The Band.

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as in the guys who backed bob dylan etc. you know the story.

is there already a thread? you can imagined what happened when i did a title search for "the band"? (they are cursed in that way, much like the band "love." perhaps they should invent special search strings for such bands...)

thinking about them (again) this week because i skimmed the most recent copy of the wire, and saw a joe boyd interview in which boyd confirmed what i had long suspected, that the band (the band "the band") and especially their second record helped to define a certain subgenre of rock music which i suppose can be called "rootsy"--not just in attitude but also in their specific approach to recording and mixing which was (oh! inverted world) quite modern by most standards, making careful use of stereo and in certain cases utitilzing quite modern equipment (synthesizers, fancy mics) to obtain an "old fashioned" sound. but it's the overall sound-presence of that LP that i feel, instinctively, was quite crucial as an influence not just on the british folk-rock guys but by succeeding generations of likeminded musicians and producers in england, america, canada, etc.

can you guys help to pin this down further for me?

thoughts?

amateur!st (amateurist), Tuesday, 10 February 2004 19:56 (eighteen years ago) link

I think they're one of those bands whose noted influence (ha where is mark s) appeals to me more than them themselves. It's no stretch to say that the Walkabouts, of whom am I thoroughly and completely fond, had them as a partial role-model -- but I'd rather listen to the Walkabouts any day of the week.

Ned Raggett (Ned), Tuesday, 10 February 2004 19:58 (eighteen years ago) link

this is like the third time you've responded in such a fashion--"i like them, but the walkabouts do it better"

that's not a criticism

i haven't been terribly excited by the walkabouts stuff i've heard, but maybe i should listen again

amateur!st (amateurist), Tuesday, 10 February 2004 20:07 (eighteen years ago) link

i can't stand bob dylan. but i love the band... why is this?

cutty (mcutt), Tuesday, 10 February 2004 20:09 (eighteen years ago) link

atrophying of brain tissue?

amateur!st (amateurist), Tuesday, 10 February 2004 20:11 (eighteen years ago) link

I think the influence on 50s-60s r&b and soul isn't given enough props in most writings about The Band. I think those influences are as important as the stripped down folk/country part of their sound.

earlnash, Tuesday, 10 February 2004 20:12 (eighteen years ago) link

that's not a criticism

It could simply be a reflection of a private passion, but at their best the Walkabouts synthesize so much in such a striking way that I'm in quiet awe (and consequently frustrated at how other bands in theoretically similar veins just don't work as well).

Ned Raggett (Ned), Tuesday, 10 February 2004 20:12 (eighteen years ago) link

Just to clarify, it should read "the influence of..." not "influence on".

earlnash, Tuesday, 10 February 2004 20:15 (eighteen years ago) link

First two records are so great & the soul thing is their most interesting quality. I can't think of any band ever that connects the dots so well between black soul and white country.

Mark (MarkR), Tuesday, 10 February 2004 20:20 (eighteen years ago) link

i thought you were going to make a revolutionary argument about he influence of robbie robertson's guitar style on curtis mayfield which relied on new theories of the time space continuum formulated in quantum physics

damn

amateur!st (amateurist), Tuesday, 10 February 2004 20:22 (eighteen years ago) link

"atrophying of brain tissue?
-- amateur!st"

no i would attribute it to bob dylan's horrendous voice

cutty (mcutt), Tuesday, 10 February 2004 20:22 (eighteen years ago) link

Charlie Rich is an interesting one-man equivalent, though. (Not to Amateurist's equation, admittedly.)

Ned Raggett (Ned), Tuesday, 10 February 2004 20:22 (eighteen years ago) link

no i would attribute it to bob dylan's horrendous voice

Ah, friend!

Ned Raggett (Ned), Tuesday, 10 February 2004 20:23 (eighteen years ago) link

oh i'm floating in a sea of fools baaaaby

charlie rich seemed genuinely uncomfortable with genre categories and that hampered his music as much as it helped it i think

the band were without doubt a 'rock' band--whether or not thats endemic of the time in which they were recording, they were comfortable with the label

but yes i agree that mixture of sensibilites is really exciting

better still that the soul influence and country influence is somehow sublimated in such a fashion where it becomes exceptionally difficult to parse the songs for evidence of discrete influence

amateur!st (amateurist), Tuesday, 10 February 2004 20:27 (eighteen years ago) link

more like "the Bland"

Gear! (Gear!), Tuesday, 10 February 2004 20:32 (eighteen years ago) link

no wait, I like them.

Gear! (Gear!), Tuesday, 10 February 2004 20:33 (eighteen years ago) link

'First two records are so great & the soul thing is their most interesting quality. I can't think of any band ever that connects the dots so well between black soul and white country.'

Yep that's it. Let's face it the 'grizzled old-timer' thing wouldn't have lasted. It's the extraordinary blend of soul, country, funk, rock n roll, wurlitzer/jug-band weirdness, and it all sounds uncalculated.

pete s, Tuesday, 10 February 2004 21:56 (eighteen years ago) link

i guess they're interesting in that they were mostly canadians getting deeper into americana than americans. i love both the big pink building shot and the family portrait album covers. I think they were trying to create a "what if the beatles never happened" musical scenario ... drawing a line between The Sun Sessions and 1969... CCR were a more punk rock version of the same idea. other than "basement tapes" i find them a little stiff.

Fritz Wollner (Fritz), Tuesday, 10 February 2004 22:04 (eighteen years ago) link

Heh Amateurist not only is there another Band thread you were the last person to post to it!

Classic Or Dud: The Band

Tico Tico (Tico Tico), Tuesday, 10 February 2004 22:12 (eighteen years ago) link

The Band were so funky. White man's funk.

Debito (Debito), Wednesday, 11 February 2004 04:13 (eighteen years ago) link

how embarassing, I said the same thing on the other thread.

Fritz Wollner (Fritz), Wednesday, 11 February 2004 04:18 (eighteen years ago) link

"i thought you were going to make a revolutionary argument"

Well Aretha Franklin did record a great version of "The Weight".

earlnash, Wednesday, 11 February 2004 04:24 (eighteen years ago) link

The phrase 'white man's funk' is sort of embarrassing, but they were funky.

Debito (Debito), Wednesday, 11 February 2004 04:25 (eighteen years ago) link

Take up the white man's funkness
Send forth the best ye stank

Ned Raggett (Ned), Wednesday, 11 February 2004 04:26 (eighteen years ago) link

Christ, they were good. Sad how they will never be again...
The Band=classic
Drugs and depression=dud

Speedy Gonzalas (Speedy Gonzalas), Wednesday, 11 February 2004 04:39 (eighteen years ago) link

Because they sounded out of tune so often while backing Dylan, I fell in love with them. It was like they were playing for the amateurs in all of us.

jim wentworth (wench), Wednesday, 11 February 2004 06:06 (eighteen years ago) link

I like the Band lots, and Robbie is maybe the greatest guitar player ever who is not one of the greatest guitar players ever, but I don't often have much use for them. Why? Because they never made an album (alone at least) concomitant with their potential? How about because they're often a little too slow for music that moves? The gentility in their tunes is the source of a good part of their charm, but is inherently limiting, perhaps.

gabbneb (gabbneb), Wednesday, 11 February 2004 06:31 (eighteen years ago) link

please don't throw rocks, but i always thought The Band was like the Grateful Dead in their least-inspired moments.

Orbit (Orbit), Wednesday, 11 February 2004 06:32 (eighteen years ago) link

They were, perhaps, out of sync. in many ways. I enjoyed their sound, but they didn't blow me away. I used to own a 3 record promo box set (Warner Bros.?) of The Band, Quicksilver Messenger Service, and Steve Miller, and... gave it to a friend. Probably in exchange for a buzz. They made their mark with Dylan.

jim wentworth (wench), Wednesday, 11 February 2004 07:00 (eighteen years ago) link

please don't throw rocks, but i always thought The Band was like the Grateful Dead in their least-inspired moments.

There's a similarity in the vocals at times (I think Rick Danko is the most Garcia-like one?), but the Band never wanked off quite like the Dead...

"Music From the Big Pink" is just about perfect, the rest a bit hit-and-miss.

no opinion, Wednesday, 11 February 2004 07:13 (eighteen years ago) link

The Avalanches throw the uber-corny "Life is a Carnival" into their mixsets.

Spencer Chow (spencermfi), Wednesday, 11 February 2004 07:18 (eighteen years ago) link

The Band are one of my parents' bands that I've never known where to get started with. (cf. Allman Bros., CCR)

"The Weight" is, of course, great - is it representative of the rest of their material. Can I just buy whatever album that's on and be set for a start?

miloauckerman (miloauckerman), Wednesday, 11 February 2004 07:26 (eighteen years ago) link

Since that album is "Music From the Big Pink," the answer is yes, buy it.

no opinion, Wednesday, 11 February 2004 07:27 (eighteen years ago) link

Only marginally on-topic, but I interviewed Levon Helm's daughter the other week. She's in this new gospel-rock outfit called Ollabelle. She was very nice and remarkably well adjusted ("remarkably" if you know anything about Levon Helm), spoke well of her dad. She's got a heck of a nice voice too, kind of a brassy R&B growl.

I like the Band a lot, but I admit I like them best on The Basement Tapes. Their first several albums are all classics, though. When I was a kid, I was always put off by their muddy, murky sound. Now that's one of the things I love about them.

spittle (spittle), Wednesday, 11 February 2004 08:10 (eighteen years ago) link

Several people otm here (mark (country/soul is spot on), pete, debito). Their albums were played a lot by my parents and I didn't hear them again until I bought Music from Big Pink two years ago. Listening to it got me hooked again right away, I remembered so much after ~15 years.

Yes miloauckerman, get Big Pink, it's awesome. I always found it much better than their self-titled second album, more diverse, less "reactionary" I suppose. "Life is a Carnival" from Cahoots is a party of a song, no wonder the Avalanches use it. Wouldn't qualify it as "corny" though...

willem (willem), Wednesday, 11 February 2004 08:36 (eighteen years ago) link

ned's post made me laugh like a schoolgirl (like ned flanders, as it were)

how embarassing, I said the same thing on the other thread.

i feel this doubly

amateur!st (amateurist), Wednesday, 11 February 2004 09:50 (eighteen years ago) link

what i mean to say is that i'm doublt embarrassed for fritz

fritz, shame on you

amateur!st (amateurist), Wednesday, 11 February 2004 09:51 (eighteen years ago) link

How do I fit in to this embarrassment?

Debito (Debito), Wednesday, 11 February 2004 10:15 (eighteen years ago) link

These accusations that The Band started 'retro-rock' or were concerned with 'authenticity' are wildly off-target, considering how much modern (at the time) stuff they absorbed into their sound. Others have mentioned synths and funky rhythm sections as proof that they weren't a bunch of burnt out hippies trying to be Doc Watson, but I also want to bring up the years with Ronnie Hawkins. When they had been playing fifties style rock & roll mixed with country and folk up through into the early sixties, why would they give up playing what they enjoyed doing and go psych? Seems like people want to blame them for not abandoning the direction of their entire career as a group, which would have produced much duller music than those first two albums.

And I can't believe you dissed "The Last Waltz" on the other thread, Matos - everybody knows the guest spots are mostly cack (they should have instituted a ban on performances by anyone named Neil) and Robbie was a douche, but "Night They Drove Old Dixie Down" should be proof enough that Fleetwood Mac AND Outkast together are not fit to lick Levon Helm's boots when it comes to adding brass bands to your sound for fun and profit(!!! Yeeeahh)

Dave M. (rotten03), Wednesday, 11 February 2004 10:33 (eighteen years ago) link

Oops, strike them parenthesis. < / Dean >

Dave M. (rotten03), Wednesday, 11 February 2004 10:34 (eighteen years ago) link

'The Band' is a perfect album... and 'whispering pines' is just about the most beautiful, desolate song i've ever heard in my life, it never fails to move me to tears. (i have an MP3 of elliott smith stumbling through it somewhere, and it is chilling)

stevie (stevie), Wednesday, 11 February 2004 10:52 (eighteen years ago) link

These accusations that The Band started 'retro-rock' or were concerned with 'authenticity' are wildly off-target

this isn't what i was trying to say, exactly; i was asserting (as i guess i had done on the other thread, but i forgot about that) that without having an ideological program necessarily they had a specific approach to arranging and recording and mixing which later became identified with a certain subgenre of rock music that is often called "rootsy"

i dunno about "authenticity" (a power word that doesn't really clear anything up) but robertson et al were certainly going for a certain "rooted" sense of americana, a music with a strong sense of history, and like ccr they were selfconsciously tapping into an existing mythology, adding to it besides (ccr was both more monomaniacal and i think even more successful in this regard)

amateur!st (amateurist), Wednesday, 11 February 2004 12:31 (eighteen years ago) link

i contradicted myself

i guess there was a kind of low-key program at work, perhaps not charged with the reactionary values that much subsequent "rootsy" music has adopted but purposeful and willful nonetheless

amateur!st (amateurist), Wednesday, 11 February 2004 12:32 (eighteen years ago) link

i dunno about "authenticity" (a power word that doesn't really clear anything up) but robertson et al were certainly going for a certain "rooted" sense of americana, a music with a strong sense of history, and like ccr they were selfconsciously tapping into an existing mythology, adding to it besides (ccr was both more monomaniacal and i think even more successful in this regard)

there's an interesting dynamic involved, however, that Barney Hoskins' Band book explored, that to the members of the Band, the cultures they were tapping in their music were both alien and natural to them, and the extent to which they were scholarly exploring these genres and musics, and simultaneously the closeness they felt to them (thinking mostly here of levon's arkansas roots). so their music was simultaneously an exercise in attempted authenticity, and imaginative explorations of genres they revered.

stevie (stevie), Wednesday, 11 February 2004 12:40 (eighteen years ago) link

five years pass...

lately i've been spinning 'Rockin' Chair' a lot - love the heartsick, pleading sound of manuel's vocals, the absence of drums, the entwined mandolin and guitar, and the way the lyrics shift between 'downhome' nostalgia and a kind of resigned dread: these lines are especially devastating

Hear the sound, Willie Boy,
The Flyin' Dutchman's on the reef.
It's my belief
We've used up all our time,
This hill's to steep to climb,
And the days that remain ain't worth a dime.

god i love the band soo much

Ward Fowler, Tuesday, 25 August 2009 12:43 (thirteen years ago) link

Great song

Aw naw, no' Annoni oan an' aw noo (Tom D.), Tuesday, 25 August 2009 12:48 (thirteen years ago) link

eight months pass...

so is this really the only thread? or just a impediment of searching "The Band"?

i've been rather obsessed lately, mostly w/ the first three records. but i'm thinking of digging around for the others on the cheap. challop: Stage Fright is every bit as good as the first two. "The Rumor" and "Sleeping" are heartbreakingly awesome.

and hey, anyone remember this POS?: http://www.artistdirect.com/artist/videos/robbie-robertson/485778-811823-1

(will) (will), Thursday, 29 April 2010 14:30 (twelve years ago) link

certainly some of the most creative and breathtaking uses of time signature changes in rock/popular music imo.

(will) (will), Thursday, 29 April 2010 14:41 (twelve years ago) link

<3<3<3Levon @ 2:58 - "maybe they won't, you know i sure hope they don't"

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=r8Pt_ZkGg8I

(will) (will), Thursday, 29 April 2010 14:42 (twelve years ago) link

this other thread is mentioned above: Classic Or Dud: The Band
certainly some of the most creative and breathtaking uses of time signature changes in rock/popular music imo.
this is otm -- for being known as such a "down-home, authentic, straightahead" their songs are hard as fuck to play. i mean, there's straight up rockabilly, but also new orleans + appalachian + country rhythms going on, sometimes all in the same song.

tylerw, Thursday, 29 April 2010 14:57 (twelve years ago) link

The Who Band

https://i.gifer.com/K1Eb.gif

jenny from the blockchain (Ye Mad Puffin), Saturday, 5 March 2022 01:29 (seven months ago) link

one month passes...

Robbie Robertson tells the story of The Band's classic song The Weight
By Matt Frost published 1 day ago

"I said, ‘Well, it’ll just be a back-up song in case some other things don’t work out’”


https://www.musicradar.com/news/the-band-the-weight-robbie-robertson-guitar-interview

dow, Friday, 8 April 2022 02:29 (five months ago) link

Does he mention Buñuel in that interview?

Came Here to Roll the Microscope (James Redd and the Blecchs), Friday, 8 April 2022 03:16 (five months ago) link

No, he barely mentions the lyrics.

Halfway there but for you, Friday, 8 April 2022 11:39 (five months ago) link

Thanks. For a while there it seemed like there was nothing else he could talk about.

Mr. Uncut Risin’ (James Redd and the Blecchs), Friday, 8 April 2022 12:04 (five months ago) link

He even discussed Buñuel with Andy and Edie! At least according to Testimony.

Mr. Uncut Risin’ (James Redd and the Blecchs), Friday, 8 April 2022 12:07 (five months ago) link

Whilst they were en route from dinner at El Quijote to Salvador Dalí's suite at the St. Regis.

Mr. Uncut Risin’ (James Redd and the Blecchs), Friday, 8 April 2022 12:10 (five months ago) link

Forgot to add #onethread

Mr. Uncut Risin’ (James Redd and the Blecchs), Friday, 8 April 2022 12:28 (five months ago) link

Take a load off discreet charm of the bourgeoisie,
and you put it
you put it
you put it
right on me-ee-ee.

dow, Friday, 8 April 2022 23:02 (five months ago) link

one month passes...

Honorary Canadian, Ronnie Hawkins.

https://www.cbc.ca/news/entertainment/ronnie-hawkins-obituary-1.6470162

― clemenza, Sunday, May 29, 2022 1:32 PM (fourteen minutes ago) bookmarkflaglink

His first single, his "Bo Diddley" cover, was 1958; he's not quite in that founding-fathers group, but pretty damn close.

― clemenza, Sunday, May 29, 2022 1:33 PM

dow, Sunday, 29 May 2022 18:54 (four months ago) link

Wow. Figured he would never die. RIP.

The Code of the Wilburys (James Redd and the Blecchs), Sunday, 29 May 2022 19:03 (four months ago) link

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pK5mxNKI9rM

Didn't invent Psychobilly, but did alot to perfect it.

Always got a kick out of the cheerfully vulgar anecdote related by Jerry Wexler to Stanley Booth about Hawkins arriving in Muscle Shoals to record his 1970 Cotillion debut (paraphrased): "He arrived in his private plane with a suitcase full of drugs, a case of whiskey, and Miss Toronto...'I've got my pot, my pills, and my pussy... Let's get to work!'"

...and of course his promise recounted by Robbie in The Last Waltz.

RIP! His 1970 solo album is worth seeking out — no one from the Band on it, but a bunch of Muscle Shoals heavy hitters.

tylerw, Sunday, 29 May 2022 20:03 (four months ago) link

You can't beat a filmography where half of it is comprised of Heaven's Gate and Meatballs III.

clemenza, Sunday, 29 May 2022 20:26 (four months ago) link

xpost yeah man---here he is w Duane Allman, x King Biscuit Boy on harmonica:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DhyTaVKd9Xk

dow, Sunday, 29 May 2022 20:40 (four months ago) link

xpost filmography also getting Robbie's geetar all het up, and then fanning the flames (with his hat), in The Last Waltz.

dow, Sunday, 29 May 2022 20:43 (four months ago) link

(influence on Dylan's taste in hats?)

dow, Sunday, 29 May 2022 20:44 (four months ago) link

RIP he seemed so spry in Once We Were Bros

but 87. Nice fuckin run

OG Bob Sacamano (will), Sunday, 29 May 2022 21:19 (four months ago) link

fyi if you don’t fuck w UMS Spotify playlist of Manuel songs you definitely should

OG Bob Sacamano (will), Sunday, 29 May 2022 21:22 (four months ago) link

...and of course his promise recounted by Robbie in The Last Waltz.

No comment, except I believe it mentions one of the three people known to have silenced the Maracaña.

The Code of the Wilburys (James Redd and the Blecchs), Sunday, 29 May 2022 21:32 (four months ago) link

#RIP Ronnie Hawkins
Brilliant musician, Ronnie Hawkins saw the exceptional talent of Rick Danko, Richard Manuel, Levon Helm, Garth Hudson and Robbie Robertson, and brought all of them together. The Band wouldn't have existed without him. pic.twitter.com/3HBSqElPLB

— Rick Danko Page (@rickdankopage) May 29, 2022

dow, Sunday, 29 May 2022 21:44 (four months ago) link

which led me to

Welcome to the Richard Manuel Archive, a celebration of the life & music of vocalist, multi-instrumentalist, and songwriter Richard Manuel of The Band.

This is a continuing research project to define his legacy outside of his tragedy, looking at his life and who he truly was. pic.twitter.com/YkZfAZVYWX

— The Richard Manuel Archive (@manuelarchive) July 13, 2021

dow, Sunday, 29 May 2022 21:46 (four months ago) link

And

Lonesome Suzie
@NathalieO5
Account mostly dedicated to The Band and Bob Dylan. Love music. Fascinated by the 1960s-70s. Aspiring writer and compulsive reader. Curator of
@rickdankopage
Canadalonesomesuziecom.wordpress.com

dow, Sunday, 29 May 2022 21:48 (four months ago) link

That last one looks like a recent launch, will follow also, though.

dow, Sunday, 29 May 2022 21:50 (four months ago) link

HI DERE

Once Were Chemical Brothers (James Redd and the Blecchs), Monday, 30 May 2022 01:30 (four months ago) link

Luvly cover (Jon Langford chimes in eventually):

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hBAWPXVbcoE

dow, Sunday, 12 June 2022 21:20 (three months ago) link

Nice.

The Crazy World of Encyclopedia Brown (James Redd and the Blecchs), Sunday, 12 June 2022 22:27 (three months ago) link

two weeks pass...

Reminds me--there was a movie of this,Festival Express, released in early 70s (they were on a train, going across Canada and maybe some of US, stopping at festivals, or every stop made a festival maybe)--Good??

#OnThisDay The Festival Express kicked off. Here's a video of @JanisJoplin, @jerrygarcia #BobbyWeir, #Marmaduke and #RickDanko having a little jam session and some drinks.

Stream music from The Band: ▶️ https://t.co/ddaeAev6G6 pic.twitter.com/fbIHlUg6WK

— The Band (@thelastwaltz78) June 27, 2022

dow, Monday, 27 June 2022 18:43 (three months ago) link

yeah it's great — that's a scene from it. the footage actually wasn't pieced together until the early 2000s.

tylerw, Monday, 27 June 2022 18:47 (three months ago) link

XP!

The footage was shelved for a long time, with the movie finally coming out in the mid-'00s. It's a fine film, worth checking out on disc for the bonus performances. Some audio from the shows turned up much sooner as part of the Janis Joplin In Concert album and other Janis archival releases.

A funny thing about it is that for somebody who loves to talk about himself on camera, for some reason Robbie Robertson <wasn't> interviewed for this film. In fact, none of the then-surviving Band members pop up.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rs-82YZFfBE

I'm not like a huge Band guy or anything, but when this scene came up I cried a little in the theater.

^Chest Fever, Great Divide, and Dixie

Oh yeah--from that Soundstage set I mentioned way upthread, where they def. held own on same bill w peak --Graham Parker & The Rumour: drinking lots of java, it seems:
h
ttp://twitter.com/TheBandPodcast/status/1543960068462465025

dow, Monday, 4 July 2022 19:35 (three months ago) link

Rick Danko performed "Java Blues" on Soundstage, 1978.

The energetic performance is one of his finest. #RickDanko #TheBand pic.twitter.com/If0iN4u2Qk

— The Band: A History (@TheBandPodcast) July 4, 2022

dow, Monday, 4 July 2022 19:35 (three months ago) link

You can watch the full performance of Java Blues here: https://t.co/EkR0Le3rSK

— The Band: A History (@TheBandPodcast) July 4, 2022

dow, Monday, 4 July 2022 19:37 (three months ago) link

(each band did a nearly hour-long set for Chicago PBS Soundstage: no breaks, no interviews, nothing but the music, as I recall).

dow, Monday, 4 July 2022 19:43 (three months ago) link

three weeks pass...

These three bands, thee whole festival, that's all required on such a summer's day

#OnThisDay in 1973, The Band played the #SummerJam at Watkins Glen with The @GratefulDead and The @allmanbrothers.

Stream music from #TheBand: ▶️ https://t.co/ddaeAev6G6 pic.twitter.com/rzbCWcOLgq

— The Band (@thelastwaltz78) July 28, 2022

dow, Thursday, 28 July 2022 22:14 (two months ago) link

Better visuals, more data:

#OnThisDay in 1973, Summer Jam at Watkins Glen, New York, reunited #TheBand, The Grateful Dead and The Allman Brothers. With a crowd of 600 000 people, it was the largest gathering for a rock festival, even bigger than Woodstock. pic.twitter.com/gRpeXbo06z

— Lonesome Suzie (@NathalieO5) July 28, 2022

dow, Thursday, 28 July 2022 22:21 (two months ago) link

Jay Babcock, who I believe is an ilxor, also has generated a remarkable wordpress around San Francisco's Diggers. In the midst of an epochal interview with a couple who were in thee flow x churn of those 60s, I came across a clip from The Last Walz featuring their colleague Freewheelin Frank, poet, painter, psychic, and ex-Hell's Angel ("he dropped out, which was hard to do")---the connection w Band may have been Digger Emmett Grogan, also co-writer of Danko's "Java Blues":

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tgiJJITabrk

interview:https://diggersdocs.home.blog/2022/03/05/we-had-a-far-more-profound-effect/

(Thanx again to Andy The Grasshopper for linking this interview on ILE thread re HBO's The Anarchists.)

dow, Friday, 29 July 2022 21:22 (two months ago) link

There were also 600,000 at the 1970 Isle Of Wight festival. Sure, that one had many more bands, but it could only be reached by boat. A bit more difficult than driving 25 miles outside of Ithaca.

xp

Montgomery Burns' Jazz (Tarfumes The Escape Goat), Friday, 29 July 2022 21:55 (two months ago) link

two weeks pass...

I was a few days ago old when I learned Johnny Cash covered "The Night They..."...in 1975!

Would have totally thought that would have been on the Rubin menu.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ba3P0aH1Hxs

three weeks pass...

All The King's Men:Ree-markable album, some of it like nothing else (in a good way)

"Keith Richards, Scotty Moore and D.J. Fontana -plus Levon Helm, Garth Hudson and Rick Danko of the Band- all got together at Helm’s Woodstock, New York barn studio to record a track. The occasion was All the Kings Men, an LP honoring Presley" #theband #levonhelm #KeithRichards pic.twitter.com/iDhcKVuSa8

— Levon And The Hawks (@LevonTheHawk) September 8, 2022

dow, Friday, 9 September 2022 02:03 (three weeks ago) link

as xgau sez (dunno what first sentence means, but rest seems right:

Scotty Moore/D.J. Fontana: All the King's Men [Sweetfish, 1997]
There's no rationalizing the success ratio of this tribute comp--I mean, gosh, Elvis Presley's original sidemen collaborate with artists who like them. I'd like to credit Scotty and D.J.'s groove, but with second drummers powering the two rockingest cuts and extra guitarists everywhere, let's just call it serendipity. Plus maybe--since Joe Ely, Steve Earle, and Raul Malo all benefit from not trying too hard--the kind of affable discretion that stays out of talent's way. The knockout rockouts are Cheap Trick's "Bad Little Girl," which sounds like great John Lennon, and Keith Richards and the Band's "Deuce and a Quarter," which sounds like great old roots-rock and also like nothing I've ever heard. And then there's Ronnie McDowell with that essential soupcon of Memphis-to-Vegas schmaltz. A-

dow, Friday, 9 September 2022 02:08 (three weeks ago) link

Never noticed this before but on "Rags & Bones," when we get to the cat lyric, Garth does a pretty awesome impression of a cat shreik on the synths. It may not have been noticeable on headphones while on-the-go but on a good stereo system with at least bookshelf speakers it's pretty clear. Not as good but still cute, when Garth does his own version of an ice cream truck jingle during the lyric about the "ice cream man."

Anyway, kind of representative of the album, where the song is actually not that good, but it's played well and Garth really shines. The three cuts that always get anthologized are definitely the three highlights, but Garth's other big number is "Jupiter Hollow" - again not a great song, but it's wonderful just to hear Garth layer things together.

birdistheword, Friday, 16 September 2022 23:59 (two weeks ago) link

Yeah i feel the same about Garth on Cahoots.

visiting, Saturday, 17 September 2022 00:05 (two weeks ago) link

It's a shame they didn't come up with more great original material past Stage Fright, but I guess in fairness there was a lot of excellent stuff that didn't make the albums proper. (The best of the bonus cuts from the 2000/2001 reissues add up to a great lost album - Robbie slipped a lot of those into The Basement Tapes in 1975.)

birdistheword, Saturday, 17 September 2022 00:51 (two weeks ago) link


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