Classic Or Dud: Laurie Anderson's "O Superman"

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As recently featured in NYLPM (and as not-so-recently featured in I Hate Music, come to think of it....). Your verdict?

Tom, Sunday, 17 September 2000 00:00 (nineteen years ago) link

Oh, a 'classic' and no mistake. I found it chilling and immersive at 13 (mind you, Godley and Creme's "Under Your Thumb" had much the same effect around the same time), one of those radio epiphany moments (others that spring to mind: Nicky Campbell (!) playing "Sour Times", Penderecki's "Threnody" late at night on Radio 3).

On the odd occasion that "Big Science" makes it onto the turntable thesedays, "O Superman" generally gets the full airing. It can be blamed for me floundering around buying Reich, Glass and Tangerine Sodding Dream records in my late teens, trying to find more of the same thing, and mainfestly failing.

Anyone remember what keep it off #1?

Michael Jones, Monday, 18 September 2000 00:00 (nineteen years ago) link

"O Superman" was kept off Number 1 by - ahem - the loathsome Dave Stewart / Barbara Gaskin remake of "It's My Party", a song from 1981's main period of retroism and only at Number 1, presumably, for that reason.

Robin Carmody, Monday, 18 September 2000 00:00 (nineteen years ago) link

Ah, "It's My Party". I didn't mind that actually - and Stewart did almost revive Colin Blunstone's career around the same time with "What Becomes Of The Brokenhearted".

I only recently discovered that it wasn't *that* Dave Stewart. Does this make me stupid? Or stoopid?

Michael Jones, Monday, 18 September 2000 00:00 (nineteen years ago) link

It makes you stoopid, though of course the chances of there being two absolutely talentless twats ploughing the same classic rock furrow not very good chick in tow with the same name does suggest some kind of conspiracy.

But to O Superman. Even if I take away the fact that Laurie has commited sythn sins since which should have relegated her to Fairlight Hell, and wipe out the Lou Reed connection, i cannot bring myself to not loathe O Superman. "They're American planes. Made in" - wait for it - its a massive revalatiuon here "America". Perhaps its metronomic looped breathy vocal percussion track is haunting, but then ghosts are haunting and my life does pretty well without them.

O Superman. A duddy dud dudster.

Tanya, Tuesday, 19 September 2000 00:00 (nineteen years ago) link

I only demonised "It's My Party" (a song I actually like, at least in Lesley Gore's original version) because of my antipathy to that early 80s bout of Kennedy-era nostalgia. It was this particular revivalist period that gave us (in its rockist form) The Stray Cats; say no more.

I too only recently discovered that it wasn't *that* Dave Stewart. I don't care either way :).

Robin Carmody, Tuesday, 19 September 2000 00:00 (nineteen years ago) link

Well, Robin, I'll take the 'revivalist' tag over the 'retroist' one - but can a rather odd, spookily synthetic rendering of an old song be considered either? Or even worth mentioning in the same sense as The Stray Cats?

Yes, it was a cover version (perhaps an implicit criticism of the quality of songwriting in the charts in 1980/81; is that what you mean by revivalist?), but done in an emphatically (even self-consciously over-the-top) modern way. That can't be 'retro', surely?

I think 'novelty hit' might be the best tag. They did, after all, go on to produce flashy studio confections around "Busy Doing Nothing" and "The Locomotion".

You can tell I'll do anything to avoid work at the moment, can't you?

Michael Jones, Wednesday, 20 September 2000 00:00 (nineteen years ago) link

In fact Robin, as a Momus fan you ought to like that kind of thing! Ho ho.

Tom, Wednesday, 20 September 2000 00:00 (nineteen years ago) link

Ah yes, Tom, but I don't indiscrimately like reinventions of slightly cheesy old songs (cf the poor, rockist / proggist Moog versions of folk songs I've heard, which conceptually make sense, but which even Momus acknowledges to be musically poor).

My dislike of "It's My Party" and the whole early 80s revivalist thing is mainly down to my loathing of what it *stood* for (the belief that everything had been lovely and simple back in those last few pre-Beatles years, populist nostalgia applied to pop, Happy Days, ad nauseam) rather than what it actually sonically is. On the other hand, now Michael mentions it, the actual *arrangement* of that version wasn't an obvious pastiche of the original; it was actually reshaped and reformed considerably and presumably got a few superannuated Kennedy-pop bores up in arms. Maybe I should seek out an MP3 ...

Robin Carmody, Thursday, 21 September 2000 00:00 (nineteen years ago) link

"...but which even Momus acknowledges to be musically poor"

Blimey! *Even* Momus?

Being called 'musically poor' by Momus is like being called loud by Lemmy, or being called a ridiculous hippy by John Lennon, or being called irritating by a barber shop quartet featuring Damon Albarn, Brett Anderson, Liam Gallagher and Robbie Williams.

The mind boggles, primarily at the news that Momus recognises that it is possible to be something other than 'musically poor'. I wonder why he doesn't try it sometime.

Tanya Headon, Tuesday, 26 September 2000 00:00 (nineteen years ago) link

I don't really trust Laurie Anderson, but I suppose there has to be a place for risk-taking. Maybe she occupies that place, maybe not. Anyway, I never disagree with Steady Mike.

But on to Dave Stewart.

1. Could the moniker coincidence be why the Eurythmics one started calling himself 'David A. Stewart'?

2. I heard that version of 'It's My Party' just the other day, having found it on a big Stiff records compilation, for the first time in years and years. It's a marvellous coincidence that it should come up here at the same time. I rather like it, and think I kind of liked it at the time too.

3. I agree with SM that it's not retro at all, for the reasons he gives, and

4. I'm afraid I can't see why Robin particularly sees the early 80s as a retro era. Mightn't we just as well say that 1985 (Back To The Future), 1987 (Stand By Me), 1990 (The Wonder Years - I know these aren't pop things, but they tie in with pop and the surrounding culture of their years), 1995 (Oasis) were more retro than 1981 - which I tend to see, in an admittedly very shaky and hazy retrospect, as a time of some kind of relative futurism and adventure, or at least a load of naff (and not very retro) funk?

the pinefox, Tuesday, 26 September 2000 00:00 (nineteen years ago) link

Ah Tanya, I meant that Momus is assumed to love anything that might be called "Analog Folk", I was just pointing out that he doesn't always :).

And Pinefox, there was indeed far more modernist and futurist pop in the charts in 1981 than there was in 1995. Nevertheless, it's easy to forget how big the 1958-63 (or thereabouts) revival was ...

Robin Carmody, Thursday, 28 September 2000 00:00 (nineteen years ago) link

three months pass...
Back to the original question: classic. I like the song "Big Science" even better, the rest is shite though.

o.munoz, Thursday, 18 January 2001 01:00 (nineteen years ago) link

three weeks pass...
Who are you people and what do you want?

I just put on a bunch of mp3's from the 80's. Among others Take Me To The River by The Talking Heads and O Superman. I remember Take Me To The River as being HUGE and was surprised by how tinny and hollow it sounds now. O Superman, on the other hand, seemed mildly interesting at the time but was just captivating now. Enough to go look up what other people had to say about it. It's a thing of its particular moment. I wouldn't put it on for anyone who hadn't heard it in 1982 except as a lesson in musicology. But a very special thing of its moment. For those who heard it then, a classic. For everyone else, the answer to the question who was number 2 when Dave Stewart was number 1.

Michael, Thursday, 8 February 2001 01:00 (nineteen years ago) link

This chain has really got me thinking.

Sitting in the bath at the time, as a boy, listening to the UK top 10.

We had in the top 3:- Its my party Oh Superman Under your thumb

This was a defining moment in my life- I have just realised, 20 years later

And WHAT a defining moment. No wonder my taste is fucked up.

Mark Dooling, Monday, 19 February 2001 01:00 (nineteen years ago) link

two weeks pass...
I am twenty years old (making me about 1 when O Superman came out) however I belive it was the first song i ever heard. I think it has possibly influenced me now more than i realise as my current tastes include successors such as the Aphex Twin, Autechre and Plaid. I also make music ( http://www.mp3.com/autofire ) of that ilk. I can't believe "O Superman" even made it into the charts let alone number 2! It's a very special and emotional record to me, especially now i appreciate it for it's nostalgic aspect and it's musical genius... but it's hard to imagine an 8 minute, beatless song that refers to Nietzche and satyrises Massenet going anywhere near the Top 40 today.

Charles Frame, Sunday, 11 March 2001 01:00 (nineteen years ago) link

three months pass...
As far as I'm concerned - Dud. I like Laurie's work otherwise, though. And my favorite album of hers is 'Big Science', but. I never have been able to stand that track, ever. Saw her live around '96 or so and...she was great. Still, can't stand that one. Have all her studio albums, but. Nevertheless.

michael g. breece, Thursday, 5 July 2001 00:00 (eighteen years ago) link

Okay, okay, somebody has to stand up for *that* Dave Stewart (of & Gaskin fame). Though one wouldn't know it from that agreeably blech version of "It's My Party", he's an amazing keyboardist with a harmonic sense above and beyond what's typically out there in the field. Listen to "Hell's Bells" off of Bill Bruford's One of a Kind, or maybe "Starlight on Seaweed" from National Health's Missing Links for a taste of what he can do. And the rest of the album that has "It's My Party" ain't so bad (I think there's a version of Thomas Dolby's "Leipzig" on there, fares better)...

Joe, Thursday, 5 July 2001 00:00 (eighteen years ago) link

Oh, I didn't answer the question. Classic, of course, but goes on a bit too long, and I think she should have made the lyrics less enigmatic and more concretely creepy.

Joe, Thursday, 5 July 2001 00:00 (eighteen years ago) link

Golly - have just reread this entire thread. Have forgotten how 'interesting' it was. We were so young and innocent then.

the pinefox, Thursday, 5 July 2001 00:00 (eighteen years ago) link

O Superman: I always thought of it as a lonely computer singing a song to itself. Twenty years old now. Still sounds crystalline, magical, and, thanks to Mr Bush, thoroughly, depressingly, relevant.

Great hair, too.

I tend to pair "O Superman" with that other great New York Female Artist 80s Pop Hit: "Kissing With Confidence" by Will Powers. Photographer Lynn Goldsmith + vocoder to make her sound male + quotes from selp-help books + Carly Simon + Todd Rundgren + Steve Winwood = pop genius.

Altogether now: "Will I spoil it / with my overbite..."

Dickon Edwards, Thursday, 12 July 2001 00:00 (eighteen years ago) link

Thank you for reminding us all of Will Powers--the first real virtual popstar. (If you don't count The Archies.)

X. Y. Zedd, Thursday, 12 July 2001 00:00 (eighteen years ago) link

one month passes...
Well I think understanding is not quiet comprehending & vica/versar (hmm....is that spelt right?).....Ms Anderson's "O Superman" in my mashed, alcoholic(currently that is) mind is a mesmerising classic...hhhhmm shame I didn't buy it at the time, might have helped to No1....yeah on average the 80's wasn't a classic year for records in the charts...but it was experimental enough to allow this & others (like, party fears two) ...to be hits ...unlike todays charts which is all about hearsay...etc...say no more

Kev, Tuesday, 14 August 2001 00:00 (eighteen years ago) link

three months pass...
what?

Jeff Guidry, Wednesday, 21 November 2001 01:00 (eighteen years ago) link

apparently it harks back to the days when laurie was going out with dean cain. teri hatcher doesn't know about it so keep schtúmm

bob snoom, Wednesday, 21 November 2001 01:00 (eighteen years ago) link

The TV Cream cartel hate "O Superman", incidentally, because it dares to interrupt their idea of what the early 80s were like. It still fucks off the right people. For that alone, more uber-classic than ever.

Robin Carmody, Wednesday, 21 November 2001 01:00 (eighteen years ago) link

O Superman = classic, proven by the fact that when some long- forgotten act tried to do a pisstake of it a few months later it totally sucked.

hu hu hu hu hu hu hu hu hu hu hu hu hu hu hu hu hu hu hu hu hu hu hu hu hu hu hu hu...

Jeff W, Wednesday, 21 November 2001 01:00 (eighteen years ago) link

one year passes...
Revive!

Cos I just found the 7" in a pile of old, er, 7"s and slapped it on, nonchalantly, only to have my brain accidentally realligned by its planet-conquering GREATNESS. God, it's like drugs, *proper* drugs, disorienting and euphoric and scary and wide-eyed and legless and...fucking hell.

CharlieNo4 (Charlie), Thursday, 28 August 2003 15:10 (sixteen years ago) link

yeah.

mitch L=lastnamewithheld (mitchlnw), Thursday, 28 August 2003 15:34 (sixteen years ago) link

(oops - the name thing was a fuckup, not a hyperobscure nietzche reference or anything)

mitch lastnamewithheld (mitchlnw), Thursday, 28 August 2003 15:37 (sixteen years ago) link

(Fr.Nietszche? Jack Nietzsche? Fite?)

t\'\'t (t\'\'t), Thursday, 28 August 2003 15:44 (sixteen years ago) link

O...h -- "O Superman"=Classic, 'fcourse

t\'\'t (t\'\'t), Thursday, 28 August 2003 15:46 (sixteen years ago) link

classic

amateurist (amateurist), Thursday, 28 August 2003 15:50 (sixteen years ago) link

I like this song, except I always wish there was more of the synth counterpoint stuff that comes in at the end.

jaymc (jaymc), Thursday, 28 August 2003 15:51 (sixteen years ago) link

one of the best Saturday Night Live performances evah

Aaron A., Thursday, 28 August 2003 16:09 (sixteen years ago) link

msp to thread

gygax! (gygax!), Thursday, 28 August 2003 16:34 (sixteen years ago) link

its totally classic. The lyrics are stupendous

So hold me, Mom, in your long arms.
So hold me,Mom, in your long arms.
In your automatic arms. Your electronic arms.
In your arms.
So hold me, Mom, in your long arms.
Your petrochemical arms. Your military arms.
In your arms.

they was she refers to the military industrial complex while superficilly also talking about physical intimacy and more specifically finding safety in your mothers arms in very moving i think.

But then i always cry at songs featuring robots.

jed_e_3 (jed_e_3), Thursday, 28 August 2003 16:43 (sixteen years ago) link

Classic.

Alex in NYC (vassifer), Thursday, 28 August 2003 17:09 (sixteen years ago) link

One of the least poor songs of the 1980s.

Momus (Momus), Thursday, 28 August 2003 17:32 (sixteen years ago) link

Am I allowed to wish there was a beat?

Tom Breihan (Tom Breihan), Thursday, 28 August 2003 18:11 (sixteen years ago) link

Do the words mean anything? I don't think the words mean anything.

Evan, Thursday, 28 August 2003 18:26 (sixteen years ago) link

Closer to dud than classic I'd say, although not quite annoying enough that I'd bother to hate it that much.

Geir Hongro (GeirHong), Thursday, 28 August 2003 18:37 (sixteen years ago) link

uh oh

amateurist (amateurist), Thursday, 28 August 2003 18:45 (sixteen years ago) link

but geir it's like beatless orbital! (kinda)

mitch lastnamewithheld (mitchlnw), Thursday, 28 August 2003 18:46 (sixteen years ago) link

and we all know Geir can't live without them beats

Curt1s St3ph3ns, Thursday, 28 August 2003 18:49 (sixteen years ago) link

Maybe you could say it sounds a bit like what Orbital might have sounded like if they had nothing else to use than a Commodore 64. :-)

Geir Hongro (GeirHong), Friday, 29 August 2003 00:10 (sixteen years ago) link

Am I allowed to wish there was a beat?

Line of the day, young Tom...line of the day.

And in answer to your query, yes you are! But trust me, it'd be awful.

CharlieNo4 (Charlie), Friday, 29 August 2003 01:22 (sixteen years ago) link

I smell a remix. And an awful one.

Alex in NYC (vassifer), Friday, 29 August 2003 01:23 (sixteen years ago) link

I've never liked anything by Laurie Anderson. Maybe I should listen again - I haven't listened really closely or in a long time - but I'll say dud for now. The lines quoted above are sort of an example of why. She turns me off the same way the Talking Heads turn me off. Like this dorky smartass but fundamentally corny 'quirky' 'wit' that says nothing at all to me but that arts profs always just love to death. And the music just never seemed to compensate.

sundar subramanian (sundar), Friday, 29 August 2003 02:42 (sixteen years ago) link

Classic with a capital C. I played this for my girlfriend, who was born a year after this song came out, had never heard it before, and pretty much regards Laurie Anderson as "Lou Reed's girlfriend," and she was mesmerized. It stands up as a piece of music, in my mind, as well as any song recorded in the 80s. And, if forced to make a choice between listening to Momus's entire catalog and listening to this song on repeat for an equivalent length of time, I could make my decision in a microsecond, as I'm sure which one I'd get more out of.

Jesse Fuchs (Jesse Fuchs), Friday, 29 August 2003 02:46 (sixteen years ago) link

I think I need to turn repeat on.

onimo, Wednesday, 17 October 2007 21:56 (twelve years ago) link

nabisco ridiculously otm.

Turangalila, Wednesday, 17 October 2007 22:11 (twelve years ago) link

still one of the best hit songs of all time and yes, nabisco otm.

the next grozart, Thursday, 18 October 2007 00:42 (twelve years ago) link

Laurie Anderson is such a legend.

I know, right?, Thursday, 18 October 2007 09:07 (twelve years ago) link

one year passes...

nabisco deserves a medal or something for that post

Trik Turner Fan Club President (Tape Store), Saturday, 29 November 2008 07:54 (eleven years ago) link

dud

The Saving Grace of Gospel House (The Reverend), Saturday, 29 November 2008 08:06 (eleven years ago) link

^^^ Crazy talk

Me and Ruth Lorenzo, Rollin' in the Benzo (Noodle Vague), Saturday, 29 November 2008 09:20 (eleven years ago) link

Quite possibly my #1 track (single or otherwise) from 1981.

Soundslike, Saturday, 29 November 2008 15:48 (eleven years ago) link

Think outside the box, Rev.

Watch Beer, Drink People (Bimble Is Still More Goth Than You), Saturday, 29 November 2008 22:13 (eleven years ago) link

Fascinating facts: This track was first aired on UK radio on John Peel producer John Walters' Saturday afternoon arts show Walters' Weekly. Apparently a big favorite with UK serial killer Dennis Nilsen.

Soukesian, Saturday, 29 November 2008 22:44 (eleven years ago) link

Being called 'musically poor' by Momus is like...being called irritating by a barber shop quartet featuring Damon Albarn, Brett Anderson, Liam Gallagher and Robbie Williams.

LOLOLOL

roxymuzak, Saturday, 29 November 2008 22:48 (eleven years ago) link

momus is great

Trik Turner Fan Club President (Tape Store), Saturday, 29 November 2008 22:55 (eleven years ago) link

i love momus, im mainly loling at the barbershop quartet here

roxymuzak, Saturday, 29 November 2008 22:55 (eleven years ago) link

three years pass...

this song's been in my head a lot lately.

make like a steak and beef (dog latin), Wednesday, 17 October 2012 10:08 (seven years ago) link

I'm surprised at sund4r's skepticism about the lyrics! People here have already rooted out some of the great stuff about them, so I won't go too far into it. But the bit of them that seems to have the most resonance in the current decade isn't the planes, so far as I can tell -- it's that asking to fall into the loving embrace of the big strong American automatic/electronic/petrochemical mom, and of course the stuff that leads up to it: "When love is gone, there's always justice; and when justice is gone, there's always force; and when force is gone, there's always mom."
Having just watched the video again, though, I think the amazing thing about this isn't really in lyrics or meaning or symbols, or anything. We can kind of hint around the "atmosphere" or the "sound" of the thing, bu it's hard to describe exactly what's going on with it: I think its stillness and repetition -- and the odd way it feels soothing where you'd think it'd feel incredibly tense and irritating -- have this strange effect of sensitizing you. You very quickly stop experiencing it with the attention span of a normal pop song, and instead slow things down, focusing on each little gesture in turn, concentrating on a whole different level -- hence, in the video, she can use this language of really minimal gestures, where watching her (say) make a fist seems like all you need for the moment. It's a really enjoyable mindset to get into.

― nabisco (nabisco), Saturday, 23 September 2006 19:26 (6 years ago) Bookmark Flag Post Permalink

Completely OTM. This is one of the first songs I can remember ever hearing, but obviously as a tiny infant I didn't realise how remarkable a record it was until I was much older. The whole piece sounds strangely soothing and womblike to me, but in the same way one might feel if placed inside a hermetically sealed bubble and wrapped in white towels by, well, assembly-line robotic arms. The double-entendres of "military arm/petrochemical arm" only struck me the other day while listening back.

It's strange to return to it with critical adult ears, having grown up listening to it in a totally decontextualised, unprejudiced way. But there are certain images that I'm not sure I imagined as a kid or if they're definitely there. The bit wear she says "Smoking or non-smoking" sounds so perfectly syncopated that it phases in exactly the same way as the effect you hear when on a passenger flight.

make like a steak and beef (dog latin), Wednesday, 17 October 2012 10:29 (seven years ago) link

two years pass...

this song is so gorgeous. heard it for the first time in like a decade yesterday and was suitably blown away.

(The Other) J.D. (J.D.), Friday, 17 October 2014 20:13 (five years ago) link

I related some years ago how I played it to Amber and Alice on a school run one time, I mention it here because Nabisco's description is exactly how they listened to it.

Mark G, Saturday, 18 October 2014 22:35 (five years ago) link

three years pass...

Started crying on the street thinking about this song today

flappy bird, Tuesday, 21 November 2017 19:09 (two years ago) link

Literally saw her perform this here the night of 9/11/01.

Josh in Chicago, Tuesday, 21 November 2017 19:11 (two years ago) link

flappy <3

In a slipshod style (Ross), Tuesday, 21 November 2017 19:41 (two years ago) link

I can't even begin to imagine what that was like xp

imago, Tuesday, 21 November 2017 19:41 (two years ago) link

yeah Josh that is absolutely nuts, what was that like??

flappy bird, Tuesday, 21 November 2017 19:49 (two years ago) link

It was mostly weird. I don't know how old/young any of you are, but that was just a weird day all around. I had a friend interview her the day of, and she told him (iirc) that she had just gotten off the phone with Lou, who was watching the towers burn from their roof. That night at the Park West - and it wasn't late yet - no one really had any idea what was going on, and of course no one had any real idea what was to come. But we all seemed to recognize the prescience of this song, and wondered whether she would even play it. Which she did, with no commentary. So: creepy. But it's only gotten more so in the months and years later. And of course it was pretty creepy to begin with.

I want to say that week I also saw PJ Harvey, who was touring "Stories from the City, Stories from the Sea," which is also infused with all sorts of eerily coincidental 9/11 stuff.

Josh in Chicago, Tuesday, 21 November 2017 19:58 (two years ago) link

thanks for sharing that, Josh

^ and yeah stories definitely had that vibe. also mercury rev's all is dream came out on 9/11. lincoln's eyes really creeped me out at that time.

In a slipshod style (Ross), Tuesday, 21 November 2017 20:19 (two years ago) link

'Stories from the City' won the Mercury Prize which was announced on 9/11. She was in Washington and phoned in to receive the award in a ceremony which was as bizarre and downbeat as you'd expect.

Dan Worsley, Tuesday, 21 November 2017 20:29 (two years ago) link

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IFGqR4b_YG4

Dan Worsley, Tuesday, 21 November 2017 20:33 (two years ago) link

I saw an insane and devastating German Richard III where Richard's descent into madness was soundtracked to O Superman. Here it is below in German with French Subs (I saw it in English). Shamefully, at the most intense moment in the show (you could hear a pin drop) just after the point where O superman starts properly my phone rang! The whole theatre looked in my direction as I fumbled into my pocket. Richard III stopped acting and looked at me and said "did you set your alarm to wake you up after two hours so you could see the end of the show?". As soon as I managed to switch my phone off he continued the show without missing a beat.

The Breaths from the track start around the jumping off point here and the song proper starts just around 2:04:50

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OsOtCIpi-M0&t=113m10s

Susan Stranglehands (jed_), Tuesday, 21 November 2017 20:38 (two years ago) link

imago, i suspect you will love that^^^

Susan Stranglehands (jed_), Tuesday, 21 November 2017 20:40 (two years ago) link

I'll try again: The breaths start at 1:53:00 The main part of the track starts at around 2:05:00

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OsOtCIpi-M0

Susan Stranglehands (jed_), Tuesday, 21 November 2017 20:44 (two years ago) link

i killed the thread with radical german theatre!

Susan Stranglehands (jed_), Tuesday, 21 November 2017 23:36 (two years ago) link

I only heard this song for the first time recently. I've had Mister Heartbreak for years and love it so I have no idea why I never looked further. The refrain popped into my head this morning and it just hit me like a sledgehammer. Such an immense, haunting, beautiful piece. The video had me spellbound. Had no idea about the 9/11 connection until I read this thread.

flappy bird, Tuesday, 21 November 2017 23:57 (two years ago) link

One of those songs I wouldn't normally choose to listen to because so well known (and long) but it came on my spotify discover playlist a few weeks ago and yeah, I had a something in my eye moment.

Monogo doesn't socialise (ledge), Wednesday, 22 November 2017 11:26 (two years ago) link

Lmao

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NJBZifZ4TIc

flappy bird, Saturday, 25 November 2017 07:03 (two years ago) link

Ah, Zoo-era totp. See also TVC-15.

koogs, Saturday, 25 November 2017 10:00 (two years ago) link

The whole theatre looked in my direction as I fumbled into my pocket. Richard III stopped acting and looked at me and said "did you set your alarm to wake you up after two hours so you could see the end of the show?".

new ilm posts which will continue to haunt your thoughts.

Luna Schlosser, Saturday, 25 November 2017 12:31 (two years ago) link

i really wanted to see that production at the barbican, but I was away

plax (ico), Saturday, 25 November 2017 13:33 (two years ago) link

one year passes...

This is kinda amazing, I had no idea -

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EQBlvyE460A

MaresNest, Wednesday, 14 August 2019 15:34 (nine months ago) link

wow, thanks!

Funky Isolations (jed_), Wednesday, 14 August 2019 16:53 (nine months ago) link

Wow

flappy bird, Wednesday, 14 August 2019 17:06 (nine months ago) link

Oh my!

Michael Jones, Thursday, 15 August 2019 11:30 (nine months ago) link

lots of elements of 'Walk The Dog' in the first bit too

frame casual (dog latin), Thursday, 15 August 2019 12:16 (nine months ago) link

This is really something. Part II in particular. Chills. Wow and flutter adding to the queasiness of the strings.

Also...May 17 1980. I remember that weekend (and not just because England got thrashed by Wales) :/

Michael Jones, Thursday, 15 August 2019 12:50 (nine months ago) link

this is crazy

na (NA), Thursday, 15 August 2019 14:18 (nine months ago) link

For dessert - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hXfMpZeiKtk

MaresNest, Thursday, 15 August 2019 14:40 (nine months ago) link

this is all great, thanks!

tylerw, Thursday, 15 August 2019 14:51 (nine months ago) link

Sooooo good. Damn

flappy bird, Sunday, 18 August 2019 05:31 (nine months ago) link

yes, incredible. thank you. i'd like to know more about the making of it. the youtube description - "Shortly before beginning work on what would become her magnum opus 'United States Parts I-IV', Laurie Anderson began receiving commissions for new music from several American orchestras. Unfortunately, she had no previous experience writing for orchestras, having preferring to work with small ensembles and electronics in her performance art. The result was an uncomfortable mix of prerecorded tape, electronic instrumentation, and unorthodox orchestral writing" - is kind of pejorative, but the results are stunning. i love work like this that doesn't have an obvious "home" for performance

Karl Malone, Sunday, 18 August 2019 06:13 (nine months ago) link

also the part 7 minutes in is unexpectedly gnarly and heavy

Karl Malone, Sunday, 18 August 2019 06:14 (nine months ago) link

it sounds like work product, which it is - fascinating for fans, by no means something for people who have never heard LA before

flappy bird, Sunday, 18 August 2019 21:55 (nine months ago) link

nine months pass...

AH AH AH AH MA MA MA MA DILL DILL DILL DILL OH OH OH OH: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fgU5Cztx490

ernestp, Monday, 18 May 2020 21:54 (two weeks ago) link


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