Wherein We Elect Our Favourite Classical Compositions of… the 1910s

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I apologize in advance, as this has been the most painful culling of all so far.

Poll Results

OptionVotes
Igor Stravinsky – The Rite of Spring (1913) 7
Charles Ives – Piano Sonata No. 2, ‘Concord, Mass., 1840-60’ (1916-1919) 4
Claude Debussy – Préludes, Book I (1909-1910) 4
Igor Stravinsky – The Firebird (1910) 2
Maurice Ravel – Daphnis et Chloé (1909-1912) 2
Gustav Mahler – Symphony No. 9 (1909-1910) 2
Karol Szymanowski – Violin Concerto No. 1, Op. 35 (1916) 2
Jean Sibelius – Symphony No. 4 in A minor, Op. 63 (1910-1911) 2
Sergei Rachmaninoff – All-Night Vigil, Op. 37 (1915) 2
Erik Satie – Nocturnes (unfinished) (1919) 1
Claude Debussy – Sonata for Flute, Viola and Harp (1915) 1
Arnold Schoenberg – Pierrot lunaire, Op. 21 (1912) 1
Alexander Scriabin – Piano Sonata No. 10, Op. 70 (1913) 1
Alexander Scriabin – Vers la flamme, Op. 72 (1914) 1
Sergei Prokofiev – Symphony No. 1 in D major, ‘Classical’, Op. 25 (1916-1917) 1
Gustav Holst – The Planets, Op. 32 (1914-1916) 1
Sergei Prokofiev – Violin Concerto No. 1 in D major, Op. 19 (1916-1917) 1
Karol Szymanowski – Symphony No. 3, ‘Song of the Night’, Op. 27 (1914-1916) 0
Jean Sibelius – Symphony No. 5 in E-flat major, Op. 82 (1914-1919) 0
Jean Sibelius – The Oceanides, Op. 73 (1913-1914) 0
Wilhelm Stenhammar – Symphony No. 2 in G minor, Op. 34 (1911-1915) 0
Leoš Janáček – In the Mists (1912) 0
Leoš Janáček – Sonata for Violin and Piano (1914) 0
Manuel de Falla – El amor brujo (1914-1915) 0
Manuel de Falla – Noches en los jardines de España (1909-1916) 0
Maurice Ravel – Ma mère l’Oye (1908-1910) 0
Ralph Vaughan Williams – Fantasia on a Theme of Thomas Tallis (1910) 0
Ralph Vaughan Williams – The Lark Ascending (1914) 0
Richard Strauss – Der Rosenkavalier (1911) 0
Sergei Rachmaninoff – Piano Sonata No. 2, Op. 36 (1913) 0
Claude Debussy – Sonata for Cello and Piano (1915) 0
Igor Stravinsky – Les Noces (1914-1917) 0
Alexander Scriabin – Piano Sonata No. 8, Op. 66 (1912-1913) 0
Alexander Scriabin – Piano Sonata No. 9, ‘Black Mass’, Op. 68 (1913) 0
Alexander Scriabin – 5 Preludes, Op. 74 (1914) 0
Anton Webern – 6 Bagatelles for String Quartet, Op. 9 (1913) 0
Anton Webern – 5 Pieces for Orchestra, Op. 10 (1911-1913) 0
Béla Bartók – String Quartet No. 2 (1915-1917) 0
Carl Nielsen – Symphony No. 3, ‘Sinfonia expansive’ (1910-1911) 0
Carl Nielsen – Symphony No. 4, ‘The Inextinguishable’ (1914-1916) 0
Charles Ives – Three Places in New England (1910-1914) 0
Charles Koechlin – Les Heures persanes, Op. 65 (1913-1919) 0
Claude Debussy – Images pour orchestre (1905-1912) 0
Claude Debussy – Préludes, Book II (1912-1913) 0
Claude Debussy – Sonata for Violin and Piano (1916-1917) 0
Edward Elgar – Cello Concerto in E minor, Op. 85 (1918-1919) 0
George Enescu – Symphony No. 3 in C major, Op. 21 (1916-1918) 0
Anton Webern – 6 Pieces for Orchestra, Op. 6 (1909-1910) 0
Igor Stravinsky – Petrushka (1911) 0
Alban Berg – 3 Pieces for Orchestra (1914-1915) 0


pomenitul, Thursday, 30 January 2020 10:42 (two months ago) link

All of these should have been included as well:

Alban Berg – String Quartet (1910)
Albert Roussel – Le Festin de l’araignée (1913)
Alexander Scriabin – Piano Sonata No. 6, Op. 62 (1911-1912)
Alexander Scriabin – Piano Sonata No. 7, ‘White Mass’, Op. 64 (1912)
Béla Bartók – Bluebeard’s Castle (1911)
Béla Bartók – Romanian Folk Dances (1915)
Béla Bartók – 15 Hungarian Peasant Songs (1914-1918)
Béla Bartók – The Miraculous Mandarin (1918-1919)
Carl Nielsen – Chaconne (1916)
Charles Ives – Symphony No. 3, ‘The Camp Meeting’ (1908-1910)
Claude Debussy – 12 Etudes (1915)
Edward Elgar – Symphony No. 2 in E-flat major, Op. 66 (1909-1911)
Edward Elgar – Falstaff, Op. 68 (1913)
Gustav Mahler – Symphony No. 10 (unfinished) (1910)
Leoš Janáček – Taras Bulba (1915-1918)
Manuel de Falla – El sombrero de tres picos (1919)
Maurice Ravel – Piano Trio in A minor (1914)
Maurice Ravel – Le Tombeau de Couperin (1914-1917)
Ottorino Respighi – Fontane di Roma (1916)
Richard Strauss – Ariadne auf Naxos (1912)
Richard Strauss – Die Frau ohne Schatten (1919)
Sergei Rachmaninoff – Etudes-Tableaux, Op. 33 (1911)
Sergei Rachmaninoff – Etudes-Tableaux, Op. 39 (1916)
Wilhelm Stenhammar – String Quartet No. 5 in C major, Op. 29 (1910)
Wilhelm Stenhammar – Serenade in F major, Op. 31 (1908-1913)
Wilhelm Stenhammar – String Quartet No. 6 in D minor, Op. 35 (1916)
Zoltán Kodály – Sonata for Solo Cello, Op. 8 (1915)

pomenitul, Thursday, 30 January 2020 10:43 (two months ago) link

And no doubt many more I'm forgetting, as usual.

pomenitul, Thursday, 30 January 2020 10:43 (two months ago) link

To think that approximately half of the decade was taken up by WWI…

pomenitul, Thursday, 30 January 2020 10:46 (two months ago) link

It was going to be an easy vote for Pierrot; then I saw The Rite of Spring there. Hm.

With considerable charm, you still have made a choice (Sund4r), Thursday, 30 January 2020 10:50 (two months ago) link

pierrot has the dumbest words

mark s, Thursday, 30 January 2020 11:04 (two months ago) link

juggalo lunaire

mark s, Thursday, 30 January 2020 11:04 (two months ago) link

Fucking Sprechgesang, how does it work?

pomenitul, Thursday, 30 January 2020 11:07 (two months ago) link

flanders and swann are the true masters of speaky-singy

mark s, Thursday, 30 January 2020 11:13 (two months ago) link

Daphnis et Chloé is where I was anticipating that I might finally give Ravel the vote. I've a soft spot for big juicy proto-filmscore-ness. But... Préludes, Les Noces and Les Heures persanes! And I recall favouring most of these Scriabin and Nielsen pieces over the earlier options. And Webern, Prokofiev, Janáček, Szymanowski and Enescu... Blimey.

Nag! Nag! Nag!, Thursday, 30 January 2020 11:33 (two months ago) link

What an absolutely crazy decade. Masterpiece and masterpiece and masterpiece. And yet I suspect it's going to be a landslide... And I voted for that as well.

Frederik B, Thursday, 30 January 2020 12:16 (two months ago) link

I take it you won't be voting for Det uudslukkelige? C'mon, Nielsen was an incredible composer, he deserves some encouragement from his fellow Danes.

pomenitul, Thursday, 30 January 2020 12:18 (two months ago) link

I love Carl Nielsen! My family is from Nr Lyndelse, specifically moved there because it's the birthplace of Nielsen. Still have a cottage house in the hills where he ran around as a boy, it's my favourite place on earth. I might vote for Fynsk Forår next decade. But I'm a singer, a Danish singer, so Carl Nielsen is this incredible songwriter who wrote all my favourite songs growing up.

Frederik B, Thursday, 30 January 2020 13:19 (two months ago) link

Fynsk Forår seems to be considerably more popular in Denmark than beyond its borders. I quite like it, but I must admit I wouldn't put it in my Nielsen top 5. Cultural relativism strikes again?

pomenitul, Thursday, 30 January 2020 13:24 (two months ago) link

You either get Funen or you don't :)

Frederik B, Thursday, 30 January 2020 13:25 (two months ago) link

Christ almighty.

I Heard You Ain't HOOS's (Eric H.), Thursday, 30 January 2020 13:53 (two months ago) link

I'm not a huge Stravinsky stan but who else has had a run like his 1910-1913 one?

I Heard You Ain't HOOS's (Eric H.), Thursday, 30 January 2020 13:54 (two months ago) link

Probably gonna vote "Vers la flamme" tho.

I Heard You Ain't HOOS's (Eric H.), Thursday, 30 January 2020 13:55 (two months ago) link

Wait, was that a real question about sprechgesang? Would be happy to explain if needed. I love the OTT Expressionist psychodrama of the text (in English or French, anyway; don't speak German).

With considerable charm, you still have made a choice (Sund4r), Thursday, 30 January 2020 13:55 (two months ago) link

lol no Sund4r, I was just riffing on mark s's ICP theme. See:

https://knowyourmeme.com/memes/miracles-fucking-magnets-how-do-they-work

pomenitul, Thursday, 30 January 2020 13:56 (two months ago) link

Oh lol. I have never knowingly heard ICP.

With considerable charm, you still have made a choice (Sund4r), Thursday, 30 January 2020 13:57 (two months ago) link

Firebird suite

culture of mayordom (voodoo chili), Thursday, 30 January 2020 13:58 (two months ago) link

That said, Sund4r, I'd love to read your thoughts on Sprechgesang, so feel free to post them as you see fit. As you know, my technical knowledge of music is severely limited.

pomenitul, Thursday, 30 January 2020 14:09 (two months ago) link

Concord Sonata, frankly. Stravinsky was ooga booga-ing for the bourgeoisie while Ives was creating a masterpiece of proto-post-modernity

Montegays and Capulez (flamboyant goon tie included), Thursday, 30 January 2020 14:09 (two months ago) link

Jesus Christ tho it’s like

The Debussy sonata AND the Janacek AND Prokofiev 1 AND Elgar Cello AND even El Amor Brujo which totally rules

This was like the zenith of fun classical music

Montegays and Capulez (flamboyant goon tie included), Thursday, 30 January 2020 14:14 (two months ago) link

More fun than the roaring twenties?

pomenitul, Thursday, 30 January 2020 14:15 (two months ago) link

I suppose we'll find out soon enough.

pomenitul, Thursday, 30 January 2020 14:15 (two months ago) link

i'd like to see an informed defence of sprechgesange which set out how you can tell the good performances from the bad

(it all sounds annoying to me but i am also unreconciled with most classical singing, in all its various evolving periods, so maybe i am just irredeemable as a listening appreciator -- ps i get that juggalot lunaire is meant to sound unhinged, and expressionist versions of unhinged get p overstatedly caligari p quickly)

mark s, Thursday, 30 January 2020 14:22 (two months ago) link

first line reads snarkier than intended, that's actually what i'd like to read! esp.from sund4r!!

mark s, Thursday, 30 January 2020 14:22 (two months ago) link

Probably gonna vote "Vers la flamme" tho.

An excellent choice. Which version do you prefer? (I'm partial to Roger Woodward.)

pomenitul, Thursday, 30 January 2020 14:38 (two months ago) link

i'd like to see an informed defence of sprechgesange which set out how you can tell the good performances from the bad

― mark s

i can't give you an informed defense, but if you want to hear bad sprechgesang listen to frank zappa, for instance "the dangerous kitchen"

you know my name, look up the number of the beast (rushomancy), Thursday, 30 January 2020 14:48 (two months ago) link

or even more than that, "star wars won't work"

you know my name, look up the number of the beast (rushomancy), Thursday, 30 January 2020 14:51 (two months ago) link

when the venn diagram of things i very much don't want to hear forms a perfect circle

mark s, Thursday, 30 January 2020 14:53 (two months ago) link

Mark do you like Wozzeck

Montegays and Capulez (flamboyant goon tie included), Thursday, 30 January 2020 15:05 (two months ago) link

ooga booga-ing for the bourgeoisie

Thanks for the display name!

ooga booga-ing for the bourgeoisie (voodoo chili), Thursday, 30 January 2020 15:08 (two months ago) link

im persuadable (i'm listenable to the boulez version right now)

mark s, Thursday, 30 January 2020 15:08 (two months ago) link

yes thats what i meant to write

mark s, Thursday, 30 January 2020 15:09 (two months ago) link

Try Dohnányi's – Eberhard Wächter is a much better Sprechgesänger than Walter Berry imo.

pomenitul, Thursday, 30 January 2020 15:11 (two months ago) link

(This may go some way towards responding to your initial challenge.)

pomenitul, Thursday, 30 January 2020 15:12 (two months ago) link

ok :)

(tho i'd still also like an actual real informed musician-composer-teacher to pin down their sense of the necessary precepts) (to give me something to disagree with as i'm processing it lol)

mark s, Thursday, 30 January 2020 15:15 (two months ago) link

BTW, I can only assume that Prokofiev's 2nd Piano Concerto is going to be counted as a 1920s piece based on the reconstruction. Because that absolutely is one of the top 10 pieces of music ever written.

I Heard You Ain't HOOS's (Eric H.), Thursday, 30 January 2020 15:18 (two months ago) link

Indeed (to the former – I'm not a huge Prokofiev stan beyond the 1st Violin Concerto and the War Sonatas).

pomenitul, Thursday, 30 January 2020 15:20 (two months ago) link

That's fine, so long as it has a seat at the table.

I Heard You Ain't HOOS's (Eric H.), Thursday, 30 January 2020 15:46 (two months ago) link

Don't worry, it will. And I'm still curious to hear your Vers la flamme recording pick. :)

pomenitul, Thursday, 30 January 2020 15:48 (two months ago) link

Might be the piano he's using, but Horowitz's is right up there:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=A0nrg7Lqfak

I Heard You Ain't HOOS's (Eric H.), Thursday, 30 January 2020 15:56 (two months ago) link

Good stuff.

pomenitul, Thursday, 30 January 2020 16:17 (two months ago) link

(At work. Will post at lunch!)

With considerable charm, you still have made a choice (Sund4r), Thursday, 30 January 2020 16:20 (two months ago) link

I think this is my favourite decade of classical music but there's quite a lot I haven't heard of here! Got a lot of love for the Bartok string quartet, Three Places in New England, the Debussy preludes and images, the Planets, the Firebird (got a totally charming recording on pedal steel guitar), the Rite of Spring, both the Vaughan Williams, and Strauss' absent Alpine Symphony (if just for the opening, which I used to play over & over).

I'd like to write in a vote for Charles Villiers Stanford's The Blue Bird from his 1910 8 part songs, which cuts me deep for personal reasons and feels so full of loss. Of these I'll vote for Debussy's first book of preludes

ogmor, Thursday, 30 January 2020 16:27 (two months ago) link

I'll seek out that Stanford piece (I'm not familiar with his oeuvre at all tbh).

As ever, don't hesitate to prop up favourite recordings should you have any. I very much admire Jean-Efflam Bavouzet's way with Debussy and the Préludes in particular. And the immortal Michelangeli…

pomenitul, Thursday, 30 January 2020 16:31 (two months ago) link

Voted Book I of the Préludes, where I think Pollini gets it more right* than most (*right as in, "how I think each one should go"). Hope someone throws a bone to Webern's 6 Pieces though - the version on the complete works box conducted by Boulez is controlled hysteria.

Jeff W, Thursday, 30 January 2020 17:35 (two months ago) link

Fair!

pomenitul, Friday, 31 January 2020 14:22 (two months ago) link

pom: Sib recommendations noted, thanks! I do not know e.g. the 4th; for some reason it's the 3rd I've heard the most, and that one is fine by me actually.

anatol_merklich, Friday, 31 January 2020 14:24 (two months ago) link

As far as recordings are concerned, Vänskä and the Lahti SO emphasize the Finnish 'glass of chilled water' aspect of his works, so that may help as well. British conductors in particular make a plodding, backward-looking mess of it and are to be avoided if you're not already sold on the mainstream Sibelius.

pomenitul, Friday, 31 January 2020 14:30 (two months ago) link

Well, mainstream in the UK, that is.

pomenitul, Friday, 31 January 2020 14:32 (two months ago) link

Vanska is overrated imo and at his most valuable in rarities

valet doberman (Jon not Jon), Friday, 31 January 2020 15:20 (two months ago) link

Hard disagree. Except for his Minnesota cycle, which I didn't care for at all.

I'd also rep for Segerstam with the Helsinki Philharmonic.

pomenitul, Friday, 31 January 2020 15:22 (two months ago) link

Yeah, well living in Minnesota is enough to ruin anybody.

🚶‍♂️💨 (Eric H.), Friday, 31 January 2020 15:47 (two months ago) link

The symphonies fared quite well in the 'golden age of stereo' and there are formidable recommendations for almost every piece from that era, yes the digital era brought about more of a focus on the pure cold water angle but the playing itself is often boring, the stereo era outings are often just so much more alive as instrumental playing.

You're right that way too many Sibelius cycles got recorded in the last couple of decades that are simply dull

OK let's do this

SYMPHONIES

1: With its Tchaikovskian/Brucknerian inheritance this is one that was pretty much nailed before CDs came along. Maazel/VPO (NOT later Maazel) for energy and verve, Colin Davis/Boston (NOT Later davis remakes) for all around excellence, Barbirolli/Halle (EMI version) for rough hewn bardic heft
2: Similarly, this is owned by Monteux/LSO, Kajanus (the very first recording from 78s), Barbirolli/RPO, and in the early CD era Jarvi/Gothenburg (NOT the later jarvi DG one) which was the first since Kajanus to understand that the first movement is always played too damn slow.
3: This one had to wait longer to be nailed, the only stereo era recordings I really rate at the highest level are Bernstein/NYPO and Davis/Boston. CD era, this is one that Vanska does very well and it was also knocked out of the park by Olli Mustonen and Thomas Zehetmair. Blomstedt/San Francisco is also very good.
4: Maazel/VPO is still the iciest and most formidable and best recorded (for my sonic tastes). Always avoid all digital-era Maazel. More recently, Segerstam (the one on Ondine not the one on Chandos) kills it here. Vanska's is too slow but interesting.
5: Barbirolli/Halle/EMI and Bernstein/NYPO are amazing here. Celibidache if you can find it. Digitally, Ole Schmidt/LSO is my favorite and this is a piece where the later Colin Davis (LSO Live label) is preferable to earlier in Boston where something is just wrong.
6: Berglund/Helsinki or Berglund/Bournemouth comes closest to getting this most sublime piece just right. Davis/Boston would be my top choice but he's too fast in one of the movements. Beecham (from 78s) is the most musically alive. Saraste's (RCA not Finlandia) was the disc that made me fall in love with Sibelius so special pride of place to that.
7: Maazel/VPO has all the same fierce qualities as the same team's 4th and never fails to slay me. This is the other symphony besides the 5th where elderly Colin Davis on LSO Live hit a transcendent peak. Mravinsky is a must-hear. My favorite of all now is a live radio capture from Charles Munch and the Boston SO but it's not fair to talk about bootlegs.

I'll do the rest of the orchestral works later today

valet doberman (Jon not Jon), Friday, 31 January 2020 15:56 (two months ago) link

Booming post, even though I strongly disagree with most of it. :)

pomenitul, Friday, 31 January 2020 15:59 (two months ago) link

Basically I prefer my Sibelius as muted, frosty, modernist and impersonal as possible.

pomenitul, Friday, 31 January 2020 16:00 (two months ago) link

Vanska’s your dude then! I was a little harsh on him tbf, his 3rd 5th and 6th are very good, but he errs too much on the side of flatness too often

I like Segerstam a lot.

There is no completely recommendable complete cycle, but Berglund/Helsinki is maybe the only one where none of the 7 gets botched

valet doberman (Jon not Jon), Friday, 31 January 2020 16:06 (two months ago) link

Sibelius was commited to a very personal and relentless brand of avant gardeism within the framework of tonality and disallowing himself from ever reaching for strange instrumentation. When he adds a bass clarinet, that’s the equivalent of Mahler rolling out an anvil.

valet doberman (Jon not Jon), Friday, 31 January 2020 16:09 (two months ago) link

Last year when I was sick and wasting away with a very severe flu I put on Symphony No. 4 and suddenly Sibelius clicked for me like never before; I felt physically in tune with this music, when I couldn't bear to listen to most other music. Later it was interesting to read that Sibelius composed it at a time when his health was precarious, having recently had operations to remove throat cancer, and fear of death was much on his mind.

Josefa, Friday, 31 January 2020 16:43 (two months ago) link

not loving that you had a mega flu but loving that post

Luonnatar, the Dryad, the Lizard (Odlan) and parts of the Everyman (Jedermann) music share some of that gnawed vibe

valet doberman (Jon not Jon), Friday, 31 January 2020 17:33 (two months ago) link

Re: Lili Boulanger, it's a lovely little piece, but not top 50 material imho.

Assuming this is in reference to D'un matin de printemps and not to Faust et Helene? Although both were named.

timellison, Tuesday, 4 February 2020 00:22 (two months ago) link

7: Maazel/VPO has all the same fierce qualities as the same team's 4th and never fails to slay me. This is the other symphony besides the 5th where elderly Colin Davis on LSO Live hit a transcendent peak. Mravinsky is a must-hear. My favorite of all now is a live radio capture from Charles Munch and the Boston SO but it's not fair to talk about bootlegs.

I'll do the rest of the orchestral works later today

― valet doberman (Jon not Jon)

interested in hearing more about the munch/boston SO recording, mostly because it's your favourite.. (only recording i could find on youtube was munch conducting the RTF in helsinki)

you know my name, look up the number of the beast (rushomancy), Tuesday, 4 February 2020 01:17 (two months ago) link

Assuming this is in reference to D'un matin de printemps and not to Faust et Helene? Although both were named.

Correct.

toilet-cleaning brain surgeon (pomenitul), Tuesday, 4 February 2020 09:53 (two months ago) link

Automatic thread bump. This poll is closing tomorrow.

System, Wednesday, 5 February 2020 00:01 (two months ago) link

Xpost

I mean it’s my favorite right now because I’m just so bowled over by its singular vision but it wouldn’t really be a “responsible” choice for an “all time favorite” Sibelius 7th - it’s really really slow, almost certainly the slowest ever, like in the 28 minute range; I didn’t think it’d work at all but it does, like crazy. Drama and tension never lets up. It can’t be what Sibelius wanted but it kills.

valet doberman (Jon not Jon), Wednesday, 5 February 2020 01:13 (two months ago) link

wellll i was kind of fishing for a ysi since it's not commercially available :)

you know my name, look up the number of the beast (rushomancy), Wednesday, 5 February 2020 02:11 (two months ago) link

Btw, for the 1920s poll, pls don't forget Heitor Villa-Lobos - Douze études pour guitare. Probably won't defeat the best of Bartok/Webern/Schoenberg but the 11th is still probably my favourite thing to play.

With considerable charm, you still have made a choice (Sund4r), Wednesday, 5 February 2020 02:26 (two months ago) link

Debussy Sonata for Flute, Viola, and Harp is peak music

J. Sam, Wednesday, 5 February 2020 03:20 (two months ago) link

Don't worry Sund4r, I've got you covered. I've got reservations aplenty about Villa-Lobos's output but those Etudes are all-time.

toilet-cleaning brain surgeon (pomenitul), Wednesday, 5 February 2020 09:23 (two months ago) link

Xpost quite possibly my favorite piece of chamber music

valet doberman (Jon not Jon), Wednesday, 5 February 2020 13:56 (two months ago) link

So many cool prototypical and influential ensembles from this general time period

That Debussy trio
The “Pierrot ensemble”
Bartok two pianos and percussion

valet doberman (Jon not Jon), Wednesday, 5 February 2020 13:58 (two months ago) link

OTM

With considerable charm, you still have made a choice (Sund4r), Wednesday, 5 February 2020 14:01 (two months ago) link

Yeah, that's 100% otm.

I'm really struggling here. Might just go with The Oceanides in the end but Vers la flamme is equally tempting (they all are).

toilet-cleaning brain surgeon (pomenitul), Wednesday, 5 February 2020 18:12 (two months ago) link

Fuck it, I'm going with Mahler's 9th, which was probably the most important music ever to me as a 19 year-old.

toilet-cleaning brain surgeon (pomenitul), Wednesday, 5 February 2020 18:14 (two months ago) link

the first movement is about as good as music gets

valet doberman (Jon not Jon), Wednesday, 5 February 2020 18:39 (two months ago) link

Yep. And when Jascha Horenstein is conducting it, the whole thing.

toilet-cleaning brain surgeon (pomenitul), Wednesday, 5 February 2020 18:40 (two months ago) link

i'll give this one to scriabin sonata 10

ciderpress, Wednesday, 5 February 2020 18:44 (two months ago) link

Deserved imo. Which reminds me:

My Tenth Sonata is a sonata of insects. Insects are born from the sun ... they are the kisses of the sun.

Ok Alex.

toilet-cleaning brain surgeon (pomenitul), Wednesday, 5 February 2020 18:47 (two months ago) link

you know he's right

ciderpress, Wednesday, 5 February 2020 18:54 (two months ago) link

I never heard back from mark! Did the description of sprechgesang give you something to process and disagree with?

With considerable charm, you still have made a choice (Sund4r), Wednesday, 5 February 2020 19:03 (two months ago) link

Almost ran out of time again. Somewhat arbitrary late vote for the Ravel (D&C) I had in mind before I even saw the list. Aaargh.

Nag! Nag! Nag!, Wednesday, 5 February 2020 23:46 (two months ago) link

Automatic thread bump. This poll's results are now in.

System, Thursday, 6 February 2020 00:01 (two months ago) link

Poor moonstruck Pierrot.

With considerable charm, you still have made a choice (Sund4r), Thursday, 6 February 2020 03:29 (two months ago) link

Hard to argue with the winner, though.

With considerable charm, you still have made a choice (Sund4r), Thursday, 6 February 2020 03:36 (two months ago) link

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Category:Art_works_that_caused_riots

mookieproof, Thursday, 6 February 2020 03:40 (two months ago) link

I respect Stravinsky far more than I enjoy his music but it's impossible to argue with the Sacre.

toilet-cleaning brain surgeon (pomenitul), Thursday, 6 February 2020 09:02 (two months ago) link

Onwards, fellow travellers:

Wherein We Elect Our Favourite Classical Compositions of… the 1920s

toilet-cleaning brain surgeon (pomenitul), Thursday, 6 February 2020 09:06 (two months ago) link

one month passes...

While I feel the best piece won this poll, I'm now listening to the Ralph Vaughan Williams compositions for the first time and these two here are unbelievably sublime. The Lark Ascending and Fantasia are just magical pieces of music. Possibly a bit on the tail end of fashion given their romantic roots, but good lord what sheer beauty.

octobeard, Tuesday, 24 March 2020 20:57 (two weeks ago) link

yeah they're wonderful, just an absurdly rich decade

ogmor, Tuesday, 24 March 2020 20:59 (two weeks ago) link

Indeed they are, and Arvo Pärt's now ubiquitous compositional style seems unthinkable without the Fantasia in particular. It's tempting to think of Stravinsky (and Prokofiev) as the torchbearers of 'primitivism' in the 1910s, but Vaughan Williams's musical language in these pieces also taps into an imagined 'archaic' consciousness, one grounded in endless melody instead of polyrhythm and not all that dissimilar Erik Satie's own self-consciously naïve experiments in simplicity.

By the way, Andrew Davis's studio recording of the Fantasia with the BBC Symphony Orchestra is stellar, but I think I like this live performance even better:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GpwqZSp_CyM

coco vide (pomenitul), Tuesday, 24 March 2020 21:21 (two weeks ago) link

*dissimilar from

coco vide (pomenitul), Tuesday, 24 March 2020 21:25 (two weeks ago) link

all these last posts otm

Two Gentlemen with the Rona (Noodle Vague), Tuesday, 24 March 2020 21:26 (two weeks ago) link

pom could you suggest a relatively recent piece which exemplifies “Arvo Pärt's now ubiquitous compositional style” and wherein i might hear this RVW influence ?

budo jeru, Tuesday, 24 March 2020 22:29 (two weeks ago) link

I hear echoes of both in Dobrinka Tabakova's music.

coco vide (pomenitul), Tuesday, 24 March 2020 22:36 (two weeks ago) link

Btw Pärt's Silouans Song strikes me as a good example of what he (consciously?) owes to RVW.

coco vide (pomenitul), Tuesday, 24 March 2020 22:38 (two weeks ago) link

The Lark Ascending and Fantasia are just magical pieces of music.

Indeed they are. Thanks for linking to that Davis' recording Pom!

Le Bateau Ivre, Wednesday, 25 March 2020 09:41 (two weeks ago) link


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