33 1/3 Series of books

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May have been discussed already (as M Matos prepares his own) but some of these books are out :

http://www.continuumbooks.com/series_details.cgi?sid=311


has anyone actually read one yet?

Matt Sab (Matt Sab), Tuesday, 7 October 2003 14:39 (fourteen years ago) Permalink

hmm,i had heard reference to matos' sign o' the times book,but i didn't realise it was part of a series.
a few of the other books look interesting,are any of them any good?
also,are these books only published in america?

robin (robin), Tuesday, 7 October 2003 14:57 (fourteen years ago) Permalink

oh,my mistake,it says on the site they'll be out in the rest of the world after april 2004

robin (robin), Tuesday, 7 October 2003 14:58 (fourteen years ago) Permalink

I'm not an impartial observer, but I got the first six and they look marvelous! Like little versions of the old Penguin series--they're pocket-sized and short, perfect for reading on trips or whatever. I've polished off the ones on Village Green Preservation Society (which I still haven't heard), Harvest, and Dusty in Memphis so far; the latter is my favorite. also, I'm not the only ILxor who has one of these--I'm especially looking fwd to Douglas Wolk's book on James Brown's Live at the Apollo, and though I'm sure Chris Ott would rather not be thought of as an ILxor, he's got one on Joy Division's Unknown Pleasures also coming.

M Matos (M Matos), Tuesday, 7 October 2003 15:15 (fourteen years ago) Permalink

yeah i would be curious to read the dusty one,the mbv one,and the james brown one,as well as your own prince one

robin (robin), Tuesday, 7 October 2003 15:47 (fourteen years ago) Permalink

And the ABBA one!!!

Tom (Groke), Tuesday, 7 October 2003 15:58 (fourteen years ago) Permalink

I just kinda stumbled over these yesterday...picked up Joe Pernice's Meat is Murder...so far it's pretty neat....a little sappy and nostalgic.....but hey it's Meat is Murder...so it's perfect.


I like his writing...I love the album.

ddb, Tuesday, 7 October 2003 16:03 (fourteen years ago) Permalink

That top link leads to a piece on the series which contains the line (A task which can be, as Elvis Costello famously observed, as tricky as dancing about architecture.)


Wasn't it Zappa who said this?

scottjames23 (worrysome-man), Tuesday, 7 October 2003 19:07 (fourteen years ago) Permalink

Wasn't it Zappa who said this?

i think it's pretty well accepted that (a) both frank and elvis said this, (b) but various others (charles mingus, for example) said it way before they did, and (c) trying to figure out who exactly thought of it first is kind of like, ya know, dancing about architecture.

fact checking cuz, Tuesday, 7 October 2003 19:36 (fourteen years ago) Permalink

Wasn't Zappa, I think. And wasn't Laurie Anderson, either...
A multitude of musicians have gladly (or wryly) quoted it again and again, but ...Damn, I wish I remembered which ish. of Ver Vire it was exactly where I saw the original source named a coupla years ago.

Hey, when will Douglas Wolk's book be out then?

t\'\'t (t\'\'t), Tuesday, 7 October 2003 19:46 (fourteen years ago) Permalink

Um... I have to FINISH it first. But I believe I'm in the third batch.

Right now I'm writing a sequence about a bear that climbed a fence in Duluth right about the time James Brown was singing "I Don't Mind" and thereby came yay-close to starting World War III.

I can't WAIT to read Matos on Prince and Elisabeth Vincentelli on ABBA.

Douglas (Douglas), Tuesday, 7 October 2003 20:39 (fourteen years ago) Permalink

Right now I'm writing a sequence about a bear that climbed a fence in Duluth right about the time James Brown was singing "I Don't Mind" and thereby came yay-close to starting World War III.

:::drool:::

M Matos (M Matos), Tuesday, 7 October 2003 21:20 (fourteen years ago) Permalink

also, you're not missing much on my end, believe me

M Matos (M Matos), Tuesday, 7 October 2003 21:21 (fourteen years ago) Permalink

Matos, are they going to revise the bio for you that's on the site? It doesn't mention your current position and says you still live in NYC.

jaymc (jaymc), Tuesday, 7 October 2003 21:46 (fourteen years ago) Permalink

fuck, you're right. thanks!

M Matos (M Matos), Tuesday, 7 October 2003 21:53 (fourteen years ago) Permalink

one year passes...
David Barker, who edits the series, has started up a blog about it:

http://33third.blogspot.com/

Enjoy!

Ned Raggett (Ned), Saturday, 9 April 2005 13:52 (thirteen years ago) Permalink

Is anyone going to write about Stevie Wonder anytime soon?

Eric von H. (Eric H.), Saturday, 9 April 2005 14:00 (thirteen years ago) Permalink

has anyone read the 33 1/3 Forever Changes book? I thought it was great--an album I've listened to a million times, but the author (can't recall his name at the moment) made me hear it in an entirely new way. There were moments where I thought he might be stretching things a bit too far--like when he began a long discussion of gnosticism--but in the end he pulled it all together rather astoundingly. anyway, it's the best one of these books I've read thus far.

tylerw, Saturday, 9 April 2005 14:03 (thirteen years ago) Permalink

Cool..anything which might potentially make me like that album again sounds good..

Masked Gazza, Saturday, 9 April 2005 14:14 (thirteen years ago) Permalink

I bought four at once and Forever Changes is the last one I have left to read. I lost a bit of steam after reading the Village Green Preservation Society book which I thought was pretty dull. I couldn't decide whether it was the writing or just the fact that the Kinks themselves are pretty boring. I enjoyed the Piper at the Gates of Dawn book quite a bit though. I didn't think there would be anything new to say about Barrett/Floyd but he found a way to make it interesting. Anyway, thanks for reminding me that I need to pull out the Forever Changes book now.

walter kranz (walterkranz), Saturday, 9 April 2005 15:04 (thirteen years ago) Permalink

how many of these books talk about the music in detail and aren't just sort of glossed "making of" things?

Amateur(ist) (Amateur(ist)), Saturday, 9 April 2005 15:16 (thirteen years ago) Permalink

ok i totally want to check out franklin bruno's book.

Amateur(ist) (Amateur(ist)), Saturday, 9 April 2005 15:34 (thirteen years ago) Permalink

I've only read Matos' book, but it certainly talks about the music in detail.

I'll probably read the Entroducing book.

Jordan (Jordan), Saturday, 9 April 2005 16:28 (thirteen years ago) Permalink

None of the three I've read (Piper, Village Green, VU) go very far beyond the realm of a making-of or a band bio that's focused on a specific period. That's not to say that they weren't worthwhile or entertaining to read if you're a fan of the album in question.

I also got the feeling (primarily from the VU book) that the writers were getting their one and only chance to write about a particular passion and as a result I felt like there was this barely constrained urge to branch out beyond the scope of the single album in question. Maybe my personal expectations for this type of book were off base but I think that for example the artist's personal life should barely if at all come into play.

I might be more interested in reading one by a writer who had already done a full biography of the artist in question so that the standard gossipy stuff and most common observations would already be out of the way. Maybe then the author would be forced to focus more deeply on the music in abstract terms and not worry about some of the more mundane details. But these criticisms are all very nitpicky and I'm sure I'll be ordering another batch soon.

walter kranz (walterkranz), Sunday, 10 April 2005 00:45 (thirteen years ago) Permalink

ok i totally want to check out franklin bruno's book.

The Armed Forces one? That's definitely on the top of my list. I'm optimistic because it's a pretty interesting choice out of the early Costello albums so I'm guessing he'll have something unique to say. A lot of the other picks are very classic-rock-y but maybe once those are out of the way the series will get more interesting.

walter kranz (walterkranz), Sunday, 10 April 2005 00:52 (thirteen years ago) Permalink

Michaelangelo, I was just telling my mom your SOTT story about imitating the 'Dirty Mind' cover with your Spiderman Underoos, etc. She got a *huge* hoot out of it. (She's 65.)

Rickey Wright (Rrrickey), Sunday, 10 April 2005 03:07 (thirteen years ago) Permalink

I'm very very psyched to read Franklin's book too.

Douglas (Douglas), Sunday, 10 April 2005 06:53 (thirteen years ago) Permalink

The Endtroducing one looks great. I love this:

Just out of curiosity, could you tell me what you think is the difference between turntablism and scratching?

Turntablism is the description of scratching that’s supposed to make people who don’t listen to hip-hop, sit up and go “Hmm, maybe it is real music.” Scratching, to me, is just what it is. Turntablism has this virtuosic aspect to it, and to me, that’s when things start to turn jazzy. And I’m not a huge fan of when things turn jazzy. Because when I think of jazzy, I think of Wynton Marsalis.

Hurting (Hurting), Sunday, 10 April 2005 08:28 (thirteen years ago) Permalink

i enjoyed Matos's book. Does pretty much everything: talks about each track in detail, the album in the context of the rest of Prince's discog, and relates it to his personal experiences at the time of release and thereafter. Couldn't HAVE wished for much more.

i saw Douglas's book in the shop the other day. Looked a bit dauntingly 'conceptual' on a quick flip through, what with all the headings and shit. But I'm sure it's a good read and i'll probably buy it. Anybody else read this?

zebedee (zebedee), Sunday, 10 April 2005 13:54 (thirteen years ago) Permalink

Just to clarify, what I really liked is not so much the Wynton Marsalis diss. What's cool is that he actually treats "mak(ing) people who don't listen to hip-hop sit up and go 'Hmm, maybe it is real music.'" as a negative.

Hurting (Hurting), Sunday, 10 April 2005 16:47 (thirteen years ago) Permalink

Z: I did read it and it is good. A Poe short story, too: you can down it in one sitting.

I should really put together a proposal for "Return to the 36 Chambers".

Forksclovetofu (Forksclovetofu), Sunday, 10 April 2005 16:49 (thirteen years ago) Permalink

Did anyone hear anything about the Loveless book?

Orange, Sunday, 10 April 2005 16:56 (thirteen years ago) Permalink

three months pass...
Don't know about the Loveless book, but all of these, if you were hoping, ain't happening:

Songs in the Key of Life, by Dave Hesmondhalgh
Parallel Lines, by Elisabeth Vincentelli
Three Feet High and Rising, by Brian Coleman
Tusk, by Stephin Merritt
Computer Love, by Michael Bracewell
Marquee Moon, by David Keenan
Master of Puppets, by Tom Bissell
The Basement Tapes, by Damon Krukowski

The editor/creator of the series, David Barker runs a blog about the series. Email him directly if you like:

http://33third.blogspot.com/

I finally read one of these. I think I picked a great place to start, Douglas Wolk's Live at the Apollo. It was really really good.

Matt Sab (Matt Sab), Wednesday, 27 July 2005 15:19 (twelve years ago) Permalink

Greatly enjoyed Meat Is Murder, the Joy Division one was more of a factual view but still very interesting, the Dusty one didn't work for me.

zaxxon25 (zaxxon25), Wednesday, 27 July 2005 15:29 (twelve years ago) Permalink

God, I cannot wait for the In the Aeroplane over the Sea book. The excerpt and things I've read by the author seem like she really gets it spot on.

PB, Wednesday, 27 July 2005 15:32 (twelve years ago) Permalink

why aren't those ones happening?

s1ocki (slutsky), Wednesday, 27 July 2005 15:34 (twelve years ago) Permalink

i just bought the James Brown too. not started it yet.

also got the ABBA one, which i devoured in a day. twas OK, wish Ms Vincentelli had spent fewer sentences justifying (or having to justify) the book's very existence. also i'm not sure she cracked the problem of how to order the narrative, though I accept it's a toughie.

zebedee (zebedee), Wednesday, 27 July 2005 15:35 (twelve years ago) Permalink

according to the blog:

These are a few of the projects that - for various and sometimes complicated reasons - never made it to fruition. Some came very close to happening, others less so; but they all would have been fun.

Matt Sab (Matt Sab), Wednesday, 27 July 2005 16:03 (twelve years ago) Permalink

Don't know about the Loveless book, but all of these, if you were hoping, ain't happening:

Songs in the Key of Life, by Dave Hesmondhalgh

Why not?

Eric H. (Eric H.), Wednesday, 27 July 2005 16:48 (twelve years ago) Permalink

For those ...

Matos' Sign O'The Times book's prince has been slashed (on Amazon at least) to $4.

http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/tg/detail/-/0826415474/qid=1122928710/sr=8-1/ref=sr_8_xs_ap_i1_xgl14/002-2999298-5726417?v=glance&s=books&n=507846

Matt Sab (Matt Sab), Monday, 1 August 2005 19:47 (twelve years ago) Permalink

five months pass...
I'm sorry to tell you that we've chosen not to sign up your proposal for the 33 1/3 series.

This has been a difficult process: we received dozens of very strong proposals from dozens of very good writers and it's a shame to have to turn down so many of you.

If you're interested, the 33 1/3 books we eventually decided to sign up are:

"If You're Feeling Sinister" by Scott Plagenhoef

"Aja" by Don Breithaupt

"Shoot Out the Lights" by Hayden Childs

"Pretty Hate Machine" by Daphne Carr

"Use Your Illusion" by Eric Weisbard

"Horses" by Phil Shaw

"Double Nickels on the Dime" by Mike Fournier

"Pink Moon" by Amanda Petrusich

"People's Instinctive Travels and the Paths of Rhythm" by Shawn Taylor

"Achtung Baby" by Stephen Catanzarite

"20 Jazz Funk Greats" by Drew Daniel

"The Dreaming" by Ann Powers

"Rid of Me" by Kate Schatz

"Another Green World" by Geeta Dayal

"Songs in the Key of Life" by Zeth Lundy

"Trout Mask Replica" by Kevin Courrier

"Let's Talk About Love" by Carl Wilson

"Lucinda Williams" by Anders Smith Lindall

"69 Love Songs" by LD Beghtol

“Marquee Moon” by Peter Blauner

“Swordfishtrombones” by David Smay

that's so taylrr (ken taylrr), Thursday, 26 January 2006 18:36 (twelve years ago) Permalink

Congrats to Drew and Geeta! (Are there other ILMers on this list I don't know?)

Tim Ellison (Tim Ellison), Thursday, 26 January 2006 20:38 (twelve years ago) Permalink

ann powers is actually esteban buttez

cancer prone fat guy (dubplatestyle), Thursday, 26 January 2006 20:41 (twelve years ago) Permalink

Scott P. has been around since the Greenspun days.

Mark (MarkR), Thursday, 26 January 2006 20:47 (twelve years ago) Permalink

i wish you could get these easily in book stores (AND NOT JUST IN THE AEROPLANE MURMUR THE SEA LIKE ROUND HERE).

j blount (papa la bas), Thursday, 26 January 2006 21:41 (twelve years ago) Permalink

hey everybody read the frank bruno one and then try to make yrs like him cuz it is AWESOME

j blount (papa la bas), Thursday, 26 January 2006 21:42 (twelve years ago) Permalink

i have only read 2

cancer prone fat guy (dubplatestyle), Thursday, 26 January 2006 21:42 (twelve years ago) Permalink

the franklin bruno one is not only awesome, it is superhuman. one of my fave pieces of rock criticism ever.

fact checking cuz (fcc), Thursday, 26 January 2006 22:24 (twelve years ago) Permalink

yeah same here

j blount (papa la bas), Thursday, 26 January 2006 22:26 (twelve years ago) Permalink

I loved that review he wrote of that indie-boy novel, so I guess I gotta get this book.

Redd Harvest (Ken L), Thursday, 26 January 2006 22:30 (twelve years ago) Permalink

no, that the book is kinda crap

licorice oratorio (baaderonixx), Friday, 7 April 2017 13:27 (one year ago) Permalink

It could've been good if he'd written a book about the Fleetwood Mac album Tusk rather than a travelogue of a journey up his own asshole (with occasional Tusk-related commentary).

Break the meat into the pineapples and pat them (Old Lunch), Friday, 7 April 2017 14:13 (one year ago) Permalink

Rob Trucks is a freelance music and sports writer based in NYC. He has published four books on baseball

heaven parker (anagram), Friday, 7 April 2017 14:55 (one year ago) Permalink

You make it sound quite good! (I've Not read it)

Mark G, Friday, 7 April 2017 16:40 (one year ago) Permalink

It's not! (Don't waste your time.)

NB: I've liked or loved or LOOOOVED (the Celine and Darnielle's Sabbath book come to mind) every other 33 1/3 I've read.

Break the meat into the pineapples and pat them (Old Lunch), Friday, 7 April 2017 16:54 (one year ago) Permalink

Tusk, OK Computer, and Wowee Zowee are all shit for those reasons. the Loveless one is sorta in between but I dug it.

best ones i've read are Song Cycle, 20 Jazz Funk Greats, Master of Reality, and There's a Riot Goin' On.

flappy bird, Friday, 7 April 2017 17:03 (one year ago) Permalink

20 jazz funk greats is definitely my favorite

i picked up franklin bruno's armed forces one recently. that one RULES

ToddBonzalez (BradNelson), Friday, 7 April 2017 17:03 (one year ago) Permalink

I liked Armed Forces except for all the stuff about "He goes from a diminished C to a G7" or whatever was in there. Riot Goin on is v good too! Still have to read 20 Jazz Funk Greats

SSN Lucci (Whiney G. Weingarten), Friday, 7 April 2017 17:06 (one year ago) Permalink

ah i love whenever the author is a musician/talks about the record in musical terms- though i understand how that could be tedious for people who don't care. that's honestly what I'm looking for in every 33 1/3 book i pick up. the Aja one is great for that reason

flappy bird, Friday, 7 April 2017 17:24 (one year ago) Permalink

ah i love whenever the author is a musician/talks about the record in musical terms

That's fascinating given that you don't understand what a musician or a riff is.

...so music and chicken have become intertwined (Turrican), Friday, 7 April 2017 17:54 (one year ago) Permalink

don't start that again

ToddBonzalez (BradNelson), Friday, 7 April 2017 17:55 (one year ago) Permalink

It could've been good if he'd written a book about the Fleetwood Mac album Tusk rather than a travelogue of a journey up his own asshole (with occasional Tusk-related commentary).

― Break the meat into the pineapples and pat them (Old Lunch), Friday, April 7, 2017 2:13 PM (three hours ago) Bookmark Flag Post Permalink

So it's basically a book about the author and how the album relates to the author, rather than a book exploring the creation of the album? Sounds like a right snooze.

...so music and chicken have become intertwined (Turrican), Friday, 7 April 2017 17:58 (one year ago) Permalink

yup, way too many 33 1/3 books are like that. a lot of the early ones are like that, newer ones less so

flappy bird, Friday, 7 April 2017 18:05 (one year ago) Permalink

I feel like that approach can work if the writer's personal experience of discovering the album helps contextualize the setting in which the album was created. Lethem's Fear of Music kind of does this; he was a teenager experiencing the weirdness of NYC in the late 70s listening to an album that was, in large part, about the weirdness of NYC in the late 70s. But I agree--too often it just takes the form of "I was working at a college radio station when this weird looking record cover caught my eye and oh by the way here is what I was studying at the time and here's who I had a crush on and here's what I was eating" etc.

some sad trombone Twilight Zone shit (cryptosicko), Friday, 7 April 2017 18:15 (one year ago) Permalink

the personal approach is fine, as long as the writer is ... a good writer.

tylerw, Friday, 7 April 2017 18:17 (one year ago) Permalink

"When we reached for the same album at the music store that day, I knew that our friendship was destined to blossom into something much more profound. The name of that album? Take Off Your Pants and Jacket. And that's...the rest of the story. Good day!"

Break the meat into the pineapples and pat them (Old Lunch), Friday, 7 April 2017 18:20 (one year ago) Permalink

I would actually read Paul Harvey's Take Off Your Pants and Jacket.

some sad trombone Twilight Zone shit (cryptosicko), Friday, 7 April 2017 18:24 (one year ago) Permalink

the personal approach is fine, as long as the writer is ... a good writer.

― tylerw, Friday, April 7, 2017 6:17 PM (nine minutes ago) Bookmark Flag Post Permalink

Or an interesting person.

...so music and chicken have become intertwined (Turrican), Friday, 7 April 2017 18:30 (one year ago) Permalink

or both, preferably!

tylerw, Friday, 7 April 2017 18:32 (one year ago) Permalink

i just read the new modern lovers 33 1/3, it was good! some interesting interweaving of boston history with the band's story.

tylerw, Friday, 7 April 2017 18:33 (one year ago) Permalink

the one on Super Mario Bros. soundtrack is really good for a musical term for the layperson approach

AdamVania (Adam Bruneau), Friday, 7 April 2017 18:56 (one year ago) Permalink

i just read the new modern lovers 33 1/3, it was good! some interesting interweaving of boston history with the band's story.

― tylerw, Friday, April 7, 2017 11:33 AM (thirty minutes ago) Bookmark Flag Post Permalink

my friend sean wrote that one! it is indeed good. love how often aerosmith appears

ToddBonzalez (BradNelson), Friday, 7 April 2017 19:04 (one year ago) Permalink

haha yeah, funny to even imagine steven tyler and jonathan richman breathing the same air

tylerw, Friday, 7 April 2017 19:05 (one year ago) Permalink

AEROSMITH ROCKS NATICK

iris marduk (Jon not Jon), Friday, 7 April 2017 19:06 (one year ago) Permalink

I recently tried to read Alan Warner's Tago Mago. Warner has a lot of leeway for various reasons but this just a rambling mess, really. Didn't get on with Hugo Wilcken's Low either, despite loving his novel, Colony. Favourite has easily been the Darnielle.

The shard-borne beetle with his drowsy hums (Chinaski), Friday, 7 April 2017 19:28 (one year ago) Permalink

liked Armed Forces except for all the stuff about "He goes from a diminished C to a G7" or whatever was in there.

i'm curious: were you ok with his equally close reading of costello's words and syllables, or did that bother you too?

i loved the book and loved all that stuff. there are so few people writing about pop who can dig under the hood of the music that effectively. alex ross obviously can whenever he approaches pop. i appreciate people who can use actual music to critique music. in the armed forces book, i thought bruno made clear why he was doing it and did a good job of explaining what it meant.

fact checking cuz, Friday, 7 April 2017 19:55 (one year ago) Permalink

Darnielle, Erik Davis, Matos my big faves

iris marduk (Jon not Jon), Friday, 7 April 2017 19:59 (one year ago) Permalink

The ATCQ book is from a personal perspective and is well written/enjoyable imho.

MaresNest, Friday, 7 April 2017 20:21 (one year ago) Permalink

The Achtung Baby and OK Computer ones are the worst I've come across.

MaresNest, Friday, 7 April 2017 20:22 (one year ago) Permalink

in the armed forces book, i thought bruno made clear why he was doing it and did a good job of explaining what it meant.

― fact checking cuz, Friday, April 7, 2017 3:55 PM (thirty-two minutes ago) Bookmark Flag Post Permalink

I read it a long time ago!

SSN Lucci (Whiney G. Weingarten), Friday, 7 April 2017 20:29 (one year ago) Permalink

oh! the one on Low by Bowie is fantastic for production/sound nerds

flappy bird, Friday, 7 April 2017 20:36 (one year ago) Permalink

Just read Matos SOTT book and it was marvellous, just a joy (Nick I need to post it back to you!).

The Riot book is good but there's not much in it that's not taken from the In Their Own Words Sly book from the early 90s (which is $$$s and crazy rare now so fair enough)

hot bech babes lick the feemer and get the skeletor fever. (stevie), Saturday, 8 April 2017 17:33 (one year ago) Permalink

Anyone read the Bitches Brew one?

I hear from this arsehole again, he's going in the river (James Morrison), Sunday, 9 April 2017 10:46 (one year ago) Permalink

I have it here but never finished it. Grella's a good writer, but the territory was too familiar - he wasn't telling me anything I didn't already know from reading a half dozen other books on Miles, album liner notes, etc., etc. If you're not up to your eyeballs in Davisiana, though, it's good.

Malcolm X, Martin Luther King, Jr, and Violent J (誤訳侮辱), Sunday, 9 April 2017 12:56 (one year ago) Permalink

Honestly, the more interesting Miles 33 1/3 would probably be On the Corner – the impact is just about as significant but the story and how the record was made is a bit less known. But who knows – maybe in a era where we have Phil's book, Tingen's book and the OTC box, even some of that may be well known enough.

I had an idea a gazillion years back to write one on Keith Jarrett's The Sun Bear Concerts—it's just such a 70s era artifact—but realized my submission would likely have a much better chance if I did the better known (and selling) Köln Concert.

Naive Teen Idol, Sunday, 9 April 2017 14:11 (one year ago) Permalink

three months pass...

anyone get round to the Sound Of Silver book yet? or does anyone have any other faves worth checking out? i couldn't get along with the OK Computer one at all.

piscesx, Sunday, 23 July 2017 12:52 (ten months ago) Permalink

OK Computer might be the worst one. Been meaning to read the one for There's a Riot Goin On for ages, been sitting on my desk.

flappy bird, Sunday, 23 July 2017 15:03 (ten months ago) Permalink

OK Computer and Achtung Baby are the worst one's i've read.

MaresNest, Sunday, 23 July 2017 16:24 (ten months ago) Permalink

Call me old fashioned, but I've enjoyed most of the ones that stick to the expected formula: a little band history, a little making of the album, and maybe break it down for me track by track. And it really helps if they have access to the band to do interviews.

The book on Portishead's Dummy was my favorite example of this format, and it definitely gave me a deeper appreciation for that album.
(in the same vein: Bowie's Low, Aphex Twin's SAWII, Neutral Milk Hotel's Aeroplane, Pixies' Doolitte, Devo's Freedom of Choice)

And at the risk of immediately contradicting myself, Carl Wilson's book on Celine Dion completely breaks from that classic formula, but it's just a great piece of writing. A sort of treatise on taste, art, credibility, and hipsterdom, with Celine Dion as a framing device. That one could really exist outside of the series, since it's brimming over with big ideas.

enochroot, Monday, 24 July 2017 01:22 (ten months ago) Permalink

eight months pass...

I was really hoping this revive was because they're accepting pitches again :(

The Harsh Tutelage of Michael McDonald (Raymond Cummings), Monday, 16 April 2018 22:32 (one month ago) Permalink

(but that said I'm game for this book)

The Harsh Tutelage of Michael McDonald (Raymond Cummings), Monday, 16 April 2018 22:32 (one month ago) Permalink

three weeks pass...

coming soon to spotify

adam the (abanana), Thursday, 10 May 2018 19:52 (two weeks ago) Permalink

Ooh, I wonder which ones and who will read them

curmudgeon, Thursday, 10 May 2018 20:32 (two weeks ago) Permalink

Or would it just be the existing audiobooks that you can find on places like Audible?

MarkoP, Thursday, 10 May 2018 22:21 (two weeks ago) Permalink

I think it’s just the audiobooks.

sctttnnnt (pgwp), Saturday, 12 May 2018 17:18 (one week ago) Permalink

That would be great, actually.

human and working on getting beer (longneck), Saturday, 12 May 2018 17:25 (one week ago) Permalink

There are Japanese iterations of these coming out, the Perfume one already is and there are books on Happy End and YMO coming.

https://www.bloomsbury.com/us/series/33-13-japan/

MaresNest, Saturday, 12 May 2018 18:19 (one week ago) Permalink

I love when these books walk that fine line between album biography and personal narrative about the significance of such record to the author ("Sign O The Times" by Michaelangelo Matos being the apotheosis).

Prefecture, Monday, 14 May 2018 02:38 (one week ago) Permalink

Holy shit that Japanese series looks awesome!

Daniel_Rf, Monday, 14 May 2018 09:40 (one week ago) Permalink


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