Pink Floyd's Richard Wright, forgotten genius?

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OK, maybe I don't mean genius, but am I the only one who really loves the songs he wrote for early Floyd? When I was a teenager I thought they were really crappy, but now I love them. I'm specifically talking about the single track Paintbox and Summer '68 on Atom Heart Mother, an album I otherwise ignore. Remember A Day is a cool 60s track as well, while It Would Be So Nice is a bit of a throwaway but pleasant enough. The only other songs he wrote were See Saw which I have to listen to again and apparently perhaps Two of a Kind, often thought a Syd Barrett song. Also, he was the primary backup vocalist on Piper At the Gates of Dawn, not Waters, and helped produce and play keys on Barrett's 2 solo LPs. Summer '68's lyrics, btw are the most nasty anti-groupie/one night stand lyrics ever:

http://www.pink-floyd-lyrics.com/html/summer-68-atom-lyrics.html

thoughts? Another vague question...

Dan Selzer (Dan Selzer), Wednesday, 29 October 2003 19:50 (seventeen years ago) link

What about "Stay"?? On Obscured By Clouds?

Mr. Snrub (Mr. Snrub), Wednesday, 29 October 2003 19:56 (seventeen years ago) link

I was really hoping that this was about a Pink Floyd concept album based on _Native Son_.

Dan Perry (Dan Perry), Wednesday, 29 October 2003 19:57 (seventeen years ago) link

Dan Selzer? THE Dan Selzer?

Agreed totally about RW. Love those songs...

Naive Teen Idol (Naive Teen Idol), Wednesday, 29 October 2003 20:00 (seventeen years ago) link

A Dan Selzer. There's a few. But none who spent as much of their teenage years dedicated to pink floyd as I did.

Dan Selzer (Dan Selzer), Wednesday, 29 October 2003 20:03 (seventeen years ago) link

Rick Wright gets no respect, especially from Waters who often goes on record to say that circa The Wall, Wright had stopped pulling his weight, and that he was only "on salary" circa the post-Final Cut years (after Roger'd flown the coop).

Moreover, like Michael Anthony in Van Halen (unfortunate comparison, I know), `tis Wright's vocals (usually harmonizing with Gilmour) that helped define the sound of the Floyd.

Alex in NYC (vassifer), Wednesday, 29 October 2003 20:10 (seventeen years ago) link

Plus without all the wooshing and shwowing and cronking he provided on keyboards they wouldn't have sounded "outer space" at all, they would've just been a band with weird songs.

nickalicious (nickalicious), Wednesday, 29 October 2003 20:21 (seventeen years ago) link

We can't have any of those kind of bands around!

Ned Raggett (Ned), Wednesday, 29 October 2003 20:22 (seventeen years ago) link

ha ha ZING!

nickalicious, the guy who loves Ween so much. (nickalicious), Wednesday, 29 October 2003 20:23 (seventeen years ago) link

Ok, Dan Selzer from Oberlin Dan Selzer? Who lives in NYC right now?

Naive Teen Idol (Naive Teen Idol), Wednesday, 29 October 2003 20:55 (seventeen years ago) link

Yes, I figured that was a given. For more or less information:

http://www.acuterecords.com

http://groups.yahoo.com/group/nyhappenings/

http://www.villagevoice.com/nightguide/evening.php?eventID=38875&slcategory=music&sldate=2003-10-30

http://www.friendster.com

http://www.razorwire.com/real-goth-faq/

Likewise, I assume you're Matt Weiner of Nozzle fame.

Dan Selzer (Dan Selzer), Wednesday, 29 October 2003 21:14 (seventeen years ago) link

I feel like I'm coffee klatching with the stars here.

Ned Raggett (Ned), Wednesday, 29 October 2003 21:17 (seventeen years ago) link

Dan Selzer is everywhere. In the great mythos of the Temple of Sting, wherein Sting embodies all that is evil (and bees represent all that is good), Dan Selzer is an anti-Sting force, bringing karmic good into the music universe. Plus he knows the secrets of BoCoCa. I know this has nothing to do with Pink Floyd. And most of you will have no idea what I am talking about anyway, including Dan Selzer.

Queen Bee Janine, Wednesday, 29 October 2003 21:23 (seventeen years ago) link

stars? then you must not have ever heard Nozzle! Oh snap! Just kidding. We're all stars here at I Love Music, no?

but I have no idea what Janine is talking about. Except in regards to BoCoCa. That's the area of NYC that I live in, and if she stops using that term, maybe it will go away.

Dan Selzer (Dan Selzer), Wednesday, 29 October 2003 21:28 (seventeen years ago) link

Dan, you missed the great era of the writings of the Temple of Sting, wherein the high priestess of the temple, the Queen Bee, didst interview musicians and bands, and spread the gospel about the evils of Sting, and dispersed propaganda about bees, and reviewed albums. This torah of the temple was distributed throughout the land on material madeth from tree bark pulp and tooketh the form commonly known as "zine". Some preserved archives of the writings of the temple may still be found lurking at http://janinebee.tripod.com/.
I'll resume talking/writing normally now.
This still has nothing to do with Pink Floyd. Sorry.

Queen Bee Janine, Wednesday, 29 October 2003 21:37 (seventeen years ago) link

Dude, rough.

Naive Teen Idol (Naive Teen Idol), Wednesday, 29 October 2003 21:44 (seventeen years ago) link

Dan Selzer is an anti-Sting force

Ironically, though, Dan is known for his tantric proclivities as well. Those relate to expounding on music, however...

Naive Teen Idol (Naive Teen Idol), Wednesday, 29 October 2003 21:58 (seventeen years ago) link

Great synth player he was. As for his songwriting, I cannot see a lot of songwriting credits for Wright in the earlier albums. "See-Saw" was great though.

Btw. "Corporal Clegg" was the greatest song Roger Waters ever wrote :-)

Geir Hongro (GeirHong), Thursday, 30 October 2003 01:24 (seventeen years ago) link

And then there was that Wright solo album. Hardly genius, was that?

t\'\'t (t\'\'t), Thursday, 30 October 2003 01:49 (seventeen years ago) link

can't say I've heard either of Wright's solo albums. Really all this thread is about is how freaking great the songs Paintbox and Summer '68 are. My next thread will be about the songs "Point Me At the Sky," possibly Waters and Gilmour's finest moment. Also, for what it's worth, I recently bought a used copy of David Gilmour's acoustic concert DVD from 2002 or so(it was 5 bucks.) It features a) a Syd Barrett cover(dominoes) and b) Robert Wyatt doing the intro voiceover to Comfortably Numb!

Dan Selzer (Dan Selzer), Thursday, 30 October 2003 01:57 (seventeen years ago) link

And then there was that Wright solo album. Hardly genius, was that?

There's three of them actually.

Elvis Telecom (Chris Barrus), Thursday, 30 October 2003 01:58 (seventeen years ago) link

Then there's this bit of obscurity

Elvis Telecom (Chris Barrus), Thursday, 30 October 2003 02:00 (seventeen years ago) link

There's three of them actually.

Ack, correcting myself. There two Wright solo albums and then the Zee album.

Elvis Telecom (Chris Barrus), Thursday, 30 October 2003 02:02 (seventeen years ago) link

I kind of like the first solo album from 1978, 'Wet Dream'. Production style is 'Meddle'-era, with 'Wish You Were Here' synths. It's very light music overall, a lot of just relaxing, but there are several very substantial songs, much in the vein of what he contributed to Floyd.

(Jon L), Thursday, 30 October 2003 02:31 (seventeen years ago) link

"paintbox" is indeed a great song.

wright does kinda get left out in discussions about synth-players. not as technically proficient or over-the-top as wakeman or emerson, not as inspired or futuristic as eno or kraftwerk -- an influence of sorts on techno and electro, yes, but certainly not a major one to be mentioned in the same breath as kraftwerk/eno/numan/vince clarke/tangerine dream (the orb notwithstanding). in the end, he was a perfectly competent keyboardist/synth-player who at his best added just what was needed for PF at a given moment.

Eisbär (llamasfur), Thursday, 30 October 2003 07:11 (seventeen years ago) link

Btw. "Corporal Clegg" was the greatest song Roger Waters ever wrote :-)

Amazingly I find myself in agreement with Geir - tho there's a possibility he might be joking (there's no possibility that i'm joking by the way). I don't know about Rick Wright's synth playing but he was a great organ player and was the only other person in the original band, other than Syd, who had any musical talent or imagination. When Syd left the Floyd, Peter Jenner asked Wright to come with him - why would he ask waters or Mason? Of course, after Syd left, Roger Waters went off and, being the diligent hard-working bore that he is, studied his Lennons and Townshends and Dylans long and hard until he learned how to write boring songs. And then, being a blustering egotistical bully, had no problem squashing the meek Wright and making him pay for all those nights in the early Floyd when Wright (or Peter Jenner) had to tune Waters' bass for him because he didn't know how to.

Dadaismus (Dada), Thursday, 30 October 2003 10:19 (seventeen years ago) link

I still maintain that they were at their best around Atom Heart Mother. If you can track down the bootleg of them recorded for the BBC, complete with AHM's choir and bress section, you'll hear a totally different side to Floyd. 'Fat Old Sun' is stretched out into a total freak-out. It also contains perhaps the best neglected Floyd Song, namely 'Cymbaline'.

persecution_smith, Thursday, 30 October 2003 10:55 (seventeen years ago) link

... I've heard this, indeed it is good but calling the version of "Fat Old Sun" a "freakout" is perhaps a little hyperbolic. "Green Is the Colour" is good on here too.

Dadaismus (Dada), Thursday, 30 October 2003 11:02 (seventeen years ago) link

Well, there is nothing English about American music anyway.

I can understand immigrants in the UK are not too keen on copying "white" styles such as Music Hall (which makes it impossible for them to sound English anyway), but why on Earth do they have to ape American styles. It was a lot more natural when bands such as UB40 did reggae in the 80s - at least reggae was based on the music from where they originally came from, not some imported US crap.

Looking at the ethnic origin of most immigrants in the UK, reggae elements and Bollywood elements would be the most natural elements in their music - besides typically English elements such as Music Hall, of course...

Geir Hongro (GeirHong), Thursday, 30 October 2003 11:09 (seventeen years ago) link

Yes, of course, Music Hall is the only indigenous (spelling?) English music. Geir please stay in pure Nordic blue-eyed blonde-haired Norway and never darken our towels again.

Dadaismus (Dada), Thursday, 30 October 2003 11:16 (seventeen years ago) link

Selzer is OTM — "Point Me At the Sky" is fantastic. I used to have a vinyl boot of outtakes called Dark Side of the Moo that had it on there (not sure if it's on that ltd. edition singles disc that came out a few years ago).

Wet Dream really has "several very substantial songs"? As much as I like him, I almost find that hard to believe...

Naive Teen Idol (Naive Teen Idol), Thursday, 30 October 2003 14:31 (seventeen years ago) link

'Point Me At The Sky' is a great song, representative of the Floyd's largely hidden pop side. You could make up a great disc of the likes of 'Corporal Clegg', 'Free Four', 'Fearless', 'Biding My Time', 'Cymbaline' and 'Green Is The Colour' and nobody would guess it was Pink Floyd. While we're at it, parts of 'Wish You Were Here' (esp. 'Have A Cigar') are actually *funky* aren't they?

persecution smith, Thursday, 30 October 2003 14:55 (seventeen years ago) link

... and of course Waters and Gilmour would hate it, boring fucks that they are. I'm guessing Rick Wright might quite like it, Nick Mason wouldn't care.

Dadaismus (Dada), Thursday, 30 October 2003 16:40 (seventeen years ago) link

Nick Mason wouldn't care.

This was always my impression too, that Mason was only along for the ride (and to keep every amused with his tonsorial shenanigans). That said, he plays a surprisingly central role in the recently re-released Live at Pompeii.

Alex in NYC (vassifer), Thursday, 30 October 2003 16:43 (seventeen years ago) link

True: he's often portrayed as a pretty rubbish drummer but on 'Pompeii' he's brilliant. Seen that bit on 'One Of These Days' where his stick goes flying and he calmly picks up another and carries on without missing a beat?

persecution smith, Thursday, 30 October 2003 17:10 (seventeen years ago) link

Yeah, I caught that too. Also, he keeps alternating between studying Waters' next move and Gilmour's, which makes the whole operation look much more difficult that it sounds.

Alex in NYC (vassifer), Thursday, 30 October 2003 17:19 (seventeen years ago) link

Yeah, I mean he doesn't have any chops or anything, but Mason played a lot of distinctive stuff on a whole lot of songs. His style really colors a lot of the music, those kind of lazy, swung fills and those dead drum sounds.

The drugs really must've taken a big toll on those guys though, as he sounds like a totally different and much more energetic drummer on, say, a Saucerful of Secrets.

Jordan (Jordan), Thursday, 30 October 2003 17:34 (seventeen years ago) link

There's a ton of great stuff snuck in on those post-syd pre-dark side albums, of course, but totally derivitave. I also have Dark Side of the Moo and it's got those Zabriskie Point tracks, one of which, Crumbling Land, is a nice bit of Byrdsian folk that breaks into more typical Floyd sections. Waters wrote a ton of those pastoral songs, Cymbaline, Green is the Colour, Grantchester Meadows etc, really a forgotten aspect, I think, everyone remembers the really long and boring songs. Maybe I don't do enough drugs, but I prefer the shorter songs. I used to have a cassette bootleg that had a live version of Green is the Colour and it was the most beautiful thing I'd ever heard.

Dan Selzer (Dan Selzer), Thursday, 30 October 2003 18:20 (seventeen years ago) link

>Wet Dream really has "several very substantial songs"? As much as I like him, I almost find that hard to believe...

as substantial as the ones he gave to the band, anyways... it's a fluffy album. but it's got moments, especially for those pre-inclined.

(Jon L), Thursday, 30 October 2003 19:28 (seventeen years ago) link

and if we're putting together a pink floyd post-syd pre-dark side pop record, we have to give serious shoutout's to More's hard-rocking twins, The Nile Song and Ibiza Bar. I mean, really, does it even need to be said? These songs kick serious ass and should be classic rock radio staples. What are they, post-Who/Stones? What's the precedents? American garage rock? Anyway, I can go on justifying my love for the forgotten and disregarded gems of classic rock, should I start a thread about how good the schmaltzy parts of the Doors Soft Parade are?

Dan Selzer (Dan Selzer), Thursday, 30 October 2003 20:10 (seventeen years ago) link

please don't (re: the doors); there are about twenty threads in the archives debating their merits - it'd be better to just revive one of those.

yeah, I'd say the Who is a pretty good reference point for those More tracks ... hmmm .. the guitar tone even sounds like Townshend (did he and Gilmour play the same model? maybe it's just that attack)

I had that Dark Side of the Moo boot as well. It's flabbergasting that they still haven't given those stray single tracks an easily obtainable release! In the early 90s I stumbled into this generally crappy used CD store just looking to kill some time, and lo and behold they had a copy of the bonus early Singles CD that accompanied the Shine On box! I couldn't believe it, and snapped it up. I don't know if some deluded soul just sold it out of the box cuz he disliked it .. or maybe there was in fact some kind of individual promo issue of it or something.

They could have totally tacked all that stuff onto Relics when they finally - after a ridiculously long delay - gave that one a CD issue. What a joke. Relics by the way was I think the first Floyd record I ever owned. "Remember a Day" was always one of my favorite songs on there; just loved Wright's piano lines on the song.

"Bridges Burning" from Obscured by Clouds is him too, isn't it?

Mr. Diamond (diamond), Thursday, 30 October 2003 20:37 (seventeen years ago) link

_Wet Dream_ has a bunch of convoluted, majestic chord changes
that I really dig (think "Great Gig In The Sky" or
"Shine On... Part 9"), alternating with soft, woozy
balladry. So if the idea of Pink Floyd crossed with easy
listening doesn't offend you, give it a try.

squirlplise, Thursday, 30 October 2003 21:40 (seventeen years ago) link

"he was the primary backup vocalist on Piper At the Gates of Dawn"
i've always wondered, who actually came up with the melodies to those harmonies, b/c ive always been under the impression that Syd did, since they're brilliant and i consider them the best thing about pink floyd after syd left. i had always assumed that syd came up with their style and just kinda passed them on to the band. because they do show up on the madcap laughs, but i dont know who was responsible for them. does anyone know the answer to that?

Felcher (Felcher), Thursday, 30 October 2003 21:47 (seventeen years ago) link

Syd was FAR from a taskmaster or control freak.
Although Syd wrote the songs, I'm certain that
the arrangements were democratic - each member
writing their own parts (including, presumably,
the backing vocals).

squirlplise, Thursday, 30 October 2003 22:01 (seventeen years ago) link

well, Richard Wright is credited as handling most of the secondary vocals on Piper. He also had a hand in producing Syd's two solo records. Everyone knows the old story about how Gilmour and Syd were chums prior to the band, which excuses Gilmour from supposedly "stealing" Syd's sound. You can hear "echoes" (excuse the pun) of Syd's guitar sound throughout Gilmour's history, and vice versa. There's some good documentation about the recording of Syd's solo records, though I think some of it may be from before the Floyd members came in and took over. I think in the end, you can't really separate Syd from the band...the sounds they came up with together carried on long after he left, and they all did a lot of work on the solo records, in some cases syd would record guitar and vocals and leave while Gilmour, Wright, Waters and others would complete the tracks.

Dan Selzer (Dan Selzer), Thursday, 30 October 2003 22:17 (seventeen years ago) link

Listening to Gary Numan's live version of "On Broadway" last night, I couldn't help but notice the similarity of the song's extended instrumental coda to the breakdown section with all the squiggly synths in "Dogs" off the Floyd's Animals (easily, btw, my favorite post-Dark Side track).

Assuming that it WAS, indeed, Rick Wright playing those squigglies (and with Roger Waters' increasingly controlling ways around that time, you never really know), I suppose it can be said that RW made quite the impression on the our Gary — and, by association, perhaps chilly-synth New Wave...

Naive Teen Idol (Naive Teen Idol), Friday, 31 October 2003 15:00 (seventeen years ago) link

on a slightly different topic...listen to Thomas Leer's first single, Private Plane/International, one of the first ever home-recorded DIY electronic/new wave self-released records. The end of International has this lo-fi organ/synth/guitar section that is possibly the best approximation of Syd Barrett's Pink Floyd in the least likeliest place. The song can be heard on the Cherry Red "Contradictions" CD and shouldn't be confused with a later Leer 12" of the same name...

Punk in general had a love/hate relationship with floyd, maybe because they loved the early stuff so much and hated the later stuff so much. John Lydon would wear his "I Hate Pink Floyd" T-shirt while the Damned would try to get Syd to produce their second record, but settle for Nick Mason, who admitedly did a terrible job. I'm sure Lydon/PIL loved early Floyd...

Dan Selzer (Dan Selzer), Friday, 31 October 2003 18:51 (seventeen years ago) link

In the early 90s I stumbled into this generally crappy used CD store just looking to kill some time, and lo and behold they had a copy of the bonus early Singles CD that accompanied the Shine On box! I couldn't believe it, and snapped it up. I don't know if some deluded soul just sold it out of the box cuz he disliked it .. or maybe there was in fact some kind of individual promo issue of it or something.

Thee exact same thing happened to me, and of course I snapped it up pretty quickly as well. I don't think there was a seperate promo release of it, a lot of places part stuff like that out when they get it in, like at the same shop I got the cocteau twins cd single box, b/c i went in just after they parted one out and put it all on the racks - they gave me discount for buying all the discs, and threw in the box as well.

Pashmina (Pashmina), Friday, 31 October 2003 23:01 (seventeen years ago) link

Oh, and I'm not entirely sure if richard wright could really be called "forgotten", but the first part of "shine on you crazy diamond" is surely close to genius of some sort.

Pashmina (Pashmina), Friday, 31 October 2003 23:02 (seventeen years ago) link

I was in much pain upon losing my copy of disc 2 of the Beach Boys box set, the one with all the Smile material on it, and figured I'd have no chance of ever finding it alone, and didn't want to buy the whole set(not that it's as rare/expensive as the Floyd collection but still) untill one day while vacationing in Krakow Poland I stumbled upon a small CD store that had all 4 CDs on the wall, but priced seperately. I grabbed the second and asked in slow english "wait, you mean I can just buy this alone?" and he thought I was crazy. That was awesome.

Dan Selzer (Dan Selzer), Friday, 31 October 2003 23:34 (seventeen years ago) link

vacationing in Krakow Poland

Now that's high comedy, Dan. There's nothing quite as painful as losing discs of a boxed set -- I had the same thing happen to me w/ the Eno instrumental box, and now that's OUT OF FUCKING PRINT.

That said, I think that early Floyd disc was available seperately -- I think we had it at the Coop Bookstore, actually (Dan will know what I'm talking about -- we both worked there!)...

Naive Teen Idol (Naive Teen Idol), Saturday, 1 November 2003 03:50 (seventeen years ago) link

damn! same thing happened to me with disc one of History Of Jamaican Music!! must have left it in a club's CD player, while DJing. Kaffahouse, yeah you ya punks, still time to make reparations!

Paul (scifisoul), Saturday, 1 November 2003 04:14 (seventeen years ago) link

I like RIck Wright. I like watching him on that Pompei Live video I got. And the rest. And also, if you have a friend that's way into P.F. and owns the Live at Pompei video but never had MTV or any exposure to the Beastie Boys' "Gratitude" video and you have that Criterion Collection Beasties thing, it's cool to make them watch the "Gratitude" video and watch their reaction.

My friend Jim, I made him watch it, and he was like "Hey, this is totally like..." and then the shot of the speaker cabs w/ "Pink Floyd London" stenciled on them came up and he just laughed his ass off. It was pretty good.

Helltime Producto (Pavlik), Saturday, 1 November 2003 07:26 (seventeen years ago) link

The Deftones' video for "Minerva" also apes the Pompeii vibe.

Alex in NYC (vassifer), Saturday, 1 November 2003 07:29 (seventeen years ago) link

Punk in general had a love/hate relationship with floyd, maybe because they loved the early stuff so much and hated the later stuff so much. John Lydon would wear his "I Hate Pink Floyd" T-shirt while the Damned would try to get Syd to produce their second record, but settle for Nick Mason, who admitedly did a terrible job. I'm sure Lydon/PIL loved early Floyd...

I don't know if Lydon did ever like early Floyd but it as actually Malcolm McLaren who first had the idea of getting in Syd Barrett as a producer - tho, knowing him, that might have been some sort of situationist prank.

Dadaismus (Dada), Saturday, 1 November 2003 18:29 (seventeen years ago) link

Syd producing would be sort of the ultimate choice if you don't want your album to be produced at all...

Geir Hongro (GeirHong), Saturday, 1 November 2003 22:57 (seventeen years ago) link

That is, unless you ply him with pork chops...

Naive Teen Idol (Naive Teen Idol), Sunday, 2 November 2003 00:39 (seventeen years ago) link

i'd like to give Wright heaps of credit as a harmony and timbre synth player, but the textures on Wish You Were Here and Moon .. did he teach the rest of the band to play VCS3s or did they just work them out ? it would be nice to think of Wright channelling the harmonies using the VCSs as a new sort of barber-shop angle, but was it the whole band ? (info on the synth use in the studio creation of "Welcome to the Machine" is even more speculative)

but yes, lovely harmonies, esp. Summer '68 and Shine 1 & 9, and i snapped up that funny little singles cd too when i saw it secondhand, and i like that (and yes, why of all things would someone sell that ?)

There's a scene in Fellini's Roma where all the "hippy free-lovers" are doing their thing juxtaposed with the "decadent ruling bourgeoisie" looking down at them from a majestrial private balcony, a mildly operatic scene, and there's a guy that looks _just_ _like_ Richard Wright in the middle of the "hippies", staring at the camera -- not Pompeii, but close time/place -- maybe something to do with "mates" like Antonioni or that weirder Barbet Schroeder (whose 2 PF movies i've found hard to find, and although critical consensus warns they're dire, i always imagined PF just suppressed them -- i just want to see the music in action as soundtrack)

george gosset (gegoss), Sunday, 2 November 2003 01:26 (seventeen years ago) link

(whose 2 PF movies i've found hard to find, and although critical consensus warns they're dire, i always imagined PF just suppressed them

Both More and La Vallee are easy to find on video and/or DVD. Amazon has them both. I haven't gotten around to La Vallee yet, but More is a pretty good little hippie nihilist junkie movie.

Elvis Telecom (Chris Barrus), Sunday, 2 November 2003 20:24 (seventeen years ago) link

Much as i like those soundtracks, i'm not going to spend overseas $$ (even US$ right now, ha ha) on seeing a somewhat throwaway "nihilist junkie" culture flik (having seen too much of that sort of "action" anyway from a couple of good friends' seemingly unstoppable local "cultural" compulsions).
La Valee smells like a sexploitation '70s romp, which given the backdrop of New Guinea might just be too crap for me. Hey, I don't know, i haven't seen it, but the fact that i haven't been able to pick it up at the local art-video hire place or see it at the cult movie collector's cinema makes me weary. Women "giving in to 'inhibitions'" is a genre i'm suspicious of, however 'high art values' an endorsement from '70s Pink Floyd might ensure.

Fellini's Roma, that's summer '72. I figure it is Wright, centre stage middle of the free-loving transistor-toting Italian hippies, reprising "Summer '68" as he stares at the camera with a sad "is this it" expression on his face, not participating feverishly like the other long-hairs. Probably my imagination, and there's no "Alberto Sordi/ Gore Vidal/ Federico Fellini/ Marcello Mastroianni as himself" credit for Wright, but then that would be Wright's almost anonymous style.
Fellini's Roma _is_ a movie i have put effort into obtaining. The vignettes are too beautiful and mostly all too plausible (except for the Vatican City Liturgical Fashion Show, which is _clearly_ o.t.t., far too camp and spooky to be anything but specious and spurious, _definitely_, but it's the best audio-cinematic music video short of high-church communion with incense, possibly the main reason i obtained the film).

george gosset (gegoss), Sunday, 2 November 2003 22:22 (seventeen years ago) link

"Also, he was the primary backup vocalist on Piper At the Gates of Dawn..."

That's Wright singing the verse parts on "Matilda Mother", isn't it?

Philip Alderman (Phil A), Sunday, 2 November 2003 23:22 (seventeen years ago) link

five months pass...
This was a great thread — not only did it discuss a topic not exactly near, but fairly dear to my heart, it reunited me with my college pal, Dan!

It occurs to me, though, that there's more to this story for me — a part that I forgot to mention, but seems relevant. My classical piano teacher—a geeky, bespectacled guy with a deviated septum who knew nothing about popular music—gave up teaching me classical around the time I was 13 or 14 because pop tunes were the only thing I really cared about. And one of the songs I INSISTED this guy teach me was "Summer '68" — which he begrudgingly did (though I'm sure that beat helping me figure out J Geils Band organ solos and so forth).

In retrospect, there's no way I would have kept up w/ music if the guy had insisted we keep doing Beethoven. But really, had this guy not taught me this song, not only might I have never attended the Oberlin Conservatory, but I never would have even met Dan Selzer! How's that for kizmit?

Thank you, Richard Wright!

Naive Teen Idol (Naive Teen Idol), Tuesday, 27 April 2004 16:58 (seventeen years ago) link

So 'Wet Dream' is actually good, huh? I'll have to take my copy off my office wall, where it's hung as a joke for years, and give it a listen.

Rickey Wright (Rrrickey), Tuesday, 27 April 2004 21:43 (seventeen years ago) link

one year passes...
http://news.yahoo.com/s/nm/20051220/music_nm/gilmour_dc

Gilmour's first solo record since 1984, feat. Ricky, Phil Manzenera and Robert Wyatt among others.

Dan Selzer (Dan Selzer), Wednesday, 21 December 2005 16:03 (fifteen years ago) link

Was able to get some "cheapo" ($100) tix in the Mezz. for one of the April Radio City shows. Fingers crossed that his solo LP has some meat to it. Also curious as to who will be in the touring band.

At least I hope to hear "Fat Old Sun" at Radio City (and just maybe some of the lesser-known/played Floyd songs). Can happily pass on any Floyd material post-Animals.

drewo (drewo), Wednesday, 21 December 2005 17:11 (fifteen years ago) link

Damn! Only five cities???

Mr. Snrub (Mr. Snrub), Wednesday, 21 December 2005 17:21 (fifteen years ago) link

On that "Classic Albums - Dark Side of the Moon" making-of DVD there are a couple of places where Wright shows little chord changes or extra harmony bits that he added to some of the songs and in every case his addition is the thing that totally makes the song.

walter kranz (walterkranz), Wednesday, 21 December 2005 17:53 (fifteen years ago) link

I was a huge fan of About Face's "Murder" as a young Floydy...

Naive Teen Idol (Naive Teen Idol), Thursday, 22 December 2005 05:03 (fifteen years ago) link

that is a great song. the rest of the album not so much

kyle (akmonday), Thursday, 22 December 2005 05:14 (fifteen years ago) link

Yes. And yet I still had a live boot from that tour in Sweden...

And you know, I recently came across an mp3 of Robert Wyatt singing Roger's part on a solo Dave version of "Comfortably Numb"...

Naive Teen Idol (Naive Teen Idol), Thursday, 22 December 2005 05:34 (fifteen years ago) link

five years pass...

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=J3m_RzweM0E

This is really gorgeous.

Euler, Monday, 18 April 2011 22:35 (ten years ago) link

three months pass...

happy birthday...

http://gozie.com/video/A98DXBYDUR38/Pink-Floyd--Paint-Box

dan selzer, Thursday, 28 July 2011 17:24 (ten years ago) link

wright is rad! i think lots of proggy bands would've benefitted from someone like this guy, who wasn't into flash so much as mood/heaviness.
is this good?
http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/d/db/Rick_Wright_Wet_Dream_album_300.jpg

tylerw, Thursday, 28 July 2011 17:43 (ten years ago) link

oh, see there's some discussion up thread

tylerw, Thursday, 28 July 2011 17:44 (ten years ago) link

this sounds tight. representative of the rest of the record?
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JEISO8cGKyo

tylerw, Thursday, 28 July 2011 17:45 (ten years ago) link

Summer '68 is my jam.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UNvEWtNa33c

solfege made me schizophrenic (MaresNest), Thursday, 28 July 2011 21:17 (ten years ago) link

This is really gorgeous.
--Euler


Awesome that Gilmour did this. Always seemed like a pretty classy chap.

Naive Teen Idol, Friday, 29 July 2011 02:04 (ten years ago) link

nine years pass...

New web site that his family put up. Worth checking out if you're a PF fan.
https://rickwright.com

Elvis Telecom, Saturday, 12 December 2020 20:05 (ten months ago) link

All the interviews on this site make me wonder whether someone was working on a documentary film at some point. It's interesting to hear the perspectives of collaborators like Manzanera and Anthony Moore, who are sort of tangential to the conventional Pink Floyd story.

I'm puzzled, though, why there aren't any pages specifically about his solo albums. I guess there are fan sites that have that information, but it seems disrespectful somehow to deal with his work so obliquely. Incidentally, it seems that the Zee album was reissued last year as Identity 2019, credited to Wright and Harris. Despite the "new" title, it seems to be the original album with bonus tracks.

Halfway there but for you, Sunday, 13 December 2020 02:57 (ten months ago) link

I only recently discovered Wet Dream, it's a really good record and probably has more of the flavors that make Pink Floyd great than anything Gilmour or Wright ever did separately.

longtime caller, first time listener (man alive), Sunday, 13 December 2020 03:26 (ten months ago) link

yeah I think Wet Dream has aged well - when I was a teenager it seemed unlistenably smooth but 2020 ears are much more forgiving - lyrically there’s a sense of someone with not much to say making a solo album because “the others are”, but I guess I find that charming now as well! and yep there’s plenty of lovely Floydy chord sequences (& high end production)

the least famous person you were surprised to discover (emsworth), Sunday, 13 December 2020 04:55 (ten months ago) link

heh I just posted abt that record today

Pink Floyd - Animals (Poll and discussion thread)

howls of non-specificity (sleeve), Sunday, 13 December 2020 05:06 (ten months ago) link

nine months pass...

Full 80min interview unearthed

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=URbiyWY-szY

Elvis Telecom, Saturday, 9 October 2021 20:38 (two weeks ago) link


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