The Band.

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as in the guys who backed bob dylan etc. you know the story.

is there already a thread? you can imagined what happened when i did a title search for "the band"? (they are cursed in that way, much like the band "love." perhaps they should invent special search strings for such bands...)

thinking about them (again) this week because i skimmed the most recent copy of the wire, and saw a joe boyd interview in which boyd confirmed what i had long suspected, that the band (the band "the band") and especially their second record helped to define a certain subgenre of rock music which i suppose can be called "rootsy"--not just in attitude but also in their specific approach to recording and mixing which was (oh! inverted world) quite modern by most standards, making careful use of stereo and in certain cases utitilzing quite modern equipment (synthesizers, fancy mics) to obtain an "old fashioned" sound. but it's the overall sound-presence of that LP that i feel, instinctively, was quite crucial as an influence not just on the british folk-rock guys but by succeeding generations of likeminded musicians and producers in england, america, canada, etc.

can you guys help to pin this down further for me?

thoughts?

amateur!st (amateurist), Tuesday, 10 February 2004 19:56 (seventeen years ago) link

I think they're one of those bands whose noted influence (ha where is mark s) appeals to me more than them themselves. It's no stretch to say that the Walkabouts, of whom am I thoroughly and completely fond, had them as a partial role-model -- but I'd rather listen to the Walkabouts any day of the week.

Ned Raggett (Ned), Tuesday, 10 February 2004 19:58 (seventeen years ago) link

this is like the third time you've responded in such a fashion--"i like them, but the walkabouts do it better"

that's not a criticism

i haven't been terribly excited by the walkabouts stuff i've heard, but maybe i should listen again

amateur!st (amateurist), Tuesday, 10 February 2004 20:07 (seventeen years ago) link

i can't stand bob dylan. but i love the band... why is this?

cutty (mcutt), Tuesday, 10 February 2004 20:09 (seventeen years ago) link

atrophying of brain tissue?

amateur!st (amateurist), Tuesday, 10 February 2004 20:11 (seventeen years ago) link

I think the influence on 50s-60s r&b and soul isn't given enough props in most writings about The Band. I think those influences are as important as the stripped down folk/country part of their sound.

earlnash, Tuesday, 10 February 2004 20:12 (seventeen years ago) link

that's not a criticism

It could simply be a reflection of a private passion, but at their best the Walkabouts synthesize so much in such a striking way that I'm in quiet awe (and consequently frustrated at how other bands in theoretically similar veins just don't work as well).

Ned Raggett (Ned), Tuesday, 10 February 2004 20:12 (seventeen years ago) link

Just to clarify, it should read "the influence of..." not "influence on".

earlnash, Tuesday, 10 February 2004 20:15 (seventeen years ago) link

First two records are so great & the soul thing is their most interesting quality. I can't think of any band ever that connects the dots so well between black soul and white country.

Mark (MarkR), Tuesday, 10 February 2004 20:20 (seventeen years ago) link

i thought you were going to make a revolutionary argument about he influence of robbie robertson's guitar style on curtis mayfield which relied on new theories of the time space continuum formulated in quantum physics

damn

amateur!st (amateurist), Tuesday, 10 February 2004 20:22 (seventeen years ago) link

"atrophying of brain tissue?
-- amateur!st"

no i would attribute it to bob dylan's horrendous voice

cutty (mcutt), Tuesday, 10 February 2004 20:22 (seventeen years ago) link

Charlie Rich is an interesting one-man equivalent, though. (Not to Amateurist's equation, admittedly.)

Ned Raggett (Ned), Tuesday, 10 February 2004 20:22 (seventeen years ago) link

no i would attribute it to bob dylan's horrendous voice

Ah, friend!

Ned Raggett (Ned), Tuesday, 10 February 2004 20:23 (seventeen years ago) link

oh i'm floating in a sea of fools baaaaby

charlie rich seemed genuinely uncomfortable with genre categories and that hampered his music as much as it helped it i think

the band were without doubt a 'rock' band--whether or not thats endemic of the time in which they were recording, they were comfortable with the label

but yes i agree that mixture of sensibilites is really exciting

better still that the soul influence and country influence is somehow sublimated in such a fashion where it becomes exceptionally difficult to parse the songs for evidence of discrete influence

amateur!st (amateurist), Tuesday, 10 February 2004 20:27 (seventeen years ago) link

more like "the Bland"

Gear! (Gear!), Tuesday, 10 February 2004 20:32 (seventeen years ago) link

no wait, I like them.

Gear! (Gear!), Tuesday, 10 February 2004 20:33 (seventeen years ago) link

'First two records are so great & the soul thing is their most interesting quality. I can't think of any band ever that connects the dots so well between black soul and white country.'

Yep that's it. Let's face it the 'grizzled old-timer' thing wouldn't have lasted. It's the extraordinary blend of soul, country, funk, rock n roll, wurlitzer/jug-band weirdness, and it all sounds uncalculated.

pete s, Tuesday, 10 February 2004 21:56 (seventeen years ago) link

i guess they're interesting in that they were mostly canadians getting deeper into americana than americans. i love both the big pink building shot and the family portrait album covers. I think they were trying to create a "what if the beatles never happened" musical scenario ... drawing a line between The Sun Sessions and 1969... CCR were a more punk rock version of the same idea. other than "basement tapes" i find them a little stiff.

Fritz Wollner (Fritz), Tuesday, 10 February 2004 22:04 (seventeen years ago) link

Heh Amateurist not only is there another Band thread you were the last person to post to it!

Classic Or Dud: The Band

Tico Tico (Tico Tico), Tuesday, 10 February 2004 22:12 (seventeen years ago) link

The Band were so funky. White man's funk.

Debito (Debito), Wednesday, 11 February 2004 04:13 (seventeen years ago) link

how embarassing, I said the same thing on the other thread.

Fritz Wollner (Fritz), Wednesday, 11 February 2004 04:18 (seventeen years ago) link

"i thought you were going to make a revolutionary argument"

Well Aretha Franklin did record a great version of "The Weight".

earlnash, Wednesday, 11 February 2004 04:24 (seventeen years ago) link

The phrase 'white man's funk' is sort of embarrassing, but they were funky.

Debito (Debito), Wednesday, 11 February 2004 04:25 (seventeen years ago) link

Take up the white man's funkness
Send forth the best ye stank

Ned Raggett (Ned), Wednesday, 11 February 2004 04:26 (seventeen years ago) link

Christ, they were good. Sad how they will never be again...
The Band=classic
Drugs and depression=dud

Speedy Gonzalas (Speedy Gonzalas), Wednesday, 11 February 2004 04:39 (seventeen years ago) link

Because they sounded out of tune so often while backing Dylan, I fell in love with them. It was like they were playing for the amateurs in all of us.

jim wentworth (wench), Wednesday, 11 February 2004 06:06 (seventeen years ago) link

I like the Band lots, and Robbie is maybe the greatest guitar player ever who is not one of the greatest guitar players ever, but I don't often have much use for them. Why? Because they never made an album (alone at least) concomitant with their potential? How about because they're often a little too slow for music that moves? The gentility in their tunes is the source of a good part of their charm, but is inherently limiting, perhaps.

gabbneb (gabbneb), Wednesday, 11 February 2004 06:31 (seventeen years ago) link

please don't throw rocks, but i always thought The Band was like the Grateful Dead in their least-inspired moments.

Orbit (Orbit), Wednesday, 11 February 2004 06:32 (seventeen years ago) link

They were, perhaps, out of sync. in many ways. I enjoyed their sound, but they didn't blow me away. I used to own a 3 record promo box set (Warner Bros.?) of The Band, Quicksilver Messenger Service, and Steve Miller, and... gave it to a friend. Probably in exchange for a buzz. They made their mark with Dylan.

jim wentworth (wench), Wednesday, 11 February 2004 07:00 (seventeen years ago) link

please don't throw rocks, but i always thought The Band was like the Grateful Dead in their least-inspired moments.

There's a similarity in the vocals at times (I think Rick Danko is the most Garcia-like one?), but the Band never wanked off quite like the Dead...

"Music From the Big Pink" is just about perfect, the rest a bit hit-and-miss.

no opinion, Wednesday, 11 February 2004 07:13 (seventeen years ago) link

The Avalanches throw the uber-corny "Life is a Carnival" into their mixsets.

Spencer Chow (spencermfi), Wednesday, 11 February 2004 07:18 (seventeen years ago) link

The Band are one of my parents' bands that I've never known where to get started with. (cf. Allman Bros., CCR)

"The Weight" is, of course, great - is it representative of the rest of their material. Can I just buy whatever album that's on and be set for a start?

miloauckerman (miloauckerman), Wednesday, 11 February 2004 07:26 (seventeen years ago) link

Since that album is "Music From the Big Pink," the answer is yes, buy it.

no opinion, Wednesday, 11 February 2004 07:27 (seventeen years ago) link

Only marginally on-topic, but I interviewed Levon Helm's daughter the other week. She's in this new gospel-rock outfit called Ollabelle. She was very nice and remarkably well adjusted ("remarkably" if you know anything about Levon Helm), spoke well of her dad. She's got a heck of a nice voice too, kind of a brassy R&B growl.

I like the Band a lot, but I admit I like them best on The Basement Tapes. Their first several albums are all classics, though. When I was a kid, I was always put off by their muddy, murky sound. Now that's one of the things I love about them.

spittle (spittle), Wednesday, 11 February 2004 08:10 (seventeen years ago) link

Several people otm here (mark (country/soul is spot on), pete, debito). Their albums were played a lot by my parents and I didn't hear them again until I bought Music from Big Pink two years ago. Listening to it got me hooked again right away, I remembered so much after ~15 years.

Yes miloauckerman, get Big Pink, it's awesome. I always found it much better than their self-titled second album, more diverse, less "reactionary" I suppose. "Life is a Carnival" from Cahoots is a party of a song, no wonder the Avalanches use it. Wouldn't qualify it as "corny" though...

willem (willem), Wednesday, 11 February 2004 08:36 (seventeen years ago) link

ned's post made me laugh like a schoolgirl (like ned flanders, as it were)

how embarassing, I said the same thing on the other thread.

i feel this doubly

amateur!st (amateurist), Wednesday, 11 February 2004 09:50 (seventeen years ago) link

what i mean to say is that i'm doublt embarrassed for fritz

fritz, shame on you

amateur!st (amateurist), Wednesday, 11 February 2004 09:51 (seventeen years ago) link

How do I fit in to this embarrassment?

Debito (Debito), Wednesday, 11 February 2004 10:15 (seventeen years ago) link

These accusations that The Band started 'retro-rock' or were concerned with 'authenticity' are wildly off-target, considering how much modern (at the time) stuff they absorbed into their sound. Others have mentioned synths and funky rhythm sections as proof that they weren't a bunch of burnt out hippies trying to be Doc Watson, but I also want to bring up the years with Ronnie Hawkins. When they had been playing fifties style rock & roll mixed with country and folk up through into the early sixties, why would they give up playing what they enjoyed doing and go psych? Seems like people want to blame them for not abandoning the direction of their entire career as a group, which would have produced much duller music than those first two albums.

And I can't believe you dissed "The Last Waltz" on the other thread, Matos - everybody knows the guest spots are mostly cack (they should have instituted a ban on performances by anyone named Neil) and Robbie was a douche, but "Night They Drove Old Dixie Down" should be proof enough that Fleetwood Mac AND Outkast together are not fit to lick Levon Helm's boots when it comes to adding brass bands to your sound for fun and profit(!!! Yeeeahh)

Dave M. (rotten03), Wednesday, 11 February 2004 10:33 (seventeen years ago) link

Oops, strike them parenthesis. < / Dean >

Dave M. (rotten03), Wednesday, 11 February 2004 10:34 (seventeen years ago) link

'The Band' is a perfect album... and 'whispering pines' is just about the most beautiful, desolate song i've ever heard in my life, it never fails to move me to tears. (i have an MP3 of elliott smith stumbling through it somewhere, and it is chilling)

stevie (stevie), Wednesday, 11 February 2004 10:52 (seventeen years ago) link

These accusations that The Band started 'retro-rock' or were concerned with 'authenticity' are wildly off-target

this isn't what i was trying to say, exactly; i was asserting (as i guess i had done on the other thread, but i forgot about that) that without having an ideological program necessarily they had a specific approach to arranging and recording and mixing which later became identified with a certain subgenre of rock music that is often called "rootsy"

i dunno about "authenticity" (a power word that doesn't really clear anything up) but robertson et al were certainly going for a certain "rooted" sense of americana, a music with a strong sense of history, and like ccr they were selfconsciously tapping into an existing mythology, adding to it besides (ccr was both more monomaniacal and i think even more successful in this regard)

amateur!st (amateurist), Wednesday, 11 February 2004 12:31 (seventeen years ago) link

i contradicted myself

i guess there was a kind of low-key program at work, perhaps not charged with the reactionary values that much subsequent "rootsy" music has adopted but purposeful and willful nonetheless

amateur!st (amateurist), Wednesday, 11 February 2004 12:32 (seventeen years ago) link

i dunno about "authenticity" (a power word that doesn't really clear anything up) but robertson et al were certainly going for a certain "rooted" sense of americana, a music with a strong sense of history, and like ccr they were selfconsciously tapping into an existing mythology, adding to it besides (ccr was both more monomaniacal and i think even more successful in this regard)

there's an interesting dynamic involved, however, that Barney Hoskins' Band book explored, that to the members of the Band, the cultures they were tapping in their music were both alien and natural to them, and the extent to which they were scholarly exploring these genres and musics, and simultaneously the closeness they felt to them (thinking mostly here of levon's arkansas roots). so their music was simultaneously an exercise in attempted authenticity, and imaginative explorations of genres they revered.

stevie (stevie), Wednesday, 11 February 2004 12:40 (seventeen years ago) link

five years pass...

lately i've been spinning 'Rockin' Chair' a lot - love the heartsick, pleading sound of manuel's vocals, the absence of drums, the entwined mandolin and guitar, and the way the lyrics shift between 'downhome' nostalgia and a kind of resigned dread: these lines are especially devastating

Hear the sound, Willie Boy,
The Flyin' Dutchman's on the reef.
It's my belief
We've used up all our time,
This hill's to steep to climb,
And the days that remain ain't worth a dime.

god i love the band soo much

Ward Fowler, Tuesday, 25 August 2009 12:43 (eleven years ago) link

Great song

Aw naw, no' Annoni oan an' aw noo (Tom D.), Tuesday, 25 August 2009 12:48 (eleven years ago) link

eight months pass...

so is this really the only thread? or just a impediment of searching "The Band"?

i've been rather obsessed lately, mostly w/ the first three records. but i'm thinking of digging around for the others on the cheap. challop: Stage Fright is every bit as good as the first two. "The Rumor" and "Sleeping" are heartbreakingly awesome.

and hey, anyone remember this POS?: http://www.artistdirect.com/artist/videos/robbie-robertson/485778-811823-1

(will) (will), Thursday, 29 April 2010 14:30 (eleven years ago) link

certainly some of the most creative and breathtaking uses of time signature changes in rock/popular music imo.

(will) (will), Thursday, 29 April 2010 14:41 (eleven years ago) link

<3<3<3Levon @ 2:58 - "maybe they won't, you know i sure hope they don't"

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=r8Pt_ZkGg8I

(will) (will), Thursday, 29 April 2010 14:42 (eleven years ago) link

this other thread is mentioned above: Classic Or Dud: The Band
certainly some of the most creative and breathtaking uses of time signature changes in rock/popular music imo.
this is otm -- for being known as such a "down-home, authentic, straightahead" their songs are hard as fuck to play. i mean, there's straight up rockabilly, but also new orleans + appalachian + country rhythms going on, sometimes all in the same song.

tylerw, Thursday, 29 April 2010 14:57 (eleven years ago) link

re: Robertson's bad singing… "to Kingdom Come" is leagues, miles better than "Knockin' Lost John" or "Out of The Blue." And while Cahoots has issues, I don't understand how anyone can belittle "the Moon Struck One."

Can anyone think of another example of a songwriter —who comes up with everything, particularly melodies made to be sung by really good singers— who is a legendarily bad singer? Like obviously there are Leonard Cohen/Mark E Smith-style singers who render their limitations artfully, and I've never encountered anyone alleging that in fact Manuel, Helm or Danko came up with those melodies… the songs for which Robertson is credited, he wrote every bit of them…whereas Manuel and Danko (very seldom) wrote or co-wrote with Zimmy the songs they are credited for… so Robertson had to say "OK, this is how the vocal melody to "Stage Fright" goes," to the other three, and yet everyone agreed at the time that the composer of these often really fantastically challenging melody lines shouldn't sing them… are there other examples of this? Not including pure, non performing songwriters…like did I heard that Duke Ellington kinda sucked as a singer?

veronica moser, Monday, 15 February 2021 23:38 (two months ago) link

Some might say Randy Newman?
I guess Robertson's vocal perceived shortcomings have to do with his somewhat whiny tone, rather than singing out of tune or having an especially limited range?

Halfway there but for you, Monday, 15 February 2021 23:43 (two months ago) link

he probably worked out the melodies on his guitar

tiwa-nty one savage (voodoo chili), Monday, 15 February 2021 23:45 (two months ago) link

Irving Berlin?

The Ballad of Mel Cooley (James Redd and the Blecchs), Monday, 15 February 2021 23:59 (two months ago) link

Sorry. Was actually thinking something similar to voodoo chili.

The Ballad of Mel Cooley (James Redd and the Blecchs), Tuesday, 16 February 2021 00:00 (two months ago) link

Boston. Tom Scholz wrote music and lyrics for almost all of their songs but never sang, not even back up.

henry s, Tuesday, 16 February 2021 19:44 (two months ago) link

Where can I find the xpost Calgary Hotel sessions? Also still wondering about where to find this, mentioned in the Viney post I recently linked upthread: There is a circulating tape of Band-only basement sessions, which was due to become the sixth volume in the bootleg series The Genuine Basement Tapes. It was never released. This includes unreleased items, like a guitar instrumental version of Ruben Remus as well as other versions of Orange Juice Blues and Yazoo Street Scandal. Any of yall heard it?

dow, Wednesday, 17 February 2021 22:23 (two months ago) link

The Calgary Hotel sessions discussed above are the ones tacked onto the recent Stage Fright reissue.

henry s, Thursday, 18 February 2021 16:48 (two months ago) link

just listening to the 2020 mix and "sleeping" does sound like it could be on something anything or the ballad of todd rundgren

brimstead, Sunday, 21 February 2021 20:23 (two months ago) link

Nice catch! For sure--"Sleeping" particularly isn't worlds away from Rundgren's "The Range War."

Kangol In The Light (Craig D.), Sunday, 21 February 2021 20:26 (two months ago) link

indeed.. the use of those sustained* chords at the end of each stanza* bring to mind "the range war" and "torch song"... plus maybe the way the piano is mixed, as birdistheword mentioned above.

*not sure if correct terms

brimstead, Sunday, 21 February 2021 20:39 (two months ago) link

I guess you could call them flat 7 triads over a tonic pedal bass (D/E in "Sleeping") or 11 chords.

I love the chord progression at the start of the song, that reappears in each refrain:

C#m/B B "Where else on
Bm/A A Earth would you
F#m/E E Want to go?"

Another similar Todd song is "Boat on the Charles". It might even be the same piano the Band used at Bearsville studios.

Halfway there but for you, Sunday, 21 February 2021 20:46 (two months ago) link

I only know "The Range War" from a good cover version on one of DBT Patterson Hood's solo albums, Murdering Oscar (and Other Love Songs). It surprised me, considering that Lester Bangs once reported asking Rundgren what he thought of country music: " 'AH'M DUMMB, AND AH'M STEWW-PID,' he brayed, but not everybody is."

dow, Sunday, 21 February 2021 21:17 (two months ago) link

I got that there was maybe a Band influence:
Your daddy runs sheep and my uncle runs cattle
Nothing can keep us out of this battle
They wage as it burns up the plains till no one is left in the saddle
Your ranch is upstream and they've dammed up the water…

There were such wars, and may be again, as the water situation out there incl. more and more drought. (Of course it's also meta, if you like.)

dow, Sunday, 21 February 2021 21:20 (two months ago) link

one month passes...

The Band opening for CSNY @ Wembley in '74 (#onethread)

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Z7CniLlueBI

"what are you DOING to fleetwood mac??" (C. Grisso/McCain), Friday, 2 April 2021 00:44 (one month ago) link

WARNING: Robbie's microphone <is on>

"what are you DOING to fleetwood mac??" (C. Grisso/McCain), Friday, 2 April 2021 00:49 (one month ago) link

halfway into this, pretty fun, thanks for the tip.

the sound mix starts glitching at certain points, resulting in some fun weird moments such as garth's organ being about 3x louder than everything else during dixie

nobody like my rap (One Eye Open), Friday, 2 April 2021 14:36 (one month ago) link

man backstage must have been a drug scene for the ages

In Shakey, Joni Mitchell said the cocaine was cut with Borax, and it was really hard to get buzzed.

"what are you DOING to fleetwood mac??" (C. Grisso/McCain), Friday, 2 April 2021 22:55 (one month ago) link

The 1974 version of a big entrance:

"LADIES AND GENTLEMEN... THE BAND"

*****five minutes of stumbling around the stage and tuning*****

Actually, it was nice to see/hear them doing "Just Another Whistle Stop" and "Smoke Signal", which aren't on any live recording I've encountered.

Halfway there but for you, Saturday, 3 April 2021 00:23 (one month ago) link

"Smoke Signal" was on the Live at the Academy reissue (i.e. the Rock of Ages reissue), and I was pleasantly surprised how well it came off on stage. It's not a great song, but even when it was slotted between much better ones, their performances sold it as a decent number.

birdistheword, Saturday, 3 April 2021 00:51 (one month ago) link

I wonder if Robbie had written any of the Northern Lights/Southern Cross material by this point. It can't have been a good feeling if the only things he had finished since 1971 were "Endless Highway" and "Two Piano Song".

Halfway there but for you, Saturday, 3 April 2021 01:18 (one month ago) link

I saw them 10-30-70 at Memorial Coliseum in Tuscaloosa, and however stitched together Big Pink had sometimes sounded (in a good way) they had no prob replicating it and then some, very passionately, however many times they'd played it, incl. 32 previous shows on that tour, which started in Jan; and lasted midway through Dec. Songs from s/t were good too, but the only thing I remember remembering (even later that evening) from Stage Fright, which had come out that summer, is and was the title song. But I'm sure I was pretty stoned, so (still). And I've never felt the urge to get back to that album, but maybe I will (though it's not on the Bucket List),

dow, Saturday, 3 April 2021 01:41 (one month ago) link

Here's the show (not song) list; no wonder Robertson retired:
https://theband.hiof.no/history/The_Band_in_Concert_1970.pdf Pretty typical for a big or big-ish act back then, I think.

dow, Saturday, 3 April 2021 01:43 (one month ago) link

Big Pink live was being inside the record.

dow, Saturday, 3 April 2021 01:44 (one month ago) link

Even on the tour supporting it, they only ever played a few things from Cahoots live, and "Life Is A Carnival" was the only one that made it up to The Last Waltz. Moondog Matinee was their latest release in '74, but apparently they never did any of that stuff live either.

"what are you DOING to fleetwood mac??" (C. Grisso/McCain), Saturday, 3 April 2021 02:15 (one month ago) link

Moondog Matinee's a good album. I get the impression it's knocked unfairly due to its origins (Levon's book argues that they could only do covers at that point because there was too much resentment and jealousy for any collaborative work creating original material to happen.) But the idiosyncratic choices are surprisingly welcome, and the performances are all excellent. And Robertson's new verses on Mystery Train are surprisingly memorable - they expand the song rather than hurt or diminish it.

birdistheword, Saturday, 3 April 2021 02:38 (one month ago) link

That should be "Mystery Train," no italics.

birdistheword, Saturday, 3 April 2021 02:39 (one month ago) link

How could I forget "Mystery Train"? One track from MM made it into the setlist.

"what are you DOING to fleetwood mac??" (C. Grisso/McCain), Saturday, 3 April 2021 02:58 (one month ago) link

two weeks pass...

Not sure why I never go beyond Big Pink and the brown album, but I heard this today and it's really nice.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wq2e7DPhyHg

longtime caller, first time listener (man alive), Thursday, 22 April 2021 21:55 (two weeks ago) link

I know what you mean. It took me ages to go beyond those two as well, bu when I first heard Northern Lights Southern Cross it was a revelation.

joni mitchell jarre (anagram), Thursday, 22 April 2021 22:09 (two weeks ago) link

i have to say the remixed and resequenced stage fright really make a great case for that album not being too far off the first two in quality

today i learned that the best band song not by the band is by....the beach boys???

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=B3Xbg7v3Fwg

Blues Guitar Solo Heatmap (Free Download) (upper mississippi sh@kedown), Thursday, 22 April 2021 22:21 (two weeks ago) link

yeah I dig that stage fright reissue, but I like the royal albert hall show that came with the deluxe edition even more!

brimstead, Thursday, 22 April 2021 23:23 (two weeks ago) link

yeah that's great!

I was more just surprised, I'm pretty leery of people fucking with old albums, especially Robbie, but he did a great job

Blues Guitar Solo Heatmap (Free Download) (upper mississippi sh@kedown), Thursday, 22 April 2021 23:34 (two weeks ago) link

I voted for that album in the Todd Rundgren poll, but I still need to listen to it some more.

Bewlay Brothers & Sister Rrose (James Redd and the Blecchs), Friday, 23 April 2021 00:20 (one week ago) link

Another Band song not by the Band: "Once Burned" by Rundgren, with Rick and Levon on bass and drums.

Halfway there but for you, Friday, 23 April 2021 00:22 (one week ago) link

Yeah, I dabbled with Stage Fright over the years, but now I love it. Time to Kill might be a top 3 The Band song for me.

keto keto bonito v industry plant-based diet (PBKR), Friday, 23 April 2021 01:26 (one week ago) link

It's the two songs that Manuel cowrote (his last songs) that are the essence of that record for me.

Halfway there but for you, Friday, 23 April 2021 01:47 (one week ago) link

https://open.spotify.com/playlist/2YiHodVA5wIgMgcIkPmwDa?si=pEI73yo7THGtx0BaSXbmZA&utm_source=copy-link

I think I posted upthread but I did a mix of all Manuel's songs/cowrites in the Band

“sleeping” is one of those songs that’s almost painful to listen to, heavy emotional stuff.

brimstead, Friday, 23 April 2021 02:20 (one week ago) link

Love Manuel’s heartbroken voice, it’s the one that I most closely associate with the group

calstars, Friday, 23 April 2021 02:35 (one week ago) link

Northern Lights/Southern Cross is all Robertson songs, but there are two otherwise unreleased Manuel songs from 67 or 68 on the box set A Musical History.

Halfway there but for you, Friday, 23 April 2021 02:49 (one week ago) link

is one of those "ferdinand the imposter"? i'm kind of obsessed with that song, it's absolutely gorgeous.

brimstead, Friday, 23 April 2021 02:50 (one week ago) link

"Words and Numbers" and "Beautiful Thing". I heard them once, but the currently available version of the box doesn't seem to include them?

Halfway there but for you, Friday, 23 April 2021 02:56 (one week ago) link

Yeah that Royal Albert Hall show is so good! Nice to have a relatively straightforward live album with just the boys and no fancy guests or horn sections.

soaring skrrrtpeggios (jon /via/ chi 2.0), Friday, 23 April 2021 14:44 (one week ago) link

The Manuel songs are always my favorites as well.

longtime caller, first time listener (man alive), Tuesday, 27 April 2021 17:50 (one week ago) link

"Get Up Jake" is amazing and proto-"Cruisin'" by Smokey Robinson -- the lead guitar on the Rock of Ages version in particular

If you value Vox, we have an axe (Sufjan Grafton), Tuesday, 27 April 2021 18:54 (one week ago) link

hadn't heard "She Knows". now listening to all available live recordings from 1985 on spotify.

If you value Vox, we have an axe (Sufjan Grafton), Tuesday, 27 April 2021 19:11 (one week ago) link

oof big co-sign on the above, the Stage Fright remaster is wonderful. sounds fantastic.

Hmmmmm (jamiesummerz), Friday, 30 April 2021 16:41 (six days ago) link


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