Chitlin Circuit Double-entendre -filled Soul 2004 (and onward) Theodis Ealey's "Stand Up In It" is a song of the year

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I've heard Theodis Easley's single "Stand Up In It" on my local DC Pacifica station's Saturday afternoon blues and soul show and I just read that it has charted in Billboard's R & B sales charts. Call 'em formulaic and retro if you wish, but I like these double-entendre-filled soul-blues songs(by the likes of Clarence Carter, Marvin Sease, Bobby Rush and others) and checking out such performers live. Has anyone heard Theodis' 2004 cd (which includes a song called "All My Baby Left Me Was A Note, My Guitar & A Cookie Jar") ? Also, how are the 2004 efforts by Charles Wilson, Tad Robinson, Betty Lavette, and Mavis Staples?

steve-k, Wednesday, 5 January 2005 05:25 (fifteen years ago) link

I need to get back to Lamont's in Pomonkey, Maryland, around 35 minutes south of Washington D.C. The fried chicken's not that great, but it's a nice comfy place for soul-blues (without any blooz-rock thank you very much). I bet Sunday night regulars Jim Bennett & Lady Mary are doing a cover of "Stand Up In It" by now...

steve-k, Wednesday, 5 January 2005 05:30 (fifteen years ago) link

I wonder if Malaco label acts tour much out of the East Coast? I don't know what label Easley's on.

steve-k, Wednesday, 5 January 2005 14:16 (fifteen years ago) link

I should have put Easley's song in my P & J Voice poll ballot. How did I forget? It's as good as any of the hiphop, pop, and dancehall I listed. It's also as good if not better than much of the material on that Kompakt 100 cd or the Arcade Fire or Ghostface or Gretchen Wilson cds.

steve-k, Wednesday, 5 January 2005 15:20 (fifteen years ago) link

( hmmmm, can bluesy soul made by middle-aged African-Americans cross over in 2005 to other audiences--urban radio, Pitchfork readers, the blogosphere....)

steve-k, Wednesday, 5 January 2005 15:27 (fifteen years ago) link

Hurtt, Wolk, Blount, Haibun, Matos to thread...

steve-k, Wednesday, 5 January 2005 16:42 (fifteen years ago) link

I like the Bettye Lavette record a lot, Mavis Staples a little less so. Bluesy soul/Malaco releases tend to be a bit patchy IMO, but there are some excellent tracks on both - search Bettye's "Through The Winter." Also check out Willie Walker, who recorded on Goldwax in the 60's and has a really nice new CD, "Right Where I Belong."

Daniel Peterson (polkaholic), Wednesday, 5 January 2005 17:19 (fifteen years ago) link

I've been meaning to check out Lavette. She seems to have gotten a bit of press from outside the Living Blues magazine/blues society newsletters/soul fanatics inner circle. I'll check for Walker as well.

steve-k, Wednesday, 5 January 2005 18:40 (fifteen years ago) link

New Year's pledge: I need to keep up better with this genre, and write about it myself.

steve-k, Thursday, 6 January 2005 13:54 (fifteen years ago) link

one month passes...
While it's not bluesy-soul, I saw the Stylistics, Chi-lites, Delfonics, Harold Melvin's Blue Notes, Cuba Gooding Sr., and Ted Mills from Blue Magic last night at Constitution Hall in DC. Early 70s lush soul still sounds good, even if many of the original performers are long gone.

Steve-k (Steve K), Saturday, 19 February 2005 19:19 (fifteen years ago) link

essential chess/stax/soul

steve-k, Saturday, 19 February 2005 22:28 (fifteen years ago) link

I understand that Willie Walker & the Butanes play out a bit in Minneapolis and St. Paul.

steve-k, Saturday, 19 February 2005 22:36 (fifteen years ago) link

Mavis Staples was ok but not quite as impressive as I hoped she'd be on that gospel segment on the Grammys with Kanye West and the Blind Boys of Alabama.

steve-k, Sunday, 20 February 2005 20:31 (fifteen years ago) link

I have only heard "Hard Times Come Again No More" by Mavis. She was also just about the best thing on the '04 tribute to Johnny Paycheck. I keep hearing about the LaVette. But shame on me, being a fan of candy lickers and other southern-fried soulsters, I seem to have missed Theodis Easley. Must correct that, looks like.

edd s hurt (ddduncan), Monday, 21 February 2005 02:44 (fifteen years ago) link

I only know that Easley song they play on the Saturday afternoon WPFW 89.3 radio show, but it's a good one. I'm gonna use this thread as the all-purpose thread for soul and candy-licker style soul.

So I failed to mention above that at that 70s Soul Jam event at Constitution Hall in DC, me and the gf were like 2 of the 5 white people there in a crowd of 3,000 age 45 and up black people. I figured that 30 years after their prime the Stylistics would appeal to oh, non-music fanatic regular joe white folks who listen to Motown, but I guess not. It was a pretty pricey ticket. Who cares, I guess. Ted Mills and the current version of the Stylistics sounded great(beautiful falsettos), and I love that in unison choreographed footwork and hand motion dancing.

steve-k (Steve K), Monday, 21 February 2005 23:08 (fifteen years ago) link

bump

steve-k (Steve K), Tuesday, 22 February 2005 04:17 (fifteen years ago) link

two months pass...
I finally picked up the latest Denise Lasalle. While a tad predictable, it's pretty nice.

Steve K (Steve K), Sunday, 24 April 2005 18:08 (fourteen years ago) link

Somebody please YSI this "Stand Up In It" song.

Mr. Snrub (Mr. Snrub), Sunday, 24 April 2005 19:30 (fourteen years ago) link

Audio CD (March 30, 2004)

Original Release Date: March 30, 2004

Label: Ifgam Records

steve-k, Sunday, 24 April 2005 19:59 (fourteen years ago) link

Amazon US has a sample...

steve-k, Sunday, 24 April 2005 20:05 (fourteen years ago) link

bump.

I can't seem to get the Sharon Jones & the Dap Kings supporters(M. Matos, D. Wolk, others) to bite at any of this stuff.

I guess I need to get hish-speed internet and start posting mp3s and yousendit stuff.

steve-k, Monday, 25 April 2005 12:22 (fourteen years ago) link

Part-time freelancer me's gotta find the time to write about this stuff, since the fulltimers don't seem to know about it, or care.

steve-k, Monday, 25 April 2005 14:48 (fourteen years ago) link

I saw the Dells and Bobby Womack Friday night at the Showplace Arena in Maryland, near DC. I got there late and unfortunately missed the Intruders("Cowboys to Girls") and most of Heatwave. There were about 2,500 people there. Other than one 20-something white guy with a black date, I was the only other non-African American in the crowd. I continue to find this odd (see my post above about the crowd at the 70s Soul Jam). The Dells were very good, if not quite as great as when I saw them years ago at Carter Barron in D.C.

steve-k, Monday, 9 May 2005 14:06 (fourteen years ago) link

From Monday May 9th Washington Post Style C5 (washingtonpost.com)

The Dells have been around a long, long time. While many acts on the oldies circuit are lucky to have one original member, the Dells have four and haven't had a membership change since 1960. Friday night at the Showplace Arena in Upper Marlboro, this soul harmony quintet, formed in 1953, exhibited the chemistry that comes from being together for decades.

Emphasizing their R&B hits from the late '60s and early '70s, baritone Marvin Junior and falsetto/tenor Johnny Carter exchanged leads, supported by the shared notes of the three other members and the sweet tones of their horns- and piano-led big band. Like veteran basketball stars, these inductees of the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame no longer dazzle at will, but their skills remain at a high level and they can turn on that special magic periodically.

On "The Love We Had (Stays on My Mind)," Junior shifted on a dime from breathy whisper to powerhouse gospel-rooted cry in a manner that was stunning both technically and emotionally. "Stay in My Corner" showcased Carter's still-amazing ability in the high range. These hits also demonstrated Carter and Junior's gymnastic abilities to stretch out notes, and the rest of the combo's exquisite tunefulness.

Opener Bobby Womack has had quite a musical life -- teenage gospel singer, guitarist with Sam Cooke, Wilson Pickett and Sly Stone, pal of the Rolling Stones and successful solo artist off and on from the '60s through the '80s. Unfortunately, he left the strumming to a band mate, and either rushed through his hits or languidly lagged behind the beat. His voice retains a distinctive bittersweet feel, but his renditions of "Across 110th Street," "Harry Hippie" and "If You Think You're Lonely Now" lacked the melancholy passion of his studio versions.


-- Steve Kiviat

steve-k, Monday, 9 May 2005 14:10 (fourteen years ago) link

I really like "Grown Folks Party" by the Problem Solvas (I think). It's driving r and b/soul w/ a small touch of blues. It's getting radio airplay in the states from the same folks who play Theodis Easley. It has a synth on it. It's not going for that Sharon Jones retro thing, though it is retro in its own way.

steve-k, Monday, 9 May 2005 14:44 (fourteen years ago) link

six months pass...
revive.

Saturday afternoon the Gator on WPFW 89.3 in DC (and online when it is working) keeps playing great new double-entendre filled Souterhn soul.

Also, I finally got the new Bettye LaVette--I've Got My Own Hell to Raise, and am impressed. I was worried that the Joe Henry production and the choice of songs (non-soul women country and folkies plus Fiona Apple & Sinead O'Connor) would be too 'tasteful', but it is not.

curmudgeon, Monday, 28 November 2005 15:52 (fourteen years ago) link

Lavette's gonna be at the State Theatre in Falls Church, outside DC on Thursday, and Aaron Neville's gonna be at the Birchmere in Alexandria, Virginia that night. Sadly, I can not make either event.

Curmudgeon Steve (Steve K), Tuesday, 29 November 2005 02:14 (fourteen years ago) link

http://soulandbluesreport.com/SouthernSoulChart.html
1
Can't Nobody Do Me
Lenny Williams
Universal

3
2
Going Crazy
Willie Clayton
Malaco

2
3
Stroke It Easy
Tazz
Mardi Gras

6
4
The Blacker The Berry
Chairman OTB
Surfside

5
5
Inseparable
Lorenzo Owens
B-Town

4
6
Dance Like You're Naked
Lee Fields
BDA

9
7
Ease On Down In The Bed
Lee Shot Williams
Ecko

7
8
Baby, I've Changed
Floyd Taylor
Malaco

8
9
Ten Toes Up
J Diamond Washington
2Brothers

10
10
Cheating & Lying
T. K. Soul
Soulful

The Top 25 Chart is calculated on a formula based on reports from our reporting panel of Radio Stations, Clubs, & Retail Stores

Curmudgeon Steve (Steve K), Tuesday, 29 November 2005 02:16 (fourteen years ago) link

two weeks pass...
The Gator on WPFW 89.3 (Pacifica station that is also online) just played "Slap That Booty" by Gary Brown and "Junk in the Crunk" by David Brinston. Raunchy great recent stuff that gets no UK or US media attention outside of some obscure newsletters and Southern US radio stations.

Curmudgeon Steve (Steve K), Saturday, 17 December 2005 19:09 (fourteen years ago) link

More Gator faves:

3. Big G Stomp, Big G
CD: Love on the Run, Bigsounds.com

4. Same Girl, Hardway Connection
CD: Hot Ticket, WILBE Records

5. Come On and Dance With Me, Hardway Connection
CD: Hot Ticket, WILBE Records

6. Brand New Dance, Jesse Yawn
CD: Forever More, Houseday Music

7. Hootchie Dance, Barbara Carr
CD: Stroke It, ECKO Records

8. I Came to Party, Monique Ford
CD: Get a Maid, Total Smash Music

9. The After Party, Gridloc Band
CD: Gridloc Band, (301)808-7272

10. Sweet Man of Mine, E.C. Scott
CD: Hard Act to Follow, Blind Pig Records

11.Was It Me, Big G
CD: Love on the Run, BigSounds.com, (804)615-2196

12. Touching Me, Lynn White
CD: Touching Me, (901)398-4948

13. Live in Freak, Jim Bennett & Lady Mary & the Unique Creation Band
CD: One More Go Round, (301)753-4335

14. A Woman Needs Money, Denise LaSalle
CD: Wanted, ECKO Records

15. I Don’t Come Cheap, Jim Bennett & Lady Mary & the Unique Creation Band
CD: One More Go Round, (301)753-4335

curmudgeon (Steve K), Saturday, 17 December 2005 19:12 (fourteen years ago) link

D.J. Freight Train also plays this stuff:

http://freighttrainsblockparty.com/index.html

Also I see that it was Carl Marshall, not the Problem Solvas, who did "Ain't No Party(Like a Grown Folks Party)" It came out in Nov. '04 on his Takin it to a higher level cd

Curmudgeon Steve (Steve K), Saturday, 17 December 2005 19:28 (fourteen years ago) link

i don't like that Lavette album. sounds like they threw her into a phone booth for some sorta cut-rate rick rubin vibe. at least they didn't have her cover marilyn manson.

scott seward (scott seward), Saturday, 17 December 2005 20:26 (fourteen years ago) link

i've been having a good time listening to all the ichiban records i bought from 1990/1992. some are great. some are bad. some are soul. some are blues. all very local and downhome. sorry, not recent. but they fit this thread. records by:

pic & bill
lv johnson
yvonne jackson
clarence carter
travis haddix
legendary blues band
john mooney
backtrack blues band
raful neil
bob margolin
troy turner
johnny sansone
the dells
artie "blues boy" white
roshell anderson
chick willis
charles wilson
nappy brown
trudy lynn
jerry mccain
dicky williams
joe beard
tommy tate
ruby andrews
prince philip mitchell
tom principato
smokehouse
drink small
noble "thin man" watts
gary b.b.coleman
david dee
sonny rhodes


scott seward (scott seward), Saturday, 17 December 2005 20:31 (fourteen years ago) link

three weeks pass...
Scott, I've liked the Chick Willis stuff I've heard. Have you checked out the record you got by him?

Also, I think the below is the link for an online station that streams current Southern double-entendre filled soul

http://alldownsouth.tripod.com/

curmudgeon, Wednesday, 11 January 2006 15:19 (fourteen years ago) link

At soulandbluesreport.com

The 4th Annual Best Southern Soul

Please Vote For Your Favorite Southern Soul Performers Of The Year

Vote On Our Special Page ... The Funky's 2005 ... Results Announced Jan 16, 2006,

Vote Often


I like the "vote often"

curmudgeon, Wednesday, 11 January 2006 15:22 (fourteen years ago) link

I thought I'd hate the Lavette because of the approach taken--have her sing lots of songs by middlebrow performers popular with NPR listeners(Rick Rubin and Joe Henry)--but I still do like it. The press kit with the release says she picked the songs from a selection provided by her hubby and the folks at Anti(who did the same with Solomon Burke). I want to check out her release from a few years ago and see how she sounds on that.

She gets virtually no airplay on the soul radio show in DC.

curmudgeon, Wednesday, 11 January 2006 15:28 (fourteen years ago) link

I do not know if producers Rubin and Henry listen to NPR, but their approach generates NPR attention is what I mean! But as I said upthread I think Lavette's voice cuts through no matter what, and I bet the Southern soul stations who like the raw double-entendre stuff might like it if Anti was smart enough to market it to them as well.

curmudgeon, Wednesday, 11 January 2006 15:34 (fourteen years ago) link

http://www.soulandbluesreport.com/Page4.html

curmudgeon, Wednesday, 11 January 2006 15:44 (fourteen years ago) link

four months pass...
Still no articles by Harvell, Finney, or Sherburne on contemporary Southern Soul in Pitchfork!

The SOULANDBLUESREPORT TOP 25
May 19, 2006 http://www.soulandbluesreport.com/top%2025.html


Mel Waiters
Willie Clayton
Bobby Rush
Vick Allen
J Blackfoot
Renea Mitchell
Sir Charles Jones
Lenny Williams
Donnie Ray
Ms. Monique
Carl Simms
Floyd Taylor
Team Airplay All Stars
Chairmen Of The Board
Lorraine Turner
Miz B
Wendell B.
Ms. Jody
Sheba Potts-Wright
Lacee'
Lorraine Turner
William Bell
Theodis Ealey
Bob Steele
Chairmen Of The Board
NEW SOUTHERN SOUL THIS WEEK
SBR's Top 25 Is Calculated On Reports From Our Panel Of Radio Stations,Clubs, & Syndicated Shows

curmudgeon (DC Steve), Monday, 5 June 2006 03:20 (thirteen years ago) link

Just got Marvin Sease's 2005 Malaco effort-Live with the Candy Licker. His schtick (spelling?) is kinda tired, but he's got a nice church-groomed timbre and a solid horns and more band with him. He's gonna be performing with Chick "Stoop Down Baby" Willis, Roy C., Jim Bennett & Lady Mary, and Floyd Haywood (once with the Hardway Connection)at Lamonts in Pomonkey, Maryland, south of DC on Saturday June 10th.

curmudgeon (DC Steve), Monday, 5 June 2006 12:10 (thirteen years ago) link

three weeks pass...
I missed Captain Fly’s DC Soul revue at Carter Barron tonight(see the writeup in the Washington Post weekend section by Richard Harrington). In recent weeks I missed Eddie & Denise with Theotis Easley at Lamont’s, I missed Marvin the Candylicker Sease at Lamonts. I missed Gator Day at Lamonts. Work and life are getting in the way of chitlin circuit soul.

So on Saturday July 15th Denise Lasalle is at Lamonts, and Captain Fly has a revue that night at Fort Dupont Park:
WPFW Night "D.C. Juke Box Review" featuring Al Johnson, William
DeVaughn, Sir Joe Quarterman, Mark Green & Captain Fly & Friends.
Opening: Hardway Connection

I need to try to make one of these events, or surely, I will be kicked out of the blue-eyed soul club.

curmudgeon (DC Steve), Saturday, 1 July 2006 04:12 (thirteen years ago) link

one month passes...
So the Denise Lasalle show got postponed to today, and I'm gonna miss it. For shame. Just heard her song "Dirty Old Woman" on WPFW 89.3 (and online). Lee Fields, who's been in Europe for awhile, is back and he's performing there as well.

I picked up the recent Mel Waiters cd. Not bad.

curmudgeon (DC Steve), Saturday, 26 August 2006 18:26 (thirteen years ago) link

two months pass...
The Waiters cd is actually really nice.

curmudgeon (DC Steve), Sunday, 19 November 2006 20:15 (thirteen years ago) link

lotsa stuff from rolling country thread, earlier this year:

Listening to a pile of Southern soul discovered via CD-baby channels. The album by a jowly guy named Jimmy Taylor leans toward the blues end of things (with lady backup vocals not far from the ones on last year's Bobby Bare album); the EP by the lady named Candis Palmer ("All Men Ain't Dawgs,* since some are electric boogie dawgs apparently) leans toward the disco end; the single by Harold, "Chill Step Party," is steppin' music. He mentions Milwaukee, Chitown, Harlem, and Atlanta in it. More fun than R. Kelly, as far as I'm concerned, but mainly all this stuff obviously has a connection to county music too. (and though candis palmer is happy to have found a man who is not a dawg, jimmy taylor insists that when women say they're looking for a good man, they're lying. really, he says, they're looking for a fool.) (apparently the kinda fool who will let her spend all his money.) (he also directly quotes zz hill's "cheating in the next room in one of his songs.) (he's from alabama; I don't know where candis or harold are from. they're not actually on cdbaby.com per se, but i was sent their cds in the same package that the jimmy taylor CD came in.) jimmy taylor on his album is totally paranoid, and in just about every song he's either cheating or being cheated on or both, and as i said, he seems fully convinced that his woman is going to put him in the poor house (where, in real life, for all i know, he may already be.) in "you're busted" he hires a private detective to follow her around, and gets a photo of her cheating. "love catcher" has a pretty good sax solo. and though some songs sound more blues to me than soul, a couple (like "all i want is you") still veer more toward disco than anybody in country music has, i think, even shannon brown on her new album.
candis palmer, as i said, gets even more disco, but her disco is maybe 1975 where taylor's is 1973. (i think i wrote on the '05 thread that shannon brown's disco sounded 1979, but maybe that was hyperbole; i'm not sure. these two soul singers FEEL more disco.) but even at her most disco, in a song called "don't let someone else come and jingle my bell" or something, palmer gets backed by HARD blues guitar riffs, so the music really rocks. if i had to compare her vocal style to anybody, it'd be the staple singers in "i'll take you there."

-- xhuxk (xedd...), January 28th, 2006


glamorous bertha payne, *bedroom offer* EP: southern country soul millie jackson style (i.e., as many parts talked as sung, many of 'em bawdy), from memphis, via cdbaby.com. starts with a good riddance song where glamorous bertha (who on the cd cover is a big girl in her red dress with a red glass of wine) tells you "i don't need your face in my face" so "go away like a bad day" and "you might as well pack your rags." then the title track, which is not about her bedroom offer to him but the other way around, which offer she says isn't enough and the two backup singers (favorite artists: denise lasalle, mary j blige) chorus "bang! bang!" but by song's end glamorous bertha is saying "i need a man who will love me all night long. are you qualified? if not, get off the pot!" then one where she promises to shake it and break it (and maybe hang it on the wall) and she tells "all you womens with big elephant ears" that with her man every day is pay day. then supposedly "part two" of the same song, which means same slinky rhythm track as part one but now with sexy breathy pillow talk all over the top where bertha tells you to lift up her skirt. then finally another good riddance song, this one a tough and funky blues, where he leaves her with a sink full of dishes in a "one-room [some word i can't make out]", hence the best dishwashing song since ray parker jr's "bad boy" if not anita ward's "ring my bell." also she brings him food in bed, which means this might also be a breakfast breakup song in the tradition of the 5th dimension's "one less bell to answer" and karyn white's "superwoman." five songs total, but two around 4:00, three around 4:25, which means glamorous bertha takes her time and surely deserves a lover with a slow hand.

-- xhuxk (xedd...), February 23rd, 2006.

the legendary moody scott, *simply moody: we gotta bust outta the ghetto*: more cdbaby southern soul, from louisiana. cover has moody, a dapper old guy seemingly in his 60s, in front of a rundown rural shack; interesting, since "ghettos" are usually assumed to be urban, right? first track "bustin out of the ghetto" is a sort of james brown rip, five minutes long, where moody as i recall reels off some towns in the south train conducter style (am i imagining this? i THINK he did that, anyway) and ends singing "america america god grant his grace on thee." then he covers tyrone davis's great "can i change my mind," my favorite track. and from there the more soul oriented stuff ("last two dollars," the misspelled cheated-on song "one man's hppiness" which for some reason makes me think of billy stewart sitting in the park even though billy had a high voice and moody really doesn't, "something you got baby") is more likeable, to me, than the more blatantly blues stuff, but then again i always think that. both the soul and blues are generic, i suppose; with the soul i don't mind. best song title: "annie mae cafe." and the closer "son of a southern man" starts with moody telling his guitarist "tattoo" suarez ("my man from argentina") about his grandpa drinking corn liquor and singing "downhome blues". so yeah, country for sure.
-- xhuxk (xedd...), March 11th, 2006.


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He does get urban and/or urbane once, though -- a nice slinky silk-shirt early '80s style quiet storm soul croon called "The Best of Me." (Not sure if any songs other than the Tyrone Davis are covers. "Last Two Dollars" and "Annie Mae Cafe" are writing-credited to one George Jackson; wasn't there a soul singer of that name once? But if so, I never heard him, though.)
-- xhuxk (xedd...), March 11th, 2006.


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"something you got baby" wouldn't be chris kenner's "something you got" would it? since moody's from louisiana...and yeah, george jackson (I'm assuming it's the same guy--I don't know "annie mae cafe") wrote z.z. hill's "down home blues" and a lot of stuff for candi staton, clarence carter, pickett, james carr; a memphis guy who later worked for malaco and wrote for all them: johnnie taylor, latimore, shirley brown, bobby bland...
enjoying jace everett, so far. it's quite a collection of somewhat off-the-wall guitar effects, interesting guitar chromatics (as in the first song), definitely a '70s pop thing happening; and in my mode of concurrent listening (lately it's been dusty springfield/the latest numero group comp of obscure '70s female singers/the new, beautiful nara leão bossa "nara '67"; and jace/radney foster/jessi colter, partly because they all have cool first names, I guess) I notice that both radney and jace hark back to stiff records, which I find interesting.

xps

-- edd s hurt (eddshur...), March 11th, 2006.

George Jackson was an occasional great old soul singer on Goldwax then Hi, and kind of a house writer at both. I'll try to remember tomorrow (just in from a party, and why I'm doing this rather than going straight to bet I've no idea) to YSI his absolutely magnificent Aretha, Sing One For Me. He was among the greatest writers in southern soul - he wrote for Ann Peebles, O.V. Wright, Otis Clay, James Carr, Clarence Carter, Etta James, Denise LaSalle, Wilson Pickett, Candi Staton and even wrote the Osmonds' first hit!
-- Martin Skidmore (lonewolf.cu...), March 12th, 2006.


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if I'm not mistaken, Alvin Robinson recorded for AFO (All for One), a New Orleans label of the '60s that Harold Battiste started; house band included Toussaint and Red Tyler. And he had a hit with Kenner's "Something You Got" (which was later covered by lots of folks, including Bobby Womack, who did a reggae remake on his "Safety Zone" LP in the mid-'70s. Alvin Robinson also recorded for Leiber and Stoller at Red Bird in New York, and did a real classic called "Down Home Girl."
I gotta get that Moody Scott record.

-- edd s hurt (eddshur...), March 12th, 2006.

That YSI:
George Jackson - Aretha, Sing One For Me
It'd be in my top 100 favourite singles ever, I think.

-- Martin Skidmore (lonewolf.cu...), March 12th, 2006.


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>I gotta get that Moody Scott record.<
I have an extra copy, Edd! I'll send it to you.

-- xhuxk (xedd...), March 12th, 2006.


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great! thanks Chuck!

-- edd s hurt (eddshur...), March 12th, 2006.


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>I don't know anything much about Moody Scott, just a handful of tracks, <
So Martin, did Moody have regional hits or something? I never heard of him before I saw his cdbaby page, and haven't really taken time to research him. I'm surprised you even heard of him!

-- xhuxk (xedd...), March 12th, 2006.

I don't know, Chuck, but bear in mind that I've been a huge fan of soul for a long time, and do know quite a lot about it (though not as much as Eddie, I'm pretty sure). The odd track does get on compilations of one sort or another, which suggests that Moody isn't incredibly obscure - but I don't even know exactly where he worked or anything, so he isn't famous either, clearly.
-- Martin Skidmore (lonewolf.cu...), March 12th, 2006.

also really liking irma thomas's *after the rain* on rounder, the "rain" obviously being katrina, though i kind of hate the mooshy shelter-from-storm piano ballad the album ends with though i do hope it provides solace to new orleans. what i love so far is "flowers" (soul about flowers on roadsides after car crashes, with a sound that i swear reminds me of "uncle tom's cabin" by warrant), "make me a pallet on the floor" (cheating with a painter, wow), "till i can't take it anymore" (country music in a soul voice, about how "you work your thing so well/I dream of heaven and live here in hell"), "these honey dos" (vampy bawdy boogie woogie where the honey dos are at first temptations but wind up also being about manners like please and thank you), and "stone survivor" (which is just plain funky).

-- xhuxk (xedd...), May 5th, 2006.

And Irma also does an extremely gorgeous version of "I Count the Tears" (the "na-na-na-na-na-na late at night" song) by the Drifters..
-- xhxuk (xedd...), May 5th, 2006.


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And she also does "Another Man Done Gone," a trad blues tune I swear I've heard hundreds of times by some huge classic rock group (Creem? Zep? the Allmans? somebody...), though no classic rock groups seem to be listed on AMG as doing it, so maybe whoever did it (which will probably hit me as really obvious once I found out) did it under a different title or something, or maybe with different words? (Also, I'm thinking now that maybe "These Honey Dos" and "Stone Survivor" and the palette one aren't quite at the level of the Warrant one and the country one and the Drifters one, but they're close.) -- xhuxk (xedd...), May 5th, 2006.

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

also liking (speaking of southern soul) *candy licker: the sex & soul of marvin sease* (jive/legacy) not all of which concerns muff diving, and at least "hoochie mama" of which has zapp-style robot-funk freakazoids reciting the names of several of the united states.

-- xhuxk (fakemai...), June 12th, 2006.

*Most of the Marvin Sease album is gloppy ballads which aren't all that good, but some of it is kinda fun. (The first track is awful though.)

-- Haikunym (zinogu...), June 13th, 2006.


--------------------------------------------------------------------------------


Marvin Sease CD is way less gloppy and ballady than Matt suggests (or maybe I just have a higher glop tolerance than he does; see also the Alan Bros!); most of it gets a good '70s smooth-jazzy funk disco groove going. And lots of the songs have pre-old-school "raps" (i.e., talking as singing, sometimes like a preacher's sermon) in them, which are really fun. And sure, the opening track "Do You Want a Licker?" is awful if you want it to be, but it's just too silly to complain about; ditto the other bookend, a five-minute live "Candy Licker 2005." Also, the ballads are pretty good, for the most part. "Don't Forget to Tell On You" sounds kind of like "Tell it Like It Is." But my favorite cuts are probably "I'm Mr Jody," the backdoor man song that starts with an ominous phone call, and the 12-step fix-your-life number "I Gotta Clean Up." (Has anybody ever written a good essay about Jody? He's the guy back on the block who's having sex to your girl while you're in the Army, and I get the idea he shows up in lots of Southern soul songs: Doesn't Johnnie Taylor have one about him, too*? As do, I would assume, other folks.)

* - yep, I just checked Whitburn: "Jody's Got Your Girl and Gone," went to number 28 in 1971. (Hey, sounds like a good EMP proposal!)

-- xhuxk (xhux...), June 14th, 2006.


--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

having sex WITH (or) making love TO.
and courtesy of HIS new truck.
).

-- xhuxk (fakemai...), June 14th, 2006.


--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Johnnie Taylor was the king of Jody songs. "Standing In for Jody" and "Jody's Got Your Girl and Gone" are just two; I mean every song he does is kind of about Jody-ism in some way or another. I am a nut for Johnnie Taylor (I like Johnny Taylor a lot, too, and Ted Taylor, the Louisiana soul singer, is also excellent--so I think an EMP paper on the Sooper Taylors would be good!!), and Taylor is also the king of fucking-around songs. There are these nifty new Stax reissues that includes stuff by Frederick Knight, the Dramatics, etc., and if you ask me one of the very best Stax albums-as-albums is Johnnie's "Who's Making Love," which is the typical collection of singles but which really has variety and which totally hangs together. "Hold On This Time" has a great Cropper riff, cubist guitar, and "Woman Across the River" is one of the best Stax blues ever.
I only know the older, cunnilingual and happy to oblige, ma'am, Marvin Sease stuff--he's really good. "Marvin Sease" on London from late '80s is a good 'un. One of those artists who've been working the I-55 corridor from Memphis to the Louisiana border, forever.

-- edd s hurt (eddshur...), June 14th, 2006.


--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Well, a Taylors EMP report would probably be really interesting, but I was thinking (theoretically, not volunteering!) more in terms of one about Jody himself. Who was he? And how far back do Jody songs go? Did Johnnie Taylor invent them? Or does Jody show up in blue songs during World War II or something? Was he a real person, like maybe Stagger Lee? (Was Shine who swam the Titanic a real person? I forget.) Seems like real *Mystery Train* mythology stuff, and I'm surprised nobody has tackled the research (unless they have and I just didn't notice, which is very possible. I haven't even done a google search.) (Also, do I only associate Jody with making cuckolds of military guys stationed overseas because I was *in* the military, and he was always showing up in cadences used while marching and/or running? Or is that his main deal? And otherwise, to what extent if any does he exist outside of the culture of Southern blacks--who, when I was in, seemed to make up a sizable portion of the Army?)
-- xhuxk (fakemai...), June 14th, 2006.


--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

This could really be hella interesting, absolutely. Is "Trapped in the Closet" the Ulysses of Jody songs?
-- Haikunym (zinogu...), June 14th, 2006.

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Here's some info I found while googling Jody songs:
http://soulfuldetroit.com/archives/10238/9918.html?1079610632

-- Sang Freud (jstrell...), June 14th, 2006.


--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

x-post. Taylor didn't invent the Jody song. Jody / Jodie / Joe the Grinder are pretty common figures in blues tunes.There's Louis Armstrong's "Jodie Man" which makes the "GI Joe de man" connection explicit. I wouldn't be surprised if that military connection is at the origin, though it's obviously gone through lots of transformations.
-- Roy Kasten (rfkaste...), June 14th, 2006.


--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Yeah, I'd forgotten Joe The Grinder. I used to own a copy of that *Get Your Ass in the Water and Swim Like Me* prison-rap comp (on Smithsonian or Rounder or something?), and I think there might even be a Joe the Grinder rhyme on there (I *may* even have mentioned it in the pre-rap rap chapter of my second book). Anyway, this link from the link above has great stuff about Jody Army cadences; also says Johnnie Taylor himself learned about Jody while in the military:
http://p211.ezboard.com/fwordoriginsorgfrm4.showMessage?topicID=153.topic

-- xhuxk (fakemai...), June 14th, 2006.


xhuxk (xheddy), Sunday, 19 November 2006 20:51 (thirteen years ago) link

lotsa stuff from rolling country thread, earlier this year:

Listening to a pile of Southern soul discovered via CD-baby channels. The album by a jowly guy named Jimmy Taylor leans toward the blues end of things (with lady backup vocals not far from the ones on last year's Bobby Bare album); the EP by the lady named Candis Palmer ("All Men Ain't Dawgs,* since some are electric boogie dawgs apparently) leans toward the disco end; the single by Harold, "Chill Step Party," is steppin' music. He mentions Milwaukee, Chitown, Harlem, and Atlanta in it. More fun than R. Kelly, as far as I'm concerned, but mainly all this stuff obviously has a connection to county music too. (and though candis palmer is happy to have found a man who is not a dawg, jimmy taylor insists that when women say they're looking for a good man, they're lying. really, he says, they're looking for a fool.) (apparently the kinda fool who will let her spend all his money.) (he also directly quotes zz hill's "cheating in the next room in one of his songs.) (he's from alabama; I don't know where candis or harold are from. they're not actually on cdbaby.com per se, but i was sent their cds in the same package that the jimmy taylor CD came in.) jimmy taylor on his album is totally paranoid, and in just about every song he's either cheating or being cheated on or both, and as i said, he seems fully convinced that his woman is going to put him in the poor house (where, in real life, for all i know, he may already be.) in "you're busted" he hires a private detective to follow her around, and gets a photo of her cheating. "love catcher" has a pretty good sax solo. and though some songs sound more blues to me than soul, a couple (like "all i want is you") still veer more toward disco than anybody in country music has, i think, even shannon brown on her new album.
candis palmer, as i said, gets even more disco, but her disco is maybe 1975 where taylor's is 1973. (i think i wrote on the '05 thread that shannon brown's disco sounded 1979, but maybe that was hyperbole; i'm not sure. these two soul singers FEEL more disco.) but even at her most disco, in a song called "don't let someone else come and jingle my bell" or something, palmer gets backed by HARD blues guitar riffs, so the music really rocks. if i had to compare her vocal style to anybody, it'd be the staple singers in "i'll take you there."

-- xhuxk (xedd...), January 28th, 2006


glamorous bertha payne, *bedroom offer* EP: southern country soul millie jackson style (i.e., as many parts talked as sung, many of 'em bawdy), from memphis, via cdbaby.com. starts with a good riddance song where glamorous bertha (who on the cd cover is a big girl in her red dress with a red glass of wine) tells you "i don't need your face in my face" so "go away like a bad day" and "you might as well pack your rags." then the title track, which is not about her bedroom offer to him but the other way around, which offer she says isn't enough and the two backup singers (favorite artists: denise lasalle, mary j blige) chorus "bang! bang!" but by song's end glamorous bertha is saying "i need a man who will love me all night long. are you qualified? if not, get off the pot!" then one where she promises to shake it and break it (and maybe hang it on the wall) and she tells "all you womens with big elephant ears" that with her man every day is pay day. then supposedly "part two" of the same song, which means same slinky rhythm track as part one but now with sexy breathy pillow talk all over the top where bertha tells you to lift up her skirt. then finally another good riddance song, this one a tough and funky blues, where he leaves her with a sink full of dishes in a "one-room [some word i can't make out]", hence the best dishwashing song since ray parker jr's "bad boy" if not anita ward's "ring my bell." also she brings him food in bed, which means this might also be a breakfast breakup song in the tradition of the 5th dimension's "one less bell to answer" and karyn white's "superwoman." five songs total, but two around 4:00, three around 4:25, which means glamorous bertha takes her time and surely deserves a lover with a slow hand.

-- xhuxk (xedd...), February 23rd, 2006.

the legendary moody scott, *simply moody: we gotta bust outta the ghetto*: more cdbaby southern soul, from louisiana. cover has moody, a dapper old guy seemingly in his 60s, in front of a rundown rural shack; interesting, since "ghettos" are usually assumed to be urban, right? first track "bustin out of the ghetto" is a sort of james brown rip, five minutes long, where moody as i recall reels off some towns in the south train conducter style (am i imagining this? i THINK he did that, anyway) and ends singing "america america god grant his grace on thee." then he covers tyrone davis's great "can i change my mind," my favorite track. and from there the more soul oriented stuff ("last two dollars," the misspelled cheated-on song "one man's hppiness" which for some reason makes me think of billy stewart sitting in the park even though billy had a high voice and moody really doesn't, "something you got baby") is more likeable, to me, than the more blatantly blues stuff, but then again i always think that. both the soul and blues are generic, i suppose; with the soul i don't mind. best song title: "annie mae cafe." and the closer "son of a southern man" starts with moody telling his guitarist "tattoo" suarez ("my man from argentina") about his grandpa drinking corn liquor and singing "downhome blues". so yeah, country for sure.
-- xhuxk (xedd...), March 11th, 2006.


--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

He does get urban and/or urbane once, though -- a nice slinky silk-shirt early '80s style quiet storm soul croon called "The Best of Me." (Not sure if any songs other than the Tyrone Davis are covers. "Last Two Dollars" and "Annie Mae Cafe" are writing-credited to one George Jackson; wasn't there a soul singer of that name once? But if so, I never heard him, though.)
-- xhuxk (xedd...), March 11th, 2006.


--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

"something you got baby" wouldn't be chris kenner's "something you got" would it? since moody's from louisiana...and yeah, george jackson (I'm assuming it's the same guy--I don't know "annie mae cafe") wrote z.z. hill's "down home blues" and a lot of stuff for candi staton, clarence carter, pickett, james carr; a memphis guy who later worked for malaco and wrote for all them: johnnie taylor, latimore, shirley brown, bobby bland...
enjoying jace everett, so far. it's quite a collection of somewhat off-the-wall guitar effects, interesting guitar chromatics (as in the first song), definitely a '70s pop thing happening; and in my mode of concurrent listening (lately it's been dusty springfield/the latest numero group comp of obscure '70s female singers/the new, beautiful nara leão bossa "nara '67"; and jace/radney foster/jessi colter, partly because they all have cool first names, I guess) I notice that both radney and jace hark back to stiff records, which I find interesting.

xps

-- edd s hurt (eddshur...), March 11th, 2006.

George Jackson was an occasional great old soul singer on Goldwax then Hi, and kind of a house writer at both. I'll try to remember tomorrow (just in from a party, and why I'm doing this rather than going straight to bet I've no idea) to YSI his absolutely magnificent Aretha, Sing One For Me. He was among the greatest writers in southern soul - he wrote for Ann Peebles, O.V. Wright, Otis Clay, James Carr, Clarence Carter, Etta James, Denise LaSalle, Wilson Pickett, Candi Staton and even wrote the Osmonds' first hit!
-- Martin Skidmore (lonewolf.cu...), March 12th, 2006.


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if I'm not mistaken, Alvin Robinson recorded for AFO (All for One), a New Orleans label of the '60s that Harold Battiste started; house band included Toussaint and Red Tyler. And he had a hit with Kenner's "Something You Got" (which was later covered by lots of folks, including Bobby Womack, who did a reggae remake on his "Safety Zone" LP in the mid-'70s. Alvin Robinson also recorded for Leiber and Stoller at Red Bird in New York, and did a real classic called "Down Home Girl."
I gotta get that Moody Scott record.

-- edd s hurt (eddshur...), March 12th, 2006.

That YSI:
George Jackson - Aretha, Sing One For Me
It'd be in my top 100 favourite singles ever, I think.

-- Martin Skidmore (lonewolf.cu...), March 12th, 2006.


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>I gotta get that Moody Scott record.<
I have an extra copy, Edd! I'll send it to you.

-- xhuxk (xedd...), March 12th, 2006.


--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

great! thanks Chuck!

-- edd s hurt (eddshur...), March 12th, 2006.


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>I don't know anything much about Moody Scott, just a handful of tracks, <
So Martin, did Moody have regional hits or something? I never heard of him before I saw his cdbaby page, and haven't really taken time to research him. I'm surprised you even heard of him!

-- xhuxk (xedd...), March 12th, 2006.

I don't know, Chuck, but bear in mind that I've been a huge fan of soul for a long time, and do know quite a lot about it (though not as much as Eddie, I'm pretty sure). The odd track does get on compilations of one sort or another, which suggests that Moody isn't incredibly obscure - but I don't even know exactly where he worked or anything, so he isn't famous either, clearly.
-- Martin Skidmore (lonewolf.cu...), March 12th, 2006.

also really liking irma thomas's *after the rain* on rounder, the "rain" obviously being katrina, though i kind of hate the mooshy shelter-from-storm piano ballad the album ends with though i do hope it provides solace to new orleans. what i love so far is "flowers" (soul about flowers on roadsides after car crashes, with a sound that i swear reminds me of "uncle tom's cabin" by warrant), "make me a pallet on the floor" (cheating with a painter, wow), "till i can't take it anymore" (country music in a soul voice, about how "you work your thing so well/I dream of heaven and live here in hell"), "these honey dos" (vampy bawdy boogie woogie where the honey dos are at first temptations but wind up also being about manners like please and thank you), and "stone survivor" (which is just plain funky).

-- xhuxk (xedd...), May 5th, 2006.

And Irma also does an extremely gorgeous version of "I Count the Tears" (the "na-na-na-na-na-na late at night" song) by the Drifters..
-- xhxuk (xedd...), May 5th, 2006.


--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

And she also does "Another Man Done Gone," a trad blues tune I swear I've heard hundreds of times by some huge classic rock group (Creem? Zep? the Allmans? somebody...), though no classic rock groups seem to be listed on AMG as doing it, so maybe whoever did it (which will probably hit me as really obvious once I found out) did it under a different title or something, or maybe with different words? (Also, I'm thinking now that maybe "These Honey Dos" and "Stone Survivor" and the palette one aren't quite at the level of the Warrant one and the country one and the Drifters one, but they're close.) -- xhuxk (xedd...), May 5th, 2006.

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

also liking (speaking of southern soul) *candy licker: the sex & soul of marvin sease* (jive/legacy) not all of which concerns muff diving, and at least "hoochie mama" of which has zapp-style robot-funk freakazoids reciting the names of several of the united states.

-- xhuxk (fakemai...), June 12th, 2006.

*Most of the Marvin Sease album is gloppy ballads which aren't all that good, but some of it is kinda fun. (The first track is awful though.)

-- Haikunym (zinogu...), June 13th, 2006.


--------------------------------------------------------------------------------


Marvin Sease CD is way less gloppy and ballady than Matt suggests (or maybe I just have a higher glop tolerance than he does; see also the Alan Bros!); most of it gets a good '70s smooth-jazzy funk disco groove going. And lots of the songs have pre-old-school "raps" (i.e., talking as singing, sometimes like a preacher's sermon) in them, which are really fun. And sure, the opening track "Do You Want a Licker?" is awful if you want it to be, but it's just too silly to complain about; ditto the other bookend, a five-minute live "Candy Licker 2005." Also, the ballads are pretty good, for the most part. "Don't Forget to Tell On You" sounds kind of like "Tell it Like It Is." But my favorite cuts are probably "I'm Mr Jody," the backdoor man song that starts with an ominous phone call, and the 12-step fix-your-life number "I Gotta Clean Up." (Has anybody ever written a good essay about Jody? He's the guy back on the block who's having sex to your girl while you're in the Army, and I get the idea he shows up in lots of Southern soul songs: Doesn't Johnnie Taylor have one about him, too*? As do, I would assume, other folks.)

* - yep, I just checked Whitburn: "Jody's Got Your Girl and Gone," went to number 28 in 1971. (Hey, sounds like a good EMP proposal!)

-- xhuxk (xhux...), June 14th, 2006.


--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

having sex WITH (or) making love TO.
and courtesy of HIS new truck.
).

-- xhuxk (fakemai...), June 14th, 2006.


--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Johnnie Taylor was the king of Jody songs. "Standing In for Jody" and "Jody's Got Your Girl and Gone" are just two; I mean every song he does is kind of about Jody-ism in some way or another. I am a nut for Johnnie Taylor (I like Johnny Taylor a lot, too, and Ted Taylor, the Louisiana soul singer, is also excellent--so I think an EMP paper on the Sooper Taylors would be good!!), and Taylor is also the king of fucking-around songs. There are these nifty new Stax reissues that includes stuff by Frederick Knight, the Dramatics, etc., and if you ask me one of the very best Stax albums-as-albums is Johnnie's "Who's Making Love," which is the typical collection of singles but which really has variety and which totally hangs together. "Hold On This Time" has a great Cropper riff, cubist guitar, and "Woman Across the River" is one of the best Stax blues ever.
I only know the older, cunnilingual and happy to oblige, ma'am, Marvin Sease stuff--he's really good. "Marvin Sease" on London from late '80s is a good 'un. One of those artists who've been working the I-55 corridor from Memphis to the Louisiana border, forever.

-- edd s hurt (eddshur...), June 14th, 2006.


--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Well, a Taylors EMP report would probably be really interesting, but I was thinking (theoretically, not volunteering!) more in terms of one about Jody himself. Who was he? And how far back do Jody songs go? Did Johnnie Taylor invent them? Or does Jody show up in blue songs during World War II or something? Was he a real person, like maybe Stagger Lee? (Was Shine who swam the Titanic a real person? I forget.) Seems like real *Mystery Train* mythology stuff, and I'm surprised nobody has tackled the research (unless they have and I just didn't notice, which is very possible. I haven't even done a google search.) (Also, do I only associate Jody with making cuckolds of military guys stationed overseas because I was *in* the military, and he was always showing up in cadences used while marching and/or running? Or is that his main deal? And otherwise, to what extent if any does he exist outside of the culture of Southern blacks--who, when I was in, seemed to make up a sizable portion of the Army?)
-- xhuxk (fakemai...), June 14th, 2006.


--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

This could really be hella interesting, absolutely. Is "Trapped in the Closet" the Ulysses of Jody songs?
-- Haikunym (zinogu...), June 14th, 2006.

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Here's some info I found while googling Jody songs:
http://soulfuldetroit.com/archives/10238/9918.html?1079610632

-- Sang Freud (jstrell...), June 14th, 2006.


--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

x-post. Taylor didn't invent the Jody song. Jody / Jodie / Joe the Grinder are pretty common figures in blues tunes.There's Louis Armstrong's "Jodie Man" which makes the "GI Joe de man" connection explicit. I wouldn't be surprised if that military connection is at the origin, though it's obviously gone through lots of transformations.
-- Roy Kasten (rfkaste...), June 14th, 2006.


--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Yeah, I'd forgotten Joe The Grinder. I used to own a copy of that *Get Your Ass in the Water and Swim Like Me* prison-rap comp (on Smithsonian or Rounder or something?), and I think there might even be a Joe the Grinder rhyme on there (I *may* even have mentioned it in the pre-rap rap chapter of my second book). Anyway, this link from the link above has great stuff about Jody Army cadences; also says Johnnie Taylor himself learned about Jody while in the military:
http://p211.ezboard.com/fwordoriginsorgfrm4.showMessage?topicID=153.topic

-- xhuxk (fakemai...), June 14th, 2006.


xhuxk (xheddy), Sunday, 19 November 2006 20:51 (thirteen years ago) link

all white chitlin circuit

and what (ooo), Sunday, 19 November 2006 21:38 (thirteen years ago) link

huh?

curmudgeon (DC Steve), Sunday, 19 November 2006 21:53 (thirteen years ago) link

My man Mel Waiters "Throw Back Days" song is still in the top 5 on the soulandbluesreport.com chart

curmudgeon (DC Steve), Sunday, 19 November 2006 21:57 (thirteen years ago) link

Hey Edd and Chuck, there's a song called "Jody's creepin'" by Mr. David (Tony Mercedes label) (?) on that soulandbluesreport.com chart. I bet it might fit in with those 'jody' songs you guys were talking about.

curmudgeon (DC Steve), Sunday, 19 November 2006 22:10 (thirteen years ago) link

Nothing from here showing up in Americana lists or even a Southern America website's top list. I don't think Big Daddy Nice does a list till January

curmudgeon, Monday, 17 December 2018 19:05 (one year ago) link

I like the Karen Wolf song . He's got OB Buchana on it too, plus the great Big G from Richmond, VA

Big Daddy Nice's top 25 southern soul songs

http://www.southernsoulrnb.com/corner2018.cfm

List (with youtube links) includes as top 5:

Fat Daddy "the Blame"
Jeter Jones "Black Horse"
Sir Charles Jones "Squeeze me"
Tucka "Ain't No Getting Over Me"
Karen Wolfe "That Bitch Ain't me"

curmudgeon, Wednesday, 26 December 2018 18:17 (one year ago) link

Tucka's voice reminds me a bit of R. Kelly

curmudgeon, Wednesday, 26 December 2018 19:02 (one year ago) link

x-post--Karen Wolfe. An 'e' on the end. Oh and by "he's got", I meant the Big Daddy Nice list...

curmudgeon, Wednesday, 26 December 2018 19:31 (one year ago) link

O.B. Buchana has a nice track on that list

curmudgeon, Thursday, 27 December 2018 19:34 (one year ago) link

http://www.southernsoulrnb.com/corner2018.cfm

Big Daddy Nice essay on 2018

curmudgeon, Wednesday, 2 January 2019 17:58 (one year ago) link

I put some stuff from here on my ilx ilm ballot. I have caught up on some 2018 Southern Soul but more to go. Ms. Jody can do no wrong with me ( even when her albums have a few misses).

curmudgeon, Monday, 7 January 2019 20:16 (one year ago) link

Johnny Rawls 2018 album I’m Still Around is a solid work of bluesy southern soul

curmudgeon, Friday, 18 January 2019 02:35 (one year ago) link

one month passes...

Anthony Hamilton has some southern soul roots

curmudgeon, Friday, 22 February 2019 14:27 (one year ago) link

Blues Festival. Sir Charles Jones, Theodis Ealey, Big Pokey Bear, Lenny Williams, Terry Wright. See festival website. Nashville auditorium

Southern soul in Nashville

curmudgeon, Friday, 22 February 2019 14:30 (one year ago) link

That Nashville gig is tonight Saturday February 23. Nashville resident and NPR critic Ann Powers should go

curmudgeon, Saturday, 23 February 2019 17:08 (one year ago) link

two weeks pass...

I doubt Ann attended.

I have praised Vickie Baker’s “Honey Hole” here before, and must do so again. So catchy

curmudgeon, Sunday, 10 March 2019 21:47 (eleven months ago) link

one month passes...

Dr Nick on WPFW yesterday played some great southern soul cuts by Mose Stovall, Christy Luv, Ms Jody, Lamorris Williams, Big Robb, & more

curmudgeon, Sunday, 28 April 2019 19:32 (ten months ago) link

I need to see if those acts also are appearing on the southern soul charts and getting love from Big Daddy Nice as well. Pretty sure they are

curmudgeon, Monday, 29 April 2019 11:10 (ten months ago) link

four weeks pass...

Everytime I hear a song from the late Mel Waiters, who died a little while back of a heart attack, I am especially sad because he wrote all kinds of songs— socio-political ones about poor folks, having a good time ones, relationship ones. He could have been the crossover artist of the genre

curmudgeon, Tuesday, 28 May 2019 17:02 (nine months ago) link

one month passes...

https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=8QxIIz1yEsA#menu

RIP Bishop Bulleinkle of “Hell to Da Naw, Naw, Naw” fame

curmudgeon, Sunday, 30 June 2019 19:54 (eight months ago) link

one month passes...

Bishop Bullwinkle R.I.P. still

Mr. Smoke has some nice ballads.

curmudgeon, Tuesday, 6 August 2019 12:23 (six months ago) link

Lots to catch up on in this genre.

curmudgeon, Friday, 9 August 2019 12:26 (six months ago) link

three weeks pass...

Liking new Lamar Brace song “Lefthand Man!” plus some old Pat Brown songs ( she sadly is very sick right now) and Sir Charles Jones “Alabama “

https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=KJYvChvkbDY

curmudgeon, Monday, 2 September 2019 17:06 (five months ago) link

The new Ms. Jody album Get it Get It , sounds good too

curmudgeon, Monday, 2 September 2019 17:55 (five months ago) link

two months pass...

still listening to this underpublicized genre. Need to update a list of fave songs

curmudgeon, Wednesday, 6 November 2019 17:21 (three months ago) link

two weeks pass...

Bobby Rush’s latest album got a Grammy nomination. It has blues and some southern soul on it. Alas, no nominations for Ms Jody

curmudgeon, Friday, 22 November 2019 04:32 (three months ago) link

Bobby Rush has a great cameo as himself in Dolemite Is My Name!.

a bevy of supermodels, musicians and Lena Dunham (C. Grisso/McCain), Friday, 22 November 2019 04:44 (three months ago) link

Cool. Haven’t seen that yet, but I should

curmudgeon, Friday, 22 November 2019 20:21 (three months ago) link

I'll put this here for the few that will be interested. Wee Willie Walker, who recorded for Goldwax in the 60s but lived in the Twin Cities for years, passed away Tuesday at the age of 77. He had just returned from a recording session in LA. performed here regularly and his voice remained supple until the end.

I already miss him immensely.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XoA2psGvtPQ&feature=emb_title

A breezy pop-rock feel fairly typical of the mid-'80s (Dan Peterson), Friday, 22 November 2019 21:13 (three months ago) link

That link works on my phone, but not my work computer.

A breezy pop-rock feel fairly typical of the mid-'80s (Dan Peterson), Friday, 22 November 2019 21:15 (three months ago) link

A soul fanatic buddy of mine posted about Walker’s death on Instagram & Facebook. I Checked out a video clip and it made me sad as guy could definitely sing. RIP

curmudgeon, Friday, 22 November 2019 21:19 (three months ago) link

He definitely could. Did the link I just posted work for you?

A breezy pop-rock feel fairly typical of the mid-'80s (Dan Peterson), Friday, 22 November 2019 21:22 (three months ago) link

On my phone it works, haven’t tried on a computer

curmudgeon, Saturday, 23 November 2019 03:56 (three months ago) link

Stan Butler sounds good on “My Priest is a Homewrecker”

https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=I46GM-QC28g

curmudgeon, Tuesday, 26 November 2019 03:49 (three months ago) link

Preacher Was a Home Wrecker I mean

curmudgeon, Tuesday, 26 November 2019 03:50 (three months ago) link

Ronnie Bell “I’ll pay the Shipping Costs” is a great, catchy southern soul tune

curmudgeon, Saturday, 30 November 2019 18:19 (three months ago) link

Saw Hardway Connection down at Lamont's in Pomonkey, Md. Great band. Latest album is only available on cd . DJ between sets played the great Jeff Floyd song "I Found Love on a Lonely Highway," and the Wobble Wobble line dance song

curmudgeon, Monday, 2 December 2019 03:54 (two months ago) link

LJ Echols “Santa Stole My Woman” has a nice lyrical twist near the end plus Echols great falsetto

curmudgeon, Saturday, 7 December 2019 18:58 (two months ago) link

Got a barely-played vinyl promo copy (complete w/a little bio insert) of Bobby Rush's first album, Rush Hour, for a buck last weekend. It's on Philadelphia International (produced by Leon Huff, who co-writes w/Gamble and Rush), and kinda feels like an attempt to do something along the lines of those late-70s Johnnie Taylor records. It smokes, with cool songs about losing your keys, having nicknames, and ends with a slower, swinging version of "Hey Western Union Man".

a bevy of supermodels, musicians and Lena Dunham (C. Grisso/McCain), Saturday, 7 December 2019 21:25 (two months ago) link

That sounds great

curmudgeon, Monday, 9 December 2019 04:10 (two months ago) link

Not seeing any southern soul on year end lists. Even the damn Bitter Southerner website is clueless. Sorry Ms Jody

curmudgeon, Friday, 20 December 2019 01:15 (two months ago) link

Ms. Jody actually has a serious song on her 2019 album. The track is called “ Got to Make a Change “

curmudgeon, Tuesday, 24 December 2019 21:40 (two months ago) link

https://www.soulbluesmusic.com/southernsoulbluescharts.htm

I need to hear LJ Echols latest; Ghetto Cowboy too

curmudgeon, Sunday, 29 December 2019 00:44 (two months ago) link

http://www.southernsoulrnb.com/corner2020.cfm

Daddy B Nice on the year in southern soul 2019

curmudgeon, Friday, 3 January 2020 17:26 (one month ago) link

I like LJ Echols latest and Ms Jody’s too, more than Daddy B Nice does.

curmudgeon, Friday, 3 January 2020 17:27 (one month ago) link

x-post--

Thrown down like a gauntlet near the end of 2018, Tucka's album "Working With The Feeling" was a challenge to every other artist to match or surpass in 2019, and although many recording artists arguably came close, no one succeeded at de-throning the sugar-coated vocalist from Louisiana. "Big Train" (DBN's #1 Song of the Year) crested in the first quarter of 2019 and found the pillow-talking candy-lander banging away at his own unique, acoustic version of the blues.

As for the challengers, just about everybody who was anybody among the major artists put out an album. Avail Hollywood, J-Wonn, L.J. Echols, T.K. Soul, O.B. Buchana, J. Red, Bigg Robb, Big G, Ms. Jody, Vick Allen, Sir Charles Jones, Willie Clayton and Calvin Richardson among others all published new collections, making 2019 a banner year for recording. But although the collective material was of high quality, none were career-defining albums for the individual artists, nor were any industry-shaking events in the way that Pokey Bear's "My Sidepiece" continued to be.

Tucka album never wowed me like that, but Daddy B Nice might be right re the Pokey Bear song...

curmudgeon, Sunday, 5 January 2020 06:01 (one month ago) link

two weeks pass...

http://www.southernsoulrnb.com/corner2019.cfm

Daddy B Nice’s top southern soul 2019 songs in various categories

curmudgeon, Friday, 24 January 2020 18:23 (one month ago) link

If I could only convince those nouveau hipster International Anthem label jazz fans that Southern soul is cool too. Oh well.

Heard a great Tucka song plus cool tunes by Jaye Hammer, Omar Cunningham, Nellie Travis, and Vicki Baker.

Omar Cunningham & Big Yayo “Keep my Boots on tonight “ is a catchy jam

curmudgeon, Tuesday, 28 January 2020 17:54 (one month ago) link

Oh nice. Thanks for posting that here. Looks good

curmudgeon, Friday, 7 February 2020 21:59 (three weeks ago) link

Michael Kiwanuka fans should also try artists on this thread

curmudgeon, Friday, 7 February 2020 22:00 (three weeks ago) link

Saw Ms Jody again ( 5 years after last time I think). Disappointing. 2 short sets over tracks. Too much lap dance schtick. She kept cutting songs short

curmudgeon, Monday, 17 February 2020 06:31 (one week ago) link

Dj played some of my fave songs at Lamont’s- Jeff Floyd -I found love on a lonely highway; some Mel Waiters songs; Nellie Tiger Travis- Hey Mr Sexy Man; Pokey Bear- My Sidepiece

curmudgeon, Monday, 17 February 2020 18:25 (one week ago) link

If only I could get a promoter to bring that current soul package tour that has Pokey Bear & Tucka on some dates, to the DC area

curmudgeon, Tuesday, 18 February 2020 18:25 (one week ago) link


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