what was the last 'classic album' you got and were knocked out by?

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anything pre 1990 im talking here people.

i know there may be threads that r similair but i want up to date stuff here.
it must be at least 6 months since i was wowed by a classic
('goodbye yellow brick road') so i'm looking for proof that it's still happening.

thanxx!

piscesboy, Wednesday, 28 July 2004 13:01 (seventeen years ago) link

i got Blood On The Tracks recently and liked it more than I would've previously expected to

Al (sitcom), Wednesday, 28 July 2004 13:05 (seventeen years ago) link

I'd say Psychocandy but I doubt anyone would apply the "classic" tag to that one :[

bohford, Wednesday, 28 July 2004 13:08 (seventeen years ago) link

I think plenty of folks would, actually.

latebloomer (latebloomer), Wednesday, 28 July 2004 13:10 (seventeen years ago) link

psychocandy is undoubtedly a classic.

fortunate hazel (f. hazel), Wednesday, 28 July 2004 13:12 (seventeen years ago) link

Fleetwood Mac - Tusk
I heard it for the first time after buying the reissue, and I am loving it.

Super Cub (Debito), Wednesday, 28 July 2004 13:13 (seventeen years ago) link

Perhaps I just hang out with the wrong crowd then.

bohford, Wednesday, 28 July 2004 13:14 (seventeen years ago) link

Love - Forever Changes

Velveteen Bingo (Chris V), Wednesday, 28 July 2004 13:14 (seventeen years ago) link

minor classics that have recently knocked me out:
nico - the end
todd rundgren - a wizard, a true star
curtis mayfield - curtis

peter smith (plsmith), Wednesday, 28 July 2004 13:17 (seventeen years ago) link

tusk OTM.

peter smith (plsmith), Wednesday, 28 July 2004 13:18 (seventeen years ago) link

Marvin Gaye - Whats Going On
Marvin Gaye - Lets Get It On

Velveteen Bingo (Chris V), Wednesday, 28 July 2004 13:18 (seventeen years ago) link

I had never heard MBV's Loveless until some dude told me the band I keybored for sounds like them (which I don't entirely agree with, but whatev), about two weeks ago. It is very very ridiculously good.

nickalicious (nickalicious), Wednesday, 28 July 2004 13:20 (seventeen years ago) link

"What's Going On" too! And Nico "The Marble Index"

Andrew Blood Thames (Andrew Thames), Wednesday, 28 July 2004 13:20 (seventeen years ago) link

Nico - Chelsea Girl

also Nick Drake - Bryter Later - but I already knew most of the songs on that, so it wasn't quite such a revelation.

hobart paving (hobart paving), Wednesday, 28 July 2004 13:23 (seventeen years ago) link

"Superfly" - Curtis Mayfield

Wooden (Wooden), Wednesday, 28 July 2004 13:24 (seventeen years ago) link

i'd been assured for a long time that japan's "tin drum" would blow me away, but it didn't. luckily quiet life and gentlemen take polaroids did blow me away.

fortunate hazel (f. hazel), Wednesday, 28 July 2004 13:25 (seventeen years ago) link

"This Nation's Saving Grace" - The Fall

M@tt He1geson (Matt Helgeson), Wednesday, 28 July 2004 13:25 (seventeen years ago) link

I dunno, I'm rarely "blown away" by an album. They tend to grow on me instead, even if I like them when I first hear them.

latebloomer (latebloomer), Wednesday, 28 July 2004 13:27 (seventeen years ago) link

I had never heard MBV's Loveless until some dude told me the band I keybored for sounds like them (which I don't entirely agree with, but whatev), about two weeks ago. It is very very ridiculously good.

:-) :-) I'm most happy to hear that!

Ned Raggett (Ned), Wednesday, 28 July 2004 13:28 (seventeen years ago) link

I already had a few Steve Reich recordings, but hadn't heard "Music for 18 Musicians" until a few weeks ago. Wow, wow, and double wow.

Barry Bruner (Barry Bruner), Wednesday, 28 July 2004 13:32 (seventeen years ago) link

(although the recording I heard was made in the 90's)

Barry Bruner (Barry Bruner), Wednesday, 28 July 2004 13:32 (seventeen years ago) link

Live Rust
and um the Bands greatest hits record (count?)

danh (danh), Wednesday, 28 July 2004 13:38 (seventeen years ago) link

18 musicians is so fucking good. has anyone heard that wired magazine music futurists cd? thats the first place i heard steve reich - that cd is really easy to find, and has some awesome stuff on it.

peter smith (plsmith), Wednesday, 28 July 2004 13:38 (seventeen years ago) link

It's not pre-1990 but Nas's Illmatic happily surprised my ass when I got the 10th anniversary edition. Nobody told me he used to be jazz-rap.

pre-1990: Poison, Open Up And Say Ahh....

CeCe Peniston (Anthony Miccio), Wednesday, 28 July 2004 13:40 (seventeen years ago) link

Black Flag - The First Four Years

DJ Mencap (DJ Mencap), Wednesday, 28 July 2004 13:41 (seventeen years ago) link

The Zombies' 'Odessey and Oracle.'

deamous, Wednesday, 28 July 2004 13:42 (seventeen years ago) link

Donna Summer - Bad Girls
Millie Jackson - Caught Up/Still Caught Up

R.I.M.A. (Barima), Wednesday, 28 July 2004 13:43 (seventeen years ago) link

Force MD's - Chillin

Velveteen Bingo (Chris V), Wednesday, 28 July 2004 13:43 (seventeen years ago) link

The first four Harry Nilsson albums. I never realized how many songs I already knew were by him.

Johnny Fever (johnny fever), Wednesday, 28 July 2004 13:47 (seventeen years ago) link

another vote for Tusk

Robin Goad (rgoad), Wednesday, 28 July 2004 13:48 (seventeen years ago) link

Art Ensemble of Chicago - Fanfare for the Warriors

earlnash, Wednesday, 28 July 2004 13:49 (seventeen years ago) link

Classic, but not really an album: Nazam AlGhazali Vol. 1. (50's, 40's? No liner notes, and only minimal information on the web.)

Also that Joe Cuba Sextette Diggin' the Most I just got is pretty great, except for the English language tunes. But the tracks that Cheo Feliciano sings on are uniformly very good.

Rockist Scientist, Wednesday, 28 July 2004 13:50 (seventeen years ago) link

I picked up the James Brown Live at the Apollo reissue and heard it for the first time and was totally blown away. I hadn't really expected it to live up to my expectations (if I can say something like that).

JC-L (JC-L), Wednesday, 28 July 2004 13:53 (seventeen years ago) link

Pink Flag

Sean Witzman (trip maker), Wednesday, 28 July 2004 13:59 (seventeen years ago) link

Not really a conventionally recognized classic, but Muddy Water's Woodstock album

jedidiah (jedidiah), Wednesday, 28 July 2004 14:11 (seventeen years ago) link

Van Morrison - Astral Weeks.....go ahead.

Velveteen Bingo (Chris V), Wednesday, 28 July 2004 14:15 (seventeen years ago) link

Montrose - S/T. Never had this, remembered some of the songs, then found one. Phew, what a scorcher.

briania (briania), Wednesday, 28 July 2004 14:17 (seventeen years ago) link

Euphoria - A Gift From Euphoria

actionjackson, Wednesday, 28 July 2004 14:21 (seventeen years ago) link

Eno - "Music for Films"

Huey (Huey), Wednesday, 28 July 2004 14:23 (seventeen years ago) link

son house - the 1960s album with death letter on it.
david bowie - ziggy stardust (i always had the soundtrack but never the actual album)
earth wind and fire - the first two albums (not canonical classics but still great)

thesplooge (thesplooge), Wednesday, 28 July 2004 14:24 (seventeen years ago) link

Not a huge David Bowie fan, but I checked out Low a few months ago and it totally surprised me, right from the first hearing. I can't believe how much enjoyment it's given me - or, at least the first half of it. Side 2, I'm not so crazy for yet; but it took me awhile to appreciate Side 3 & 4 of Tago Mago too. As it is, it's the first Mick Ronson-less Bowie LP I've ever really liked.

Myonga Von Bontee (Myonga Von Bontee), Wednesday, 28 July 2004 14:49 (seventeen years ago) link

Wedding present - Sea Monsters
Television - Marquee Moon
[I would also like to give a special mention to 'love is strange' by Buddy Holly as most suprisingly contemporary sounding record more than 30 years old I've ever heard.]

hmmm (hmmm), Wednesday, 28 July 2004 14:56 (seventeen years ago) link

Oh shit, I should've said NEU!

latebloomer (latebloomer), Wednesday, 28 July 2004 14:57 (seventeen years ago) link

Another Green World as much as it is possible to be 'knocked out by".

artdamages (artdamages), Wednesday, 28 July 2004 15:01 (seventeen years ago) link

i usually skip the instrumental portions of low and heroes. ive discovered lodger lately too, and love it even more after finding out how bowie and eno were commanding/instructing the musicians to make it.

thesplooge (thesplooge), Wednesday, 28 July 2004 15:02 (seventeen years ago) link

two of my answers already mentioned: Odyssey & Oracle, Pink Flag.
also, Chairs Missing, and pretty soon i imagine, 154. i'm loving Wire

common_person (common_person), Wednesday, 28 July 2004 15:02 (seventeen years ago) link

Slugfuckers -- Cacaphony

jack cole (jackcole), Wednesday, 28 July 2004 15:16 (seventeen years ago) link

Glenn Gould's Goldberg Variations.

shookout (shookout), Wednesday, 28 July 2004 15:30 (seventeen years ago) link


The Zombies - Odessey and Oracle
Stevie Wonder - Talking Book
The Kinks - Village Green

darin, Wednesday, 28 July 2004 15:40 (seventeen years ago) link

on the beach.

i more or less have all of his records and i have the feeling otb is his best studio album. it's the most intense of his folky/soft songwriter albums. there are no real standouts except the first song which i knew from decade. it's all pretty much made of one stone. by the way neil did many shit and average albums. most of his 90s (except ragged glory, dead man was ok) and a lot of his 80s releases (trans, reactor, landing on water etc., hawks + doves was ace) should be mentioned here.

alex in mainhattan (alex63), Wednesday, 28 July 2004 16:11 (seventeen years ago) link

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GCBOTLZABkk

xzanfar, Friday, 27 May 2022 18:27 (one month ago) link

Finally got a copy of the Andy Irvine & Paul Brady lp cos it finally got a decent remaster.
Lovely mid 70s traditional Irish based lp.
Quite beautiful. It is something that I have meant to get hold of for years, I had ome money come my way for something unexpected so got i.
So nice way to commemorate an event I nearly boycotted. But turned out nice.
& it is a sublime record.

Stevolende, Wednesday, 1 June 2022 10:19 (one month ago) link

Technically not an album, but I remember ignoring Talking Heads' Stop Making Sense (the film) for ages, because I assumed it was one of those concert shows where the band smiles at each other and everybody jams and it's slick and it's all precisely-recorded etc. And I'm not keen on Talking Heads.

But! Well, actually it is all of those things, but it's better than I expected and I found myself warming to the songs. Even the versions of the groove songs from Remain in Light are good. Perhaps I'm getting old. I mean, it didn't knock me out, but I remember wondering how a man could sweat so much without getting dehydrated, and how many calories they all burned, and how it was possible for people to do shows like that night after night - it's because they were young, and professional musicians with many years' experience - and those thoughts didn't go through my mind when I first heard Dark Side of the Moon (for example).

Conversely I remember being slightly disappointed with Propaganda's A Secret Wish. It's like a really good 10". The decision to have two versions of "Duel" next to each other wasn't a good one.

Ashley Pomeroy, Wednesday, 1 June 2022 19:13 (one month ago) link

Miles Davis "Kind of Blue", because somebody hit me with a baseball bat with the cassette glued to the end of it

Gymnopédie Pablo (Neanderthal), Wednesday, 1 June 2022 19:19 (one month ago) link

really?

Portrait Of A Dissolvi Ng Drea M (Camaraderie at Arms Length), Wednesday, 1 June 2022 19:20 (one month ago) link

i mean i hope it's just a goof, but hey: free copy of kind of blue!

Let's disco dance, Hammurabi! (Austin), Wednesday, 1 June 2022 19:25 (one month ago) link

"hey man, you gotta hear these wire demos. they're gonna..."

*stares intensely*

"knock you out."

Bruce Stingbean (Karl Malone), Wednesday, 1 June 2022 19:27 (one month ago) link

damaged, but the reels will probably be intact. also a free baseball bat, since it was glued to the tape, presume they must have left that behind too.

Portrait Of A Dissolvi Ng Drea M (Camaraderie at Arms Length), Wednesday, 1 June 2022 19:29 (one month ago) link

Not an album, but I just got the DVD of the Who live in Houston, 1975. It's been a while since I've seen Keith Moon in anything, and after staring at his drumming for about two or three numbers, it really sank in like "holy shit, how can someone play like that?" On first glance it's complete anarchy the way his arms are flailing about, and somehow it not only works but lands in all the right spots.

birdistheword, Wednesday, 1 June 2022 19:31 (one month ago) link

Ashley Pomeroy, pretty sure the answer to most of the things you were wondering is cocaine

Muad'Doob (Moodles), Wednesday, 1 June 2022 19:47 (one month ago) link

1) What's Going On. head in the clouds the whole time. it's great in such an effortless sounding way. very much a world you wanna live inside.

2) Revolver!! decided to give it my first full listen (of course, I knew more than half the songs already) while very high and in that state I was able to imagine what it might have been like to discover this in 1966. fucking astounding, of course.

frogbs, Wednesday, 1 June 2022 19:56 (one month ago) link

some things I've been enjoying from 1952

Stan Kenton - New Concepts of Artistry in Rhythm - I know Kenton is considered pretty square but in the slightly drab context of 1952 this is wildly exciting and just rammed with BIG ideas.

Dinu Lippati - Chopin: Waltzes Apparently from '49, just astonishingly inventive riffing off these waltzes, sounds like 20th century compositions then you keep picking out the familiar tunes. (I know this wasn't recorded in '52 as Dinu was already dead by then, but anyway)

Singin' In The Rain OST a four-disc remaster with original 20s / 30s versions of the songs, outtakes, etc. but the stereo remastering is the thing here, I cannot for the life of me work out if this was originally stereo mixed, but in any case it sounds just fantastic.

1952 is a weirdly fallow year for both be bop and r&b, so no really decent LPs, if you have a counterexample then please share.

Portrait Of A Dissolvi Ng Drea M (Camaraderie at Arms Length), Wednesday, 1 June 2022 20:27 (one month ago) link

I'd add Monk's final recordings with Blue Note and Gerry Mulligan's first great recordings with Chet Baker. LP's were an emerging format so anything I listen to from 1952 is usually on a compilation.

Also in country music, Hank Williams was making his final (great) records in 1952.

birdistheword, Wednesday, 1 June 2022 20:46 (one month ago) link

Yeah agreed on both, just listing LPs, which were still a novelty at this point.

Portrait Of A Dissolvi Ng Drea M (Camaraderie at Arms Length), Wednesday, 1 June 2022 20:53 (one month ago) link

I've been enjoying He Touched Me by Elvis Presley, which was mentioned on the Elvis thread. I wouldn't have guessed a post-1970 Elvis Gospel album could be this good.

o. nate, Friday, 3 June 2022 02:59 (one month ago) link

The Song Remains The Same was leaving Criterion Channel and I haven't seen it since I was a kid on a crappy VHS transfer. Goddamn it knocked me out!

kurt schwitterz, Friday, 3 June 2022 04:35 (one month ago) link

I was wondering the other day if there are any equivalents to Stop Making Sense in terms of combining a high quality theatrical concept, spectacular band show, and very cool music. The first time I saw it, my father who is not very curious musically and probably never listened to Talking Heads after that, sat next to me and watched the entire show with me.

I'm listening to my first Steely Dan album, their first too. It's ok, I'm still standing.

Nabozo, Friday, 3 June 2022 06:12 (one month ago) link

Finally got a copy of the Andy Irvine & Paul Brady lp cos it finally got a decent remaster.

great album^^^ didn't know about about the new remaster

also very worth hearing: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Parallel_Lines_(Dick_Gaughan_%26_Andy_Irvine_album)

no lime tangier, Friday, 3 June 2022 07:16 (one month ago) link

The reissue of The Bridge by Robert Rental and Thomas Leer. Lovely stuff

paolo, Friday, 3 June 2022 07:40 (one month ago) link

Andy Irvine & Paul Brady new version is pretty new. I was seeing reviews of the vinyl version 3 or 4 months ago and hoping that it was going to come out on cd too. So it appeared on cd and I couldn't afford to buy it then I got a little windfall last weekend so got it.

The pair are touring in November, apparently rescheduled from January.

JUst seen this too so thought I'd add it. Then read it
https://www.irishexaminer.com/lifestyle/artsandculture/arid-40782783.html

Stevolende, Friday, 3 June 2022 10:38 (one month ago) link

I was wondering the other day if there are any equivalents to Stop Making Sense in terms of combining a high quality theatrical concept, spectacular band show, and very cool music. The first time I saw it, my father who is not very curious musically and probably never listened to Talking Heads after that, sat next to me and watched the entire show with me.

It's really the gold standard. You rarely have a concert film that manages to have a great artist and be a truly great film and feature truly great music. The only other one that comes to mind is Monterey Pop, and that's not even one artist or one setlist.

I'd check out Prince's Sign 'O' the Times which may be on the Criterion Channel. It's more of a serviceable film than a great film (the scripted dramatic elements alone are a bit clunky) but musically it's pretty f-ing great, every bit the equal if not better than Stop Making Sense in that department.

birdistheword, Friday, 3 June 2022 14:37 (one month ago) link

I should add The Last Waltz. Plenty of people like myself have reservations about it, but there are people who have argued that it's better than Stop Making Sense. (FWIW, if Stop Making Sense is an A+ film, I'd call The Last Waltz an A- at best, more likely a B+.)

birdistheword, Friday, 3 June 2022 14:40 (one month ago) link

On a more modest level, perhaps Laurie Anderson's 'Home of the Brave'?

Maresn3st, Friday, 3 June 2022 15:02 (one month ago) link

I still haven't seen it, but since so much of her work was conceived with a visual or theatrical component in mind, it's probably essential viewing.

United States Live is my holy grail - I know Christgau loves the soundtrack, but I would love to see a complete film of her legendary BAM production.

birdistheword, Friday, 3 June 2022 15:09 (one month ago) link

me too! fgti has mentioned it before - i think the original full recordings/ films are gone?

massive :(

Bruce Stingbean (Karl Malone), Friday, 3 June 2022 15:22 (one month ago) link

is it heretical to say Strange Angels is her best? Some of my favorite synth sounds on a Poppy Bush Interzone album.

Malevolent Arugula (Alfred, Lord Sotosyn), Friday, 3 June 2022 15:23 (one month ago) link

I would sell a lung for a blu ray of the United States Live footage.

Maresn3st, Friday, 3 June 2022 15:29 (one month ago) link

My favourite thing about the Sign O The Times film is that Prince has preciseley two lines of dialogue "Hey Cat why don't you let me take you out tonight?" to which she replies "Fuck off!" and one other where he points at a ring in a mocked-up jewellery shop window and says "Come closer... isn't that nice?". I mean.. the humour of this man! God damn!

piscesx, Friday, 3 June 2022 15:31 (one month ago) link

two weeks pass...

"unhalfbricking". Amazing record.

Saxophone Of Futility (Michael B), Saturday, 18 June 2022 11:12 (two weeks ago) link

Operation Doomsday

brimstead, Saturday, 18 June 2022 15:12 (two weeks ago) link

Love - Forever Changes

Malevolent Arugula (Alfred, Lord Sotosyn), Saturday, 18 June 2022 15:14 (two weeks ago) link

Wisdom, Mr. Soto.

Ned Raggett, Saturday, 18 June 2022 15:39 (two weeks ago) link

I can't characterize it yet! Spooky folk? I keep imagining the Walker Brothers at the mike.

Malevolent Arugula (Alfred, Lord Sotosyn), Saturday, 18 June 2022 15:46 (two weeks ago) link

I'm finding Herbie Hancock's nventions and Dimensions pretty fascinating. Have had it as part of a box set for a couple of years and not payed much attention to it. Now had it on for a few days and seeing various levels. Interesting for a jazz record with no horns and one real melody instrument.
Has had me wondering how popular it was with mods or at least whatever the group who were makers and shakers in taht scene and may have rejected taht label. Since it came out in 64 it should be more what that scene was into than what it was depicted as, especially with him being a Miles sideman.
Anyway interesting textures etc. & interesting choice of sidemen with 2 Latin players on percussion instruments/drums.

Stevolende, Saturday, 18 June 2022 19:37 (two weeks ago) link

xp interesting, just been listening to a number of podcast interviews with Johnny Echols over the last couple of weeks which has given some background on the development of Love up to Forever Changes taht I wasn't 100% familiar with before. Worth looking around for, & I'm looking forward to his own memoir whic is supposed to underway and hopefully mostly written.

The JOhn Einarson reworking of Arthur Lee's incomplete memoir was pretty interesting too

Stevolende, Saturday, 18 June 2022 19:41 (two weeks ago) link

Johnny Echols is kind of known for his tall tales tbh.

Doodles Diamond (Tom D.), Saturday, 18 June 2022 19:43 (two weeks ago) link

"unhalfbricking". Amazing record.

co-inky: a few days ago i was thinking to myself that unhalfbricking was the only FC record i'd heard, so went and listened to, and ended up *loving*, Fotheringay

Half Japanese Breakfast (outdoor_miner), Saturday, 18 June 2022 19:55 (two weeks ago) link

Otherly Pastoralism?

Ride into the Sunship (James Redd and the Blecchs), Saturday, 18 June 2022 22:17 (two weeks ago) link

(Multi-xp)

Ride into the Sunship (James Redd and the Blecchs), Saturday, 18 June 2022 22:18 (two weeks ago) link

I'd say all the run of Richard Thompson era FC was worth hearing, definitely all of teh Sandy Denny era which mainly overlaps though she comes back for 2 lps later. But all that era with Hutchings and Thompson including the first lp which has Judy Dyble on and may be more psychedelic.
I'd also checck out the lps by hutchings when he moved on to other projects. The first 3 Steeleye Span which are pretty psychedelc reworkings of traditional material, then the Albion band material starting with No Roses and the Battle of The Field. & if you can get a chance to hear the early live recordings with Richard & Linda Thompson onboard they're pretty great too.
Richard & Linda Thompson the 1st 3 especially Bright Lights & Pour Down Like Silver as well as the recordings from the 1975 tour which were released much much later. All great.

Stevolende, Saturday, 18 June 2022 23:28 (two weeks ago) link

thx for the recs, Stevolende. have Bright Lights and Pour Down like Silver, but have never listened to Steeleye Span or any of the other stuff you mentioned.

Half Japanese Breakfast (outdoor_miner), Sunday, 19 June 2022 13:41 (two weeks ago) link

& if you really like that stuff you can check out the Trees, Woods Band, Pentangle, Jefferson Airplane, Great Society, Folque, Ougenweide and a few others. Incredible String Band also good but maybe a different direction since early stuff all acoustic and possibly a bit more hand over one ear folky though even then there have been some rock covers of a couple of their songs.

Richard Thompson's memoir was good. & Clinton Heylin's books on the band are informative if you can get over him

Stevolende, Sunday, 19 June 2022 14:01 (two weeks ago) link

"I was wondering the other day if there are any equivalents to Stop Making Sense in terms of combining a high quality theatrical concept, spectacular band show, and very cool music. The first time I saw it, my father who is not very curious musically and probably never listened to Talking Heads after that, sat next to me and watched the entire show with me."

I was going to say Laurie Anderson's Home of the Brave, which feels as if it was greenlit because of the success of Stop Making Sense, but Maresn3st beat me. Beat the crap out of me. Anderson didn't have the same kind of wide appeal, though. For some reason I've always thought of REM as the next "mainstream US indie band with popular and critical appeal" after Talking Heads, but I have the impression that they weren't interested in theatrical live performance. And Talking Heads emerged at a different point in history, when Woody Allen films were popular and everybody in the United States was middle-aged and cared passionately about wind power and solar power etc. People were willing to watch a bunch of quirky students dance in place on an empty stage while playing mutated funk music at the beginning of the 1980s. The rest of the 1980s did away with all that. If Talking Heads had formed in 1984 they would have been denounced as communists. Their one and only album would have been produced by Stephen Hague.

I think the problem is that the next big thing in concert productions after Sense was e.g. Peter Gabriel's Secret World Live, which fits the brief - it was really something - but it was conducted a more impersonal scale, with everybody jamming to a click track, scheduled to the second, a la Pink Floyd's The Wall. Gabriel belonged to a different kind of theatrical tradition. Sadly neither Shed Seven nor Meanswear had the budget to express themselves fully in a live setting.

On topic, Never Mind the Bollocks, many years ago. I assumed it was going to be tuneless buzzing monotonous rubbish but it sounded like metal. Wracking my brains I'm struck by how few classic albums blew me away when I first heard them. Probably because they were already familiar on account of them being big-sellers. And also because very few albums are consistently good, because music is hard, and forty minutes of concentrated music is hard. Led Zeppelin's first four albums impressed me because here in the UK they didn't release singles, and despite being massive at the time their music doesn't get played on the radio or TV very often, so those albums still sounded fresh.

Ashley Pomeroy, Sunday, 19 June 2022 17:10 (two weeks ago) link

Talking Heads emerged at a different point in history, when Woody Allen films were popular and everybody in the United States was middle-aged and cared passionately about wind power and solar power etc. (…) The rest of the 1980s did away with all that. If Talking Heads had formed in 1984 they would have been denounced as communists.

Uh…(??)

Bunheads Pilot Enthusiast (morrisp), Sunday, 19 June 2022 17:13 (two weeks ago) link

didn't the recent talking heads stage show get rave reviews? is there a recording of that?

koogs, Sunday, 19 June 2022 18:01 (two weeks ago) link

Far East Family Band - Parallel World

Holy hell this is killer.

a superficial sheeb of intelligence (jon /via/ chi 2.0), Monday, 20 June 2022 19:47 (one week ago) link

Xp I assume you mean ‘American Utopia’, yes there’s a movie and I think it’s the equal of SMS.

Dan Worsley, Monday, 20 June 2022 20:54 (one week ago) link

Over on the main Laurie thread, somebody refers to talking with somebody who should know who seemingly confirms that the original full-length reels of live United States no longer exist, and that Anderson's a tough self-critic, maybe esp. that era (also see the archived Norton Lecture which I refer to on the same thread as "My Life As A Capitalist Tool," for her confusing, unexpected involvement with 80s investors, from record biz and elsewhere)
TCM's Juneteenth schedule incl. one of if not the earliest landmark concert films, Jazz On A Summer's Day(1959) with theatricality in part planned, in part accidental (the storyline about two lovahs who go to the show, didn't come together at all), and no fucking narration or interviews, hallelujah, just Willis Conover's occasional foghorn IDs of the performers, direction by Bert Stern, a Mad Man and wizard of commercial photography, making his first and only film, with Aram Avakian, who I think took his innovative, then-startling edits to or at least influenced xpost Monterey Pop and Woodstock--mostly, he and Stern played it pretty straight, but this kind of thing freaked out some of the moldy figs of film as well as jazz (also bringing in non-jazzers like Big Maybelle and omg Chuck Berry, who def. holds his one with sets by Louis Armstrong ect.):

Even worse for jazzophiles is Bert Stern’s refusal to pay due reverence to his musical subjects. How dare he obscure Thelonious Monk’s rendition of “Blue Monk” behind footage of and announcements for the America’s Cup yacht race, introduce “Loose Walk” with Sonny Stitt in mid-solo, or lay an interview between Elaine Lorillard and radio reporter Donna Larsen over George Shearing’s “George in Brazil?” These objections, though, are questions of degree as Jazz on a Summer’s Day succeeds not just by capturing great jazz performers for posterity but by representing jazz in new and vibrant contexts. Stern’s “impression of jazz …was something downstairs in a dark room. [Jazz on a Summer’s Day] brought jazz out in the sun and it was different.” First and foremost is Stern’s election to shoot the film in vibrant colours, a decision inspired by seeing The Red Shoes a decade earlier (“the first color movie that used color instead of it being in colour”). By day, Stern captures the dappled sun on rippling ocean waves, while at night he turns his cameras into the stage lights and bathes his musicians in saturated red auras. Secondly, Stern attends to the juxtaposition of rich and poor in old-money Newport’s Jazz Festival. Yacht races and elderly citizens contrast with buses full of African-American attendees, shirtless children pushing strollers in adult heels, and beer-fuelled house parties spilling out onto roofs. And Stern merges these contrasting images into wonderful knots: a roving jalopy full of Yale students playing Dixieland, Nathan Gershman playing Bach on the cello in a smoky practice room, and Anita O’Day stealing the show with her up-tempo vocals and scat while poshly dressed for tea in white gloves and a wide, feathered hat

To its credit, Jazz on a Summer’s Day offers no moralizing interviews on the meaning of jazz, the problems of race or class or generation, or the promise of music to remedy or aggravate these ills. To the extent that Stern looks for answers, he does so by “poking around” with tight close-ups of the performers, with lingering views of their audiences, and with the possible transcendences that the music might offer to the otherwise banal life outside the Festival’s grounds. Stern finds a prosperous, stable, and progressing America in the desegregated acts and audiences of the Jazz Festival (particularly in Terry Gibbs sharing the vibes with Dinah Washington during “All of Me” and Louis Armstrong and Jack Teagarden’s cavalier rendition of “Rockin’ Chair”), in young white girls screaming for a somewhat subdued Chuck Berry, and in Mahalia Jackson’s heart-melting statement to the watching crowd, “You make me feel like I’m a star.” Above all, there is a breezy leisure to Summer’s Day, notwithstanding a few consternated faces of older residents apparently feeling a bit under siege. Young and old, black and white, observe the Festival patiently, bobbing their heads, puffing on pipes, and eating popsicles. The pace feels natural, in keeping with the cool ocean tide pools that lay serenely along the coast and the lively ocean sprays of yachts and ferries. In Jazz on a Summer’s Day, Stern reveals the secret of jazz, taking it out of monochrome nightclubs to breathe free in the world outside and to be made all the more glamourous in this new expanse.

Lots more backstory/otm points here (but not really spoilers: you really gotta see it to get it):
https://makeminecriterion.wordpress.com/2018/03/29/jazz-on-a-summers-day-bert-stern-1959/

Summer of Soul is about on this level overall, despite being a bit too pushy/obvious with the modern-day editorials.

dow, Monday, 20 June 2022 22:14 (one week ago) link

Also, Stern and Avakian got there during a precursor to theee Sixties: the texture and tumult of rock and blues and social subtexts with older jazz stars at peak and Jimmy Giuffre 3 easing in there w the subtle shades of stoner aromatics, made more bold by the Chico Hamilton Quintet.

dow, Monday, 20 June 2022 22:24 (one week ago) link

Not free jazz, but JG3 watercolors, CHQ oils.

dow, Monday, 20 June 2022 22:26 (one week ago) link


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