DON'T FORGET TO REMEMBER: The Official ILM Track-By-Track BEE GEES 1968-1981 Listening Thread

Message Bookmarked
Bookmark Removed

Put on your 18th century frock coat and/or satin windbreaker and pull up a chair as we explore the dizzying highs and breathtaking lows of over two-decades of the Brothers Gibb! This will probably take the better part of a year, even doing a song a day, so let's get this party started.
https://proxy.duckduckgo.com/iu/?u=http%3A%2F%2F4.bp.blogspot.com%2F-Nae4_TVLdGI%2FTS6nJi6S9EI%2FAAAAAAAABFY%2FYSpEBCMmgjI%2Fs1600%2FDSCF3356.JPG&f=1
(not pictured: the best Bee Gee)

Οὖτις, Friday, 14 December 2018 16:42 (eleven months ago) link

here's a picture of Robin just to be fair
https://proxy.duckduckgo.com/iu/?u=https%3A%2F%2Fi.pinimg.com%2Foriginals%2F2a%2Ff7%2F58%2F2af7580d42646622244602b5cba6e162.jpg&f=1

Οὖτις, Friday, 14 December 2018 16:43 (eleven months ago) link

shit this should be 1967-1981 d'oh

Οὖτις, Friday, 14 December 2018 16:49 (eleven months ago) link

first up, from Bee Gees 1st, "Turn of the Century". In the vein of other late 60s chamber-pop psych pining for bygone eras, fashions, and manners (The Association's "Wasn't It a Bit Like Now", The Hollies "Ye Olde Toffee Shoppe", Tomorrow's "Auntie Mary's Dress Shop" etc.) and yet I think this one harkens *back* the farthest - not just to the 20s or pre-war UK but actually to the previous fucking century. For who among us has not longed for hoop skirts, unwieldy bicycles, and oversized cravats. As with many other tracks on this album, it sounds hastily composed and is not particularly complex and has daft lyrics - but the eerie orchestration, harmonies and finely tuned melodies ultimately sell it. The teary-eyed nostalgia for a vanished British Empire was a mode Robin would return to again and again.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4P9COyXDe4g

Οὖτις, Friday, 14 December 2018 17:38 (eleven months ago) link

*crickets*

Οὖτις, Friday, 14 December 2018 19:08 (eleven months ago) link

Not a great idea to launch this when (seemingly) 90% of ILXors are getting all giddy and light-headed over an indie band from Glasgow.

It's Beginning to Look a Lot Like Christ (Tom D.), Friday, 14 December 2018 19:12 (eleven months ago) link

But, yes, "Turn of the Century", much better than those other songs you cited, not as good as the Bonzos' "The Equestrian Statue" though, which resembles this.

It's Beginning to Look a Lot Like Christ (Tom D.), Friday, 14 December 2018 19:19 (eleven months ago) link

huh didn't know that particular Bonzos track

Οὖτις, Friday, 14 December 2018 19:30 (eleven months ago) link

so many harpsichords, when is someone gonna bring back the harpsichord in pop music

Οὖτις, Friday, 14 December 2018 19:30 (eleven months ago) link

A concert favourite for over 30 years, Maurice Gibb often provided the audience with comedic antics by attempting many failed attempts to join Barry and Robin while singing this song. Evidence of this can be seen in the 1989 "One For All" concert video where Maurice takes a camera from a film cameraman standing nearby and films Barry and Robin as they sing the song.

Who knows what this song is about, really. Beautifully eerie.

https://youtu.be/_hQ1HQh9_JM

Οὖτις, Saturday, 15 December 2018 16:30 (eleven months ago) link

i’m in !!

budo jeru, Saturday, 15 December 2018 16:56 (eleven months ago) link

I'm in too. Coincidentally, I'm writing about these dudes tonight.

Your sweetie-pie-coo-coo I love ya (Alfred, Lord Sotosyn), Saturday, 15 December 2018 17:00 (eleven months ago) link

FUCK YES I'm so glad I suggested this

"Who knows what this song is about" is an excellent question about so many bee gees songs

resident hack (Simon H.), Saturday, 15 December 2018 18:02 (eleven months ago) link

god some of these early songs should really be licensed out for horror soundtracks

resident hack (Simon H.), Saturday, 15 December 2018 18:04 (eleven months ago) link

they have to be the weirdest looking gaggle of freaks ever to become oversexed pop stars

resident hack (Simon H.), Saturday, 15 December 2018 18:07 (eleven months ago) link

"Who knows what this song is about" is an excellent question about so many bee gees songs

I think a lot of them are about fitting any old words that'll do to a good tune, they have written some very weird lyrics over the years.

It's Beginning to Look a Lot Like Christ (Tom D.), Saturday, 15 December 2018 18:28 (eleven months ago) link

I think they were quite good lyricists from time to time, but it’s clear from their demos and recording habits that their overriding priority was always melodies (and harmonies) first and foremost

Οὖτις, Saturday, 15 December 2018 19:37 (eleven months ago) link

imho this is an excellent approach to lyric creation

resident hack (Simon H.), Saturday, 15 December 2018 19:43 (eleven months ago) link

so many harpsichords, when is someone gonna bring back the harpsichord in pop music

something something indie band from Glasgow...

Nag! Nag! Nag!, Sunday, 16 December 2018 11:25 (eleven months ago) link

Oh ffs.

It's Beginning to Look a Lot Like Christ (Tom D.), Sunday, 16 December 2018 12:26 (eleven months ago) link

yknow, I'll be interested when you guys get to tunes that Maurice sang…like I have the 1990 box set, but I can't tell the difference easily between his voice and Barry's, at least in the early years…like what's the most prominent tune he sang? or what's the song that's most his but one of the other two sang? My understanding is that he was the boffin of the three, but there must be something else noteworthy about him…it does seem that Barry was the massively talented one, and Robin was notably toothsome, charmingly awkward…

veronica moser, Sunday, 16 December 2018 13:24 (eleven months ago) link

He only very occasionally had a lead vocal - and I don't think he sounded much like Barry, he didn't have a particularly distinctive voice, he did a good John Lennon impersonation though! I would say the title track of "Trafalgar" is his most prominent vocal?

It's Beginning to Look a Lot Like Christ (Tom D.), Sunday, 16 December 2018 13:50 (eleven months ago) link

I know him best as keyboarist and harmonist.

Your sweetie-pie-coo-coo I love ya (Alfred, Lord Sotosyn), Sunday, 16 December 2018 13:50 (eleven months ago) link

did maurice do lead on "have you heard the word?"

errang (rushomancy), Sunday, 16 December 2018 13:53 (eleven months ago) link

(xp) Bass player!

It's Beginning to Look a Lot Like Christ (Tom D.), Sunday, 16 December 2018 13:55 (eleven months ago) link

Of course. Less so on later albums.

Your sweetie-pie-coo-coo I love ya (Alfred, Lord Sotosyn), Sunday, 16 December 2018 13:58 (eleven months ago) link

One odd thing about Barry Gibb, of course, is that he plays in Open D tuning. Worth remembering if you're trying to learn Bee Gees songs on guitar!

It's Beginning to Look a Lot Like Christ (Tom D.), Sunday, 16 December 2018 14:07 (eleven months ago) link

Today’s entry, more flutes and mellotron and some nonsense lyrics about childhood (afaict). A goat appears to have snuck into the studio towards the end. To me, this one always feels a little bit of a piece w Syd Barrett’s similar obsession w fairytales, nursery rhyme sorta stuff (albeit w out the same level of creepy undertow)
https://youtu.be/AldVXUgCY1Q

Οὖτις, Sunday, 16 December 2018 16:06 (eleven months ago) link

This possibly their most psychedelic track, though there's a lot of them - it's brilliant anyway.

It's Beginning to Look a Lot Like Christ (Tom D.), Sunday, 16 December 2018 19:23 (eleven months ago) link

By the way, to return to the earlier discussion on Maurice's contribution to the band, I believe he's responsible for the mellotron on this and other tracks.

It's Beginning to Look a Lot Like Christ (Tom D.), Sunday, 16 December 2018 19:26 (eleven months ago) link

Yeah his bass and keyboard playing is p distinctive. Not sure what his first lead vocal is - one of his tracks from odessa or cucumber castle maybe?

Οὖτις, Sunday, 16 December 2018 19:59 (eleven months ago) link

And four songs into the first album we finally get something with a relatively conventional lyrical POV, and one the bros would mine extensively - the pleading lover. Musically I don't think it's that distinctive from other orchestral balladry of the era, but it's not bad. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fuvGSWU5xw0

Οὖτις, Monday, 17 December 2018 16:28 (eleven months ago) link

Who are those other 2 rando's on the cover of this album? Also, is Maurice getting a message on one of those secret service earpieces, or did he just have a toothache?

enochroot, Monday, 17 December 2018 18:45 (eleven months ago) link

the other two are the drummer (Colin Petersen) and the lead guitarist (Vince Melouney)

Οὖτις, Monday, 17 December 2018 18:46 (eleven months ago) link

wiki implies that Maurice's first solo vocal turns are on Odessa ("Suddenly", where you can definitely tell him apart from Barry and Robin; less so on "I Laugh in Your Face")

Οὖτις, Monday, 17 December 2018 18:48 (eleven months ago) link

(xp) Yes, they were a fully-fledged band by the time they got (back) to the UK.

It's Beginning to Look a Lot Like Christ (Tom D.), Monday, 17 December 2018 18:51 (eleven months ago) link

Could "In My Own Time" be them at their most beatlesque? The bass line definitely bears a strong resemblance to Taxman.

enochroot, Monday, 17 December 2018 18:53 (eleven months ago) link

no skipping ahead!

Οὖτις, Monday, 17 December 2018 18:54 (eleven months ago) link

(but yes)

Οὖτις, Monday, 17 December 2018 18:54 (eleven months ago) link

My bad - i have no idea how these listening threads work... someone mentioned "One Minute Woman" already, but there was no mention of "Holiday".

enochroot, Monday, 17 December 2018 18:56 (eleven months ago) link

They're not exactly short of Beatleseque tracks.

It's Beginning to Look a Lot Like Christ (Tom D.), Monday, 17 December 2018 18:58 (eleven months ago) link

"Holiday" was posted on Saturday
xp

Οὖτις, Monday, 17 December 2018 19:31 (eleven months ago) link

Missed it too, great song, great non-ovine vocal from Robin too.

It's Beginning to Look a Lot Like Christ (Tom D.), Monday, 17 December 2018 19:35 (eleven months ago) link

Ah, so it's a track a day. Got it.
(i'll save my Taxman/Doctor Robert comparisons for tomorrow)

enochroot, Monday, 17 December 2018 20:41 (eleven months ago) link

I can skip tracks on weekends, if ppl aren't around as much

Οὖτις, Monday, 17 December 2018 20:53 (eleven months ago) link

I almost missed this! Yay! Bookmarking so I can join in. Thanks for starting this up Shakey... we are in for QUITE a journey I think! :D

Squeaky Fromage (VegemiteGrrl), Monday, 17 December 2018 20:55 (eleven months ago) link

I missed the start of this as well. Cool idea – tho maybe we should name the song explicitly? Esp. since the song titles don’t show up if using the app and they’re embedded in videos.

Anyway...

Turn of the Century – not much I have to add to Οὖτις’s take on this.

Holiday –

Who knows what this song is about, really. Beautifully eerie.

Yeah no idea but Robin singing about puppets and repeating “Throwing stones” in a descending melodic turn defines melancholy. The first Robin classic if not a three-hanky one.

Red Chair Fadeaway – I love the “IIIIII can feel/The speaking sky” twist of the chorus. There are bits here near the end of the choruses where the melody drops away and the drums and bass keep pounding away and there are little trumpet flourishes that have, yeah, a real Revolver/the tape is still rolling feel. But the whole thing feels a little too “psychedelia for your auntie” to be mistaken for that record.

One Minute Woman – not sure I have much to say beyond that it’s one of Barry’s earliest soul tunes and fairly successful for what it is.

Naive Teen Idol, Monday, 17 December 2018 21:25 (eleven months ago) link

Great thread. I don't expect to add much but will listen with pleasure.

Ned Trifle X, Monday, 17 December 2018 21:28 (eleven months ago) link

yeah sorry, I will add the songtitles in posts from now on!

Οὖτις, Monday, 17 December 2018 21:34 (eleven months ago) link

so.

much.

harischord

Squeaky Fromage (VegemiteGrrl), Monday, 17 December 2018 22:50 (eleven months ago) link

their European appeal is definitely... something

Οὖτις, Tuesday, 29 October 2019 22:18 (two weeks ago) link

Track No. 176: Wildflower ("Living Eyes", 1981)
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uxVxDWZAYmY

Is it possible that Maurice delivers the best track on this album? Maybe! Lyrically it has a few less clunkers than the other tracks, and the relatively uncluttered arrangement is refreshing, the various elements are all given space to dip in and out. Anchored by the layered 12-string acoustic guitars and a restrained rhythm section, the overall effect isn't too far from other country-pop of the era, just with maybe a few more Beatle-isms inevitably thrown in (primarily thinking of that chiming lead electric guitar sound). Vocally the boys are in fine form, and the coda in particular with the overlapping melody lines is pretty sweet. Still, it feels a little sleight - the hook is not particularly memorable and it feels like the band was throwing more Maurice a bone, but at least his craftsmanship still shines through.

Οὖτις, Thursday, 31 October 2019 18:34 (two weeks ago) link

Yes, this album is not exactly great - so far anyway, though I'm not holding my breath in anticipation of any massive improvement in quality in the tracks still to come. In a way it's a bit like some of the lost 70s years album in that it seems entirely rudderless. It's slightly weird hearing Robin lead vocals after all this time, I think his 80s solo albums, which are really Robin + Maurice albums, are better than this though - certainly the first one is. Is the Maurice track the first time the Bee Gees have ever shown any Beach Boys influences?

Michael Oliver of Penge Wins £5 (Tom D.), Thursday, 31 October 2019 21:49 (two weeks ago) link

funny you should mention the Beach Boys, it hadn't occurred to me but the aimless, vaseline-on-the-lens, proto-yacht vibe they seem inclined to is def reminiscent of the late 70s BB albums in various ways.

But I think you have to go all the way back to the 60s stuff ("Please Read Me" in particular) for other signs of detectable BBs influence.

Οὖτις, Thursday, 31 October 2019 22:14 (two weeks ago) link

shit, just realized we skipped the "Too Much Heaven" b-side (the country ballad "Rest Your Love on Me") many posts back. oh well. It's good.

Οὖτις, Thursday, 31 October 2019 22:47 (two weeks ago) link

Or Track No. 164-B, as it’s known for administrative purposes :-)

breastcrawl, Friday, 1 November 2019 07:06 (two weeks ago) link

Yeah the vocal melody at 2:58 in Wildflower has pretty strong Brian Wilson vibes.

enochroot, Friday, 1 November 2019 13:44 (two weeks ago) link

Track No. 177: Nothing Could Be Good ("Living Eyes", 1981)
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dAQf0qEzSms

The grammatical error in the title really bothers me (it should be "nothing could be AS good"), but that's a minor quibble compared to the song's overall garden variety easy listening schmaltz. It's very much in step with the times - there was a *lot* of this kind of shit on the radio in the late 70s/early 80s as boomers retreated into middle aged suburban stupor - it's just disappointing in its utter anonymity and formlessness. Nothing unusual or interesting happens, nothing unique to the Gibb brothers is on display, it's just this fluffy, bland, airbrushed "elevator music". You can't hum the melody, you can't recall the words, you can't dance to it, your eyes just glaze over.

Οὖτις, Friday, 1 November 2019 16:46 (two weeks ago) link

Track No. 178: ("Living Eyes", 1981)
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-S4_bJlamT0

Synth shuffle! We're definitely in 80s territory now, Robin transposing his standard approaches onto a different sonic template, which he would further explore on his solo albums with Maurice. The juxtaposition of Robin's theatrical vibrato against New Wave is.... interesting. Things are kinda working until Barry crashes into the song with his bridge melody and rhythmic switchups, and then it feels like the song is rolling downhill and off a cliff. It feels like the song gets crushed under the weight of too many awkward key changes. Some cool backing vocals buried in the mix under the arpeggiated synthesizers.

Οὖτις, Monday, 4 November 2019 16:50 (two weeks ago) link

Yes, this album is a bit of dog.

Michael Oliver of Penge Wins £5 (Tom D.), Monday, 4 November 2019 18:29 (two weeks ago) link

lol I see I didn't even bother to include the title of the song in my last post

That was "Cryin' Every Day" at no. 178.

Οὖτις, Monday, 4 November 2019 19:57 (two weeks ago) link

We're so close to the end. Tomorrow is the final track in our survey :(

Οὖτις, Monday, 4 November 2019 22:36 (two weeks ago) link

I hope we've all learned some important lessons.

Οὖτις, Monday, 4 November 2019 22:39 (two weeks ago) link

Eh? You've got six more albums to get through!

Michael Oliver of Penge Wins £5 (Tom D.), Monday, 4 November 2019 22:59 (two weeks ago) link

The Official ILM Track-By-Track BEE GEES 1968-1981 Listening Thread

Οὖτις, Monday, 4 November 2019 23:02 (two weeks ago) link

there's a 6-year gap between Living Eyes and their next "reunion" record, it's a natural cut off point

Οὖτις, Monday, 4 November 2019 23:02 (two weeks ago) link

LOL shows how much attention I've paid to the title of the thread.

Michael Oliver of Penge Wins £5 (Tom D.), Monday, 4 November 2019 23:06 (two weeks ago) link

I think this album has killed off my enthusiasm for any continuation of the project tbh.

Michael Oliver of Penge Wins £5 (Tom D.), Monday, 4 November 2019 23:07 (two weeks ago) link

I just felt like the gap was kind of difficult to ignore/navigate - go through all the solo albums/side projects/songs for others in the interim? There's interesting stuff in there but I dunno if would be worth it

Οὖτις, Monday, 4 November 2019 23:08 (two weeks ago) link

You mean like Barry's collaboration with Sleazy of Throbbing Gristle/Coil fame, for instance?

Michael Oliver of Penge Wins £5 (Tom D.), Monday, 4 November 2019 23:10 (two weeks ago) link

of course not. I was referring to this
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=D8WSSG3UzwU

Οὖτις, Monday, 4 November 2019 23:16 (two weeks ago) link

I have no idea why I haven't contributed enough, but I wanna shout out my love for Spirits Having Flown's title track. I love the keyboard hook.

TikTok to the (Alfred, Lord Sotosyn), Monday, 4 November 2019 23:18 (two weeks ago) link

I quite like the 80s Robin albums, I mean, diminishing returns by the final one, but they're still better than "Living Eyes".

Michael Oliver of Penge Wins £5 (Tom D.), Monday, 4 November 2019 23:31 (two weeks ago) link

"Boys Fall in Love" would've been touching in 1983 as a A Flock of Seagulls or Peter Schilling knockoff: a lonely planet boy riding to earth on synths.

TikTok to the (Alfred, Lord Sotosyn), Monday, 4 November 2019 23:33 (two weeks ago) link

Robin is the original lonely guy just thinking baout things.

Michael Oliver of Penge Wins £5 (Tom D.), Monday, 4 November 2019 23:37 (two weeks ago) link

oh shit

Οὖτις, Monday, 4 November 2019 23:37 (two weeks ago) link

omfg are we really up to "spirits having flown"

i have so much catching up to do

tantric societal collapse (rushomancy), Tuesday, 5 November 2019 00:39 (one week ago) link

That was a whole album ago

Οὖτις, Tuesday, 5 November 2019 00:42 (one week ago) link

Track No. 179: Be Who You Are ("Living Eyes", 1981)
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nwyEE9ExD2o

In yet another stylistic left-turn, this song opens with an extended and sumptuous orchestral introduction (over 2 minutes long!) worthy of Robin's more grandiose moments. When Barry finally enters it's just his isolated vocal and a bit of electric guitar, with strings and piano gradually creeping back in and building up through the first verse. Barry's melody is kind of all over the place; he leaps from his lower register all the way into his falsetto more than once, and by the first chorus we are solidly in 80s power ballad territory complete with melodramatic power chords and plodding drums. Wordless harmonies come in, doubling by violins, towards the end of the second verse (or is it a chorus? the structure of this one kind of eludes me with its endless crescendos and diminuendos). The 80s gloss on this type of overblown balladry feels a little off to my ears, maybe this would've worked better with a more roughly hewn early 70s-type sound, there's at least half of a good hook somewhere in Barry's lead melody but it gets lost. An album closer that reaches for epic but doesn't quite get there.

This album is a bookend for the second phase of their career. I wish I could say we were ending this survey on a high note, but let's face it this album is pretty bad. They still had quality material in them - the 80s hits they penned for others are generally very high quality ("Islands in the Stream" obviously at the top of that heap), plus weird solo experiments and a certain white-jumpsuited duet smash hit, and they would regroup and return to the charts again towards the end of the decade. But by 1981 they were exhausted, adrift, and feeling like more of a running joke than one of the most successful bands ever. By this point, thankfully, I think some measure of critical rehabilitation has set in; they've always had a massive fanbase in Europe, and the hits from their peak eras are undeniable.

RIP Robin and Maurice.

Οὖτις, Tuesday, 5 November 2019 16:44 (one week ago) link

*crickets*

― Οὖτις, Friday, December 14, 2018 11:08 AM (ten months ago) bookmarkflaglink

Οὖτις, Tuesday, 5 November 2019 20:40 (one week ago) link

Don't really know what they're trying to do with that closing track but I suppose it's different. I hope people re-visit this thread, if only to listen to some Bee Gees (how) deep (are your) cuts!

Michael Oliver of Penge Wins £5 (Tom D.), Tuesday, 5 November 2019 21:23 (one week ago) link

This album feels like a compilation of random leftovers from other albums

Οὖτις, Tuesday, 5 November 2019 21:37 (one week ago) link

That final song sounds like compilation of random leftovers from other albums.

Michael Oliver of Penge Wins £5 (Tom D.), Tuesday, 5 November 2019 21:38 (one week ago) link

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=x5eLLmpulqI

Οὖτις, Tuesday, 5 November 2019 21:41 (one week ago) link

what a strange trip it's been
Thanks for your tenacity, shakey, I have heard some pretty, pretty odd music via this thread, and I wouldn't have otherwise.

an incoherent crustacean (MatthewK), Tuesday, 5 November 2019 22:51 (one week ago) link

Yeah, this has been a super-fun thread. Thanks for doing it! Any other bands you'd want to do this for?

DJI, Wednesday, 6 November 2019 01:27 (one week ago) link

Me? lol no I’m takin a break

Οὖτις, Wednesday, 6 November 2019 01:41 (one week ago) link

OK, having sorted through this thread here's my pick of Bee Gees' deep cuts. "Children of the World" I know was technically a hit but since I managed to go 43 years never having heard it before I'm going to classify it as a "deep cut".

How Deep Are Your Cuts? The Bee Gees 1967-1979

Record 1: The 1960s

Side 1:
Cucumber Castle
Every Christian Lion-Hearted Man Will Show You
I Close My Eyes
Sinking Ships
Down To Earth
Out of Line

Side 2:
Kilburn Towers
Indian Gin and Whisky Dry
Swan Song
Edison
Odessa (City on the Black Sea)

Record 2: The 1970s

Side 3:
The Greatest Man in the World
It's Just the Way
Paper Mache, Cabbages & Kings
Please Don't Turn Out the Lights
Dogs

Side 4:
Charade
I Can't Let You Go
Lovers
Children of the World
Until

Note: I didn't listen to every single song posted to the thread...

tantric societal collapse (rushomancy), Wednesday, 6 November 2019 02:08 (one week ago) link

Charade? For real?

Οὖτις, Wednesday, 6 November 2019 02:13 (one week ago) link

I like clarinet solos.

tantric societal collapse (rushomancy), Wednesday, 6 November 2019 03:03 (one week ago) link

If this collection was ever released that would make two albums I'd have to skip "Charade" on.

Michael Oliver of Penge Wins £5 (Tom D.), Wednesday, 6 November 2019 07:36 (one week ago) link

whatever, you probably don't like benny goodman either

it did occur to me reading this thread that the osmonds literally rock harder than the bee gees. that's pretty impressive.

tantric societal collapse (rushomancy), Thursday, 7 November 2019 01:07 (one week ago) link

Thanks for this whole thing, Οὖτις! I was quietly reading and listening along to this oddness almost all the way through. (Though I think I de-lurked a bit before realising I was never really saying anything.) Cheers!

Nag! Nag! Nag!, Thursday, 7 November 2019 05:04 (one week ago) link

it did occur to me reading this thread that the osmonds literally rock harder than the bee gees. that's pretty impressive.

You can almost count all the instances of the Bee Gees legit "rocking" on one hand:
Heavy Breathing
In My Own Time
Such a Shame
Idea
Back Home
Bad Bad Dreams
Down the Road

Οὖτις, Thursday, 7 November 2019 17:18 (one week ago) link

Even after following along with this thread, it wasn't apparent to me just how popular the Bee Gee's were prior to their falsetto reinvention, but this data visualization really drove it home:
https://youtu.be/a3w8I8boc_I

They were one of the top 10 selling artists for most of the 70's (i.e. the first 2 minutes of the video)
Didn't realize the Odessa/Trafalgar/Tin Can period sold so well.

enochroot, Monday, 11 November 2019 01:07 (one week ago) link

I would guess a lot of that is back catalog sales actually. None of those albums sold particularly well.

Οὖτις, Monday, 11 November 2019 02:14 (one week ago) link

Although Lonely Days and How Can You Mend a Broken Heart were big hits in the US

Οὖτις, Monday, 11 November 2019 02:16 (one week ago) link

that data visualization is fun to look at and doesn't even remotely track with reality.

fact checking cuz, Monday, 11 November 2019 09:15 (one week ago) link

That's why you're my fact-checkin' cuz

enochroot, Monday, 11 November 2019 14:05 (one week ago) link


You must be logged in to post. Please either login here, or if you are not registered, you may register here.