Origins of Pub Rock

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"In the 1980s, London pubs played jazz, which the kids didn't think was alright. Eggs Over Easy, an American group who had trouble getting gigs anywhere, asked the folks in charge at the Tally Ho pub if they could play and were told yes. Their shows made such a splash that other local bands became fans and also wanted to perform there. That's how pub rock was born."

This is from a review of Elizabeth McQueen's latest album on Buzzflash (http://www.buzzflash.com/jukebox/05/04/blu05003.html). Even assuming the decade is a typo, it still sounds like a crock to me. Surely there were always rock bands playing in pubs? Anyone know for sure?

everything, Friday, 22 April 2005 16:26 (fifteen years ago) link

Well, the decade in question should almost definitely be the '70s, not the '80s. But I think otherwise that you have to distinguish "pub rock" (the mid '70s, largely country and r&b influenced, allegedly back to basics subgenre that in some ways preceded punk, starring eddie and the hot rods, the count bishops, eggs over easy, ducks deluxe, the tyla gang, brinsley schwarz, chilly willy and red hot peppers, kilburn and the high roads, the motors, and, um, other bands who nobody remembers) from "rock that happens to be played in pubs." As for whether rock actually got booked in pubs *before* pub rock per se...um, I'm not British. So I guess I didn't anwwer your question.

xhuxk, Friday, 22 April 2005 17:17 (fifteen years ago) link

(Related question: Was the jazz all Mr. Acker Bilk type stuff?)

xhuxk, Friday, 22 April 2005 17:19 (fifteen years ago) link

I was thinking they probably meant the 60's, after all, Brinsley Schwartz were together in the late 60's.

everything, Friday, 22 April 2005 17:56 (fifteen years ago) link

Just found this at the Rare Vinyl Network site, as part of their roots of punk article. Sounds pretty dodgy too....

"Reggae was soon replaced by a new form of rock 'n' roll when a band of white skinheads called Slade started becoming popular in 1973 and introduced the skinhead world to Oi! or pub rock as it was known then. "

Yeah, right.

everything, Friday, 22 April 2005 18:14 (fifteen years ago) link

Wow...Well, it totally ignores Slade's reggae influences, for one thing.

xhuxk, Friday, 22 April 2005 18:18 (fifteen years ago) link

What it's saying in context, though, is that skinheads tended to listen to reggae before Slade (then called Ambrose Slade, and wearing suspenders as well as bald heads) came along, which sounds more or less accurate, from what I've read before. And Slade's working class stovepipe hat chimney sweep Cockney-esque music hall shouting and stomping for sure (via the Clash and Sham 69 etc.) grandfathered the sound of oi!, though I never heard of it being called oi! in 1973 (which was a couple years before AC/DC even did their oi! oi! oi! thing in "T.N.T.", for instance.) As for Slade presaging pub rock, that seems a little bit iffier, though I could see how the big tough friendly stomp of the Bishops or maybe even the Hot Rods could owe something to them; Slade were HUGE in England in the '70s, right? And I'm sure they quaffed plenty pints at pubs, if they didn't actually play in them. But I also never heard of them being called pub rock.

xhuxk, Friday, 22 April 2005 18:30 (fifteen years ago) link

I mean, Slade were considered GLAM, right? And in some ways, pub rock and oi! are the least glamorous kinds of British rock ever! (Which doesn't mean that the subgenres had nothing to do with each other. Lots of glam-rock -- the Slam/Mott the Hoople kind anyway -- seemed a lot more connected with the urban gutter than with outer space.)

xhuxk, Friday, 22 April 2005 18:34 (fifteen years ago) link

I mean Slade not Slam! (Though Slade could slam as well as anybody.)

xhuxk, Friday, 22 April 2005 18:36 (fifteen years ago) link

Slade cut their hair in an attempt to jump on the skinhead bandwagon, for they were the Bravery of their day, before going on to invent Oasis. I recommend the excellent 'Glitterbest' compilation, which captures the glam/gutter crossover perfectly.

snotty moore, Friday, 22 April 2005 18:50 (fifteen years ago) link

So were there skinhead bands BEFORE Slade, then? (I mean, if they were the Bravery, who were Franz Ferdinand or the Killers, or even the White Stripes or the Strokes? If such bands existed, did they *sound* like Slade?)

And do people believe that Slade "invented Oasis" *musically* (or just, you know, in that way that apparently in England the Oasis brothers were apparently advertised as "hard drinking men starting rows in the loo" even though you can't remotely hear it in their music?) Because I don't think I hear any Slade in their music either. To me Slade sound like they invented the Clash and AC/DC (and the 4 Skins and Kix and Girlschool) way more than they invented Oasis.

xhuxk, Friday, 22 April 2005 19:04 (fifteen years ago) link

Slade were experienced musicians who saw a bandwagon and jumped on it, with limited success. The skinhead fashion was a spin off from the mod scene by those who rejected hippiedom. So I suppose the Bravery are more analogous to the brickies in eyeliner who rode the glam wave.
The Oasis/Slade comparison is perfectly valid in that both were genuinely huge with genuinely noisy guitar records, something which, outside the glam era, has very rarely happened in British pop. Singles flying in at number one, temporarily more popular than football etc. They even covered a Slade tune, pretty much note for note and it still sounded like Oasis. They do not sound one bit like the Beatles (unless they're making a real effort) but they held a similar position to Slade at their peak.
I don't hear the slightest hint of Slade in the Clash and very little in AC/DC (perhaps 'Alive', but not the singles). But I grew up with these records in their original chart context during my schooldays, so my Anglo view is entirely skewed to that. White dogshit, Spangles, Magpie with Jenny Hanley etc...

snotty moore, Friday, 22 April 2005 19:48 (fifteen years ago) link

stack waddy

autovac (autovac), Friday, 22 April 2005 22:24 (fifteen years ago) link

Slade were experienced musicians who saw a bandwagon and jumped on it, with limited success.

Uh, OK. I guess you could say the same thing about David Bowie. If you really think that Slade sounds more like Oasis than the Clash and that Oasis sounds more like Slade than the Beatles you must be listening to different Slade records than I.

walter kranz (walterkranz), Friday, 22 April 2005 23:35 (fifteen years ago) link

Mr. Acker Bilk was some kind of Dixieland revival, wasn't he? Striped shirts and bow ties and two-step rhythms. I don't know, was there hard-bop stuff like Davis or Wayne Shorter being played in pubs? Seems like that would be the kind of jazz you'd hear--would be funny to think that people were sitting in pubs listening to re-creations of Jack Teagarden in 1970, but maybe they were.

edd s hurt (ddduncan), Saturday, 23 April 2005 00:24 (fifteen years ago) link

I don't think Oasis necessarily sound a lot like Slade, but I think it's in their mix -- as is Bowie, at least on 'Definitely Maybe.'

Rickey Wright (Rrrickey), Saturday, 23 April 2005 01:45 (fifteen years ago) link

I like Slade--I need to get some of their stuff.

There was a book on pub rock, I believe, called "Happy Doing What We're Doing."

Eliz. McQueen's recent album is excellent--she sings great, and has the completely correct attitude toward those songs. Good band, too.

edd s hurt (ddduncan), Saturday, 23 April 2005 14:22 (fifteen years ago) link

I have admittedly never heard Oasis's Slade cover, so who knows about that. (I have heard Quiet Riot's Slade covers, though; they were okay. ) But judging from the three or so Oasis albums I've heard (i.e., the ones with the hits, most of which were swoopy and timidly ornate but not remotely rocking ballads), Oasis never had "loud guitars," not in any songs I've ever heard.; that's just bizarre. They never much stomped and never did gang shouts, not like the Clash (early on) and AC/DC did. (Heck, not like Twisted Sister or Andrew WK or Lil Jon and the Frigging East Side Boyz did!) Oasis rocked harder than Coldplay or Radiohead I guess (not necessarily harder than Blur, though, who I gather were considered aesthetes or dilletantes in he UK, but who now and then could be vaguely glam-pop-punky in a sort of Mott/Boomtown Rats way when they speeded up), but big deal. Their music did not swing; their whitbread bland singing and whitebread bland rhythm section have nothing to do with what Slade did. (Actually, Noddy's vocals, when he wasn't doing the Cockney stuff, sometimes veered toward a post-Janis wail that's closer to the vocals in Guns N Roses or Nazareth than to anything Oasis ever did.) I'm not saying Oasis didn't somehow serve a sociological function in England (i.e.: football hooligan music); I know nothing about that, and I know nothing about what fights the tabloids might have reported about band members. And I'm also not saying they sounded very much like the Beatles, though they may have tried (actually, isn't more of their music closer to, say, random tracks on Lennon and Harrison solo albums?) I remember a couple isolated but failed attempts at a sort of Bolan/Ian Hunter glamminess (what was that cigarettes and alcohol song they did?), but they never matched T. Rex's or Mott's beat, and they sure never pushed like Slade could push. But then, few bands do.

xhuxk, Saturday, 23 April 2005 14:28 (fifteen years ago) link

I meant I'm not saying they didn't serve a sociological function SIMILAR TO SLADE in England; they most likely did--just not by sounding like Slade.

xhuxk, Saturday, 23 April 2005 14:30 (fifteen years ago) link

(and okay, "whitebread bland" might be a bit of an exagerration -- not to mention a cliche in the Xhuxk Eddy insult lexicon -- but sorry, Oasis's vocals and rhythm are just not *full bodied* the way Slade's and Slade's descendents' were. Slade's rhythm often harked back to New Orleans r&b and, as I say above, even Jamaica -- Frank Kogan has written more eloquently about this than I have. And Oasis sounded pretty thin, for the most part. And the Oasis bros may well have had a lot of drunken fight in their lives, but they didn't have a whole lot of drunken fight in their music. Even ask the Anti-Nowhere League if you don' t believe me. Hell, even ask the Pogues!)

(Also, am i wrong about blur being considered aesthetes/dilletantes? maybe; again, i don't read british music papers. but i somehow get the idea they were marketed as nice boys from the country house in the village green -- whatever that means; we don't have those here -- not bad boys from the streets. correct me if i'm wrong. at any rate, the new wavey glammy kind of blur nugget i'm thinking of would be something like "jubilee": ok, maybe closer to a fast early police song, or 999 or somebody like that, than mott? you figure it out. still more energetic and effervescent than anything i ever heard from the oasisites. and it's no mistake that in the states, where people cared about what these bands sounded like more than what they supposedly "stood for," "song no. 2" wound up as the "whoomp there it is"-style jock jam, and nothing by oasis did.) (not that i'm a big blur fan or anything; even their best-of album seems to me bloated with a lot of crap. i'm just talking about peak moments here.)

xhuxk, Saturday, 23 April 2005 15:33 (fifteen years ago) link

the only Blur song I'm familiar with is "Girls and Boys," from '94. Locked-in post-disco rhythm section, guitar swoops. I am light on that era of British pop music, actually. On the same comp CD my buddy made me, there's a good Morrissey song from the same year, "The More You Ignore Me, the Closer I Get," which I like far better, even though I'm not a big fan of Morrissey or the Smiths. More heart, more to my taste as it's kinda British-pop-soul like they did in the '60s.

I always for some reason associate Status Quo with Slade--was that the same kind of thing, or were Status Quo more twee, like the Move or Vanda and Young or something?

edd s hurt (ddduncan), Saturday, 23 April 2005 16:33 (fifteen years ago) link

Status Quo had a somewhat twee psychedelic hit "Pictures of Matchstick Men" in the 60s and then became a loutish boogie band in the 70s, maybe the Brit equivalent of Black Oak Arkansas? (shudders) Wishbone Ash on qualudes?

m coleman (lovebug starski), Saturday, 23 April 2005 16:42 (fifteen years ago) link

what, Lovebug--no love for the Black Oak? I always thought they should've hooked up with Captain Beefheart, and backed him up...Wishbone Ash, didn't they have five or six guitarists in the group?

edd s hurt (ddduncan), Saturday, 23 April 2005 17:53 (fifteen years ago) link

Status Quo had a somewhat twee psychedelic hit "Pictures of Matchstick Men" in the 60s and then became a loutish boogie band in the 70s, maybe the Brit equivalent of Black Oak Arkansas? (shudders) Wishbone Ash on qualudes?

Nothing 'luded' about Status Quo. You have to listen to a lot more from them, particularly from the Lancaster/Coghlan-era. If anything, for some of those albums Rossi and Parfitt were on sulphate, as they say in the UK. "Big Fat Momma" from their double live LP in '77 or '78 just shreds on rhythm guitar.

On the other hand, Wishbone Ash, a band I also like, can accurately
be described as being 'luded' next to Status Quo. Or maybe just more interested in oozing and flowing than stomping. But for the most parts of their catalogs, there is not much overlap. Wishbone Ash were a twin guitar jam band which often arranged things off folk rock-like bases. The boogies in Wishbone Ash material, in the style a Quo heavy boogie (and actually Quo had a boogie style that was completely their own, built off the rhythm sections timekeeping and the twin Telecasters of Paritt and Rossi which gave it an attack no one else duplicates), come on a small set of records, and even then do not entirely fill these albums.

Quo was/is a boogie band and a singles band. After Coghlan and Lancaster were gone, they became much more pop. Last album I have from them, 'Heavy Traffic,' it's closest thing in the US would be Tom Petty. Quo had almost no impact in the United States and many of their later records were not released here. On the other hand, they sold an astronomical number of records everywhere else in the world, seemingly. In this respect, they're sort of like Slade. Even bigger than Slade in England, even less than Slade in the States.

The DVD of Quo at some thing called the "Anniversary Waltz" is also an eye and ear-opener. It has them coming to a gig in a celebrity filled train, all these semi-famous (unknown to Americans) British geezers waxing drunkenly on the band. And then there's the gig which has them still sounding like they're playing on methamphetamine, cramming a dozen songs or so, per block, intomedleys. "Railroad," "Hold Yer Back," "Whatever You Want," "Break the Rules," lots of zooming chug.

George Smith, Saturday, 23 April 2005 18:09 (fifteen years ago) link

thanks for the description, George. I guess I have "Matchstick Men" on a comp somewhere or another.

edd s hurt (ddduncan), Saturday, 23 April 2005 18:18 (fifteen years ago) link

"Matchstick Men" is what they're best known for in the States. Whenever I go into a store, I'm most likely to find an anthology that focuses on their Pye catalog, centered on "Matchstick Men" and the psychedelic early side.

Not everything they did for Pye was that twee, though, either. Toward the end of their run with the label they put out "Ma Kelly's Greasy Spoon," and "Dog of Two Head," the latter of which really begins to head in the no-nonsense head-down boogie direction. "Railroad" is the piledriver from it and "Something Goin' On In My Head" is also good. "Mean Girl" is another fine single from that period.

George Smith, Saturday, 23 April 2005 19:26 (fifteen years ago) link

**White dogshit, Spangles, Magpie with Jenny Hanley etc...**

Me too. Also Magpie with Susan Stranks!

George OTM about early-boogie Quo. They were excellent up until after the Sweet Caroline/Paper Plane/Down Down era. Even the odd later track is good - Mystery Song and Rain from 'Blue for You' are ace too.

There was a good pub rock thread a while back, I'll search for it.

Dr. C (Dr. C), Saturday, 23 April 2005 19:43 (fifteen years ago) link

Pub Rock

A good post from the music mole there.

Dr. C (Dr. C), Saturday, 23 April 2005 19:46 (fifteen years ago) link

George knows from Quo. I'm humbled.

m coleman (lovebug starski), Saturday, 23 April 2005 20:56 (fifteen years ago) link

Color me crazy, but I'd imagine the origins of Pub Rock are found in the Pub.

Alex in NYC (vassifer), Saturday, 23 April 2005 22:18 (fifteen years ago) link

so, wait, back to the topic not at hand: is it possible that snotty moore meant that oasis sound like slade's BALLADS? Like, you know, "Far Far Away" and the Christmas one? Maybe that would make at least a little more sense, now that I think of it, though I still don't hear how the singers sound remotely similar. Anyway, when I think of Slade, I think of the 90 percent or so of their catalog that was stomps, but is it true that the ballads were (and maybe still are, at Christmastime at least) more ubiquitous hits in England? Not that their ballads didn't stomp too; they kind of did. But usually when I think of Slade I forget the ballads ever existed; maybe that's part of the difference here?

xhuxk, Sunday, 24 April 2005 15:23 (fifteen years ago) link

would be funny to think that people were sitting in pubs listening to re-creations of Jack Teagarden in 1970, but maybe they were.

I've been in pubs in the last 5 years which had trad jazz bands.

Too many bits and pieces here but Chucks 'whitbread bland' typo is unintentionally prescient as whitbread is a brand of beer in the UK though Noel probably drinks Southern comfort and lemonade.

If you're looking to fine Slade in Oasis check out Stay young, which is a b-side somewhere, actually has a sweaty, joyful yob vibe to it rather than the mannered formalism they often peddle.

As for Quo, twelve gold bars is on of the great singles compilations ever but are still sneered at even now, Blur of course christened Oasis, Quoais as an attack on their supposed formulaic, unimaginative output. After Coghlan and Lancaster left quality nosedived precipitiously and it would be a brave man to defend their 80's and 90's output (live, might be a different matter). Nasty country influenced soft rock.

Billy Dods (Billy Dods), Monday, 25 April 2005 19:10 (fifteen years ago) link

more on blur vs oasis vs slade here:

How Brits hear Oasis and Blur (and Slade?) differently than Americans

xhuxk, Monday, 25 April 2005 19:16 (fifteen years ago) link

After Coghlan and Lancaster left quality nosedived precipitiously and it would be a brave man to defend their 80's and 90's output (live, might be a different matter). Nasty country influenced soft rock.

Agreed, on stage Quo appears to be not nearly as lame as things like "Thirsty Work," "In the Army Now," and "Famous In the Last Century" made them out to be. You gotta like medleys, though. The country-licks and soft delivery are way to the front. "Heavy Traffic," however, did make an attempt to put some boot back into the compositions.

George Smith, Monday, 25 April 2005 19:23 (fifteen years ago) link

what exactly does "trad" mean, Billy Dods? Dixieland, New-Orleans style stuff? I mean the only place you'd hear that in the States would probably be Preservation Hall, 100-year-old guys reaching for their dentures and half-lipping "Funky Butt" for some tourists.

edd s hurt (ddduncan), Monday, 25 April 2005 20:50 (fifteen years ago) link

To me Slade sound like they invented the Clash and AC/DC (and the 4 Skins and Kix and Girlschool) way more than they invented Oasis.

Those singalong choruses, diatonic melodies and rather loud vocals over loud guitars: A lot in common with Oasis for sure.

Slade were never as overly Beatlesque as Oasis, but there are moments. Listen to the middle-8 in "Merry Xmas Everybody", for instance: Certainly some highly Beatlesque harmonies in there.

Geir Hongro (GeirHong), Monday, 25 April 2005 20:52 (fifteen years ago) link

what exactly does "trad" mean, Billy Dods? Dixieland, New-Orleans style stuff?

Exactly. Although, Brit jazz from the 60's is currently quite hip with Tubby Hayes, Evan Parker, Mike Westbrook etc being more popular now than at any time since then. What was really popular was Trad jazz which was enormously popular in the early 60's with Humphrey Lyttleton, Temperance Seven, George Melly, and it still has it's adherents, even today.

Billy Dods (Billy Dods), Monday, 25 April 2005 21:09 (fifteen years ago) link

> rather loud vocals over loud guitars<

again, where are all these mysterious "loud guitars" in oasis songs??

xhuxk, Monday, 25 April 2005 21:44 (fifteen years ago) link

nice boys from the country house in the village green -- whatever that means; we don't have those here

Yes we do! There are village greens all over Connecticut and Massachusetts. Or are you saying that they only produce nasty boys?

"Pictures of Matchstick Men" was not twee in its time; the guitar riff was far too piercing and the overall sound too crunching. Of course, taking out of context you can decide that "I Can See for Miles" was twee and "Get Off Of My Cloud" was pale and "Ticket to Ride" was dinky, but that just means you're listening with ears conditioned by several decades of push-button thumpery; one needs to recondition one's ears backwards to hear the crunch.

Frank Kogan (Frank Kogan), Thursday, 28 April 2005 19:43 (fifteen years ago) link

By the way, I quite like the Elizabeth McQueen LP; my review of it is sitting in the Voice barrel and should float to the surface in a month or two.

Here's a guess about pub rock: It pretended to be punk's sensible sibling, or a corrective to arena rock, but really, it was glam's timid kid brother, boys who liked their girl pop but who wanted to come off as regular boyrockers while playing it.

Mark Sinker and I had a twenty email interchange on pub rock recently; maybe Mark will want to post some of it when he's back in circulation.

Frank Kogan (Frank Kogan), Thursday, 28 April 2005 19:52 (fifteen years ago) link

Also, Slade didn't start as skinheads. That was a calculated commercial move suggested by manager Chas Chandler.

Frank Kogan (Frank Kogan), Thursday, 28 April 2005 19:57 (fifteen years ago) link

glam's timid sibling? I dunno, I guess it is in the sense of it being a variant of the back-to-the-'50s thing happening around 1970. Anyway, what is the emblematic pub-rock record? "Nervous on the Road" is the one I think of, but maybe there's something else better?

edd s hurt (ddduncan), Thursday, 28 April 2005 20:22 (fifteen years ago) link

again, where are all these mysterious "loud guitars" in oasis songs??

-- xhuxk

"Acquiesce"
"Hello"
"Rock and Roll Star"
"Columbia"

57 7th (calstars), Thursday, 28 April 2005 20:34 (fifteen years ago) link

Guitar tone or not, "Pictures of Matchstick Men" was definitely bubblegum psychedelia. Status Quo covered the Lemon Pipers, Bee Gees, and Tommy Roe on their first album.

Tim Ellison (Tim Ellison), Thursday, 28 April 2005 20:53 (fifteen years ago) link

"Acquiesce"
"Hello"
"Rock and Roll Star"
"Columbia"

And not only back then. You find them in more recent stuff such as "I Can See a Liar" and "The Hindu Times" too.

Geir Hongro (GeirHong), Thursday, 28 April 2005 21:26 (fifteen years ago) link

I don't hear the slightest hint of Slade in the Clash and very little in AC/DC (perhaps 'Alive', but not the singles).

I certainly do hear Slade in the singalong choruses of "You Shook Me All Night Long" and "Back In Black"

Geir Hongro (GeirHong), Thursday, 28 April 2005 21:28 (fifteen years ago) link

fifteen years pass...

Good little history lesson here:

https://pleasekillme.com/pub-rock-wilko-johnson/

Andy the Grasshopper, Tuesday, 13 October 2020 22:53 (two weeks ago) link

> rather loud vocals over loud guitars<again, where are all these mysterious "loud guitars" in oasis songs??


is this sheer buffoonery or some rhetorical attempt to tease out what it meant by “loud”?

brimstead, Tuesday, 13 October 2020 23:09 (two weeks ago) link

Some excellent reading on this thread. I started listening to Slade when they "stormed" America, and played Midnight Special or Don Kirshner's Rock Concert or summat, and a friend of mine, half-English, and maybe a native (Dad was stationed there), said. "Those guys are never gonna make it, they're too English." Looks like he waw right. But the Clash, who of course did have US hits (ditto Slade, but only as 80s covers; another friend saw them back over here then, when they lip-synched or sang live but to a backing tape, either way didn't go too well), the Clash did seem maybe influenced image-wise: their Angels With Dirty Faces shtick went with Slade as singing chimneysweeps (maybe also pre-Village People, with the guy in the glam suit, Noddy in his own gear etc.

dow, Tuesday, 13 October 2020 23:15 (two weeks ago) link

Slade's "Run Runaway" was a bit of a US hit, right? maybe their only one.

Andy the Grasshopper, Tuesday, 13 October 2020 23:20 (two weeks ago) link

*was* right.
Don't remember an American hit, hope you're right!
I heard the Elizabeth McQueen covers album referenced by threadstarter, back when it first came out. Wasn't that into her presentation (seems like she's since been more effective with Asleep At The Wheel, who come to think of it are somewhat like American pub rock re their mix of western swing and other roots traditions, covers and originals, with some originals). But I was intrigued by some of McQ's pub rock selections, incl. Ducks Deluxe originals. I still want to check them out, and Kilburn High Roads too, because Ian Dury.
Graham Parker & The Rumour sound kind of post-pub; he faded away after ditching them, but I a late 70s album they made without him kept me listening.

dow, Tuesday, 13 October 2020 23:25 (two weeks ago) link

"Post-Pub" is golden..

Interesting that this old thread was hijacked into a discussion of Slade in the first place, who were essentially glitter/arena (after the skinhead phase) and everything pub rock was supposed to be in opposition to. But as Wilko argues in that piece I linked to, there never was a definitive pub "sound" per se; it's just that the bands happen to play in pubs.

I always thought Huey Lewis's "Workin' for a Livin'" was sort of post-pub... he was in Clover, after all. When I learned they backed Elvis on My Aim is True I tracked some down and found it really, really unlikeable.

Andy the Grasshopper, Tuesday, 13 October 2020 23:42 (two weeks ago) link

Glad I missed that, thanks for the warning.
But pub rock seems def. based on hearty bar appeal, but also they were trying to balance that with something more: not just any old covers, or any old originals; it had to all fit together in a signature sound, to develop their own following, without gettin too wierd.
Which reminds me, in the 70s Consumer Guide capsules stashed on xgau's site, he compares Duck Deluxe, at least in approach, if not actual sound, to Commander Cody and the Lost Planet Airmen, whose covers and originals attracted quite a social mix, suits and headz and geezers and more, in early 70s Austin, even before they started having albums released (Well, starting waaay before, if you count the first decade in Ann Arbor, 'til they finally exhausted the possibilities of being professional students etc., jumped to Berkeley and became barriffic favorites there, and an opening act for the Dead, who were getting back to being more collegetown-proto-pub-rootsy themselves, esp. when not jamming)

dow, Wednesday, 14 October 2020 00:06 (two weeks ago) link


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