Macarthur Park - Classic or Superstar?

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No song has ever affected as many parts of my body as this,, and I know it shoulddn't, but its 7+ minutes of streling pop beauty - whether you hear Jimmy Webb's or Richard Harris. How in hell did the fifth dimension knock it back?"

Geoff, Monday, 4 June 2001 00:00 (sixteen years ago) Permalink

uh, because the lyrics are so fuckin dumm?

duane zarakov, Monday, 4 June 2001 00:00 (sixteen years ago) Permalink

Donna Summers version wins hands down .

anthony, Monday, 4 June 2001 00:00 (sixteen years ago) Permalink

that was the exact point where donna summer records stopped being any good.

duane z., Monday, 4 June 2001 00:00 (sixteen years ago) Permalink

i really need a few buttons on my computer one to tell you i am being campy one to tell you i am being ironic and one to tell you i am being sarcastic.

i would use those 3 buttons on the above response.

anthony, Monday, 4 June 2001 00:00 (sixteen years ago) Permalink

Somewhere in there there's a classic waiting to get out. Though you also couldn't imagine it being much shorter, cause then you'd miss (as DS did) the most psychologically acute bit, which is also the most embarrassing/uncomfortable bit, i.e. Webb's dead-on capture of piqued adolescence in the "take my pain and use it" section. It's not Webb's best track or even Webb's best track for Richard Harris but, yes, classic.

Tom, Monday, 4 June 2001 00:00 (sixteen years ago) Permalink

Jimmy Webb's version gets me every time.

Kodanshi, Monday, 4 June 2001 00:00 (sixteen years ago) Permalink

actually, it was the association who turned it down. after they'd done so, their manager, a bit pissed off, said that the day "macarthur park" hit top 10 was the day he'd resign as their manager (which he did when the record went to #2). i don't know why webb didn't think to offer it to the fifth dimension after he'd done the gorgeous and loony -- a bit of a precursor to the harris albums -- the magic garden with them.

once he heard harris, full of his oratorical skill and dramatic flair, sing it, webb knew it had to go to harris even if it was a bit out of his range. too much acid, too many broken hearts, too young, too ambitious, too fabulous. absolute classic, but as tom said, not the best track webb did with harris by a country mile.

fred solinger, Monday, 4 June 2001 00:00 (sixteen years ago) Permalink

and, of course, it obliterated then notion that songs needed to be three minutes long to be hits and it forced fm radio to change its playlisting policies. would we have a "november rain" if not for "macarthur park"?

fred solinger, Monday, 4 June 2001 00:00 (sixteen years ago) Permalink

Wasn't it 'that six-minute single' "Like a Rolling Stone" which made the big hole in the three-minute rule of thumb, a couple of years before "Macarthur Park"?

Tim, Monday, 4 June 2001 00:00 (sixteen years ago) Permalink

would we have a "november rain" if not for "macarthur park"?

in and of itself, reason enough to despise the song. Complete dud of the duddiest degree. Overlong, boring, over the top in the bad way, trill, horrid, facile. The metaphor is stupid. And who the fuck eats cakes with green icing?!

Ally, Monday, 4 June 2001 00:00 (sixteen years ago) Permalink

in and of itself, reason enough to despise the song. Complete dud of the duddiest degree. Overlong, boring, over the top in the bad way, trill, horrid, facile.

...but who could live without the November Rain video? Not me, anyway.

The Shrek cookies come with purple and green icing to apply to the cookies, so I tried painting their faces green yesterday and it tasted vile. Like food coloring with sugar. Perhaps there's a song in that.

I do like Macarthur Park, probably because I'm just a sucker for ott melodrama.

Nicole, Monday, 4 June 2001 00:00 (sixteen years ago) Permalink

tim: good point. also, "you've lost that lovin' feeling" had started it all with its 4 minute run time (with a false ending and a sleeve that read three minutes), then dylan, and "macarthur park" ended the notion for good.

of course the metaphor is stupid, it was the 60s! you're too concerned about the color of the icing and not WHY it's flowing down.

i couldn't live without the "november rain" video either. maybe we're not so incompatible, nicole!

fred solinger, Monday, 4 June 2001 00:00 (sixteen years ago) Permalink

of course the metaphor is stupid, it was the 60s! you're too concerned about the color of the icing and not WHY it's flowing down

Quite frankly, I think focusing on the technical details and not the idiotic simplicity of the duff metaphor is the way to go.

If you can't live without the November Rain video, why do you turn it off every time it's on tv and bitch about how horrid it is? Tosser. I'm starting to believe you're a robot programmed by Tom to agree with everyone on NYLPM except me.

Ally, Monday, 4 June 2001 00:00 (sixteen years ago) Permalink

Don't refuse to let RIchard Harris' "Trap Shiting" overemotionality find its way itno your all too closed up heart "ally".

Mike Hanley, Monday, 4 June 2001 00:00 (sixteen years ago) Permalink

I've never spotted the connection before, but maybe November Rain is the prequel to Macaarthur park ala Star Wars etc...only tihng is Axl's cake ain't green but it is white, which mya repreesent symbolically the coke and smack they all did in LA (which apparently, and according to Jimmy last year in Brisbane, who'd partied hard with harry Nilson & JL on the lost weekend, he mya have done), and according to the theory that's why the cake was melting in the park - too much drugs and the relationship shot the shit. or something.

Geoff, Monday, 4 June 2001 00:00 (sixteen years ago) Permalink

"House of the Rising Sun" was the first big hit to break 4 minutes, surely?

Oh, classic, of course. Like Tom, I'm moved most by the middle section, but personally I think the most brilliant trick of Summer / Moroder's version is the way it works itself up into a frenzy and then, at the height of its hysteria, stops on the fourth bar of the extended instrumental. Though I agree with Duane about Donna Summer's subsequent decline - I heard "Hot Stuff" at the weekend and found it absolutely repulsive AOR-pop (it's not disco as I understand it), anticipating Belinda Carlisle and Pat Benatar. I'm unspeakably proud of the fact that I come from a country where "Down Deep Inside" peaked higher.

Robin Carmody, Monday, 4 June 2001 00:00 (sixteen years ago) Permalink

robin, as i understand it...

"you've lost that lovin' feeling" -- early '65
"like a rolling stone" -- summer '65
"house of the rising sun" -- late '65

regarding donna summer, i personally like "hot stuff" quite a bit (and find "down deep inside" something of a snoozer): the drum sound is fantastic as is the synthesizer. not disco, of course, but fine tech-rock all the same.

fred solinger, Monday, 4 June 2001 00:00 (sixteen years ago) Permalink

This chart-chat is all very well: but what happens when Mya's attorney reads what Geoff's been saying about her activities in LA?

mark s, Monday, 4 June 2001 00:00 (sixteen years ago) Permalink

Sorry Fred:

"House of the Rising Sun" July 64 UK / September 64 US "You've Lost That Lovin' Feelin'" January 65 UK and US "Like A Rolling Stone" August 65 US / September 65 UK

How can anyone not love "Down Deep Inside"? Is it the structurelessness and the fact that it got lost in "I Feel Love"'s slipstream at the time, maybe?

Robin Carmody, Monday, 4 June 2001 00:00 (sixteen years ago) Permalink

Blimey, our second coke-fib legal tussle.

"Hot Stuff" is ace. And 'anticipating Belinda Carlisle' is WHY it is ace, to boot. I don't know "Deep Down Inside" but it sounds like I should.

Tom, Monday, 4 June 2001 00:00 (sixteen years ago) Permalink

Maybe I still can't disassociate that kind of bombast from its original context, so the triumphalist self-importance of the chorus of "Hot Stuff" just reminds me of, you know, The Eighties (TM), only *before they happened*. It's not that I *hate* it, I just find it sonically repulsive and musically very, very limited, and it simply doesn't stand comparison to her previous singles.

"Down Deep Inside" is wonderful; I suspect you'd know it if you heard it.

Robin Carmody, Monday, 4 June 2001 00:00 (sixteen years ago) Permalink

blame my inept typing skills..i meant may...now who's this mya? More importantly, who's her attorney?

Geoff, Tuesday, 5 June 2001 00:00 (sixteen years ago) Permalink

three months pass...
I actually like the verse music, but I hate everything else. Especially the lyrics and Richard Harris's "dying calf" wail. And didjall realize that the verse prog in "November Rain" was ripped off from a John Lennon song?

Jack Redelfs, Sunday, 23 September 2001 00:00 (fifteen years ago) Permalink

four months pass...
It's a goodie but goes on a bit. "The yard went on forever" is a vastly superior album to "A tramp shining" but I find it impossible to age the female sitting with Harris on the cover, the best I can do is somewhere between 12 and 29.

Best Donna Summer track, er, I could say "I feel love" but that would be too obvious so I'd have to go for:

I remember yesterday. Down deep inside. Love's unkind. Love to love you baby.

Kris England, Monday, 11 February 2002 01:00 (fifteen years ago) Permalink

Ha you've got the perfect email address to revive this thread Kris :).

Robin Carmody, Monday, 11 February 2002 01:00 (fifteen years ago) Permalink

which reminds me - have you listened to the jimmy webb covers album up,up and away - it has this birllaint 14 minute free jazz version of macarthur park, as well as another versionw hich starts of wiith the insturmental from CB's Oh Fortuna...very classy.

Geoff, Tuesday, 12 February 2002 01:00 (fifteen years ago) Permalink

I never bought it when it came out and Im pretty sure it's deleted now, shame that cos it sounds pretty good and any new versions of Jimmy Webb songs are always worth a listen.

Many of the Webb/related albums are fetching pretty good money, esp in the U.S. but i've never paid more than £2.00 for any of them. I've got as good mate who works at the record and tape exchange in London and he tends to find me quite a few goodies.

Still not managed to get a copy of "Pacific ocean blue" by Dennis Wilson though...

Kris England, Wednesday, 13 February 2002 01:00 (fifteen years ago) Permalink

Can we get back on topic here? Those who slag MacArthur Park's lyrics slay me. Ever heard of metaphor? Of course, in the same breath you'd likely extol Lucy in the Sky with Diamonds or Strawberry Fields Forever as brilliant lyricism. It was the 60's! Over-the-top, intentionally obscure, drug-induced imagery was as much a part of the times as a "strip-ed pair of pants"!

MP is one of the most poignant, gut-wrenching "my heart is broken but I'll go on" songs I've ever heard. Harris interprets it brilliantly (he does know a thing or two about dramatic interpretation). Besides the lyrics, the music is beautiful. Complex chord, key and tempo changes in the form of a musical trilogy.

Richard Harris' version of MP is one of the most brilliant pop music performances of all time. Donna Summers', on the other hand, is a joke.

Peanut T. Butter, Friday, 22 February 2002 01:00 (fifteen years ago) Permalink

three months pass...
Referring to Peant T. Butter's claim -- "Richard Harris' version of MP is one of the most brilliant pop music performances of all time. Donna Summers', on the other hand, is a joke."

Sorry, Mr. Butter, but to label Donna Summer's version of this song as a "joke" is not being fair to Donna or the era in which her version was released. Mr. Webb composed a doozy of a "pop" song (lyrically, anyway) and Mr. Harris, a good actor (if not a great singer) simply did what actors do - he "acted" the song. Like you, I immediately picked up on Webb's metaphor and laughed at those who didn't "get it". How could they not miss it? Especially with Harris "acting" it out like he did.

To appreciate Donna Summer's version, one must take into account the time in which it was recorded and who sang it. Simply put, it was the disco era and Donna Summer was the reigning star at the time. Given her vocal talents and her Eurodisco brand of disco (long running times, orchestral arrangements - as opposed to "American" disco popularized by K. C. & The Sunshine Band, the Bee Gees, etc.), it only made sense that she sing a song like "MacArthur Park".

Actually, I think the song lent itself quite well to a disco arrangement. In fact, it's a wonder no one gave "Up, Up and Away" (another Webb tune) a disco treatment. Given the 60s drug culture, "Up, Up And Away" could be interpreted differently beyond its literal hot air balloon scenario; this other interpretation, taking into account that cocaine was the drug of choice among the disco crowd, would have fit in just as well in the 70s disco scene.

Getting back to "MacArthur Park", given that most - not all - disco was just a lot of "ear candy", it allowed Donna to flex her vocal muscles and put to use a great talent that was earlier written off by critics for her earlier "sex kitten" songs (e.g., "Love To Love You Baby", "Spring Affair"). A real melody with a real arrangement and real range - "MacArthur Park" is a classic. Compared with the crap riding the airwaves these days, I'd kill for someone with the vocal prowess to tackle this song or something similar to it.

Until then, I'll always have Donna's version. Harris' almost over-the- top delivery aside, hers is the one that's closest to my heart. Some people might look on disco as a joke, but some great songs came out of the disco era. Though Donna's version of "MacArthur Park" was a remake, her version was one of them.

William Jefferson, Tuesday, 18 June 2002 00:00 (fifteen years ago) Permalink

I had to go back and reread all of the posts to find out what the "metaphor" was that I missed. Previous posts made it sound like I had been mising something - like maybe leaving the cake out in the rain was some anti-war metaphor or had something to do with socialism. I mean, it was always so obvious but the way people talk here, I thought it might be more complex, and I was missing it...

And yeah, it's a fucking stupid metaphor and a lousy song.

Dave225, Wednesday, 19 June 2002 00:00 (fifteen years ago) Permalink

And I saw Rolf Harris performing it on his Saturday night show circa 1971. When they got to the Pearl and Dean style instrumental break, on came the Young Generation to do a "creative dance" interpretation, involving lots of anguished waving of hands, some brandishing plastic poppies.

Ruined the song forever for me.

Marcello Carlin, Wednesday, 19 June 2002 00:00 (fifteen years ago) Permalink

It occurred me that I forgot to mention Jim Steinman, someone who's written a helluva lot of stuff similar to "MacArthur Park" in terms of high drama and heavy use of imagery (the work he created for Meat Loaf, not to mention "Total Elipse Of The Heart" by Bonnie Tyler, "Left In The Dark" by Barbra Streisand, and "It's All Coming Back To Me Now" by Celine Dion). Though really a contemporary of Jimmy Webb's, he's made more of a career of such material than Webb did.

William Jefferson, Wednesday, 19 June 2002 00:00 (fifteen years ago) Permalink

I just dont seem to understand why a song that is so brilliant in musical writing had to be so bad lyrical! It occurs to me that when I was in high school that i played the runs and chords on my clarinet and it was so awesome! But when i heard someone read the lyrics it made me wonder just what was going on here? I worked the courage to download it and was appalled. It was so bad that by the time i got to "striped pair of pants" I was hysterical in tears. This is some really bad stuff! Those that see this as a metaphor for the love lost I can see the connection, but i mean really. We might as well be using this album to start a fire at winter than to be subjected to it. If we were to punish war criminals i think this should be played on a loop for about 2 hours a day and then we see if the person wants to subject themselves to this the next day or sumbit to the firing squad. I care nothing for the lyrics of a song if they cant make a connection, and those that can feel one to this, well youre just sick, thats about all i can say. Harris must truely be punished for this in the afterlife, I think he should be subjected to it on endless loop for eternity to make up for this sin... that should suffice.

Mike S., Thursday, 27 June 2002 00:00 (fifteen years ago) Permalink

it wd have to, probably

mark s, Thursday, 27 June 2002 00:00 (fifteen years ago) Permalink

My Dad loves this song, and he is mainly into Deep Purple and REM. I think it speaks to men of his generation. He often says, 'What's that track again? If only I could get that single. You know when you look at that old vinyl, could you pick me up a copy of that track ... what's it called again ... if you see it.'

maryann, Thursday, 27 June 2002 00:00 (fifteen years ago) Permalink

two weeks pass...
The absolute best version of Macarthur Park ever recorded is the one by The Queers. All others are crap.

Josh, Saturday, 13 July 2002 00:00 (fifteen years ago) Permalink

I find it amazing that a song can affect the very fabric of our life in the way Macarthur Park has. We hate it because we don't quite understand what it's about, but we listen to it because it touches the inner side of ourselves that says we don't know what life is all about either. My hat is off to Jimmy Webb and Richard Harris for showing us that life's complexities will always be worth talking about.

Ted, Sunday, 14 July 2002 00:00 (fifteen years ago) Permalink

MacArthur Park has got to be the worst pop song ever recorded. I live in America, surely a songcraft-challenged country if there was one (Cisco's "Thong Song" or Anka's "You're Having My Baby", anyone?), but surely MP rides the top of the crap list. I just heard this song on a compilation CD today and was so sickened, it's still haunting me! You can't believe it's really that bad! But it is! There is a rule in songwriting about never using the word "bake" in a song, and this song is Federal guilty. It should be executed, stretched and tanned in the sun and hung in the public square for children to see and throw rocks at. Overblown melodrama and sickly sweet orchestral arrangements are fine - I can even live with chord changes for chord changes' sake - but this song is like Roger Whitaker on Xanax or William Shatner after a speedball. Agonizing. I'm not an alcoholic and this song makes me really need a stiff drink. If you want to hear overdramatic sugarpop with nosebleed key changes done right, avoid this lysergic crap. Check out Freda Payne's "I'm Not Getting Any Better" and hear it done the right way. GOD this song is awful. Jimmy Webb can swear up and down he was on acid when he wrote this, but acid writes better lyrics than this. Cheese this slick and nasty spells p-o-s-e-u-r. He was probably trying to make it sound like he was acid so he would seem more with it. Tripe. Tripe. Tripe. The worst song ever made.

I Hate This Song, Sunday, 21 July 2002 00:00 (fifteen years ago) Permalink

Wow now I have to check out the original. I've only heard Donna Summer's version. Yes, it's full of melodrama, but in my mind's ear I hear a singer with a far more pleasant voice than our current pop divas, and sometimes that's all I need. I also wonder how accurate "my mind's ear" is, but no matter.

Sean, Monday, 22 July 2002 00:00 (fifteen years ago) Permalink

seven months pass...
Wait until you hear World of Twist's version on the lost album. Would have hit number one if they released it.

Richard Harris, Thursday, 13 March 2003 20:19 (fourteen years ago) Permalink

I am just listening to it at the moment. I think it would have broke the World of Twist internationally. That song's mutant ability to be extremely heart wretching through the over the top psychotic acid drenched lyrics could have/would have been a perfect ending to the World of Twist saga. Especially the middle section as discussed up thread which is a vietnam drugged up route 66 sort of thing. Bloody fantastic, it is. It would have carried World of Twist over to the next phase of English Pop music - i.e. Suede, Saint Etienne and The Auteurs. But, however, if they were to have heard the rest of the album with the extremist tactics of experimentation were some songs are literally hash drenched, maybe their fame would have been short lived. But jesus christ, what a perfect ending to the Tony Ogden story.

Richard Harris, Thursday, 13 March 2003 20:28 (fourteen years ago) Permalink

I can't believe anybody would even THINK, much less SAY...oh never mind *cries*

dave q, Thursday, 13 March 2003 20:34 (fourteen years ago) Permalink

Dave Q you know you love the World of Twist! You know you love the World of Twist's version of MacArthur Park!

Richard Harris, Thursday, 13 March 2003 20:37 (fourteen years ago) Permalink

What's a World of Twist?

dave q, Thursday, 13 March 2003 20:50 (fourteen years ago) Permalink

That's o.k. if you do not remember. It was like Vietnam in the clubs during the early 90s. ; - )

Richard Harris, Thursday, 13 March 2003 20:52 (fourteen years ago) Permalink

I also wonder how accurate "my mind's ear" is, but no matter.

Since my above post I've gotten Donna Summer's "On the Radio" best-of in the bargain bin, and my memory was correct. Real good voice. Silly song, but I enjoy it just the same.

Sean (Sean), Friday, 14 March 2003 05:02 (fourteen years ago) Permalink

six months pass...
I can't stop thinking about how brilliant the Richard Harris version is.

Curt1s St3ph3ns, Friday, 26 September 2003 01:07 (thirteen years ago) Permalink

That Richard Harris classic is one of the underrated classics of rock history. Truly great like most epics!

Geir Hongro (GeirHong), Friday, 26 September 2003 12:46 (thirteen years ago) Permalink

one year passes...
"Truly great like most epics!"

awesome

Amateur(ist) (Amateur(ist)), Wednesday, 19 January 2005 16:15 (twelve years ago) Permalink

three months pass...
the song is about a bum trip, right? (whereas "up, up & away" is about a great one!)

cindy margolis holocaust (Jody Beth Rosen), Monday, 9 May 2005 01:25 (twelve years ago) Permalink

I think it's about love

A Viking of Some Note (Andrew Thames), Monday, 9 May 2005 02:11 (twelve years ago) Permalink

It's definitely about love -- young love, in particular.

Naive Teen Idol (Naive Teen Idol), Monday, 9 May 2005 02:49 (twelve years ago) Permalink

hey has anybody ever sampled the opening harpsichord chords?

cindy margolis holocaust (Jody Beth Rosen), Monday, 9 May 2005 03:15 (twelve years ago) Permalink

Perfect!

jim wentworth (wench), Monday, 9 May 2005 03:42 (twelve years ago) Permalink

hey has anybody ever sampled the opening harpsichord chords?

"Dreamy Days" by Roots Manuva. Also referenced (if indirectly) on Wu-Tang's "Second Coming."

Marcello Carlin (nostudium), Monday, 9 May 2005 07:43 (twelve years ago) Permalink

To the fat ugly MacArthur Park bitch who is sick of Mexicans
last modified: Mon, 9 May 00:44 PDT

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To the fat ugly MacArthur Park bitch who is sick of Mexicans
Reply to: anon-72365922@craigslist.org
Date: 2005-05-09, 12:44AM PDT


I am a hard-working college-educated Mexican American male, and you didn't mention MY category. You only see the bad, lazy people because that's all you want to see. Your racism feeds itself. I know many Latinos who live in YOUR area and surrounding ares who work hard, put the kids through college, and are an asset (see I can talk intelligently too-but you ignore it when we do that) to their community. Some of the "few" people you see going to work, who you also smeared, are just starting out , or students, and they can only afford to live in that area. YOU live in that area-does that mean that you are a lazy, fat, hotel worker? Are YOU too lazy to stay off the sidewalk? Your post slams LEGAL Mexicans-we have EVERY right to be here-I was born here, as were my parents, who started out in the Macarthur Park area.
It would be wrong if I said that all Native Americans were drunks who push gambling and avoid taxes-what you said is just as wrong. How dare you call your fellow human beings AN INFECTION. Do you know what a sociopath is?!? This Mexican does, and thinks YOU are one-look it up, you superior bitch! BTW if you take an illegal cab service, it's YOUR fault for not calling a real cab.
Your boyfriend probably looked at some Mexican girl because he's sick of your fat angry ass-THAT'S why you hate Mexicans.

Vichitravirya XI, Monday, 9 May 2005 07:59 (twelve years ago) Permalink

"I will have the things that I desire and never let you catch me looking at the Sun."

early anti-Murdoch tirade obviously

Marcello Carlin (nostudium), Monday, 9 May 2005 08:24 (twelve years ago) Permalink

or even "I will drink the wine while it is warm and never let you catch me looking at the Sun" for fuck's sake what's WRONG with me this morning?

The consequence of drinking warm wine being that you imagine that rivers flow through the sky.

Marcello Carlin (nostudium), Monday, 9 May 2005 08:25 (twelve years ago) Permalink

Were my early posts inspiration for this, only for this to be posted, and I totally missed it?

Obviously, by my previous posts, I think it's one of the funniest songs recorded, and I love Jimmy Webb AND Donna Summer.

My girlfriend always thought it was a parody of something she knew nothing about. 'nuff said...

PappaWheelie (PappaWheelie), Monday, 9 May 2005 14:49 (twelve years ago) Permalink

one year passes...
"and wondering WHYYYYYYYYYY????"

Marmot (marmotwolof), Tuesday, 12 September 2006 07:18 (ten years ago) Permalink

greatest song ever*. no question.

harris version, obviously.

guanoman (mister the guanoman), Tuesday, 12 September 2006 07:41 (ten years ago) Permalink

"I will have the things that I desire and never let you catch me looking at the sun."
early anti-Murdoch tirade obviously

-- Marcello Carlin

Back in the acid daze, there was an unsubstantiated rumour/scare tactic (spread by some anti-drug MD or scientist or something) that a bunch of hippies had dropped some Yellow Sunshine and stared at the sun for hours, eventually blinding themselves! Maybe that was what Webb was referring to?

Monty Von Byonga (Monty Von Byonga), Tuesday, 12 September 2006 07:48 (ten years ago) Permalink

The Harris version, the Donna Summer version and Webb's own version (on Ten Easy Pieces) are all great in their own ways.

Marcello Carlin (nostudium), Tuesday, 12 September 2006 07:50 (ten years ago) Permalink

Yeah, I just listened to the Richard Harris one for the first time in over a year, 5 times in a row - hence the revive. That's my favorite part.

Marmot (marmotwolof), Tuesday, 12 September 2006 07:51 (ten years ago) Permalink

what are some other songs that mention specific parks by name? "palisades park" is one (we'll allow amusement parks). "itchykoo park"... what else?

ruddy raleigh and the rickets (Jody Beth Rosen), Tuesday, 12 September 2006 09:37 (ten years ago) Permalink

Gorky Park is mentioned in "The Winds of Change" by the Scorpions.

Elvis Costello's an obvious place to go for some London parks: Regent's Park ("London's Brilliant Parade" and Holland Park ("Hoover Factory") come to mind, though the latter is really talking about the tube station.

Tim (Tim), Tuesday, 12 September 2006 09:47 (ten years ago) Permalink

People's Park in "Student Demonstration Time", that core favourite of Beach Boys afficionados worldwide.

The song "In Gunnersbury Park" by the band The Hit Parade.

Tim (Tim), Tuesday, 12 September 2006 10:02 (ten years ago) Permalink

tim hopkins, much wuv.

ruddy raleigh and the rickets (Jody Beth Rosen), Tuesday, 12 September 2006 13:14 (ten years ago) Permalink

JBR, likewise!

I wonder if there is a famous park in New York City, mentioned in any popular songs, ever.

Tim (Tim), Tuesday, 12 September 2006 13:18 (ten years ago) Permalink

Jurassic Park is frightening in the dark.
All the dinosaurs are running wild.
Someone shut the fence off in the rain
I'm afraid those things'll harm me
Cause they sure don't act like Barney
And they think that I'm their dinner, not their friend
Oh, noooo!!

Geir Hongro (GeirHong), Tuesday, 12 September 2006 14:08 (ten years ago) Permalink

Check out the Ska-tastic version on "Hybrid Kids" folks!

mark grout (mark grout), Tuesday, 12 September 2006 14:15 (ten years ago) Permalink

"Lakeside Park", immortalized by Rush, is decidedly real.

M. Agony Von Bontee (M. Agony Von Bontee), Tuesday, 12 September 2006 18:19 (ten years ago) Permalink

duh, "paisley park"

ruddy raleigh and the rickets (Jody Beth Rosen), Tuesday, 12 September 2006 19:17 (ten years ago) Permalink

"Grace Cathedral Park", Red House Painters

LC (Damian), Tuesday, 12 September 2006 19:39 (ten years ago) Permalink

"Rock Creek Park", the Blackbyrds

hank (hank s), Tuesday, 12 September 2006 19:42 (ten years ago) Permalink

three years pass...

how can i get my grubby paws on the World of Twists version of this??

George Mink, Monday, 16 November 2009 21:46 (seven years ago) Permalink

three months pass...

just heard the donna summer version for the first time (as i was getting my hair cut)

wau awesome

mookieproof, Thursday, 18 February 2010 18:23 (seven years ago) Permalink


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