Defending the indefensible: Don Henley

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Ok, he's crap. It's a shame that "Dirty Laundry" has to be by such a bad artist, because the synth line that it rides on is completely classic. And the way that he sings "It's interesting when people die" is beautiful. But other that that, a whole career of dud.

Kenan Hebert (kenan), Thursday, 10 July 2003 04:49 (fourteen years ago) Permalink

He made the ponytail mainstream in 1989. I'm not giving him credit for the white man 'fro, though.

Andrew Frye (paul cox), Thursday, 10 July 2003 05:03 (fourteen years ago) Permalink

there are some nice state-of-the-art production touches on all his records. "the boys of summer" is classic.

his current metier is the generalized societal complaint but his complaining is done to better tunes than most.

amateurist (amateurist), Thursday, 10 July 2003 05:12 (fourteen years ago) Permalink

He made the ponytail mainstream in 1989. I'm not giving him credit for the white man 'fro, though.

Wait...neither of those is a good thing.

Andrew Frye (paul cox), Thursday, 10 July 2003 05:18 (fourteen years ago) Permalink

henley is the epitome of bland, as were the eagles -- except maybe henley solo is even more bland (thought not even as bad as glenn frey).

jack cole (jackcole), Thursday, 10 July 2003 05:28 (fourteen years ago) Permalink

"boys of summer"! "Dirty laundry"! those're great songs. also, every other song by every other "artist" they play on the kind of stations that play those songs are way more deserving of yr hate.

duane, Thursday, 10 July 2003 05:32 (fourteen years ago) Permalink

Oh come off it , Boys Of Summer is an absolute classic.

RickyT (RickyT), Thursday, 10 July 2003 09:37 (fourteen years ago) Permalink

Yeah, we're scraping the barrel of indefensibility if the guy who wrote "Boys Of Summer" is to be included before we've even done Weller.

(NB WORD are really testing my newfound loyalty)

Tico Tico (Tico Tico), Thursday, 10 July 2003 09:44 (fourteen years ago) Permalink

Yes WORD started promisingly but has rapidly become a pretty mediocre dadrockmag. (They write a feature on Andrew Collins' 70stalgia BLOG in this issue, for pity's sake!)

Jerry the Nipper (Jerrynipper), Thursday, 10 July 2003 09:48 (fourteen years ago) Permalink

I second (er, 3rd or 6th or whatever) "Boys of Summer," but you gotta give partial credit to the underappreciated Mike Campbell for that one. Mike Campbell is the West Coast Keith Richards.

Also -- better than Glen Frey!

JesseFox (JesseFox), Thursday, 10 July 2003 10:10 (fourteen years ago) Permalink

Did anyone hear Tony Hadley and Mark Cox cover "Boys of Summer" on This Morning a few weeks back? Man, that's the tune of the summer right there...

Dom Passantino (Dom Passantino), Thursday, 10 July 2003 10:18 (fourteen years ago) Permalink

Weren't we defending "Boys of Summer" six months ago? (It's Tom's fault, even if he's right.)

b.R.A.d. (Brad), Thursday, 10 July 2003 10:32 (fourteen years ago) Permalink

Eagles threads to thread!

Jody Beth Rosen (Jody Beth Rosen), Thursday, 10 July 2003 11:48 (fourteen years ago) Permalink

as far as defending the solo stuff: the chorus of "I Will Not Go Quietly" is pretty fantastic! It's meant to sound metal (Axl's b-vox) but there's something vaguely latin-freestyle about it. Once again, Axl brings the disco.

Jody Beth Rosen (Jody Beth Rosen), Thursday, 10 July 2003 11:51 (fourteen years ago) Permalink

It's a shame that "Dirty Laundry" has to be by such a bad artist,
the painful/funny thing is if you know what embrassasing incident inspired it.

Lord Custos Epsilon (Lord Custos Epsilon), Thursday, 10 July 2003 11:57 (fourteen years ago) Permalink

I'm not giving him credit for the white man 'fro, though.
Copyright: Art Garfunkel, 1964. All Rights Reversed (TM)(R)(C)

Lord Custos Epsilon (Lord Custos Epsilon), Thursday, 10 July 2003 11:59 (fourteen years ago) Permalink

I cannot defend Henley on account of the End of the Innocence, a song so turgid that not even the brilliance of Boys of Summer can redeem him.

Incidentally, the "dead-head sticker on a Cadillac" line totally perplexed me until recently when I found a site which said that it is a reference to the Grateful Dead, whose fans are called Dead-Heads. I must admit I still don't understand how it fits in with the rest of the song, but at least it takes away some of the mystery, as I had previously thought "dead head" was just a horticultural term ("I'm going to dead-head the roses").

MarkH (MarkH), Thursday, 10 July 2003 12:03 (fourteen years ago) Permalink

Henley is implying that Deadheads are supposed the "good hippees" and Cadillac owners are "bad yuppies" and when deadheads drive Cadillacs they've sold their soul...or something.
Hence why he mopinly finishes that verse with "Never look back/ you can never look back"

Lord Custos Epsilon (Lord Custos Epsilon), Thursday, 10 July 2003 12:05 (fourteen years ago) Permalink

"good hippies"/"bad yuppies" vs "Get Over It"

Jody Beth Rosen (Jody Beth Rosen), Thursday, 10 July 2003 12:19 (fourteen years ago) Permalink

What's the punk band that covered the song but changed it to a Black Flag sticker? That was neat.

Kris (aqueduct), Thursday, 10 July 2003 13:14 (fourteen years ago) Permalink

That line is about THE END OF THE SIXTIES, MAN. Don't look back, you can never look back.

amateurist (amateurist), Thursday, 10 July 2003 13:43 (fourteen years ago) Permalink

The sixties ended in 1984!?

Curt1s St3ph3ns, Thursday, 10 July 2003 13:59 (fourteen years ago) Permalink

"the sixties"

amateurist (amateurist), Thursday, 10 July 2003 16:14 (fourteen years ago) Permalink

I'm not giving him credit for the white man 'fro, though.
Copyright: Art Garfunkel, 1964. All Rights Reversed (TM)(R)(C)


Ooooh! I think Sib Hashain owes him some money!

dave225 (Dave225), Thursday, 10 July 2003 16:19 (fourteen years ago) Permalink

The sixties ended in 1984!?
The sixties took a few years off in the seventies, but then came back for a swan song before dying a horrific death in (more like) 1988. Big fucking Chill. (Right now, man.)

dave225 (Dave225), Thursday, 10 July 2003 16:26 (fourteen years ago) Permalink

The Ataris have gone TOP Ten Modern Rock with their "Boys..." cover.

Charles McCain (Charles McCain), Thursday, 10 July 2003 19:01 (fourteen years ago) Permalink

I don't know much about his music, but the eagles were involved in a lawsuit recently involving songwriting credits. Alot of them showed up here at the office I work in for depositions and whatnot and I must say: Don Henley is a self-important pushy asshole. He was completely rude to all of the staff and had this whole 'what about me?' attitude.

He was also pissed nobody recognized him. Aging, drugs, and balding haven't been too kind to the man, let me tell you...

bill stevens (bscrubbins), Thursday, 10 July 2003 19:06 (fourteen years ago) Permalink

Don Henley is a good excuse to discard auterist notions in popular music! Love the song, not the singer!

amateurist (amateurist), Thursday, 10 July 2003 20:14 (fourteen years ago) Permalink

Here Here.
I have his greatest hits record, but I doubt that I'd like sitting across a table from him. He's like Bono without a "Sense of the Absurd"

Lord Custos Epsilon (Lord Custos Epsilon), Friday, 11 July 2003 03:27 (fourteen years ago) Permalink

C'mon, it's about forgiveness, people, forgiveness! Even if you don't love him anymore!

Joe (Joe), Friday, 11 July 2003 03:50 (fourteen years ago) Permalink

He's like Bono without a "Sense of the Absurd"

Custos wins.

Kenan Hebert (kenan), Friday, 11 July 2003 03:54 (fourteen years ago) Permalink

one year passes...
....while browsing i found this here article that lets me offer him a little "forgiveness"...

Published on Tuesday, February 17, 2004 by the Washington.Post
Killing the Music
by Don Henley

When I started in the music business, music was important and vital to our culture. Artists connected with their fans. Record labels signed cutting-edge artists, and FM radio offered an incredible variety of music. Music touched fans in a unique and personal way. Our culture was enriched and the music business was healthy and strong.

That's all changed.

Today the music business is in crisis. Sales have decreased between 20 and 30 percent over the past three years. Record labels are suing children for using unauthorized peer-to-peer (P2P) file-sharing systems. Only a few artists ever hear their music on the radio, yet radio networks are battling Congress over ownership restrictions. Independent music stores are closing at an unprecedented pace. And the artists seem to be at odds with just about everyone -- even the fans.

Contrary to conventional wisdom, the root problem is not the artists, the fans or even new Internet technology. The problem is the music industry itself. It's systemic. The industry, which was once composed of hundreds of big and small record labels, is now controlled by just a handful of unregulated, multinational corporations determined to continue their mad rush toward further consolidation and merger. Sony and BMG announced their agreement to merge in November, and EMI and Time Warner may not be far behind. The industry may soon be dominated by only three multinational corporations.

The executives who run these corporations believe that music is solely a commodity. Unlike their predecessors, they fail to recognize that music is as much a vital art form and social barometer as it is a way to make a profit. At one time artists actually developed meaningful, even if strained, relationships with their record labels. This was possible because labels were relatively small and accessible, and they had an incentive to join with the artists in marketing their music. Today such a relationship is practically impossible for most artists.

Labels no longer take risks by signing unique and important new artists, nor do they become partners with artists in the creation and promotion of the music. After the music is created, the artist's connection with it is minimized and in some instances is nonexistent. In their world, music is generic. A major record label president confirmed this recently when he referred to artists as "content providers." Would a major label sign Johnny Cash today? I doubt it.

Radio stations used to be local and diverse. Deejays programmed their own shows and developed close relationships with artists. Today radio stations are centrally programmed by their corporate owners, and airplay is essentially bought rather than earned. The floodgates have opened for corporations to buy an almost unlimited number of radio stations, as well as concert venues and agencies. The delicate balance between artists and radio networks has been dramatically altered; networks can now, and often do, exert unprecedented pressure on artists. Whatever connection the artists had with their music on the airwaves is almost totally gone.

Music stores used to be magical places offering wide variety. Today the three largest music retailers are Best Buy, Wal-Mart and Target. In those stores shelf space is limited, making it harder for new artists to emerge. Even established artists are troubled by stores using music as a loss leader. Smaller, more personalized record stores are closing all over the country -- some because of rampant P2P piracy but many others because of competition from department stores that traditionally have no connection whatsoever with artists.

Piracy is perhaps the most emotionally gut-wrenching problem facing artists. Artists like the idea of a new and better business model for the industry, but they cannot accept a business model that uses their music without authority or compensation. Suing kids is not what artists want, but many of them feel betrayed by fans who claim to love artists but still want their music free.

The music industry must also take a large amount of blame for this piracy. Not only did the industry not address the issue sooner, it provided the P2P users with a convenient scapegoat. Many kids rationalize their P2P habit by pointing out that only record labels are hurt -- that the labels don't pay the artists anyway. This is clearly wrong, because artists are at the bottom of the food chain. They are the ones hit hardest when sales take a nosedive and when the labels cut back on promotion, on signing new artists and on keeping artists with potential. Artists are clearly affected, yet because many perceive the music business as being dominated by rich multinational corporations, the pain felt by the artist has no public face.

Artists are finally realizing their predicament is no different from that of any other group with common economic and political interests. They can no longer just hope for change; they must fight for it. Washington is where artists must go to plead their case and find answers.

So whether they are fighting against media and radio consolidation, fighting for fair recording contracts and corporate responsibility, or demanding that labels treat artists as partners and not as employees, the core message is the same: The artist must be allowed to join with the labels and must be treated in a fair and respectful manner. If the labels are not willing to voluntarily implement these changes, then the artists have no choice but to seek legislative and judicial solutions. Simply put, artists must regain control, as much as possible, over their music.

The writer is a singer and drummer with the Eagles and a founding member of the Recording Artists' Coalition.

###

william (william), Tuesday, 5 October 2004 16:30 (thirteen years ago) Permalink

Sunset Grill is a good song.

M@tt He1geson (Matt Helgeson), Tuesday, 5 October 2004 18:10 (thirteen years ago) Permalink

Yeah, "Sunset Grill", "Dirty Laundry" and especially "Boys Of Summer" are so much better than anything the Eagles ever did.

Myonga Von Bontee (Myonga Von Bontee), Tuesday, 5 October 2004 18:59 (thirteen years ago) Permalink

"Sunset Grill", "Dirty Laundry" and especially "Boys Of Summer" are so much better than anything the Eagles ever did.

so much better than "new kid in town" or "take it to the limit" or "i can't tell you why"? i'm not so sure about that.

fact checking cuz (fcc), Wednesday, 6 October 2004 03:40 (thirteen years ago) Permalink

i am totally otm on this thread

amateur!!!st (amateurist), Wednesday, 6 October 2004 03:57 (thirteen years ago) Permalink

It never even occurred to me that there was anything good about "Boys of Summer" until I heard the Ataris version, which is classic. The original still doesn't do that much for me although I appreciate why it's a good song, even a good production if you go for that thing. And also, the line about the sticker on the Cadillac seems less BS in the Ataris version because it at least still sounds like a punk song not like a synthed-out 80s yuppie studio artifact. I'd take "Witchy Woman" over that.

Why did critics always describe "End of the Innocence" as "intelligent"? I hated that song so much in Grade 5.

sundar subramanian (sundar), Wednesday, 6 October 2004 04:11 (thirteen years ago) Permalink

Congrats, Cuz: You managed to mention three of the four Eagles hits I dislike the most! ("One Of These Nights" being the fourth.)

Myonga Von Bontee (Myonga Von Bontee), Wednesday, 6 October 2004 04:12 (thirteen years ago) Permalink

synthed-out 80s yuppie studio artifact

Oh wait, maybe that actually goes with the "Don't look back, you can never look back" part.

sundar subramanian (sundar), Wednesday, 6 October 2004 04:12 (thirteen years ago) Permalink

It's weird. I know I must have heard all these Eagles songs many times but nothing really comes to mind at most of their names.

sundar subramanian (sundar), Wednesday, 6 October 2004 04:13 (thirteen years ago) Permalink

myonga: "one of these nights" never did a whole lot for me; sorry i couldn't hit for the songs-you-hate cycle! "take it to the limit" i like for the huge chorus, "new kid in town" for the girl-groupy outro, which sneakily makes me like the rest of the song retroactively every time i hear it; and "i can't tell you why" is just purty.

the solo songs you mentioned sound to me neither better nor worse than the typical eagles song; they sound exactly like eagles songs.

fact checking cuz (fcc), Wednesday, 6 October 2004 04:26 (thirteen years ago) Permalink

"Look, I've had a rough night, and I hate the fucking Eagles, man..."
http://www.zelluloid.de/images/szenen/382c6b8bd1f80.jpg

Myonga Von Bontee (Myonga Von Bontee), Wednesday, 6 October 2004 04:44 (thirteen years ago) Permalink

I just d/led "Dirty Laundry". I stopped it partway through the guitar solo. Now I'm totally mystified - I think it just sounds like a bad Bryan Adams song (like circa 1994 or something) except more 80s. "Witchy Woman" all the way!

sundar subramanian (sundar), Wednesday, 6 October 2004 04:49 (thirteen years ago) Permalink

(Actually, I can name a half-dozen or so Eagles songs that I like. [Pretty sure none of 'em are Glen Frey songs, tho.] I don't even mind "Hotel California"!)

Myonga Von Bontee (Myonga Von Bontee), Wednesday, 6 October 2004 04:51 (thirteen years ago) Permalink

(Is "New Kid In Town" the song that goes "Johnny come lately/The new kid in town"? That beats this shit too. And "Take It Easy" is OK - the "seven women on my mind" has a certain something to it and it's a nice laid-back chorus.)

sundar subramanian (sundar), Wednesday, 6 October 2004 04:52 (thirteen years ago) Permalink

I have no problems with Don Henley at all.

And I really like The Eagles

Glenn Frey totally sucks though

roger adultery (roger adultery), Wednesday, 6 October 2004 04:54 (thirteen years ago) Permalink

I can't believe I'm downloading Eagles songs. "Witchy Woman" rocks even better in reality than in memory. Elaine's favourite Eagles song!

sundar subramanian (sundar), Wednesday, 6 October 2004 04:56 (thirteen years ago) Permalink

For the first time I'm realizing that I might actually really like the Eagles. How's that Greatest Hits?

sundar subramanian (sundar), Wednesday, 6 October 2004 05:10 (thirteen years ago) Permalink

Well, it IS the all-time top selling record in the USA, sundar.


What's the consensus on "Heart of the Matter"? I though that was a good song when I was like 10. Should I download it or will I be disappointed?

AaronHz (AaronHz), Wednesday, 6 October 2004 05:24 (thirteen years ago) Permalink

one year passes...
you are all cunts dissing the best singer of all time not to mention he's songwriting which is unbelievable, all you halfwits only know the famous tunes like boys of summer and all she wants to do is dance ever heard of lilah, land of the living, the last worthless evening or the sad cafe by the eagles, why not listen to more of the music before you critisize it, after all we know henley is an asshole but he's good at it and manages to get his way right?

keefy, Monday, 15 May 2006 10:41 (eleven years ago) Permalink

Oh (Well?) yeah, we've been having fun with that over at A Good Day In Hell - The Official ILM Track-By-Track EAGLES Listening Thread

Damnit Janet Weiss & The Riot Grrriel (C. Grisso/McCain), Friday, 6 June 2014 04:55 (three years ago) Permalink

Thanks

curmudgeon, Friday, 6 June 2014 13:56 (three years ago) Permalink

don henley is NOT impressed

brimstead, Friday, 6 June 2014 19:17 (three years ago) Permalink

Well, no

Sir Lord Baltimora (Myonga Vön Bontee), Friday, 6 June 2014 21:24 (three years ago) Permalink

Henley's mind might be blown when he becomes familiar with the concept of interpolations

Neanderthal, Friday, 6 June 2014 21:36 (three years ago) Permalink

is the song literally just frank ocean singing a new melody over the hotel california backing track?

display name changed. (amateurist), Friday, 6 June 2014 22:25 (three years ago) Permalink

yes. it's embarassingly bad.

Οὖτις, Friday, 6 June 2014 22:27 (three years ago) Permalink

Can we be shown weirdoes + Don Henley?

Damnit Janet Weiss & The Riot Grrriel (C. Grisso/McCain), Friday, 6 June 2014 22:43 (three years ago) Permalink

No one will defend Frank Ocean's song, but everyone of us will defend the right of Frank Ocean to treat Don Henley like shit at the bottom of a shoe.

guess that bundt gettin eaten (Alfred, Lord Sotosyn), Friday, 6 June 2014 23:00 (three years ago) Permalink

p much

Οὖτις, Friday, 6 June 2014 23:16 (three years ago) Permalink

don henley acts like the world treats him like shit whether or not it does, so we may as well treat him like shit

display name changed. (amateurist), Friday, 6 June 2014 23:22 (three years ago) Permalink

it's not like he can get any more ornery

display name changed. (amateurist), Friday, 6 June 2014 23:22 (three years ago) Permalink

What amuses me is it's HENLEY complaining and not Felder, who wrote the indelible hook and and who can chill in his garden w/out working for the rest of his life. It's possible Felder complained privately but we know there's no uh love lost b/w the Felder and Henley-Frey camps.

guess that bundt gettin eaten (Alfred, Lord Sotosyn), Friday, 6 June 2014 23:28 (three years ago) Permalink

don henley acts like the world treats him like shit whether or not it does, so we may as well treat him like shit

― display name changed. (amateurist)

He will not stop. He thinks the world will fuck him over if he doesn't fuck over the smallest fish.

guess that bundt gettin eaten (Alfred, Lord Sotosyn), Friday, 6 June 2014 23:29 (three years ago) Permalink

thing is that guys half don's age already bitch ahistorically about kids today, so...

da croupier, Friday, 6 June 2014 23:31 (three years ago) Permalink

though don's been doing that for half his life as well

da croupier, Friday, 6 June 2014 23:32 (three years ago) Permalink

He will not stop. He thinks the world will fuck him over if he doesn't fuck over the smallest fish.

It's true: after this photo was taken, Henley stole that poor bear's fish, fucked it*, and then proceeded to shit in the Walden Woods--once the province of the bear, but now the land of Henley.

*the fish, not the bear (GLENN: That came later.)

Damnit Janet Weiss & The Riot Grrriel (C. Grisso/McCain), Friday, 6 June 2014 23:57 (three years ago) Permalink

it was kinda exciting when Don himself showed up under the name "keefy" in 2006 (see above)

col, Saturday, 7 June 2014 00:39 (three years ago) Permalink

ten months pass...

“We appreciate and respect what Mr. Henley has meant to music and we now see that our use of his name and an Eagles’ song title in our advertisement was inappropriate,” it reads in part. “For that we are deeply regretful and we apologize, not just to Mr. Henley, but to anyone else who took offense. We have learned a valuable lesson and thank Mr. Henley for helping us appreciate the importance that he and other artists place in their publicity rights.”

http://www.avclub.com/article/henley-manufacturers-apologize-don-henley-218208

mookieproof, Friday, 17 April 2015 22:09 (three years ago) Permalink

five months pass...

“There aren’t any trucks or beer on this album. This is an album for grown-ups, for people that have done some living.”

hunangarage, Thursday, 17 September 2015 15:48 (two years ago) Permalink

two years pass...

The Boys of Summer is SO GOOD, and unexpectedly moving.

i cannot stand the rest of his stuff.

omar little, Thursday, 11 January 2018 17:47 (three months ago) Permalink

he gave us "Well, yeah." so, classic

flappy bird, Thursday, 11 January 2018 18:37 (three months ago) Permalink

During the holidays my phone started randomly playing I Can’t Stand Still every time I got into my car, despite the fact that I have no Henley on my Spotify playlists or on iTunes.

Naive Teen Idol, Friday, 12 January 2018 12:37 (three months ago) Permalink

Abandon your car immediately

flappy bird, Friday, 12 January 2018 15:46 (three months ago) Permalink

turns out the don henley we were looking for was inside us all along

pee-wee and the power men (bizarro gazzara), Friday, 12 January 2018 15:58 (three months ago) Permalink

eww

pee-wee and the power men (bizarro gazzara), Friday, 12 January 2018 15:58 (three months ago) Permalink

Been thinking about how most of my fave Henley jamz are duets. "No Mistakes," "Sometimes Love Just Ain't Enough." In certain moods I even welcome "Leather and Lace."

mime kampf (Ye Mad Puffin), Friday, 12 January 2018 16:03 (three months ago) Permalink

i can't quite put a dud on henley bc of boys of summer (incredible song, yeah he didn't write it but he sells it) and one of these nights (each eagle has one joint that rules - that's don's.) (see also in the city/joe, take it to the limit/randy, i can't tell you why/tim, journey of the sorcerer/whatshisname, umm can't remember my glenn one, sorry felder nothing for you)

Winter. Dickens. Yes. (Jon not Jon), Friday, 12 January 2018 20:06 (three months ago) Permalink

didn't glenn write 'new kid in town'? that's the only Eagles song i love

flappy bird, Saturday, 13 January 2018 02:52 (three months ago) Permalink

uh yes Henley co-wrote "Boys of Summer" -- those are his lyrics.

morning wood truancy (Alfred, Lord Sotosyn), Saturday, 13 January 2018 02:55 (three months ago) Permalink

Oh shit really? I thought it was completely written when they brought it to him

Winter. Dickens. Yes. (Jon not Jon), Saturday, 13 January 2018 03:37 (three months ago) Permalink

sorry felder nothing for you

Felder made up for it later w/"Heavy Metal (Takin' A Ride)"

Never Learn To Mike Love (C. Grisso/McCain), Saturday, 13 January 2018 05:29 (three months ago) Permalink

C'mon, Let's All Groove...

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=02nAH_oAjeg

Never Learn To Mike Love (C. Grisso/McCain), Saturday, 13 January 2018 05:32 (three months ago) Permalink

IDK I guess my imaginary version of felders ‘reggae’ home demo of hotel California is kind of my felder pick

Winter. Dickens. Yes. (Jon not Jon), Saturday, 13 January 2018 18:38 (three months ago) Permalink

New kid in town good pick for Roach.

Winter. Dickens. Yes. (Jon not Jon), Saturday, 13 January 2018 18:39 (three months ago) Permalink

two months pass...

I was much too, er, innocent back when I'd regularly listen to this song: the grossness that Henley's bio lends it didn't occur to me until I read your piece.

Dangleballs and the Ballerina (cryptosicko), Tuesday, 20 March 2018 02:19 (one month ago) Permalink

lol/wtf at the negative comments there from the don henley defence force

in conclusion, it is good to peel the sheeps (bizarro gazzara), Tuesday, 20 March 2018 11:32 (one month ago) Permalink

In the dozens of posts since last year the only two that have provoked so many comments have been Eagle-related.

morning wood truancy (Alfred, Lord Sotosyn), Tuesday, 20 March 2018 11:36 (one month ago) Permalink

sore with the eagles

when worlds collide I'll see you again (Jon not Jon), Tuesday, 20 March 2018 14:40 (one month ago) Permalink

According to one of the #MeTop sites (I can’t remember what it’s called at the moment), it sounds like Don’s 16 y/o girl (or her friend at the house that night) may now be married to a California politician and readying herself to come forward about this whole ordeal.

Naive Teen Idol, Saturday, 24 March 2018 01:17 (three weeks ago) Permalink

#MeToo =#MeTop

Here’s the piece: http://www.crazydaysandnights.net/2017/11/blind-item-1-he-made-millions-from.html

Naive Teen Idol, Saturday, 24 March 2018 01:26 (three weeks ago) Permalink

DON: Oh shit.

GLENN: I'm glad I kicked it before this whole #MeToo thing got rebranded to not be about threesomes.

DON: Well, yeah.

...some of y'all too woke to function (C. Grisso/McCain), Saturday, 24 March 2018 01:28 (three weeks ago) Permalink

Great piece Alfred.

illegal economic migration (Tracer Hand), Saturday, 24 March 2018 01:35 (three weeks ago) Permalink

thank you!

morning wood truancy (Alfred, Lord Sotosyn), Saturday, 24 March 2018 01:36 (three weeks ago) Permalink

it sounds like Don’s 16 y/o girl (or her friend at the house that night) may now be married to a California politician and readying herself to come forward about this whole ordeal.

That whole article is O_O, but the bit about Girl #1 (the 16 y/o) dying under mysterious circumstances a year later after getting clean probably takes the cake.

...some of y'all too woke to function (C. Grisso/McCain), Saturday, 24 March 2018 01:46 (three weeks ago) Permalink

Yup. Also that Don’s public response to all this was to blame the media by writing “Dirty Laundry.”

Naive Teen Idol, Saturday, 24 March 2018 18:34 (three weeks ago) Permalink

Re-re-post: orig. from Rolling Country, then a little tweaked for xpost A Good Day In Hell, the notorious Eagles thread:

Henley's Cass County actually doesn't suck! Quite possible that this totally unexpected impression has led me to initial overrating, but here's what I said on Rolling Country (hearing npr's post of the deluxe edition, with those four bonus covers, really did help)
Don Henley's guest-star-laden Cass County turned out to be surprisingly painless, enjoyable, even. Starts with one of four well-chosen covers (all present on this deluxe edition, that is): Tift Merritt's "Bramble Rose," which he starts in relatively good voice---not just lack of the strain I remember; he actually seems to have a feel for the phrasing and pace---then hands it off to Miranda Lambert, who passes a verse to Mick Jagger---also good, even though he plays it straight. "Cost of Living" meets Merle Haggard, Martina McBride's good on "Old Flame," although the story gets cut short, probably because it's based on a real-life episode, according to him. Dolly Parton is excellent, duh, on the Louvin Brothers' "When I Stop Dreaming," but she doesn't obliterate Henley vocal, so give points to both vox.
Some other voices are more in the background, like "two out of three Dixie Chicks," Vince Gill, Lucinda---though NPR streams aren't always as good as they should be, and my headphones are certainly not for audiophiles, but I like the way he melds near-subliminal yet unmistakable Lee Ann Womack to a chorus that would otherwise probably get monotonous.
Even at least one cratedigger's catnip find, at least for me: "She Sang Hymns Out of Tune," with a low-key, sneaky surrealism that surely suggested some Gram Parsons originals, and had me thinking that this presentation surely is the mature, generous Henley, since Parsons reportedly loathed the Eagles--but apparently it was written by one Jesse Lee Kincaid, and recorded by Nilsson, on his Pandemonium Shadow Show (also by the Dillards on Wheatstraw Suite).
Speaking of the Eagles, I never was a big fan, but the overall sense of radio-ready structures here even extends to up- and downtempo tracks that would improve several of their albums.
Catchiness etc. also gets past most editorial moments, so more points for not playing the old man card too much (trepidation of atmospheric "Train In The Distance" could be felt by anyone, most likely).
― dow, Thursday, October 1, 2015 1:09 PM (two years ago) Bookmark Flag Post Permalink
Even at least one cratedigger's catnip find, at least for me: "She Sang Hymns Out of Tune," with a low-key, sneaky surrealism that surely suggested some Gram Parsons originals, and had me thinking that this presentation surely is the mature, generous Henley, since Parsons reportedly loathed the Eagles--but apparently it was written by one Jesse Lee Kincaid, and recorded by Nilsson, on his Pandemonium Shadow Show (also by the Dillards on Wheatstraw Suite).
---dow

Kincaid's original is on Rhino's LA Nuggets box, and it was also recorded by Hearts & Flowers, featuring future Eagle Bernie Leadon.
― Love, Wilco (C. Grisso/McCain), Thursday, October 1, 2015 1:15 PM (two years ago) Bookmark Flag Post Permalink

Thanks! Will check out those earlier versions, and try to dig up something else re Kincaid too.
---dow

dow, Sunday, 25 March 2018 19:36 (three weeks ago) Permalink


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