The Residents: C/D;S&D

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Mitch Lastnamewithheld, Tuesday, 16 October 2001 00:00 (eighteen years ago) link

well i've tried and i've tried and i've tried down the years but apart from the sleeve on to 'satisfaction' single, i think they're no good: it's HAHA we see right the machinations and trickery of the music industry and to prove it, here's a sludgy boring "parody" of the machinations and trickery of the music industry, for we have no ideas of our own oh no that would be too much to ask

mark s, Tuesday, 16 October 2001 00:00 (eighteen years ago) link

Have to disagree with you there, Mark -- recently got their DVD collection of videos, and both musically and visually I found it quite compelling. Certainly they can trowel on the irony pretty thick, thus a demolition of "We Are the World" on the collection, but they created a number of haunting and intriguing moments. And I lurve "Sinister Exaggerator."

Ned Raggett, Tuesday, 16 October 2001 00:00 (eighteen years ago) link

I'm constantly surrounded by Residents freaks -- wherever I live, whether it's more than half the San Diego indie musicians, or Zappa- esque high school prom dance pop bands from Seattle...

I'm scared to buy a Residents CD, because I'm afraid I'd fall into buying them all -- and there are, like, what... 173 albums or something?

That said, I'd say the new "Icky Flix" DVD (if you have a DVD player) is the best place to start, because it is an assemblance of their "greatest hits" to some degree. Plus the videos are insane.

Otherwise, "Third Reich 'n Roll", "Hell", "Eskimo" have all gotten high praise from the Residents fanatics I've consorted with...

Oh, and see them live if you can... (and can afford it... their shows tend to be a lil' pricey). You don't have to know their material to enjoy the live shows. You just have to tolerate a multimedia headfuck that accurately simulates bad dreams on bad acid.

Brian MacDonald, Tuesday, 16 October 2001 00:00 (eighteen years ago) link

I used to have 3rd Reich and I hated it. Really, I did. And I like "experimental" or "avant garde" shit to a certain extent. However, I have some of their newer synth-type stuff and I love it! It's amazing to me how organic they make those buttons sound.

Nude Spock, Tuesday, 16 October 2001 00:00 (eighteen years ago) link

They're really really REALLY inconsistent, and the bad stuff is abysmal, and even the good stuff I rarely get the urge to put on for a spin. That said, I do like _Eskimo_ a bunch, and bits of _Commercial Record_, and I admire the joke behind _George & James_, and their single of Hank Williams' "Kaw-Liga" totally lit up a dance floor when DJ $mall ¢hange spun it at a club I was at a few years ago.

Douglas Wolk, Tuesday, 16 October 2001 00:00 (eighteen years ago) link

Their Elvis tribute/pisstake alb is truly ghastly - are they always that unmusical, unfunny, uninteresting?

Andrew L, Tuesday, 16 October 2001 00:00 (eighteen years ago) link

Andrew, the only proper answer to that question is, "No, definitely not! But, sometimes, very much so!"

Nude Spock, Tuesday, 16 October 2001 00:00 (eighteen years ago) link

More classic in theory than in practice, I suspect.

The only album of theirs I own is "The Residents' Commercial Album". It's wonderful, and arguably the best distillation of their 'pop' side. I also have their debut ("Meet the Residents", was it?) and "Third Reich" on a tape somewhere. Both are okay, especially the former. I've never heard Eskimo (or Diskomo, for that matter) but would love to.

One other Residents-related sound recording you MUST search is a cassette tape starring Penn Gillette (this was way before Penn and Teller really took off). Basically he was locked in a windowless room for an extended period by the band (who's music he was totally unaware of hitherto), given one by one their entire back catalogue to listen to, and invited to make an audio diary of the experience. It's a classic!

When the Residents started on their composers series and the Mole trilogy, things started getting seriously dodgy, so I gave up on them. But I've read interesting pieces about their more recent projects, especially the ones involving other media than (just) music. Are there any decent critiques on the net of this later stuff that people could point me to? (i.e. not something by a bemused outsider banging on about eyeballs-for-heads)

Jeff, Wednesday, 17 October 2001 00:00 (eighteen years ago) link

The most melodious records are Not Available and Eskimo, Not Available being my pick as it's less 'we are important' than the latter. The most interesting is the 'Residents sing the Beatles & The Beatles sing the Residents' 45, which is at least 20 years ahead of its time.

Most of their output up to Commercial Album is worth hearing, tho 3rd RnR is one joke stretched over 2 sides of a record, thus a trifle wearing. Everything I've heard post-CA is pretty awful. It's like "we can afford all this technology now, see what we can do with it!" thus destroying all their string-&sealing-wax creativity (cf: Laurie Anderson).

, Wednesday, 17 October 2001 00:00 (eighteen years ago) link

Why has no one mentioned Duck Stab/Buster and Glen? In it's own weird way, it's their pop collection (rather than their "pop" collection, a la Third Reich and Commercial Album). Tunes like "Constantinople" and "Hello Skinny" represent their least cantakerous swipes at the song form. I can even remember some horrible ska-rock band recording a cover of "Constantinople" many years ago. If that's not a sign of accessibility (albeit an unfortunate one), I don't know what is.

That said, I don't listen to my Residents albums that much anymore, but I'm glad to have them around. Pretty much anything they did before the unfortunate "Mole trilogy" (beginning of the prolonged and dispiriting end) is worth hearing in my book.

lee g, Wednesday, 17 October 2001 00:00 (eighteen years ago) link

"Duck Stab" is great, isn't it?

Norman Fay, Wednesday, 17 October 2001 00:00 (eighteen years ago) link

five months pass...
look what i found!!

mark s, Saturday, 13 April 2002 00:00 (eighteen years ago) link

Sinker, you naughty man... this is how we spend our Saturdays?

and no mention of Goosebump either, tut-tut

hmmm, Harvey Williams even?
Harvey puhlease make the next TBS album sound like da Residents!

Paul, Saturday, 13 April 2002 00:00 (eighteen years ago) link

Nice idea, but beyond my conrol, mister...

harveyw, Saturday, 13 April 2002 00:00 (eighteen years ago) link

"You YesYesYes" - even The Residents fall in love

Paul, Saturday, 13 April 2002 00:00 (eighteen years ago) link

one year passes...
Hmm. There's a new offering from the Residents called WB:RMX, which is their Warner Bros. Album from over thirty years ago, remixed. But, not "remixed" as in "cleaned up, edited, etc." but "remixed" as in "add generic techno drum beats," or so that's the best I can tell from the audio samples. Tell me it isn't so. Has anyone heard it? What I've heard from the Residents, pre-Santa Dog, is pretty amazing/messed up ("Hallowed Be Thy Ween" is completely bonkers and totally great). Ahh, those wonderful pre-sequencer days of the Residents...

Ernest P. (ernestp), Monday, 9 February 2004 05:46 (sixteen years ago) link

Residents, circa Eskimo seem pretty out there (in a very good way), though admittedly, I haven't kept up with them much. I'd kill for a collab with Biota or NWW.

dleone (dleone), Monday, 9 February 2004 06:15 (sixteen years ago) link

another vote for "duck stab"/ "buster & glen"/ "goosebumps" which all appeared on the one cd, and represent a pretty impressive pop music stab, songs that are both funny and spooky in a deliberately silly way.
if i'm in the right mood then "krafty cheese" (their french nuclear testing protest song) and "the laughing song" in particular usually have me ROTFLOL.
and i remember seeing the b&w videos for some of these songs (eg "hello skinny") late night on tv years before the deluge of MTV "rock videos" and being slightly spooked by them. Although they were still genuinely silly and weird, they were impressively so.

george gosset (gegoss), Monday, 9 February 2004 06:44 (sixteen years ago) link

oh, i'm more of a fan of their "analog period" too, the "concept albums" from the '70s, even if the talent might be more for daffiness, parody and concept than any real avant-garde zeal.

the parodies of "george & james" i found grating after one listen. Both the "composer series" and the "mole series" seemed to be pushing the same musical plonking idea too far, and then they got into digital synths, which just sounded boring.

i think it's a pity that Snakefinger died. I saw them live once (13th anniversary tour), and while the Residents sounded sequenced (as has been mentioned), they were funny/ridiculous as a stage show, but Snakefinger stole the show with his witty-gritty guitar noises.

george gosset (gegoss), Monday, 9 February 2004 06:58 (sixteen years ago) link

Their best albums are (in order):

Not Available
The Commercial Album
Third Reich 'n' Roll

The following two are almost as good:

Duckstab/ Buster and Glen
Meet the Residents

I confess to being one of those idiots who owns most of what they have done, but the last album I bought was "Freak Show", which is a while ago now. "Hello Skinny" is the best music video I've ever seen.

Dadaismus (Dada), Monday, 9 February 2004 10:45 (sixteen years ago) link

george gosset wrote: the parodies of "george & james" i found grating after one listen.

I'm not sure they were trying to purposely parody Gershwin/James Brown, because they actually have a sincere reverence for them. I guess anything they cover is going to sound pretty strange. But anyway, I saw a show on their latest tour, for Demons Dance Alone, and surprisingly, the lead Resident had a poignant story about meeting James Brown as a child. Apparently, Brown and his entourage needed help with directions after a show, and the Resident guy and his friends helped them out, and when Brown thanked them, it was one of the most treasured moments of his life - but to Brown, it probably was just like any other day. It was an oddly personal moment in the show, which is ironic since of course we (supposedly) don't know who the Resident is or what his face looks like. Then some idiot in the audience shouted out "James Brown stole the eyeball!".

Ernest P. (ernestp), Monday, 9 February 2004 13:06 (sixteen years ago) link

I like all the Residents albums I own: "Duck Stab/Buster and Glen", "Commercial Album", "Eskimo" and "Freak Show". Possibly "Eskimo" is the weirdest of those, and my favourite: a beautifully glacial air about it all, and the last track is a slow-burning classic. "Freak Show" (from 1990) is possibly very underrated I'd say; I found it quite affecting, though it's probably not as well-formed a whole as CA or DS/B&G.

Tom May (Tom May), Monday, 9 February 2004 15:35 (sixteen years ago) link

i'll dig up "george and james" again and give it another listen alongside Brown's "Apollo" album. i remember the vocals seeming deliberately non-sensical, presenting a completely hysterical picture of the vocalist, but i guess that's vintage James Brown hard work. Having never really dug Brown's rhythym section anyway, i may well have missed the point. i do remember the george side having lots of those lush slides and blurs gershwin is famous for, but again i'm no gershwin devotee.
i admit too that i was too scared to listen to the john phillip sousa "marhes" at all, and yes, i remember the albums being presented as "homages" at the time. "It's a man's, man's, man's world" is a killer version. It is hard to know how serious they were when they did that since it's such a great version of the song, so Earnest P., thank you for relating the chance meeting anecdote.
in fact i also have to admit that i got fed up with the residents about the time of the soundtracks to "the census taker" and "vileness fats", and "not available" never really did it for me either, so with the endless wait for part 3 of the mole trilogy, imo they've teased and titilated in equal measure.

listening to "3rd r&r" made me realise that i was only just old enough to know some of those songs, but i found all the versions of songs i knew very funny, particularly "light my fire" and "sympathy for 'hey jude'", and i found the "eskimo" soundscapes inevitably comical, even if i wasn't strictly meant to. For me, my first "fake ethnic" album.

and forgot to mention, i've found the slightly out-of-tune analog attack of DS/B&Gs "Birthay Boy" perfect for anonymous answering machine birthday messages

george gosset (gegoss), Monday, 9 February 2004 17:16 (sixteen years ago) link

funny to see this thread come up; I bought WB:RMX on sight when I discovered it online the other day, and listened to it on saturday night.

It is terrible. They've carved up the original Warner Brothers Album tapes into horrible 4/4 loops, which they drop piecemeal & meaninglessly on top of some of the most tasteless drum loops imaginable. Like a drum library CDROM from 1999. Bad bad progressive house. It's a real disappointment. Two or three tracks are nearly okay, but it's so frustrating to have them put this out instead of the original tapes.

'Warner Brothers Album', is apparently a 40 minute edited tape with 39 songs on it, edited from long group jams. I haven't heard that, but have a cassette dub of a 60 minute master reel that obviously contains elements that ended up on it, their versions of 'strawberry fields forever', 'maggie's farm', 2 versions of 'i hear you got religion', 3 versions of 'oh mommy oh daddy can't you see that it's true', etc. It's one mic in a room catching them playing, no overdubs, then spliced together onto a master reel. And while the vocals are maniacal, the young singing resident in full force, what's interesting is how normal they sound; they're just a bunch of maniacs in san mateo in 1970 'freaking out'. It also puts the myth to the idea that they can't play their instruments; they're not 'tight', but the guy on guitar can play quite well. Clearly, they had two options; to tighten up further, or 'unlearn' their instruments and figure out how to play them in new ways. 'Warner Brothers Album' is for fanatics only, but there are a lot of Residents fanatics out there, and it's wonderful to hear the roots of the band. At least as valuable as hearing the Beatles Hamburg tapes. Even the 'Get Back' sessions.

'Baby Sex' is a different matter altogether. It is a masterpiece, as good as any of the released studio albums and it's kind of upsetting to me that they haven't released an intact edition of it yet. Sections of it have been released on various limited edition fan club CDs through the 90's (the two Liver discs, the Snakefinger tribute and the 'History Mystery' disc of 'Huddled Masses'.) 'Hallowed Be Thy Ween'.

Douglas says above that the Residents work are very inconsistent, but I don't think that's true at all; I think they were absolutely solid from 1972-1981, every album, every ep, every single. In 1981 two core members left, leaving only the singing resident and the composing resident, and a lot of new MIDI hardware and sampling synthesizers; from 1981 onward, the discography grows spotty and the album concepts obviously come before the production of the actual music, the music is manufactured to order as an afterthought.

I have heard just about all the later stuff. I still like parts of 'Tunes of Two Cities', the Sousa side of 'Stars n Hank Forever', and a few tracks from 'Our Finest Flowers'. The 2 CD set 'Live at the Fillmore' documents the 1997 25th anniversary concerts, and has superior live versions of things from 'freak show' and 'gingerbread man', and ends with their fairly incredible cover of 'We Are The World'. The 'Liver' series has some great 70's tracks.

The absolute best best thing they've done since 1981 was their tribute to Snakefinger, 'Snakey Wake'.

(Jon L), Monday, 9 February 2004 18:10 (sixteen years ago) link

re-reading my post, I think it's a little harsh. Even today, it's still obvious that the person who wrote the main theme to 'Six Things to a Cycle' can still write some incredibly bizarre, unique and affecting melodies, even when they're sequenced out. And the singing resident is doing some of his best work these days; just as psychotic, and often much more profoundly moving.

oh, also any recording of the '13th Anniversary' show has good sections; generous helpings of Snakefinger. and the James Brown side of 'George and James' sounds _incredible_ when you play it at 45 rpm.

(Jon L), Monday, 9 February 2004 18:36 (sixteen years ago) link

two last things: didn't mean to imply upthread that I've heard anything other than the officially released sections of 'baby sex'. Even just based on the fragments, it's clearly a masterpiece, and needs to come out.

also, wanted to make it clear that I'm not the person responsible for filesharing the WB album; I received the tapes with the promise not to copy them and I've complied. But I'm personally very happy they've turned up online.

(Jon L), Monday, 9 February 2004 20:32 (sixteen years ago) link

I just recently watched the Demons Dance Alone DVD, and while it was very entertaining, I suspect from reading the program notes that the DVD might actually be better than the show was.

I saw them in I guess about 1990 on the King And Eye tour, which was one of the coolest things I've ever seen. I liked that album, too, but haven't heard it in about a decade. The Residents are a group I respect a lot, but hardly ever want to actually listen to for pleasure.

Phil Freeman (Phil Freeman), Monday, 9 February 2004 20:41 (sixteen years ago) link

I agree since '86 they've become much more of a multi-media band; so much of the energy of any one project is dedicated to the visual/performance aspect of the work, it's almost unfair to judge the records on their own (except for the fact that as albums they can't compete with the 1972-1981 stretch). The King And Eye tour ('Cube E') was incredible, and I really enjoyed the 25th anniversary show. I saw Wormwood on opening night and there were some technical difficulties.

also, their 90's CD ROMS set a very high, very strange standard for early interactive media.

(Jon L), Monday, 9 February 2004 20:54 (sixteen years ago) link

That's a shame about WB:RMX totally sucking. Thanks for the info, milton, especially about the early stuff.

Man, those CD-ROMs blew my mind (well, Freak Show and Bad Day on the Midway; Gingerbread Man isn't as interesting). The story of Ted in Midway - making artificial moths out of detritus, wanting to destroy ugliness in the world, then eventually hanging himself because he concludes that he is part of the ugliness - I mean, good lord. Wow. (This is a game?). And the "Harry the Head" story and the Human Mole story in Freak Show...amazing. A disembodied head on the floor, painting angels on a woman's skirt with a paintbrush in his mouth - I like that.

milton wrote: from 1981 onward, the discography grows spotty and the album concepts obviously come before the production of the actual music, the music is manufactured to order as an afterthought.

Yes...and this is a HUGE philosophical shift, for the band. Their lyrical songwriting got better and better, but their music became a lower priority. The epitome of this is God in Three Persons, the lyrics of which are so meticulously written...but the music is probably the dullest and most uninspired of any Residents album. They had forgotten the "Theory of Phonetic Organization":

http://www.rzweb.net/collab/n-senada.html#phonetic

Quote: According to this theory the musician should put the sounds first, building the music up from them rather than developing the music then working down to the sounds that make it up.

You can easily imagine how this theory was used to make music in the earlier days, like "Smelly Tongues" or Eskimo.

Ernest P. (ernestp), Tuesday, 10 February 2004 04:51 (sixteen years ago) link

"I confess to being one of those idiots who owns most of what they have done, but the last album I bought was "Freak Show", which is a while ago now."

You're missing a real return to form with Wormwood and Demons Dance Alone then - best stuff they've done (that I've heard) since The Commercial Album (except possibly God In Three Persons).

Stewart Osborne (Stewart Osborne), Tuesday, 10 February 2004 09:48 (sixteen years ago) link

I've got something like 6 or seven of their albums, and ultimately, while i'd say they're classic, would relegate even the best of their material into mixtapes amongst others. I'd say Eskimo is the only thing i can still listen to all the way through, and then, only on that "one" day amongst hundreds (or thousands).

christoff (christoff), Tuesday, 10 February 2004 16:16 (sixteen years ago) link

In 1981 two core members left, leaving only the singing resident and the composing resident

Is that fact - because I think the singing Resident IS the composing Resident and that, musically, The Residents is now a one man band. In fact, I think what you have in The Residents now is the musical Resident and the design/multimedia Resident. I could be wrong of course.

Dadaismus (Dada), Thursday, 12 February 2004 11:43 (sixteen years ago) link

Even I find "Commercial Album" a lot of fun ;)

Geir Hongro (GeirHong), Thursday, 12 February 2004 11:46 (sixteen years ago) link

>Is that fact - because I think the singing Resident IS the composing Resident and that, musically, The Residents is now a one man band.

I can't be positive, but I'm pretty sure, both from reliable conversation and listening to the records. Listen to 'Stars and Hank' for the clearest example, it's basically a split solo album, each getting a full side.

put on WB:RMX again last night. it's not quite as terrible as I initially thought, it's just that the drum loops are so repellent I couldn't hear through them, there are some interesting things going on if you give it time. still, fans only.

(Jon L), Thursday, 12 February 2004 20:05 (sixteen years ago) link

rereading the Phonetic Organization theory cements one thing though -- you're right, dadaismus, they certainly do belong on the musique concrete reference list, their theory's identical to Schaeffer's whole point about how composition can't begin until after you've chosen your sound objects.

from http://www.jahsonic.com/PierreSchaeffer.html

He also described the composer of musique concrete as one who"...Takes his point of departure the objets sonore, the sound objects, which are the equivalent of visual images, and which therefore alter the procedures of musical composition completely...The Concrete experiment in music consists of building sonorous objects, not with the play of numbers and seconds of the metronome, but with pieces of time torn from the cosmos." (3)

(Jon L), Friday, 13 February 2004 03:02 (sixteen years ago) link

relistening to Fingerprince and Not Available today confirmed what i felt about Duck Stab and the Commercial album -- the residents are my favourite sounding band (re: the above-mentioned sound objects).

Those '70s albums seem to take apparently seperate 'tracks' within songs and use them as layers, and by then blurring them, twisting them, deftly tweaking the whole nervous system going right up and especially right down the octaves with those beautifully warm tones, these are masterful displays of synth playing, both virtuosity and creativity.

that those 'songs' can have very sharp noises and very curvy noises co-existing with so much else often going on in the mix, i say the residents were quite a way ahead of Kraftwerk (who spring to mind as aprox. peers). The Kraftwerk work rate just doesn't compare to the Residents. So many deft tweakings per song ! Such precision with bass width and sequencing. ! Humour ! Cultural critique ! One of the earliest 'indie' labels !

my point: Stereolab can get as much timbral twist, but they can't wrench as much humour or perversely human/ alien width-of-purpose out of the same machines.
That New Order became the poster people for the post-analog MIDI sound really evidences how retarded synth music became with the new polyphonic toys of the '80s. The wretched 'chorus' effect -- i first saw one on a synth on the Juno 6 and listening to that synth it really sounded like it sucked. Reverb and chorus and the implicit overtone rich chorus-like impact of polyphony itself, as used by Van Halen and New Order (two very similar sounding bands), these early '80s 'digital synth' moments, they have a tenth of the warmth and none of that continual musical rates-of-change sound that make the '70s residents records _the_ synth pop records for the technologies of the times, and still charming and unique (antique as any '60s psych band is saying nothing).

How ironic that people buy analog synths on eBay today precisely to try and regain that level of control the residents always had, and that the '80s and '90s were blighted by digital synths, with all the noises pretty much sounding the same, all the while the digital synths seen as 'progress'.
(or more importantly, except for a couple of brian eno records, there are no other '70s 'art pop' records containing the sheer sonic detail and invention of the residents artful displays of synth virtuosity and inspiration)

and if you can think of other music with as much timbral artfulness per-beat,
tell me about it please :
(here will do)

george gosset (gegoss), Sunday, 15 February 2004 12:09 (sixteen years ago) link

well, i'm wrong, there are plenty of other interesting synth bands, as though early synths more often turned up in more 'artie' bands in the '70s

somehow the residents got their records distributed. i suppose they were any early college radio favourite. if it is satire or parody, it's not as if that feels predominant or forced. it's nice to think of the residents existing out of CA in the US since the times of Nixon, and managing to annoy him. sound effects are a guilty pleasure, but i do find them danceable. the faster material is earlier in their career. i like that some of them have been around doing that in one form or another for this length of time. like some running gag. i think critics sometimes find it easier to beat up on things that are meant to be funny, but there is still generally goodwill for the residents, even if fans sometimes feel a little let down. i think there's enough fun stuff to happily outweigh their bad stuff.

george gosset (gegoss), Sunday, 15 February 2004 15:20 (sixteen years ago) link

ten months pass...
New album "Animal Lover" due out in Feb. apparently.

Stewart Osborne (Stewart Osborne), Thursday, 6 January 2005 12:55 (fifteen years ago) link

http://www.residents.com/C1016472556/E14207023/Media/four-visionsweb.jpg

THE RESIDENTS
BRAND NEW ALBUM RELEASE
ANIMAL LOVER - OUT 14th FEBRUARY 2005

"Dogs love their friends and bite their enemies, quite unlike people, who are incapable of pure love and always have to mix love and hate in their object-relations." - Sigmund Freud

The Residents have announced details of a brand new album, their first for Mute, to be released on Valentine's Day 2005. "Animal Lover" follows the 25th Anniversary re-release of the Commercial Album in the Autumn of 2004.

When Charles Darwin first proposed in the late 1800's that homo sapiens had evolved from and were in fact a species of animal, many humans were horrified. Humans had an unusual need to feel superior, something their fellow animal associates had never quite understood. When Sigmund Freud, a few years later, destroyed the accepted opposition between sanity and madness by locating "normality" on a sliding scale, the poor humans were even more shocked. Taking a step beyond Darwin, Freud believed that the human was an animal in conflict, and informing the human of that very simple concept seemed to only increase the conflict.

In The Residents' "Animal Lover", the creatures who don't really mind if they are animals take an existential look at the upright animal whose normality is sliding toward the wrong end of the spectrum. The human beasts live in a world of primal darkness, their heads forever stuck in the ground like frightened ostriches living in a constant murky dream state.

In creating this picture book of animal tales, The Residents wanted to include a soundtrack that related directly to "animal love." The result is an imaginative CD whose rhythm tracks are based entirely on animal noise mating patterns generated primarily by cicadas and frogs. Also the actual sounds of mating whales and humans were used for longer tonal passages. They weren't mating with each other, by the way.

So the world is filled with tubular entities. Food goes in one end and shit comes out the other. Sperm goes in and babies come out. It's all we've got. That and love.

Animal Lover is released on Mute on 14th February 2005.

The Residents Bog

Stewart Osborne (Stewart Osborne), Thursday, 6 January 2005 12:59 (fifteen years ago) link

OUR POOR OUR TIRED OUR HUDDLED MASSES is a 2-CD anthology that goes backwards chronologically (with a few jumps back to the future)(1996-1981 on Disc I; 1980-1972, Disc II), and just gets better and better! They must know this--musn't they? Their funniest mystery, that I know of. Iespecially like Eskimo Concentrate, a mix of that album's highlights; and also Fingerprince Concentrate (an album that UK punks liked, at least according to the annotator) Third Reich 'n' Roll Concentrate, plus tracks from Duck Stab/Buster+Glen, etc. I also thought they seemed like more of a band in the first decade, and I like the tracks from THE COMMERCIAL ALBUM, and note that their emthod of getting airtime by buying it (for commercials) is basically what 'independant promoters" did, especially with major label product, in 90s-00s, although Clear Channel claims to have stopped accepting such payments.

don, Friday, 7 January 2005 00:50 (fifteen years ago) link

The strangest (and certainly the most irritating) thing about Our Poor Our Tired Our Huddled Masses is that the sleeve notes spend pages going on and on and on about the band's legendary and incredibly rare first single, "Santa Dog", and then immediately proceed to not include the the sodding thing on the comp., not even on the extended 4CD EuroRalph version!

Of course if the collection had been compiled more recently and included material from Demons Dance Alone and Wormwood (and also didn't fail to include anything from the God In Three Persons album, which is a strangely indefensible omission too imho) it might help to remedy the impression of the material gradually deteriorating in quality as you move backwards though time.

Stewart Osborne (Stewart Osborne), Friday, 7 January 2005 09:50 (fifteen years ago) link

The liner notes do go on and on about that, yeah, and in general fit with the how-intentional-is-this bit mentioned aboove. But Stewart, your opinion is the reverse of mine: you think it gets *worse as goes backwards? So how would more recent music correct this impression, as you suggest? Is the more recent music so bad it makes the older stuff look better? From what I've heard of their more recent, I'd agree with you, in the sense that it would make the older sound *even better (too bad the very first WB-aimed demo, cited by Milton above, isn't here at the very end; might be best of all, is the logical implication of this comp as heard by me)

don, Friday, 7 January 2005 19:53 (fifteen years ago) link

there's a 'WB Album Concentrate' floating around on the web, apparently assembled by fans... I've never heard it unfortunately, would like to.

I love the Concentrates on Our Huddled Masses (especially the one for Reich). The editing in some places is so dense that they almost qualify as new pieces. In any case the 4 CD version is worth $60 for the 15 minute excerpt from Baby Sex alone.

(Jon L), Friday, 7 January 2005 20:02 (fifteen years ago) link

how coincidental.
When presenting a radio special on the residents (way before Our Huddled Masses ), chronologically presenting material from latest back to earliest seemed the right strategy for sufficiently more extreme and exciting radio, for build-up, for taking people to a place they could maybe only get to via the comparatively normal digital stuff.

george gosset (gegoss), Saturday, 8 January 2005 10:47 (fifteen years ago) link

one of my best friends here in Nashville is a Residents freak, so I've endured them plenty. I do have "Commercial Album" and it's pretty good, and I actually like their version of "Viva Las Vegas" on their Elvis record.

That said, I think they're awful--I mean I have respect for anyone trying to do anti-music, and they succeed. But I don't mean it as a compliment; it's not only anti-music but anti-anti-music. I find them very, very puerile, and their later stuff seems infused with some sort of melancholia I don't think they earn at all. My buddy here listens to a lot of stuff I don't like, many things I do, and he's always draggin' out the Residents or the Firesign Theater (not the classic '60s stuff but their later shit, which is just actively unfunny). And I feel the same way about the Residents--they're not funny, their videos are totally geeky (except for the very early short ones), they're a total one-joke band. That whole thing with the eyeballs is just totally lame, they should've stopped that shit years ago. I think they're from Shreveport or somewhere--well, I say Louisiana's pop combo John Fred and His Playboy Band were both more avant-garde and certainly more listenable.

However, I kinda like "Eskimo," in a way; but none of it is anything I listen to for pleasure

eddie hurt (ddduncan), Saturday, 8 January 2005 16:34 (fifteen years ago) link

as time goes on there's a greater 'succeed or fail' element to each successive residents project, anything new carrying the risk of comparison to classic original residents, 2 person residents, digital vs. analog, etc., any past residents stuff. I just think of all the work over the years as

george gosset (gegoss), Sunday, 9 January 2005 10:22 (fifteen years ago) link

pray continue

Bumfluff, Sunday, 9 January 2005 10:41 (fifteen years ago) link

roadworms was rad

chaki in charge (chaki), Sunday, 9 January 2005 10:44 (fifteen years ago) link

Yeah, Eddie, they (the original they, anyway) are from Shreveport. When the relaunched villagevoice.com finally gets its whole archive back online, it should include the Primus review in which I comment on their Residents infuence/connection, and that experience (which I share with them) of struggling with a sense of isolated, reactionary origins. So rebellion and idealism can be tainted with a degree of keejerking against the original local overlord kneejerks. Even kneejerking *with the originals, ultimately. So the later Residents seem to buy into an oppressively overblown defintion of Real Art, not very different from the Biz Ideal they once rebelled against. Not to songle them out too much; "hardcore punks" could and can be just as reductive, for instance. And the Residents were inspirational to some underground bands of 80s Middle and East Europe (even after they heard other stuff!)

don, Sunday, 9 January 2005 18:16 (fifteen years ago) link

But none of that is generally accepted. What is generally accepted is that, of the two Residents left, Homer Flynn was both the lead vocalist and the main creative element in the band's graphic design (pretty important in this band) and that Hardy Fox (the 'keyboard player') was responsible (difficult to tell how much, though I could speculate) for a lot of their music. Can't be sure what Jay Clem did in the Residents, but has he done anything in music since? He does play the main character in the Vileness Fats film and he was, sort of, the face of the Cryptic Corporation and he definitely contributed vocals on occasion. Meanwhile it's generally accepted that, fourth member, John Kennedy was the 'money guy' in the band, but I'm not sure he even existed tbh! I've never heard of an interview with him or seen a photograph of him. There's film of the Residents 'at home' at 444 Grove Street in 1976 and Clem, Flynn and Fox are all there but no John Kennedy.

As for the decline, there could be all sorts of reasons beyond the two that left being the talented ones in the organization - for instance, moving over to digital had a deleterious effect on the quality of the band's music imo - but, hey, a band declining as they get older and not being as good in their 60s as they were in their 20s/30s, it's hardly a novel situation!

holger sharkey (Tom D.), Saturday, 11 July 2015 13:15 (five years ago) link

misspoke, I just didn't know it was generally accepted that there'd been four and two left, which seems to be what people do say. while I was going down the rabbit hole about this yesterday I found a post I didn't save on some prog-related forum that was kinda snooty but seemed otm - it said Clem was the musical brains of the outfit and talked about thirds over chords which I think is right, I think there was a strategy to the writing that goes missing after '82. Clem's an attorney now I think.

that said, I love Eskimo unreservedly, great record

Joan Crawford Loves Chachi, Sunday, 12 July 2015 13:34 (five years ago) link

I found a post I didn't save on some prog-related forum that was kinda snooty but seemed otm - it said Clem was the musical brains of the outfit and talked about thirds over chords which I think is right

Yeah, two left, but it seems it was much more a business disagreement than an artistic one, Clem & Kennedy thought taking the Mole Show out on the road would bankrupt them (and Ralph/Cryptic Corp.) and it virtually did. Which ties in with the idea that those two were more involved in the business side of the operation.

I don't know what thirds over chords means tbh, can you give an example of it in Residents' music before 1982? Maybe Jay Clem was the musical brains behind them but somehow I doubt it, who know though? Anyway I'm no expert on the Residents post-1982 but what I have heard sounds like the same keyboard player as their earlier music, i.e., Hardy Fox.

holger sharkey (Tom D.), Sunday, 12 July 2015 14:18 (five years ago) link

one year passes...

has anyone ever watched those "Cool 3D World" videos? gives me a vibe that nothing but the Residents weirdest stuff does.

frogbs, Monday, 31 October 2016 16:28 (three years ago) link

two months pass...

New album, The Ghost of Hope, out March 24 (CD, vinyl). Also upcoming shows as The Real Residents, and mentions recent ones as Randy, Chuck and Bob, The World's Greatest Residents Cover Band:

http://campaign.r20.constantcontact.com/render?m=1102557630070&ca=df6cf40e-c50b-477d-8613-2f17f5aacb37

dow, Monday, 30 January 2017 23:57 (three years ago) link

if that link doesn't work:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=d8DjpU7ompc

Following their long tradition of projects based on narrative themes, The Residents are pleased to announce the release of The Ghost of Hope, a historically accurate album based on train wrecks from the late 19th and early 20th Centuries.

After discovering a series of vintage news articles highlighting the dangers of train travel in the late 19th and early 20th centuries and inspired by the era's graceful language, the group contrast that eloquence against the sheer horror of these devastating events. In their own unique style, the band has constructed a highly original series of tone poems quite unlike the music of anyone else - except, of course, The Residents. The album features guest collaborator Eric Drew Feldman - who has worked with everybody cool, so he's already in your record collection.

If there's a primary metaphor within this collection it is certainly found in that humble word 'hope.' When powerful men of the world build political campaigns around this simple four-letter word and fail, one wonders what life might become without it. Regardless, whether it be historical and literal, symbolic and metaphorical or simply nonsense, The Residents remain mum.

THE GHOST OF HOPE

"My heart is warm with the friends I make and better friends, I'll not be knowing,
Yet there isn't a train I wouldn't take, no matter where it's going."
-Edna St Vincent Millay

While the great poet's romantic relationship with train travel was undoubtedly heartfelt, she was definitely not traveling by rail as the 19th century neared its end. The dangers posed by increasingly fast trains, coupled with heavier and heavier cargo loads, moving across an aging rail system, made derailment a common occurrence.

In addition, the primitive communications and safety mechanism of the era often resulted in either head-on collisions or, conversely, "telescoping," which occurred when a stationary or slow-moving train was hit from the rear by another train on the same tracks. When this happened, especially in winter when the cars were heated by coal-burning stoves and illuminated by kerosene lamps, the wooden passenger cars were quickly engulfed in flames, resulting in a quick and unpleasant death for those surviving the initial impact. In retrospect, a simple fact was obvious: this revolutionary technology was progressing faster than society could regulate or control it.

Utilizing various techniques, including music, sound effects and text from actual newspaper accounts from the era, The Ghost of Hope purports to recreate several of these horrific incidents. While the dangers described in these factual events are now largely confined to the past, humanity perseveres, valiantly thundering ahead into the uncharted realms of digital technology, genetic engineering, artificial intelligence and the attempt to spread our seed throughout the cosmos. Meanwhile, have we learned from the past or are we doomed to repeat our mistakes on an ever grander scale?

Tracklist:
Horrors Of The Night
The Crash At Crush
Death Harvest
Shroud Of Flames
The Great Circus Train Wreck of 1918
Train vs Elephant
Killed At A Crossing

The CD and Vinyl can be ordered at the MVD Shop or on Amazon

Website: http://www.residents.com

THE RESIDENTS

Alternately seen as a rock band, an arts collective and a spirit,The Residents have been regarded as icons in the world of experimental music for over forty years. In addition to their groundbreaking work in the areas of trance, world fusion, electronica, punk, industrial and lounge music, the group has also been credited with being among the originators of performance art and music video. Their early videos are in the permanent collection of the Museum of Modern Art and their Freak Show CD-Rom was featured in MOMA's "Looking at Music 3.0" exhibition. Their four decade long career has also taken them into the world of film and television music, having scored numerous films and TV series as well as several projects for MTV. In addition, the group is also thriving in the world of digital media having released ten DVDs, and two internet series.

Recently, performing as Randy, Chuck & Bob, the World's Greatest Residents' Cover Band, the group celebrated its 40th anniversary with a trilogy of tours: The Talking Light, Wonder of Weird and Shadowland. No longer content to merely impersonate a band, The Residents unexpectedly morphed into a power trio, gleefully plundering their vast catalog of music to the delight to their fans. Not content to rest upon their justly lauded laurels, the group is currently reforming as The Real Residents, a four piece combo that will celebrate its debut at the prestigious Blue Note jazz club in Tokyo, performing six shows from March 21-23, 2017.

dow, Tuesday, 31 January 2017 00:00 (three years ago) link

nine months pass...

should I pick up this comp Y/N

https://rateyourmusic.com/release/comp/the-residents/80-aching-orphans-45-years-of-the-residents/

I've made it all the way through to the Mole Trilogy but don't have it in me to pick up 700 more albums

frogbs, Thursday, 2 November 2017 15:41 (two years ago) link

two months pass...

uh... wow

https://www.billboard.com/articles/columns/rock/8094982/the-residents-reissues-vintage

It begins Friday (Jan. 19) with the reissues of 1974's Meet The Residents and 1976's The Third Reich 'N Roll, featuring more than 30 previously unreleased tracks between them

sleeve, Saturday, 20 January 2018 06:02 (two years ago) link

Oh wow

kolakube (Ross), Saturday, 20 January 2018 09:54 (two years ago) link

Didn't know Hardy Fox had left the Residents - shouldn't they just be called The Resident now?

Whiney Houston (Tom D.), Saturday, 20 January 2018 10:53 (two years ago) link

http://www.klanggalerie.com/gg264

^^ first press release I've seen which basically drops all pretenses

Milton Parker, Saturday, 20 January 2018 21:44 (two years ago) link

the ethos of "anonymity" has changed a lot since 1971. it's a good time for hardy to take off the eyeball.

Arnold Schoenberg Steals (rushomancy), Saturday, 20 January 2018 23:12 (two years ago) link

I really enjoy Fox's writing, a lot of it is scattered around his site but this compiles a fair chunk, and is something close to a memoir (45MB PDF)]

Brakhage, Sunday, 21 January 2018 22:24 (two years ago) link

Got copies of the two reissues the other day and am listening to the expanded Meet the Residents now. Still such a strange...thing. I can never actually *place* it in 1974 or thereabouts, I can't place it anywhere in a personal sense of chronologic time. It just is.

The bonus tracks so far have been engaging. Even an alternate take on "Smelly Tongues" with what sounds like both a different vocal take and a different mix changes the song.

Ned Raggett, Sunday, 21 January 2018 22:33 (two years ago) link

Not to mention a "Spotted Pinto Bean" sung clearly by some quavery voiced dude accompanied by what sounds like flute and toy piano!

Ned Raggett, Sunday, 21 January 2018 22:37 (two years ago) link

And then there's the other alternate, "Spotted Pinto Queen," now sung quietly by a dude and sounding like a Disney song from a nightmare sequence.

Ned Raggett, Sunday, 21 January 2018 22:41 (two years ago) link

That memoir link is amazing, thank you. This is the kind of "inside The Residents" view I've always wanted more of. Played some Negativeland last night and was immediately nostalgic for The Residents. I miss the bay area weirdo music scene that those two bands spearheaded. Stuff like Chino Amobi's Paradiso seems to have that theatrical wtf spirit, but somewhat lacks the intrepid silliness of that bay scene of yore.

octobeard, Monday, 22 January 2018 03:03 (two years ago) link

The infamous Warner Bros album for RSD 2018!

https://www.musiquemachine.com/articles/articles_template.php?id=435

Homer is selling out and I'm loving every minute of it ;)

Sebastian (Royal Mermaid Mover), Monday, 22 January 2018 11:42 (two years ago) link

That memoir link is amazing

Yeah, I wish they both would collaborate on a book, and write it straight. That collection of Fox's and the stuff for The Mole Show ('Diary' tab) and Not Available on the official site are really interesting. There's this tension between wanting to disclose as part of a mea culpa, and wanting to obfuscate the details to be consistent with the goals of the Residents 'art project'

If you're curious there's home movies/photos of them at the Mission studio, apologies if they've been mentioned before

There's also a really well-photographed performance of Mole on YT, which is neat not just for the show but cos one of the crew/dancers serves as an impromptu spokesman - Penn was in hospital for this show, appendix

Brakhage, Friday, 26 January 2018 23:07 (two years ago) link

Oh, and there's a demo of God In Three Persons up, where Fox is doing the singing-credits introduction before it was written, it's great

Brakhage, Friday, 26 January 2018 23:13 (two years ago) link

I'm digging this online-only compilation called Morning Music today. I don't recognize most of the songs, so I gather it's latter-period stuff. Kind of an easy listening comp (by Residents standards) light on typical Residents vocals, oddly pretty.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UQmZPH7GDtA

Brave Combover (Dan Peterson), Monday, 29 January 2018 20:12 (two years ago) link

one month passes...

can anyone giv eme opinions as to this comment left on Discogs re: 3rd R&R reissue?

Bonus tracks are mostly interesting but, my god, the sound on this is truly horrific. Awful example of the loudness wars nonsense. Tragic.

sleeve, Tuesday, 27 March 2018 19:11 (two years ago) link

for the 1st album 2CD REISSUE:

all those extras , great art work. great packaging but the sound quality is just unbearable . almost unlistenable so tinny and harsh. ive also pre ordered duck stab and fingerprince, but if its the same deal, i'm asking for money back.

the effort gone into getting these tracks from wherever they dwelled in residents world has been completely ruined by the shittiest mastering i have ever heard in my life.

Don't bother with this remaster. Even though the extras and packaging are nice, the production is like something you'd see on a modern metal album -- brickwalled to hell and harshly EQ'd. If you need to have this on CD, opt for one of the older ESD or Torso issues.

sleeve, Tuesday, 27 March 2018 19:14 (two years ago) link

I heard the first one and I didn't think the EQing was horrible. Definitely a bit brick walled, or sounds like it at least (I haven't looked at waveforms). Much loudness.

EZ Snappin, Tuesday, 27 March 2018 21:11 (two years ago) link

I have the first two (with the other two on the way) and don’t think they sound horrible, although they’re definitely loud/brickwalled (but not as extreme as some of the more egregious offenders out there, I think). Bonus stuff is generally pretty interesting and worthwhile, though I could do without some of bonuses from this century.

spastic heritage, Tuesday, 27 March 2018 21:42 (two years ago) link

Edit: some of *the* bonuses. (Eh, whatever.)

spastic heritage, Tuesday, 27 March 2018 21:42 (two years ago) link

The live bad versions from the last few tours are NOT a positive bonus, even if I enjoyed seeing those tours.

EZ Snappin, Tuesday, 27 March 2018 22:24 (two years ago) link

I just got the first two (Meet... and 3R&R) and did a waveform comparison between the 2018 (Colburn) remastered stereo mix and the 1997 (Master & Servant) remastered stereo mix of "Meet..." (I don't have the original vinyl to compare.)

To reiterate what others said, the new mix is a little too loud, but it's not unlistenable.

Here are waveforms for "Infant Tango," "N-ER-GEE (Crisis Blues)," and "Smelly Tongues." In each picture, the top two channels are the 1997 mix and the bottom two are the 2018 mix.

Go here: https://imgur.com/a/SFAAc

Observation #1: peaks are squashed during loud sections, but it's not totally brickwalled.

Observation #2: the left and right channels are reversed between the mixes! I'm not sure which is "correct."

Observation #3: the 2018 mix of "N-ER-GEE (Crisis Blues)" is longer than the 1997 mix. It looks like small bits were removed, but then extra repetitions of the "Go home, America..." bit were added at the end. The new mix of "Infant Tango" is a little shorter than the 1997 mix.

ernestp, Monday, 2 April 2018 02:17 (two years ago) link

they look pretty fuckin' brickwalled tbh

just noticed tears shaped like florida. (sic), Monday, 2 April 2018 07:48 (two years ago) link

yeah that is very disappointing

sleeve, Monday, 2 April 2018 14:05 (two years ago) link

I thought we were moving past the loudness wars argh

octobeard, Monday, 2 April 2018 18:55 (two years ago) link

five months pass...

Looks like Hardy's about out

https://www.residents.com/news/?article=20180921-0732

Ned Raggett, Saturday, 22 September 2018 16:59 (one year ago) link

aw man

sleeve, Saturday, 22 September 2018 16:59 (one year ago) link

deleted tweet:

@PsychedelicMag 41m41 minutes ago
RIP Hardy Fox. He grew up in Texas. After college he moved to San Francisco reveling in the free love days of 1967-68. He co-founded the much loved cult band, the Residents, where he was primary composer.
https://pbs.twimg.com/media/DntiwtBXoAA67D9.jpg

If pic doesn't show, it's front cover of Meet The Residents.

dow, Saturday, 22 September 2018 17:10 (one year ago) link

HARDY FOX
Many of you may have noticed changes to Hardy Fox's website and Facebook page giving dates of 1945-2018, and understandably are wondering if he has passed away. The good news is that he was definitely alive when he made those updates.

The bad news, though, is that he is very ill and that end date of "2018" may prove to be true. Hardy, a longtime master of PR thanks to his decades as a Cryptic Corp spokesperson, has seized the opportunity to scoop everybody on an autobiographical detail that very few get the chance to share.

We at Cryptic are deeply saddened by this news, but while Mr. Fox is still alive we prefer to celebrate his life rather than dwell on his impending exit. And to respect his actions, we will not share any details he himself does not make public.

Hardy has been, and remains, a good friend, and we wish him nothing but peace and happiness in his remaining time.

EZ Snappin, Saturday, 22 September 2018 18:34 (one year ago) link

On Hardyfox.com, following the above bit excerpted in the deleted Psychedelic Baby Magazine tweet:
Hardy retired from The Residents in 2015 but continued to compose for the group through 2018. In addition to his work with that band, he has recorded as a solo artist under various names including Charles Bobuck, Combo de Mechanico, Sonido de la Noche, Chuck, TAR, among others.

Also from his site (via The Official Residents On Twitter account:
From The Desk of Hardy Fox
Hi from me, Hardy. Yes, got sick, making my pass out of this world, but it is "all" okay. I have something in my brain that will last to a brief end. I am 73 as you might know. Brains go down. But maybe here is my brain functioning as I'm almost a dead person just a bit of go yet. Doctors have put me on drugs, LOL, for right now.

Anyway. Probably the last of seeing me. Thanks for checking in.

Love you all.

dow, Sunday, 23 September 2018 22:02 (one year ago) link

Incredible attitude... much respect.

growing up in publix (morrisp), Sunday, 23 September 2018 22:48 (one year ago) link

Yes, and what an amazing body of work over 6 decades. A true artist!

everything, Monday, 24 September 2018 02:56 (one year ago) link

Aw man, I knew him as Don. He lived near the Korbel cellars up in West Sonoma (just off the Russian River) and was involved in many social projects in keeping that stretch of the coast culturally vibrant and resisting corporate encroachment. His son was making a lot of films (including one on his dad's band a few years back).

Jersey Al (Albert R. Broccoli), Tuesday, 25 September 2018 02:42 (one year ago) link

three weeks pass...

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vKpw4i9iYw0

MaresNest, Tuesday, 16 October 2018 13:42 (one year ago) link

two weeks pass...

Members of the Residents' founder Hardy Fox's email list received the following message today: "RIP Brain Cancer Hardy Fox 1945 - 2018" 👁️ pic.twitter.com/npGUjiHk0M

— Aidin Vaziri (@MusicSF) October 30, 2018

Ned Raggett, Tuesday, 30 October 2018 23:02 (one year ago) link

The wording of that statement is so weird that I'm clinging to the hope that it's the brain cancer that's dead and not Hardy. Talk about clutching at straws!

Alma Kirby (Tom D.), Tuesday, 30 October 2018 23:21 (one year ago) link

Official announcment, RIP Hardy.

https://www.residents.com/news/?article=20181030-0621

Alma Kirby (Tom D.), Wednesday, 31 October 2018 01:07 (one year ago) link

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_-ISfhLLJpc

Alma Kirby (Tom D.), Wednesday, 31 October 2018 01:10 (one year ago) link

Fascinating guy!!! R.I.P.

timellison, Wednesday, 31 October 2018 02:50 (one year ago) link

Backstory and lots of Homer quotes:
https://www.nytimes.com/2018/11/03/obituaries/hardy-fox-dead.html

dow, Monday, 5 November 2018 03:21 (one year ago) link

A still more detailed overview/backview & quotes of Chuck/Hardy, whoms the author was in some degree of contact with:
https://www.npr.org/2018/11/07/664314033/the-residents-unmasking-death-hardy-fox-composer-america-weirdest-band

dow, Wednesday, 7 November 2018 19:56 (one year ago) link

one year passes...

I wouldn't call myself a fan now, but I definitely was in high school, and the Cube-E tour in NYC in 1989 was one of the coolest shows I've ever been to. There's a 7CD box coming out from Cherry Red, and I think I need it.

Cube-E Box – The History Of American Music In 3 E-Z Pieces pREServed

In the late 1980s The Residents embarked on what many fans still consider their greatest live project. “Cube-E – The History Of American Music In 3 E-Z Pieces” spanned almost four years and proposed to do nothing less than its title suggested, telling the story of American popular music, from its birth around the campfires of a non-existent Old West to its death at the hands of Elvis and the British Invasion, all in three easy pieces.

Performed on TV and on stage around the world between 1987 and 1990, the show saw The Residents fully embrace their loves of elaborate and imaginative staging, the latest in music technology and, of course, The King – Elvis Aaron Presley. It goes without saying that there was barely a dry seat in the house, and alongside live recordings and contemporaneous studio material this pREServed set includes the previously unreleased demos for the entire “King & Eye” album, which saw the group tackle twenty-something (you can count ’em!) of Mr. Swivel Hips’ hottest hits.

Spread across an inescapably unwieldy 7CDs at the group’s insistence, “Cube-E pREServed” is the final word in Americana cool. Or so it says here!

Remastered, expanded, and pREServed for future generations, this is the latest in a series of archival Residents reissues that will continue throughout 2020 and beyond. Look out for “Freak Show” and “Gingerbread Man” sets, coming to a record store near you!

TRACK LISTING

DISC ONE
BUCKAROO BLUES LIVE IN AMSTERDAM
1. FROM THE PLAINS TO MEXICO
2. THE THEME FROM BUCKAROO BLUES
3. THE STAMPEDE
4. TRAIL DANCE
5. BURY ME NOT
6. COWBOY WALTZ
7. SADDLE SORES
8. THE THEME FROM BUCKAROO BLUES (REPRISE)
BONUS BUCKS
9. SUZANNA
10. BUCKAROO BLUES
(STUDIO INSTRUMENTAL)*
11. FROM THE PLAINS TO MEXICO
(ITALIAN VERSION)
12. FROM THE PLAINS TO MEXICO (NIGHT MUSIC)
13. BUCKAROO BLUES THEME
(LIVE IN LONDON, 2001)
14. FROM THE PLAINS TO MEXICO
(LIVE IN NEW YORK, 2002)
15. BURY ME NOT
(LIVE IN SAN FRANCISCO, 2011)
16. FROM THE PLAINS TO MEXICO
(LIVE IN SAN FRANCISCO, 2018)

DISC TWO
BLACK BARRY LIVE IN AMSTERDAM
1. THE GOSPEL TRUTH
2. SHORTNIN’ BREAD
3. BLACK BARRY
4. FORTY-FOUR
5. ENGINE 44
6. NEW ORLEANS
7. VOODOO QUEEN
8. WHAT AM I GONNA DO?
9. ORGANISM
BONUS BARRIES
10. WISTFUL BREAK
11. VOODOO QUEEN/WHAT AM I GONNA DO? (REHEARSAL)
12. NEW ORLEANS (STUDIO JAM)
13. HOUSEHOLD WORK*
14. AMAZON*
15. FEVER DREAM*
16. THE TOY FACTORY (FANFARE MIX)*
17. GHOST MUSIC
18. FORTY-FOUR
(LIVE IN SAN FRANCISCO, 1997)
19. FORTY-FOUR (LIVE IN NANTES, 2014)
20. BLACK BARRY DYNASONE

DISC THREE
THE BABY KING LIVE IN AMSTERDAM
1. OBER
2. THE BABY KING PT. 1
3. DON’T BE CRUEL
4. HEARTBREAK HOTEL
5. FOOL SUCH AS I
6. ALL SHOOK UP
7. THE BABY KING PT. 2
8. DEVIL IN DISGUISE
9. BURNING LOVE
10. TEDDY BEAR
11. VIVA LAS VEGAS
12. THE BABY KING PT. 3
13. LOVE ME TENDER
14. THE BABY KING PT. 4
15. HOUND DOG / OUT
BONUS BABIES
16. DON’T BE CRUEL (VIDEO EDIT)*
17. DON’T
18. SURRENDER
19. BURNING LOVE (TELE5 DEMO)
20. BURNING LOVE (TELE5 PERFORMANCE)
21. OBER (LIVE IN AUSTRALIA, 2005)
22. TEDDY BEAR (LIVE IN AUSTRALIA, 2005)
23. TEDDY BEAR (LIVE IN SAN FRANCISCO, 2018)

DISC FOUR
CUBE-E LIVE IN SAN FRANCISCO, 1989
1. BUCKAROO BLUES
2. BLACK BARRY

DISC FIVE
CUBE-E LIVE IN SAN FRANCISCO AND RECKLINGHAUSEN, 1989
1. THE BABY KING BEGINNING*
2. THE BABY KING MIDDLE*
3. THE BABY KING END*
PLUS
4. MR SKULL’S NYE SONG

DISC SIX
THE KING & EYE REMASTERED
1. BLUE SUEDE SHOES
2. THE BABY KING PT 1
3. DON’T BE CRUEL
4. HEARTBREAK HOTEL
5. ALL SHOOK UP
6. RETURN TO SENDER
7. THE BABY KING PT 2
8. TEDDY BEAR
9. DEVIL IN DISGUISE
10. STUCK ON YOU
11. BIG HUNK O LOVE
12. A FOOL SUCH AS I
13. THE BABY KING PT 3
14. LITTLE SISTER
15. HIS LATEST FLAME
16. BURNING LOVE
17. VIVA LAS VEGAS
18. THE BABY KING PT 4
19. LOVE ME TENDER
20. THE BABY KING PT 5
21. HOUND DOG
BONUS KINGS
22. DOG GLUE
23. JAILHOUSE ROCK RMX
24. SURRENDER RMX
25. HEARTBREAK HOTEL RMX
26. LITTLE SISTER RMX
27. BURNING LOVE RMX
28. A FOOL SUCH AS I RMX

DISC SEVEN
THE KING & EYE DEMOS
1. BLUE SUEDE SHOES*
2. THE BABY KING PT 1*
3. DON’T BE CRUEL*
4. HEARTBREAK HOTEL*
5. ALL SHOOK UP*
6. RETURN TO SENDER*
7. THE BABY KING PT 2*
8. TEDDY BEAR*
9. DEVIL IN DISGUISE*
10. STUCK ON YOU*
11. BIG HUNK O LOVE*
12. A FOOL SUCH AS I*
13. THE BABY KING PT 3*
14. LITTLE SISTER*
15. BURNING LOVE*
16. VIVA LAS VEGAS*
17. THE BABY KING PT 4*
18. LOVE ME TENDER*
19. THE BABY KING PT 5*
20. HOUND DOG*
21. I CAN’T HELP FALLING IN LOVE WITH YOU*
22. DON’T*
23. SURRENDER*

*previously unreleased

but also fuck you (unperson), Tuesday, 28 July 2020 13:01 (one week ago) link


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