."

of course you dont.

blahbariantheoriginal, Tuesday, 17 May 2005 13:48 (fourteen years ago) link

I think it's really useful to think of ballads in this way, as a deliberate assertion of fidelity to something

Great post, Tim, but I think what this reminds me of -- inadvertantly (perhaps?) -- is the piece linked over on the NME editor thread by Sarah Dempster, specifically here:

A 31-year-old friend recently told me that he'd just bought U2's entire back catalogue, despite "never being that much of a fan". "They're still here," he explained, "and that counts for a lot." He's not wrong. Longevity is as important to the maturing listener as appalling attitudes are to a teenager. It's badge of honour, proof that mortgages and fallen arches may dampen one's ardour, but the spirit of rock is inextinguishable.

I'm not trying to tie this together *totally* -- these are two different situations and arguments -- but in a way I sense 'fidelity' in your terminology and 'longevity' in Dempster's as trying to grasp for a similar 'at least there's something to hold on to that lasts' vibe. The core difference is obviously that in Dempster it's a salute to the musicians while here it's one to the sound. (And if the sound, then as you carefully suggested above, all of a sudden the indie sonic continuum above so many people here are trying to kick comes back with this roaring vengeance, because what is that if not keeping it real?)

Ned Raggett (Ned), Tuesday, 17 May 2005 13:50 (fourteen years ago) link

For 'a certain quality to the piano tingles and starry background effects' substitute 'a certain quality to the feedback hooks and sweaty background vibe,' say. Which can be positively construed!

Ned Raggett (Ned), Tuesday, 17 May 2005 13:53 (fourteen years ago) link

You are an intriguing soul, justsaying (based on your various posts over the moons and who I half think you might be).

Ned Raggett (Ned), Tuesday, 17 May 2005 14:48 (fourteen years ago) link

is it... CIARA?!

s1ocki (slutsky), Tuesday, 17 May 2005 15:02 (fourteen years ago) link

And yet this position is not created Kelis-style by a succession of deliberate breaks with the genre-formula-chain, but rather by a succession of subtle shadings of the formula. It is this dialectic movement of individualism arising out of genre formalism that interests me, but it also makes Teedra difficult to unpack.

Tim you are GREAT.

The Lex (The Lex), Tuesday, 17 May 2005 15:08 (fourteen years ago) link

It's a fine post, that. :-)

Ned Raggett (Ned), Tuesday, 17 May 2005 15:12 (fourteen years ago) link

that brooke valentine album sux like a hoover btw
-- strng hlkngtn (vroo...), May 17th, 2005.

from the Chain Letter thread:

this album is GREAT. i can't wait to review it.
-- strng hlkngtn (ya...), April 4th, 2005.

huh? not questioning anyone's freedom to change their mind, but that's quite an about-face.

Al (sitcom), Tuesday, 17 May 2005 19:11 (fourteen years ago) link

The act of reviewing = 'each man kills the thing he loves'

Not C.3.3 (Ned), Tuesday, 17 May 2005 19:12 (fourteen years ago) link

I can get behind that theory, actually.

Al (sitcom), Tuesday, 17 May 2005 19:18 (fourteen years ago) link

Solution: stop talking about music. (This is going to be hard to do.)

Ned Raggett (Ned), Tuesday, 17 May 2005 19:19 (fourteen years ago) link

More importantly, don't talk about anything you've killed.

Al (sitcom), Tuesday, 17 May 2005 19:27 (fourteen years ago) link

*taps fingers* That could be even harder, depending.

Ned Raggett (Ned), Tuesday, 17 May 2005 19:30 (fourteen years ago) link

a lot of people are uncomfortable with displays of virtuosity and high emotional drama at the same time. it's hard to shake the (very rock) idea that an unpolished performance is somehow more genuine and/or sincere (see most field recordings of folkies all the way through Nirvana Unplugged).

also Tim i like the idea of R&B balladeers keeping it real by keeping R&B from getting swallowed by hip-hop, and would add that 'real' in this sense also means 'in touch with the roots of the music - Aretha etc - without being totally hidebound by classicism a la Joss Stone'.

Dave M. (rotten03), Tuesday, 17 May 2005 19:39 (fourteen years ago) link

thank you for interrupting our riffing and stopping me from making a regrettable rigor mortis joke.

Al (sitcom), Tuesday, 17 May 2005 19:43 (fourteen years ago) link

"also Tim i like the idea of R&B balladeers keeping it real by keeping R&B from getting swallowed by hip-hop, and would add that 'real' in this sense also means 'in touch with the roots of the music - Aretha etc - without being totally hidebound by classicism a la Joss Stone'."

Yeah okay but that's not what i mean at all! In this case "keeping it real" means "keeping it (un)real". The classixor are not "Respect" but "I Have Nothing" etc. It is a disavowal of grit, which both Aretha and hip hop have (or have been designated by critics as possessing) in spades.

Tim Finney (Tim Finney), Tuesday, 17 May 2005 23:08 (fourteen years ago) link

Why is Aretha automatically the root of this music? Why not Lionel Richie? I think we have to avoid the notion that because one piece of music precedes another chronologically it therefore possesses some explanatory power in determining what is of value in the "genre", when obv the rules of the genre at any given moment will depend on the music that is being made and disseminated at that moment.

When I say "fidelity" I mean fidelity to a concept (R&B balladry as a space for the feminine of effeminate) rather than a past musical precedent. I don't want to imply that this concept has some sort of ethical/epistemological validity or superiority (ie. that R&B "understands" the feminine correctly) though, or that "fidelity" is the correct posture for musicians generally.

I guess what interests me is that you have a constellation at work: the concept of current R&B balladry and what it "means" generally, and then the real life actual R&B ballads and what they "mean" specifically (all will differ or deviate from the concept to a greater or lesser extent). And these are all interrelational: we will understand R&B ballads in a normative fashion (ie. how they relate to the concept of R&B ballads) but that concept itself is an effect of the constellation of individual examples. So you have this back and forth of concept and real life examples, and there's no necessary value that derives from breaking away from the concept, or remaining true to that concept, or remaining true to another concept (pieces of music, unlike stars, can belong to several different constellations); and yet it is this movement, this tension, this friction etc. which generates the appeal of a particular piece of music.

Tim Finney (Tim Finney), Tuesday, 17 May 2005 23:25 (fourteen years ago) link

Why is Aretha automatically the root of this music? Why not Lionel Richie? I think we have to avoid the notion that because one piece of music precedes another chronologically it therefore possesses some explanatory power in determining what is of value in the "genre", when obv the rules of the genre at any given moment will depend on the music that is being made and disseminated at that moment.

Aretha was perhaps a bad example. a modern balladeer eg. Teedra Moses doesn't appear to be expressing fidelity to Aretha and deliberately ignoring Whitney or Mariah, she's expressing fidelity to the R&B ballad tradition as a whole, which includes even the treacliest Babyface material. ditto Beyonce, who is probably more influenced by Mariah than anyone else IMHO. in fact, people who try to disavow certain influences from the tradition usually end up marginalizing themselves - Jill Scott will never sell as much as Ashanti.

When I say "fidelity" I mean fidelity to a concept (R&B balladry as a space for the feminine of effeminate) rather than a past musical precedent. I don't want to imply that this concept has some sort of ethical/epistemological validity or superiority (ie. that R&B "understands" the feminine correctly) though, or that "fidelity" is the correct posture for musicians generally.

is R&B balladry necessarily feminine or effeminate? i see it as being much more about virtuosity combined with vulnerability. the singer has to show off their range, scale the heights, triumph over that absurdly high note not only to expose the depth of their emotion, but as a demonstration of their mastery of the form. incidentally, ballads in heavy metal are nearly identical, but they usually leave the crazy virtuosity to the guitar solo, which in my opinion comes because singing in a really emotional, demonstrative way is like crying in public - they have to sublimate it through the guitarist. (I'm thinking of Ozzy and his seemingly emotionless vocal on "Mama I'm Coming Home").

Dave M. (rotten03), Tuesday, 17 May 2005 23:57 (fourteen years ago) link

The guitar solo is the woman in heavy metal songs obv.

"Aretha was perhaps a bad example. a modern balladeer eg. Teedra Moses doesn't appear to be expressing fidelity to Aretha and deliberately ignoring Whitney or Mariah, she's expressing fidelity to the R&B ballad tradition as a whole, which includes even the treacliest Babyface material."

Yeah I'd agree with this definitely.

Tim Finney (Tim Finney), Wednesday, 18 May 2005 00:01 (fourteen years ago) link

i work at sony and my bonus is based on sales so yes, buy that bitch

bahktin, Wednesday, 18 May 2005 03:58 (fourteen years ago) link

Hi there! It's great to see you putting your theories of carnival into practice.

Ned Raggett (Ned), Wednesday, 18 May 2005 04:59 (fourteen years ago) link

thirteen years pass...

surprised there's no discussion of her new track here of all places

aloha darkness my old friend (katherine), Wednesday, 18 July 2018 15:52 (eleven months ago) link

Yeah, “Level Up” is great!

https://youtu.be/Dh-ULbQmmF8

(and Ciara has become a niche interest on ILM, just like almost everything else that’s interesting and fun, sadly)

breastcrawl, Thursday, 19 July 2018 17:08 (eleven months ago) link

She's a niche interest now because her last album was really boring, but if this is representative of the new one then I'm on board.

Matt DC, Thursday, 19 July 2018 18:00 (eleven months ago) link

this sounds like it's already been given its own Soundcloud Deconstructed Club Edit

boxedjoy, Friday, 20 July 2018 09:58 (eleven months ago) link

This is fucking great

No angel came (Ross), Friday, 20 July 2018 14:38 (eleven months ago) link

Yep, way to save everybody some time and jump right to the Jersey club remix

change display name (Jordan), Friday, 20 July 2018 15:42 (eleven months ago) link

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RBcXmRe5UAw

this predates Level Up which is strange because when I first heard it I thought it was a parody

boxedjoy, Saturday, 28 July 2018 08:21 (eleven months ago) link

also this now has a remix with Missy Elliott and Fatman Scoop, which is actually really phoned in but also cute for existing

boxedjoy, Saturday, 28 July 2018 08:22 (eleven months ago) link

yeah it's explicitly based on that, I think they're credited even?

aloha darkness my old friend (katherine), Saturday, 28 July 2018 16:09 (eleven months ago) link

"level up" is just okay to me. i like the vid tho and am glad it's getting her some attention

dyl, Saturday, 28 July 2018 19:16 (eleven months ago) link

https://youtu.be/NSIDTlG6bbs

OMFG. This is above and beyond anything I might have hoped for at this stage.

Matt DC, Friday, 10 August 2018 08:01 (eleven months ago) link

A couple of years ago this would have felt like a daring left turn but now it feels like a perfectly natural move that could do numbers but I'm still overjoyed it actually happened.

Matt DC, Friday, 10 August 2018 08:04 (eleven months ago) link

Love this so much

Tim F, Friday, 10 August 2018 10:03 (eleven months ago) link

So it looks like the strategy for this album is to get Ciara on as many genre playlists as possible but if the execution is this good on all of them then I'm onboard.

I also feel like afrobeats hasn't inflitrated US R&B and rap to anywhere near the extent it has in the UK, so this might actually lead somewhere exciting? I mean the alternative is that no one there cares about her any more, but if you're going to bandwagon jump to mitigate that then this is a pretty good one to be on.

Matt DC, Friday, 10 August 2018 10:41 (eleven months ago) link

love both these tracks but lmao at Level Up being based on Fuck It Up Challenge

ufo, Friday, 10 August 2018 12:57 (eleven months ago) link

I approve of this collabo, but “Freak Me” didn’t come out of thin air either. It sounded super familiar, and yes:
https://www.google.nl/amp/s/amp.pulse.ng/entertainment/music/ciara-samples-tiwa-savage-on-new-single-freak-me-with-tekno-id8708959.html

breastcrawl, Friday, 10 August 2018 16:07 (eleven months ago) link

one month passes...

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FcfwvX0HPVI

three for three

ufo, Friday, 14 September 2018 11:30 (ten months ago) link

Yep. At first I thought "hmm a Lose My Breath rip off" but it rewards repeat plays. A+ video too.

Jeff W, Friday, 14 September 2018 20:31 (ten months ago) link

haven't heard yet (no headphones at work) but does this one have a prominent sample as well?

aloha darkness my old friend (katherine), Friday, 14 September 2018 21:08 (ten months ago) link

not feeling this so much - functional and perfunctory but nowhere near the level of the last two

boxedjoy, Wednesday, 19 September 2018 14:14 (nine months ago) link

four months pass...

new song is super gorgeous, fuck

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5BjpWJyd_hk

monotony, Wednesday, 13 February 2019 04:35 (five months ago) link

two months pass...

Beauty Marks is another disappointment.

recriminations from the nitpicking woke (Alfred, Lord Sotosyn), Friday, 10 May 2019 18:43 (two months ago) link

ton of good stuff on the record, kind of a DOA first track though

"thinkin bout you" song of the year

american bradass (BradNelson), Friday, 10 May 2019 18:46 (two months ago) link

I like the one.

I really can't stand this tendency to lapse into therapyspeak with goddamn Macklemore and the title track.

recriminations from the nitpicking woke (Alfred, Lord Sotosyn), Friday, 10 May 2019 18:47 (two months ago) link

* I like THAT one

recriminations from the nitpicking woke (Alfred, Lord Sotosyn), Friday, 10 May 2019 18:47 (two months ago) link

the bookends are the worst, it's true. really love the run from "dose" to "freak me," which should've been in the ilm 77 last year

american bradass (BradNelson), Friday, 10 May 2019 18:54 (two months ago) link

'I Love Myself ft Macklemore' is a blazing do-not-listen-to-this batsignal that I sadly failed to heed.

The rest rules but the afrobeats tracks >>>>> all.

Matt DC, Friday, 10 May 2019 19:46 (two months ago) link

You might like the original “Freak of the Week” as well:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IeasOeUgkA8

Tiwa Savage ft. D’Prince • Before Nko

breastcrawl, Friday, 10 May 2019 20:23 (two months ago) link

(I posted about this upthread as well, but I feel it’s important to give credit where it’s due. This is more than just a sample or an interpolation.)

breastcrawl, Friday, 10 May 2019 22:34 (two months ago) link

Woof, minus a few of the singles this is a stinker

i believe that (s)he is sincere (forksclovetofu), Sunday, 12 May 2019 16:39 (two months ago) link

yikes

boxedjoy, Sunday, 12 May 2019 18:38 (two months ago) link

not a stinker but what a disappointment - the good stuff here is the adventurous and unexpected sonic moves so the first half being heavy on the formulaic r&b is really uninspiring and I really don't need another "I'm going to out to have fun" xerox like Girl Gang. She's always been more comfortable than most others doing weird stuff and Level Up/Freak Me were the first time in ages I felt she had broke out the bubble of yesteryear r&b star, so why this falls back into really lacklustre stuff seems a mystery. And both the opener and closer are terrible choices.

boxedjoy, Sunday, 12 May 2019 18:42 (two months ago) link


You must be logged in to post. Please either login here, or if you are not registered, you may register here.