Aging rock act on new album: This time we wanted to go back to the basics

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Seems like every other issue of RS features a legacy act describing their new album as a return to basics, or something similar. I feel like I've seen Dave Grohl and Bono do so recently but can't find the quotes. Hopefully this Muse statement, even if it is slightly anti-album, can serve as inspiration to get the thread rolling:

https://i.imgur.com/5T3KfOi.jpg

But in a radical twist, they have decided to lose the high concepts and release new songs individually weeks after recording them (...) "It reminds me of when the band first started..."

This thread should also have room for quotes in the spirit of "we went into the studio with 300 new songs and in the end only 14 made the cut"

niels, Wednesday, 7 March 2018 18:23 (three months ago) Permalink

i'm into this radical new idea of just focusing on one song at a time.

and in my opinionation, the sun is gonna surely shine♪♫ (Karl Malone), Wednesday, 7 March 2018 18:24 (three months ago) Permalink

"..and release new songs individually weeks after recording them .."

didn't Ash try this approach for a while ?

mark e, Wednesday, 7 March 2018 18:33 (three months ago) Permalink

here's Grohl on the latest Foo Fighters:

So we were like, ‘God, if we were to record again, how are we going switch it up?’ For us to switch it up right now (whistles) would be to go into the studio and make a record like a normal band. That kind of became the focus, it was like alright, now that we can sort of shed that other stuff and just write songs and record them in a studio as you do.”

https://www.alternativenation.net/dave-grohl-reveals-foo-fighters-will-switch-new-album-sonic-highways-dead/

niels, Wednesday, 7 March 2018 18:41 (three months ago) Permalink

wait, what were they doing before? not writing songs and recording them on the moon?

scott seward, Wednesday, 7 March 2018 18:45 (three months ago) Permalink

seattle grunge rocker rob halford will tell you that it isn't always so easy to go back to basics.

https://scontent-lga3-1.xx.fbcdn.net/v/t1.0-9/28685635_10156694694627137_7491661337674484406_n.jpg?oh=262fb34b4144f30bdf1ec04eae601257&oe=5B44A395

scott seward, Wednesday, 7 March 2018 18:46 (three months ago) Permalink

haha, I love that image

niels, Wednesday, 7 March 2018 18:50 (three months ago) Permalink

This is Wire since they came back for the 2nd time, isn't it?

Buff Jeckley (Tom D.), Wednesday, 7 March 2018 18:51 (three months ago) Permalink

Flagpole: This interview is about your new album, but since it hasn't been released yet, can you tell us something about it?

Michael Stipe: Well, it's a lot louder than the last three records. It's
very raw, and, uh, punk rock. It's kind of in-your-face.

mookieproof, Wednesday, 7 March 2018 18:58 (three months ago) Permalink

Joe Strummer on Cut the Crap

"We wanted to strip it down, back to punk rock roots"
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=O12XU0KS8fU

kornrulez6969, Wednesday, 7 March 2018 18:58 (three months ago) Permalink

Ha, that Grohl quote is priceless! Pure Spinal Tap.

Full of bile and Blue Nile denial (Turrican), Wednesday, 7 March 2018 19:08 (three months ago) Permalink

I'm guessing mookieproof's Stipe qupte relates to Monster.

Full of bile and Blue Nile denial (Turrican), Wednesday, 7 March 2018 19:10 (three months ago) Permalink

*quote, even.

Full of bile and Blue Nile denial (Turrican), Wednesday, 7 March 2018 19:10 (three months ago) Permalink

Was searching for a Nick Cave quote, circa Nocturama and Grinderman, on writing and recording quickly. Fifth google result already bled into Pixies interviews:

https://dailycollegian.com/2017/09/a-conversation-with-the-pixies-joey-santiago/

DC: Your new record “Head Carrier” sonically builds off the new addition of Bassist Paz Lenchantin. I’m wondering what it was like to get into the studio with her? Did she contribute anything new to the Pixies sonically?

JS: Yes, of course she did. Her suggestions and her arrangement ideas. When we got into the studio with Paz, it was time to get back to basics, whatever that meant with us. We didn’t have to work hard at finding a new connection. When we start making music, it’s just making music. There’s no thought or pressure involved in it. If it’s good, it’s good. If it’s bad it’s bad. That was our only criterion.

Mungolian Jerryset (bendy), Wednesday, 7 March 2018 19:19 (three months ago) Permalink

Talking of Spinal Tap, here's Scouting For Girls on how people don't want to watch them play anymore because they're shit:

We’ve gone back to basics and we’re playing Academies and smaller venues, it’s all very intimate and we much prefer playing the smaller venues. We love being on the road and seeing the country.

By the way, in the same interview they actually do talk about going back to basics in the recording of their new album, they use the phrase back to basics twice in the same interview, but that's enough from Scouting For Girls.

Buff Jeckley (Tom D.), Wednesday, 7 March 2018 19:31 (three months ago) Permalink

i swear every single new U2 album has a quote from Bono that's akin to, "we just wanted to get back to the sound of four guys in a room playing."

omar little, Wednesday, 7 March 2018 19:34 (three months ago) Permalink

came here to post about u2, beaten to the punch

War, Famine, Pestilence, Death, Umami (bizarro gazzara), Wednesday, 7 March 2018 19:40 (three months ago) Permalink

I'm sure there is a Chris Frantz quote about getting back to basics before Little Creatures was released. Google (or my memory) is failing me.

that's not my post, Wednesday, 7 March 2018 19:57 (three months ago) Permalink

U2 find it impossible to make an album that sounds like that, which is the funniest thing about it.

(xxxposts)

Full of bile and Blue Nile denial (Turrican), Wednesday, 7 March 2018 19:57 (three months ago) Permalink

someone mentioned Stipe but i was gonna say there's at least a couple R.E.M. records that qualify for this, right?

alpine static, Wednesday, 7 March 2018 21:24 (three months ago) Permalink

"back to basics is the death of romance" --Stephin Merritt

geoffreyess, Wednesday, 7 March 2018 21:41 (three months ago) Permalink

bill wyman's bass is v cool

It's not delivery, it's Adorno! (upper mississippi sh@kedown), Wednesday, 7 March 2018 22:02 (three months ago) Permalink

someone mentioned Stipe but i was gonna say there's at least a couple R.E.M. records that qualify for this, right?

― alpine static, Wednesday, March 7, 2018 9:24 PM (fifty-two minutes ago) Bookmark Flag Post Permalink

Yeah that quote Mookieproof posted refers to Monster (as Turrican guessed) but I automatically assumed it was Accelerate...

Gavin, Leeds, Wednesday, 7 March 2018 22:19 (three months ago) Permalink

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=p6gKe9Fr2ok

Brad C., Wednesday, 7 March 2018 23:20 (three months ago) Permalink

go into the studio and make a record like a normal band
go into the studio and make a record like a normal band
go into the studio and make a record like a normal band
go into the studio and make a record like a normal band
go into the studio and make a record like a normal band
go into the studio and make a record like a normal band
go into the studio and make a record like a normal band

calstars, Wednesday, 7 March 2018 23:39 (three months ago) Permalink

Ok I Googled "back to their roots" in Goog News and here's what I found:

Of Mice & Men go back to their roots on new material -
“I think what we’re doing right now, which is the most important thing that we can, is really just honing in on the elements of what makes our music sound like our music.”

25 YEARS AGO: BON JOVI RESTART THEIR CAREER WITH ‘KEEP THE FAITH’ -
“We needed to find ourselves individually,” he said. “The Bon Jovi situation was extremely successful, and I was very happy to be in a band of that stature, but there was almost nothing left to write about at that point — we were all just so tired and so burnt out. All we were writing about was bein’ on the road and bein’ in a hotel room and bein’ lonely and talkin’ to your girlfriend on the phone. They miss you and you miss them — that was what our lives were about at that time.
“So to actually take a step back and see what was happening in our lives gave us some more stuff to write about. Plus, all of a sudden I was working with people like Eric Clapton and Tony Levin from Peter Gabriel, and Jon was workin’ with Elton John and Jeff Beck, so workin’ with all these different artists gave us different influences, which we brought back to Bon Jovi. It made it fresh and brand-new, and we were excited to be with each other again."

kurt schwitterz, Wednesday, 7 March 2018 23:49 (three months ago) Permalink

Every huge artist has their "Keep the Faith"

mookieproof, Thursday, 8 March 2018 00:58 (three months ago) Permalink

Future historians will explain all culture - indeed, all of history - primarily through the lens of Bon Jovi's discography.

John F. Kennedy was the American presidency's "New Jersey."

"The Winter's Tale" is Shakespeare's "Keep the Faith."

The Ford Model T is the "Slippery When Wet" of cars.

Stonewall Jackson's famous flank march at the Battle of Chancellorsville was the Confederacy's "Have a Nice Day."

tater totalitarian (Ye Mad Puffin), Thursday, 8 March 2018 01:18 (three months ago) Permalink

We needed to find ourselves individually
We needed to find ourselves individually
We needed to find ourselves individually
We needed to find ourselves individually
We needed to find ourselves individually

calstars, Thursday, 8 March 2018 01:35 (three months ago) Permalink

actually my favorite Bono-ism on this front is referring to Achtung Baby as "the sound of four men chopping down the Joshua Tree."

omar little, Thursday, 8 March 2018 01:40 (three months ago) Permalink

suck on that, eno

mookieproof, Thursday, 8 March 2018 01:54 (three months ago) Permalink

There's some serious g-droppin' goin' on in that Bon Jovi quote

doug watson, Thursday, 8 March 2018 14:08 (three months ago) Permalink

also rofling at Puffin's history lesson through the lens of the BJ discography

doug watson, Thursday, 8 March 2018 14:09 (three months ago) Permalink

Never said by Yes, Tangerine Dream, or Gentle Giant.

clemenza, Thursday, 8 March 2018 14:11 (three months ago) Permalink

This thread should also have room for quotes in the spirit of "we went into the studio with 300 new songs and in the end only 14 made the cut"

ahah, I have always hated these comments.
Especially when you hear how shitty the remaining 14 tracks are, most of the times... makes you wonder what the other 286 sounded like !

AlXTC from Paris, Thursday, 8 March 2018 14:15 (three months ago) Permalink

Animal Collective: 'We wrote our new album as a rock band'

Asked how it differed from their previous albums, Weitz said: “We all moved back to Baltimore, the last few records we’ve written apart and by sending each other stuff. This time we all wanted to write in the same room together. We went back to our roots and we got a little practice space in this barn on Josh’s [Dibb – fellow band member] mum’s property and it was like being a garage band again.”

This one we wrote as a rock band in a room and we wanted to record it that way.”

... (Eazy), Thursday, 8 March 2018 14:18 (three months ago) Permalink

and yeah, the original "back to basics" move was the Beatles' Get Back sessions, surely.
Or maybe the Stones' Beggars Banquet, actually.

AlXTC from Paris, Thursday, 8 March 2018 14:18 (three months ago) Permalink

^^ bonus points for "a barn" xpost

... (Eazy), Thursday, 8 March 2018 14:19 (three months ago) Permalink

and yeah, the original "back to basics" move was the Beatles' Get Back sessions, surely.

― AlXTC from Paris

wasn't this inspired by the Basement Tapes?

ziggy the ginhead (rushomancy), Thursday, 8 March 2018 14:25 (three months ago) Permalink

While the band's two albums for Sony have been rockers, Ness says Social Distortion plans to turn it up a notch for its next studio effort.

"I'm about half way through writing the new album and on it I'm going to stray away a little bit from the country and blues influence and I'm digging back to that late '70s feel. It's a personal thing I gotta do. I just want a real hard-edged, stake-our-claim, back-to-our-roots record.

"It's like, 'Hey, you flannel-wearing, pony-tail, pierced-nose kid. I took beatings so you could dress the way you dress and we were doing this long before any of these other people were doing it,"' says Ness.

how's life, Thursday, 8 March 2018 14:26 (three months ago) Permalink

not an album but an early back-to-basics move: Elvis' 1968 comeback special

Brad C., Thursday, 8 March 2018 14:29 (three months ago) Permalink

yeah, I thought about the Basement Tapes but how was it wasn't really a return to bacics, was it ? It wasn't Dylan going back to his folk songs alone with his guitar...

AlXTC from Paris, Thursday, 8 March 2018 14:31 (three months ago) Permalink

the unspoken truism here presumably being that layman's-terms descriptions of the recording process are fundamentally dull

like, I'm struggling to think of a plausible summary of one which wouldn't invoke some form of music biz cliche

suspect the audience that things like the OP are written for is now small and stubborn enough that if this kind of thing got excised from the 'big band with new album' narrative entirely they would be sore about it just because it's a thing that one expects to read

thirst trap your hare (DJ Mencap), Thursday, 8 March 2018 14:31 (three months ago) Permalink

ouch sorry : but it wasn't really a return to bacics, was it ?

AlXTC from Paris, Thursday, 8 March 2018 14:32 (three months ago) Permalink

Some bands get back to basics differently than others.

"For us, we wanted to go back to our roots. So we said, yeah, let's go to a house like the Stones and Led Zeppelin used to do. Let's just do our own project and have some fun.

"So, we rented a house in Spain, a villa overlooking the sea, and that allowed us to make a really free sounding record. I mean, on Hysteria, I remember spending a month recording just one guitar riff. On Slang the emphasis was on the song, the inspiration for it, the vibe.

"We wanted it to have more the feel of classic albums by bands we liked, like the Stones or Zeppelin."

how's life, Thursday, 8 March 2018 14:35 (three months ago) Permalink

Also, wondering about artists with a very strong and long back catalog but who NEVER did the "back to basic" move : Prince (I'm not too sure about his 90s output) ? Bowie ? Stevie Wonder ?

AlXTC from Paris, Thursday, 8 March 2018 14:35 (three months ago) Permalink

yeah, I thought about the Basement Tapes but how was it wasn't really a return to bacics, was it ? It wasn't Dylan going back to his folk songs alone with his guitar...

― AlXTC from Paris

as good an explanation as any for why the "basement tapes" don't suck but every single "back to basics" record it inspired does

ziggy the ginhead (rushomancy), Thursday, 8 March 2018 14:37 (three months ago) Permalink

Wasn't Hours Bowie's Back to Basics?

Colonel Poo, Thursday, 8 March 2018 14:39 (three months ago) Permalink

I'm sure Bowie did this, he tried virtually everything else post-Scary Monsters.

Buff Jeckley (Tom D.), Thursday, 8 March 2018 14:41 (three months ago) Permalink

I feel like Presence kind of fills this whole for LZ with its couple of throwbacks. But I don’t think they would be cheesy enough to announce it as such.

calstars, Friday, 9 March 2018 00:09 (three months ago) Permalink

^^Page has said in recent years that he and Bonham were discussing a back to basics approach for the obviously never realized first 80s Zep album.

...some of y'all too woke to function (C. Grisso/McCain), Friday, 9 March 2018 00:38 (three months ago) Permalink

the 1980 europe tour was a "back to basics" tour! (and it was terrible.)

ziggy the ginhead (rushomancy), Friday, 9 March 2018 01:03 (three months ago) Permalink

^^Page has said in recent years that he and Bonham were discussing a back to basics approach for the obviously never realized first 80s Zep album.

― ...some of y'all too woke to function (C. Grisso/McCain),

Totally understandable plan after soldiering through a 5th take of the synth soufflé of carouselambra

calstars, Friday, 9 March 2018 02:16 (three months ago) Permalink

Let’s not start saying things we’re bound to regret later on.

Scam jam, thank you ma’am (Sparkle Motion), Friday, 9 March 2018 02:57 (three months ago) Permalink

I feel like Presence kind of fills this whole for LZ with its couple of throwbacks. But I don’t think they would be cheesy enough to announce it as such.

― calstars, Thursday, March 8, 2018 6:09 PM (yesterday) Bookmark Flag Post Permalink

Presence is the way it is because the band was nearly dead, exhausted from drugs and death and injury, Plant literally singing from a wheelchair, Page smacked out of his gourd. It's also an intensely weird and gloomy album and hard for me to say "back to basics" a) because what the hell is basics for such an omnivorous band and b) it literally starts with perhaps the apex of their Wagnerian epics "Achilles Last Stand"

It's not delivery, it's Adorno! (upper mississippi sh@kedown), Friday, 9 March 2018 14:47 (three months ago) Permalink

let's not forget "this is my most personal record yet"

algorithm is a dancer (katherine), Friday, 9 March 2018 15:07 (three months ago) Permalink

And the "maturity album" (which might be a bit weird for an ageing rock act...)

AlXTC from Paris, Friday, 9 March 2018 15:11 (three months ago) Permalink

The maturity back to basics most personal album is a narrow category.

AlXTC from Paris, Friday, 9 March 2018 15:12 (three months ago) Permalink

feel like Weezer are always half assing this look now with the "White Album" "Green Album" "Black Album" always hearkening back to their one good record that everyone liked

Hazy Maze Cave (Adam Bruneau), Friday, 9 March 2018 15:36 (three months ago) Permalink

Sea Change was the first album to come to mind

Scam jam, thank you ma’am (Sparkle Motion), Friday, 9 March 2018 15:37 (three months ago) Permalink

"...we felt we really trusted our instincts with this one"
" (noted instrumentalist) wasn't into overdubs"
"...many of the songs were first or second takes...there's something honest in that approach"

Master of Treacle, Friday, 9 March 2018 15:40 (three months ago) Permalink

Also, wondering about artists with a very strong and long back catalog but who NEVER did the "back to basic" move

Ryuichi Sakamoto perhaps. I don't think Todd Rundgren ever really made a "return to 70s" record though I think maybe Liars could qualify. XTC always moved forward - Wasp Star is kind of an exception here but that one doesn't really sound like any XTC album before it either. Autechre straight up said they would never ever do this, mainly because it's impossible given the way they work

frogbs, Friday, 9 March 2018 16:15 (three months ago) Permalink

yeah, I thought about the Basement Tapes but how was it wasn't really a return to bacics, was it ? It wasn't Dylan going back to his folk songs alone with his guitar...

― AlXTC from Paris

as good an explanation as any for why the "basement tapes" don't suck but every single "back to basics" record it inspired does

Helps when you record with an act that is essentially Rock Band: 1857

Master of Treacle, Friday, 9 March 2018 16:16 (three months ago) Permalink

whatever their flaws I find it tough to imagine Radiohead claiming a new record as a "back to basics" type deal

Simon H., Friday, 9 March 2018 16:19 (three months ago) Permalink

helps too that basement tapes was a bunch of stoners having fun without the intention to release that stuff

marcos, Friday, 9 March 2018 16:22 (three months ago) Permalink

Oh that's definitely going to happen one day. (xp)

Buff Jeckley (Tom D.), Friday, 9 March 2018 16:22 (three months ago) Permalink

the basement tapes are a bunch of funky, cryptic little goofs, dylan going back to the "basics" would have been serious folk songs

It's not delivery, it's Adorno! (upper mississippi sh@kedown), Friday, 9 March 2018 16:23 (three months ago) Permalink

They Might be Giants seem to do this a lot. I feel like Flood is mentioned in every press release they do - ah, we're back to that studio, we're using the same producer, we're writing the songs the same way where it's just the two of us, etc. etc. It's a bit odd since their songwriting never really changed much but kinda shrewd I guess, you gotta make a living. In fact I suspect a lot of this is just that, stuff you just say because you're anxious that you don't sell the amount of units that you used to. I wonder how many of these albums actually do sound like something they would have put out 20-30 years ago. Maybe the last few OMD records.

frogbs, Friday, 9 March 2018 16:25 (three months ago) Permalink

Yeah and that Stipe quote about Monster - they weren't claiming it was like Murmur or anything. I don't think any REM album really is a "back-to-basics" move like that (not that I listened to the last couple)

Screamin' Jay Gould (The Yellow Kid), Friday, 9 March 2018 17:05 (three months ago) Permalink

Also, wondering about artists with a very strong and long back catalog but who NEVER did the "back to basic" move

Leonard Cohen never went back, other than going from sketch-like songs/production on Ten New Songs and Dear Heather into more fully realized ones once he returned to touring.

... (Eazy), Friday, 9 March 2018 17:08 (three months ago) Permalink

Ryuichi Sakamoto perhaps

He literally has an album called "Back To The Basics".

new noise, Friday, 9 March 2018 18:05 (three months ago) Permalink

I liked the recent acoustic Robyn Hitchcock album that was designed to be in the style of the 60’s folk albums he grew up listening to, but not necessarily like anything he’d made earlier.

JoeStork, Friday, 9 March 2018 18:17 (three months ago) Permalink

Speaking of the Fabs on the roof, the actual set is so weird innit? Get Back FOUR times, nothing off the first 10 albums..

https://www.setlist.fm/setlist/the-beatles/1969/apple-corps-rooftop-london-england-53d6f3ad.html

piscesx, Friday, 9 March 2018 18:23 (three months ago) Permalink

Sea Change was the first album to come to mind

which previous era of heavily-orchestrated songs recorded in a big expensive studio was Beck reverting to here

just noticed tears shaped like florida. (sic), Friday, 9 March 2018 18:28 (three months ago) Permalink

He literally has an album called "Back To The Basics".

that just refers to the fact that it's solo piano, part of his stripped-back modern classical phase. it's not really a "return" to anything in his catalogue

frogbs, Friday, 9 March 2018 18:56 (three months ago) Permalink

Yes, but a lot of these aren't returns to anything - how many of these bands have ever recorded anything as four guys in a room with no overdubs blah blah blah?

Buff Jeckley (Tom D.), Friday, 9 March 2018 19:09 (three months ago) Permalink

Jarvis Cocker's 'Further Complications' is one of these, annoyingly so as he'd never made that sort of music before. IMO it's the worst album he's made, solo or in a group.

mfktz (Camaraderie at Arms Length), Friday, 9 March 2018 19:12 (three months ago) Permalink

Leonard Cohen never went back, other than going from sketch-like songs/production on Ten New Songs and Dear Heather into more fully realized ones once he returned to touring.

Recent Songs was intentionally a back-to-basics acoustic record after the full Spector sound of Ladies' Man.

dinnerboat, Friday, 9 March 2018 19:41 (three months ago) Permalink

Sea Change was the first album to come to mind

which previous era of heavily-orchestrated songs recorded in a big expensive studio was Beck reverting to here

I guess I meant the pivot to "personal" material and a turn away from his shtickier side but maybe not the best example

Scam jam, thank you ma’am (Sparkle Motion), Friday, 9 March 2018 20:29 (three months ago) Permalink

Mgmt might qualify for this. By the bands own admission the new songs are meant to make people dance again, more in line with their earlier hits. But then not sure how much the album is back to basics

kolakube (Ross), Friday, 9 March 2018 22:04 (three months ago) Permalink

There’s a difference to me between returning to the style that people liked more and going ‘back to basics’ which is a much more authenticity based move

President Keyes, Saturday, 10 March 2018 01:09 (three months ago) Permalink

back to basics shd only be used when ppl go back to, like, gregorian chants.

NBA YoungBoy named Rocky Raccoon (m bison), Saturday, 10 March 2018 01:12 (three months ago) Permalink

Or do they come back to computers after going "natural" ?
Maybe Depeche Mode would be an example of this

surely the electronic version of this is : 'we dug out all our old analogue equipment/modular synths for this album ... '

Not following a "natural" release, but... 'All You Need is Now' certainly makes this move, down to making sure there's the "Girls on Film" one, "The Chauffeur" one, etc... a wholly unnecessary self-flagellation for the fan uproar over 'Red Carpet Massacre'.

mr.raffles, Saturday, 10 March 2018 03:16 (three months ago) Permalink

Dylan's "back to basics" was incontrovertibly the World Gone Wrong / Good As I Been to You double - obscure folk standards, Dylan + guitar, recorded in his garage. Laid the foundation for Time Out of Mind - "Love and Theft" - Modern Times so, time well spent.

startled macropod (MatthewK), Saturday, 10 March 2018 07:18 (three months ago) Permalink

Time wasted actually listening to the fuckers though.

Buff Jeckley (Tom D.), Saturday, 10 March 2018 09:48 (three months ago) Permalink

I love them

startled macropod (MatthewK), Saturday, 10 March 2018 11:43 (three months ago) Permalink

yah me too

It's not delivery, it's Adorno! (upper mississippi sh@kedown), Saturday, 10 March 2018 12:19 (three months ago) Permalink

i think it's mostly marketing. on the contrary i can't think of many albums who were promoting as being daring and experimental. the music industry is inherently conservative (hence reliance on the btb trope)

Hazy Maze Cave (Adam Bruneau), Saturday, 10 March 2018 17:17 (three months ago) Permalink

Iirc some Radiohead members said this twice. Once when recording Hail to the Thief (something about recording it in California in a few days and releasing it without overthinking it like their past records) and another for In Rainbows (something about going back to a rock band dynamic)... cant find the quotes though.

✖✖✖ (Moka), Saturday, 10 March 2018 17:55 (three months ago) Permalink

Yorke told MTV: "The last two studio records were a real headache. We had spent so much time looking at computers and grids, we were like, that's enough, we can't do that any more. This time, we used computers, but they had to actually be in the room with all the gear. So everything was about performance, like staging a play."[12]

new noise, Saturday, 10 March 2018 18:07 (three months ago) Permalink

The Guess Who in 1972: they weren't really an aging rock act, but Bachman was gone and their best stuff was behind them. Rockin' from that year definitely fits this thread. The Guess Who had had pop hits, had a social-concern hit ("Share the Land"), and had dabbled in psychedelia (sometimes brilliantly--"No Sugar Tonight"--sometimes laughably) by that point, and clearly they wanted to align themselves with that Sha Na Na/Elvis and Chuck Berry on the radio again/American Graffiti/Richard Nader '50s revival thing happening. The album had a doo-wop style medley that included "Sea of Love," other throwback-sounding stuff, and "Heartbroken Bopper" (which I heard on the radio today), seemingly about a John Milner-type high school burnout. (Also more social concern with "Guns, Guns, Guns" and "Big Smoke Factory.") I'd love to dig up interviews from that time; I guarantee Cummings would have been piling on the back-to-basics platitudes in every one of them. I think Rockin' was probably the second LP I ever walked up to the cash and bought myself, after the Partridge Family's debut.

clemenza, Sunday, 18 March 2018 19:18 (three months ago) Permalink

"The Rockin' album…best GW time of my entire GW time…we started getting drum sounds about noon on Monday, and we turned in the finished, mixed masters about 3 p.m. on Friday."

- Burton Cummings

niels, Monday, 19 March 2018 12:27 (three months ago) Permalink

who the hell thinks "No Sugar Tonight" is psychedelic???

The Desus & Mero Chain (upper mississippi sh@kedown), Tuesday, 20 March 2018 20:50 (three months ago) Permalink

Me! Not so much sound--I mean, it doesn't exactly swirl--but certainly subject matter...it's not actually about coffee, I don't think. And it does rely heavily on atmospherics. It gets its own page on the Trippy Me website--I mean, how much more psychedelic does it get than that? Call it a Western-Canadian prairie-head version of psychedelia, if you will. We do things differently up here.

clemenza, Tuesday, 20 March 2018 21:51 (three months ago) Permalink

hmmm, i guess things are more psychedelic here 400 miles south of Winnepeg, we had Crow and The Litter back then

The Desus & Mero Chain (upper mississippi sh@kedown), Wednesday, 21 March 2018 16:31 (three months ago) Permalink

Even Bruce Gilbert, interview from 1999:

I thought it would be an interesting and amusing thing to see if Wire were actually put in a position where we would have to play for a quarter of an hour or something. What would it do now? The curiosity factor is still there. I think for everybody, but, apparently, not for Robert. I don't play guitar anymore, but I still have a curiosity about what would happen if the four of us got back to basics. What would happen if four people got into a room with limited means--limited musical ability--what would they do?

Buff Jeckley (Tom D.), Monday, 2 April 2018 12:52 (two months ago) Permalink

one month passes...

http://www.youtube.com/watch?time_continue=1&v=bOELnR2vb-8

15 seconds in

kurt schwitterz, Friday, 4 May 2018 19:14 (one month ago) Permalink

haha, love it

niels, Saturday, 5 May 2018 12:38 (one month ago) Permalink

Nice find, kurt.

how's life, Saturday, 5 May 2018 13:16 (one month ago) Permalink


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